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30 Dec 12 The 5 Chrome apps and extensions I used most in 2012


The year is about to draw to a close. It is that time when we plan our resolutions for the coming year, get ready for New Year’s Eve parties and celebrations and reflect back on the year that was. One fun thing to think about is the technology you used most in the past year. For me there is quite a bit, but I thought I would focus on one — web browser apps and extensions.

Being a writer, my browser is my most-used tool and this year I made a switch from Firefox to Google’s Chrome. Like Firefox, Chrome has countless extensions, but it also has apps that reside on the New Tab page — access them by opening a new tab and clicking on Apps at the bottom of the screen.

So, this got me thinking about which extensions and apps I used most over the past year and I decided to put together a little list of my top-5.

1. Tab Cloud

Tab Cloud is a great cross-platform (it works in Firefox as well) way to save your tabs and move them from PC to PC or even back and forth between two different brands of browsers. Sure, Chrome can do this, but it does sometimes crash and once in a while even loses your tabs, so I do periodic backups to Tab Cloud. The extension places a cloud icon on your menu bar.

2. Tampermonkey

While Chrome can do a lot with apps and extensions, Tampermonkey adds an additional dimension by letting you access user scripts in an easy way. Again, it adds an icon to your menu bar. Clicking it will give you access to options, access to new user scripts and a lot more.

tampermonkey

3. Evernote Web Clipper

Evernote is a great service. It works on the web and across multiple mobile platforms and allows you to save all sorts of information. It constantly syncs the notes and images so you can always access them from anywhere. The Web Clipper app allows you to “clip” sections or entire web pages to save for later reference.

4. Angry Birds

Yes, the popular mobile game has moved to other platforms. You can play it on Facebook, but you can also play it in Chrome. Access it by clicking Apps on a New Tab page.

5. Better Music for Google Play Music

This is a great little extension that gives you easy access to your Google Music right from the menu bar. There is no need to visit the site or click on a tab. You can Play, Pause and do more from the icon on your menu bar.

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Responses so far:

  1. Still no good mouse gestures addon for Chrome, unfortunately. That’s forcing me to stick with Firefox.

  2. Ah that Angry Birds ruined the awesomeness of your list lol
    For me it’s
    WOT
    Lastpass
    Andd app shrotcuts like gmail gdrive drop ox etc :)

Article source: http://www.ghacks.net/2012/12/29/the-5-chrome-apps-and-extensions-i-used-most-in-2012/

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29 Dec 12 Makers of $99 Android-Powered Game Console Ship First 1200 ‘Ouyas’


Like Nintendo’s Wii U game console, the Ouya (that’s “OOH-yuh”) has an unusual name and even more unusual hardware. The console is roughly the size of a Rubik’s cube, and is powered by Android, Google‘s open-source operating system that’s normally found on smartphones and tablets.

Ouya’s makers, who are preparing the console for its commercial launch, encourage interested gamers to pop the case open and use it in electronics projects … or even to write their own games for it. Especially if they’re among the 1,200 who are about to receive their own clear plastic Ouya developer consoles.

Not exactly a finished product

The limited-edition consoles, which have been shipped out to developers already, are not designed for playing games on. They don’t even come with any.

Rather, the point of these consoles is so that interested Android developers can write games for the Ouya, which will then be released to gamers when the console launches to the public. Fans who pledged at least $1,337 to Ouya’s record-breaking Kickstarter project will get one, and while they’re not quite suited for playing games on — “we know the D-pad and triggers on the controller still need work,” Ouya’s makers say — the clear plastic developer consoles serve as a preview of what the finished product will look like, and a reminder of Ouya’s “openness.”

You keep using that word …

In the food and drug industries, terms like “organic” and “all-natural” are regulated so that only products which meet the criteria can have them on their labels. In the tech world, however, anyone can claim that their product is “open,” for whatever definition of “open” they like.

The term was popularized by the world’s rapid adoption of open-source software, like Android itself, where you’re legally entitled to a copy of the programming code and can normally use it in your own projects (like Ouya’s makers did). But when tech companies say that something is “open,” they don’t necessarily mean that the code or the hardware schematics use an open-source license.

How Ouya is “open”

Ouya’s makers have released their ODK, or developer kit, under the same open-source license as Android itself. This allows aspiring game developers to practice their skills even without a developer console, and to improve the kit however they want. The hardware itself is currently a “closed” design, however, despite the clear plastic case. The makers have expressed enthusiasm for the idea of hardware hackers using it in projects, and have said, “We’ll even publish the hardware design if people want it,” but so far they haven’t done so.

What about the games?

The most relevant aspect of “openness” to normal gamers is that Ouya’s makers say “any developer can publish a game.” This model is unusual for the console world, where only select studios are allowed to publish their wares on (for instance) the PlayStation Network, but is more familiar to fans of the anything-goes Google Play store for Android. Several big-name Android developers — including console game titan Square-Enix — have already signed up to have their wares on the Ouya.

Preordered Ouya game consoles (the normal ones, not the developer edition) will ship in April. They will cost $99 once sales are opened to the general public.

Jared Spurbeck is an open-source software enthusiast, who uses an Android phone and an Ubuntu laptop PC. He has been writing about technology and electronics since 2008.

29 Dec 12 What to Do With Your New Android


SEE ALSO: Top 20 Things Every First-Time Android User Should Know

Switching from an older Android requires a bit more prep, but it’s not impossible. Once you have a Google account, simply log in and sync accounts to receive your email and contacts. Some of your data, like photos and apps, will not transfer as easily, but there are a few ways to get around that.

The easiest way is to purchase the MyBackup Pro app. It’ll cost you $4, but the app backs up data and restores it to a new device.

If you’d rather start with a clean slate, without losing old photos, store all of your data in the cloud. Apps like Dropbox will back up data, but you can manually restore specific items to the new device.

Apps will need to be re-downloaded manually on a new device. Any apps purchased on a former Android will not need to be purchased again, but you will have to download those again, too.

Get Connected

The first thing to do before playing around with your new phone is to set up a Wi-Fi connection.

Hit the Menu button, and choose Settings. Then select Wireless Networks and connect to the proper Wi-Fi as you would anywhere with a computer.

You’ll also have the option to connect to mobile networks — those settings can be found in the same menu. Your phone runs on 3G or 4G mobile networks when there is not a Wi-Fi connection.

It’s important to connect your phone to Wi-Fi when it’s available, because running on mobile networks uses data. Each download will cost data, which can quickly run over when you first get a new phone and want to try new apps. Running over on data can be very expensive.

Apps on Apps on Apps

Now that you’re up and running, it’s time to dive into the Google Play Store and get the apps that will make your life easier and more efficient.

There are so many apps for every aspect of your life. It depends on whether you want something entertaining, educational, fun, informative, creative or navigational. Sifting through apps can feel overwhelming — trial and error is the best way to approach the task. You can always uninstall an app if you don’t want it.

If you plan on purchasing anything, you’ll need a credit card. Your information will be stored securely, so you’ll only need to enter this once. But that doesn’t mean you have to spend money — there are plenty of free apps that will help you just as effectively.

Your phone will already have built-in apps, which differ with every manufacturer. These are likely due for an update before you even log into the new device. You can update them all at once by opening the Play Store, tapping the Menu button and selecting “My Apps.”

The Google Play Store can be accessed and adjusted from your phone or a desktop when logged into your Google account. You can install, update or remove any app from your phone via the store.

Google’s native apps should already be built in the device. If you can’t function without these tools — which is likely why you went with Android — you won’t be disappointed with the mobile versions.

If you juggle more than one email address, Gmail will access multiple accounts in one device.

Google Maps is a seamless GPS system, plus the updated app gives offline maps, indoor navigation and recommendations for nearby places.

Social

Facebook’s native app favors Android devices. The app closely mirrors what you’d see on a desktop, making it easy to navigate. Like any other app, it has pre-fixed settings, so you might need to adjust, depending on your preferences.

After downloading and logging in to your account, hit the Menu button and select Settings. If you don’t want to use Facebook Chat from your phone, make sure Chat Availability is off. You can also adjust notifications so they only push the updates most important to you.

If you choose to sync your Facebook friends, they will automatically appear in your contact list if they share their phone number. When you agree to use the Facebook app, it shows your phone number on your profile. If you don’t want to share your number with friends, be sure to edit your contact info so that information is only available to you. The easiest way to do so is from a desktop.

Setup for Twitter is pretty straightforward. You can adjust syncing and push notifications, just like you did for Facebook, by going to Settings from the Menu button.

There are a couple options for Twitter aside from the native app. If you’re a list person, TweetDeck or Hootsuite might be better experiences.

If there is one good thing about Google+, it’s the syncing features that come with an Android device. If you don’t use the network as a social place, it can function as an automatic storage space. For example, if you take a photo with your phone, it will save to your Google+ account, even if you delete the photo from your device.

Of course, there are plenty of other social networks, so test them out and judge for yourself. If you don’t like one (or any app, for that matter) you can always uninstall it from the Google Play Store, just as you would update it.

Music

Your new Android replaces the need to carry multiple devices, including an MP3 player. If you’re gung-ho Google, the native Music app stores all of your files in the cloud, so you can easily switch from device to computer.

There is no native iTunes app, but that’s nothing a little hack can’t work around. DoubleTwist is worth the $5 pricetag if you cannot live without your iPod. Also, your iTunes library syncs over Wi-Fi — no wires required.

There are other great apps for music lovers on the go. Spotify is the best service for sharing and discovering music. You can send friends songs, albums and playlists. The free service features a nearly limitless music library, or you can upgrade to premium for an unlimited, ad-free experience.

Are you and Android user? Share any advice for first-timers in the comments below.

Images courtesy of iStockphoto, by_nicholas, Flickr, JD Hancock

Article source: http://mashable.com/2012/12/28/android-setup/

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29 Dec 12 DNA investigations: ‘Pharma firms-doctors nexus puts patients at risk ‘


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Guru Meditation:

XID: 1835811189


Varnish cache server

Article source: http://www.dnaindia.com/india/report_dna-investigations-pharma-firms-doctors-nexus-puts-patients-at-risk-_1782918

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29 Dec 12 Poetic Nexus 4 Borderline Bumper



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Article source: http://benchmarkreviews.com/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=21494&Itemid=23

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29 Dec 12 Google Nexus review: What are Google ‘Nexus’ Android phone, tablet all about … – ABC15.com (KNXV


PHOENIX – iPhones and iPads are simple.  Apple only makes a handful of models and that’s it, that’s that.  The simplicity of their product line is part of the charm.  Android on the other hand is a totally different story. 

There is a long list of manufacturers all making different sizes, speeds, software versions, etc, etc.  There is some beauty to having more options but there is also a lot of confusion. 

Amid it all, there is one line of Android products that stands alone. The Nexus products from Google . Problem is, most people have no idea what “Nexus” is all about.

Nexus, is a line of products sold by Google. Google doesn’t actually make the smartphones and tablets.  It’s essentially a collaboration between Google engineers and a hardware company.  Think of it as Google’s idea of the perfect Android smartphone or tablet.

Here’s how it works: the people at Google who create the Android software work hand in hand different hardware companies to design the next Nexus product.  Usually in the world of Android devices, Google makes the software and then a hardware company takes that software and finesses it for their specific hardware.  The Nexus line is a marriage of the two processes.

Nexus provides synergy (man I hate that word).  It provides a connection between Android hardware and software that typically doesn’t exist.  It’s not always the best hardware out there and you often times miss out on some of the added features that manufacturers tack on to the Android OS.  None the less, you get the Android experience exactly as the creators of the Android operating envisioned. 

What many consumers don’t know is that most Android smartphones actually run a very modified version of Google Android.  This means each tablet or smartphone manufacturer will add their own software tweaks to give them the competitive edge.  They’re all called “Android” smartphones but the software can look very different on some devices.  In some situations this is a good thing, in other situations it just adds clutter.  Nonetheless, Samsung, HTC, LG, Motorola and others have carved out their Android niche because of their added secret sauce.  With a Nexus device, it’s Android bare naked.  No tweaks, no add-ons and no skins.  It’s Android exactly as the software geniuses at Google dreamed it up. 

The best part about Nexus devices is that you will almost always get the latest updates to the Android software within days of it being released by Google.  Typically, months before normal Android smartphones and tablets get that same update.  If you’re a “bleeding edge” kind of techie, this is a big deal.  Otherwise, most consumers won’t care or notice the difference.

Right now, Google offers 3 Nexus devices including the Nexus 4 smartphone, the Nexus 7 tablet and the Nexus 10 tablet.  The smartphone is not connected to a cell phone carrier and is only compatible with att and T-mobile.  Buy the smartphone, slide in a SIM card from your selected carrier and you’re good to go.  No contracts, no commitments. 

Are Nexus devices the best?  Not always.  They offer a great marriage between the Android software and the exact hardware that Google dreams up.  Typically they have some of the best specs to date but not always. 

What you do get is a streamlined Android experience without the added clutter from the manufacturers and cell phone carriers.  You also get updates as soon as they’re released.  Best of all, you typically get this at a rock bottom price.  The Nexus 7” tablet starts at $199, the 10” tablet at $399 and the Nexus 4 smartphone at $299 (without any contracts).   These prices are hard to beat for the hardware you get and the “pure” Google Android experience. 

I’m currently testing out the both the Nexus 4 smartphone and the Nexus 10 tablet, look for my reviews in the coming weeks.

Have you tried out a Nexus smartphone or tablet?  I’d love to hear your thoughts in the comments below or on Twitter or Facebook .

Copyright 2012 Scripps Media, Inc. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

Article source: http://www.abc15.com/dpp/news/science_tech/google-nexus-review-what-are-google-nexus-android-phone-tablet-all-about-yuhnke-tech-check

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29 Dec 12 Ant Raid launches on Google Play for just 99c


ant raid

The popular iOS game Ant Raid has just been released on Google Play. As part of the launch the developers are offering a discount for early buyers: you can pick up the game for just 99c!

Ant Raid is a strategy game which pits you against invading mutant insects. You must defend your colony from these various threats by directing your ant minions into battle. There’s a little story to go along with the main game, accompanied by some wonderful 3D graphics and a very unique art style, which helps keep you glued to your screen in between sending waves of ants to their deaths.

For a game with such a simple premise, there is definitely a difficulty curve. Some of the later missions are pretty tricky, as you try to balance your army placement and power-ups against the bigger threats. Fortunately the touch controls are very intuitive; although selecting ants on smaller devices can be a little tricky.

The game also features a multiplayer mode, where you can challenge your friends at one of four different survival modes. In this game mode you face off against wave after wave of mutant insects, with the only goal being to find out who can survive the longest.

If all this content doesn’t sway you over, HeroCraft has put together a nice trailer as well.

The game was incredibly well received over on iOS devices, with a Metacritic score above 90, so 99c seems like an absolute steal. Head on over to Google Play if you fancy a copy.

SOURCES Google Play

Sonic-4-episode-ii Sonic the Hedgehog 4 Episode II for non-Tegra devices now up on Google Play for $6.99 Anomaly-Korea Anomaly Korea lands on Google Play for $2.83 modern-war GREE unleashes free to play military game Modern War in Google Play antraid Popular iOS game Ant Raid on its way to Android

Long time Android user and supporter of anything open-source, Robert is a BSc graduate with an enduring fascination for technology. Glued to his Galaxy S2 there’s very little tech news which slips past him unnoticed.

29 Dec 12 Developer releases dozens of fake apps in Google Play store, user beware


Malware in the Google Play store is nothing new, and Google does their best to sift out most of the crap that makes its way in, but sometimes some of it sneaks through. A Google Play developer account by the name of “apkdeveloper” has released a ton of fake apps and games that are essentially rip-offs of other popular apps.

Screen Shot 2012-12-28 at 1.23.51 PM

Some of the more popular titles that the developer rips off are Imangi’s Temple Run game and Glu Mobile’s Contract Killer Zombies. It appears the faux developer has put “Super” at the end of each app name, which should throw a red flag up right away as far as if it’s a legitimate app or not. Plus, all of the icons for all the apps are the same, rather than unique icons for each individual app or game.

Since many people won’t even dare to install these fake and malware-infested applications, we’re not quite sure what the malicious code might be capable of exactly, but several reports suggest that it delivers unwanted ads to several parts of your device. While doesn’t seem like a huge deal, it’s still annoying, and you never know what could be going on behind the scenes.

As always, be careful when downloading apps and make sure you’re not downloading a fake app that’s filled with malware. Usually, though, it’s all about common sense — check the name of the developer, check the reviews, check the descriptions and make sure you’re always downloading from legitimate sources. And if you come across a fake app, report it to Google.

Article source: http://www.slashgear.com/developer-releases-dozens-of-fake-apps-in-google-play-store-user-beware-28262454/

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29 Dec 12 ‘Make Me Asian’ App For Google Play Blasted As Racist, Offensive (VIDEO)


An app that allows users to change their eye shape and add stereotypical “Asian” accessories is drawing fire from the Asian-American community for being racist, CNN reports.

The “Make Me Asian” app works by narrowing eyes, adding a Fu Manchu mustache and a rice paddy hat. A similar app called “Make Me Indian” darkens skin, adds face paint and a headband in an apparent effort to make users resemble a Native American.

KimberyDeiss, a user on Google Play, seems to be the creator of a host of similar Android apps, including “Make me Russian,” “Make me fat,” “Make me bald” and “Make me Irish.”

“This is just a fun app [that] lets you indulge you and your friends!” the “Make me Asian” app’s description reads. “Almost instantly, you can make yourself or your friends … representatives of Asian nations, such as Chinese or Japanese.”

The app currently has earned a user rating of two out of five stars. The San Francisco Chronicle reports that both the “Make me Asian” and “Make me Indian” apps have been downloaded between 50,000 and 100,000 times each.

But as Yahoo! notes, some Asian-Americans do not find the application clever or fun and have launched an online campaign to have the app pulled. A group called 18 Million Rising’s petition asks signers to “take a stand” against “racist and offensive portrayals of Asians and Native Americans perpetuate damaging racial stereotypes.”

The Asian-American Legal Defense and Education Fund has also asked Google to take down the “Make me Asian” app, according to Yahoo!

Peter Chin, a pastor from Washington, D.C., also posted a petition on the website Change.org.

The Change.org petition reads, in part:

Google’s motto is “Don’t Be Evil”, which makes it difficult to fathom why they carry the “Make Me Asian” and “Make Me Indian” apps by KimberyDeiss on their Google Play Store. These apps overlay dated and racist stereotypes onto your photos: rice paddy hat, fu manchu mustache, slanty eyes and yellow skin – and voila, digital yellowface!

They are not funny, and their use highlights a vicious double standard, where people are allowed to characterize Asians and Native Americans in a way that they never would do to other races or ethnic groups. Google is implicitly normalizing these characterizations by allowing them to proliferate on their branded Google Play store.

Chin asks readers, close to 3,000 of whom have signed his petition in the several weeks since it was posted, to flag the Asian and Native American apps as inappropriate on the Google Play site.

Google, however, appears to disagree with Chin, telling CNN in a statement that the apps in question did not seem to violate company policy.

“We don’t comment on individual apps,” the statement read. “We remove apps from Google Play that violate our policies.”

Color us unimpressed.

A Google app that allows users to change their eye shape and add stereotypical “Asian” accessories is drawing fire from the Asian-American community for being racist, reports CNN.

The “Make Me Asian” app works by narrowing eyes, adding a Fu Manchu mustache and a rice paddy hat, while a similar app, “Make Me Indian,” darkens skin, adds face paint and a headband in an apparent effort to make users resemble a Native American.

KimberyDeiss, a user on Google Play, seems to be the creator of a host of similar Android apps, including “Make me Russian,” “Make me fat,” “Make me Bald” and “Make me Irish.”

“Have you ever wondered to present himself as a person of another nationality,” the “Make me Asian” app’s description reads. “This is just a fun app lets you indulge you and your friends! You can for a few seconds to make himself a Chinese, Japanese, Korean or any other Asians!”

The app currently has earned a user rating of two out of five stars. The San Francisco Chronicle reports that both the “Make me Asian” and “Make me Indian” apps have been downloaded between 50,000 and 100,000 times each.

But some Asian-Americans do not find the application clever or fun, according to Yahoo! and have launched an online campaign to have the app pulled. A group called 18 Million Rising’s petition asks signers to “take a stand” against “racist and offensive portrayals of Asians and Native Americans perpetuate damaging racial stereotypes.”

The Asian-American Legal Defense and Education Fund has also asked Google to take down the “Make me Asian” app, according to Yahoo!

Peter Chin, a pastor from Washington D.C., decided to mount a pastor of his own, also posting a petition on the website Change.org.

Chin’s Change.org petition reads, in part:

Google’s motto is “Don’t Be Evil”, which makes it difficult to fathom why they carry the “Make Me Asian” and “Make Me Indian” apps by KimberyDeiss on their Google Play Store. These apps overlay dated and racist stereotypes onto your photos: rice paddy hat, fu manchu mustache, slanty eyes and yellow skin – and voila, digital yellowface!

They are not funny, and their use highlights a vicious double standard, where people are allowed to characterize Asians and Native Americans in a way that they never would do to other races or ethnic groups. Google is implicitly normalizing these characterizations by allowing them to proliferate on their branded Google Play store.

Chin asks readers, close to 3,000 of whom have signed his petition in the several weeks since it was posted, to flag the Asian and Native American apps as inappropriate on the Google Play site.

Google, however, appears to disagree with Chin, telling CNN in a statement that the apps in question did not seem to violate company policy.

“We don’t comment on individual apps,” the statement read. “We remove apps from Google Play that violate our policies.”

Color us unimpressed.

A Google app that allows users to change their eye shape and add stereotypical “Asian” accessories is drawing fire from the Asian-American community for being racist, reports CNN.

The “Make Me Asian” app works by narrowing eyes, adding a Fu Manchu mustache and a rice paddy hat, while a similar app, “Make Me Indian,” darkens skin, adds face paint and a headband in an apparent effort to make users resemble a Native American.

KimberyDeiss, a user on Google Play, seems to be the creator of a host of similar Android apps, including “Make me Russian,” “Make me fat,” “Make me Bald” and “Make me Irish.”

“Have you ever wondered to present himself as a person of another nationality,” the “Make me Asian” app’s description reads. “This is just a fun app lets you indulge you and your friends! You can for a few seconds to make himself a Chinese, Japanese, Korean or any other Asians!”

The app currently has earned a user rating of two out of five stars. The San Francisco Chronicle reports that both the “Make me Asian” and “Make me Indian” apps have been downloaded between 50,000 and 100,000 times each.

But some Asian-Americans do not find the application clever or fun, according to Yahoo! and have launched an online campaign to have the app pulled. A group called 18 Million Rising’s petition asks signers to “take a stand” against “racist and offensive portrayals of Asians and Native Americans perpetuate damaging racial stereotypes.”

The Asian-American Legal Defense and Education Fund has also asked Google to take down the “Make me Asian” app, according to Yahoo!

Peter Chin, a pastor from Washington D.C., decided to mount a pastor of his own, also posting a petition on the website Change.org.

Chin’s Change.org petition reads, in part:

Google’s motto is “Don’t Be Evil”, which makes it difficult to fathom why they carry the “Make Me Asian” and “Make Me Indian” apps by KimberyDeiss on their Google Play Store. These apps overlay dated and racist stereotypes onto your photos: rice paddy hat, fu manchu mustache, slanty eyes and yellow skin – and voila, digital yellowface!

They are not funny, and their use highlights a vicious double standard, where people are allowed to characterize Asians and Native Americans in a way that they never would do to other races or ethnic groups. Google is implicitly normalizing these characterizations by allowing them to proliferate on their branded Google Play store.

Chin asks readers, close to 3,000 of whom have signed his petition in the several weeks since it was posted, to flag the Asian and Native American apps as inappropriate on the Google Play site.

Google, however, appears to disagree with Chin, telling CNN in a statement that the apps in question did not seem to violate company policy.

“We don’t comment on individual apps,” the statement read. “We remove apps from Google Play that violate our policies.”

Clarification: Language in text has been amended to indicate that the app is a third-party app for Google Play.

Article source: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/12/27/make-me-asian-google-app-racist-offensive_n_2372573.html

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29 Dec 12 Got a Galaxy S3 or Galaxy Note 2? Get a free Flip Cover…


If you’re on Facebook, you might want to run on over to Samsung Mobile USA’s Facebook page here and register your new Samsung Galaxy S3, Galaxy Note 2. Why? Because if you do, Samsung will send a “care package” your way as a free gift. Inside, you’ll find one of their official Flip Covers (in either pink, blue, orange, or guacamole) and a few NFC TecTiles.

What’s more, newly registered Samsung owners will also receive a 50%-off coupon code for the accessory of their choice on Samsung’s official web store. There you can get a spare battery for the device of your device, bluetooth headset, or even additional Flip Covers for half off. Not too bad, right?

UPDATE: If you don’t have a Galaxy Note 2 or Galaxy S3, you wont receive a Flip Cover or the TecTiles. You do still get the 50% off coupon as a door prize.

You’ll need to enable the Facebook app first, then revisit the link to get the popup for registering your device. Enter in the necessary information and you’ll then receive an email to receive your care package. Better hurry as supplies are limited.

Thanks, Steven!

[Samsung Facebook]