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16 Jun 12 Google Chrome Gets Early Metro-Style App for Windows 8


Google Chrome Gets Early Metro-Style App for Windows 8Windows 8 users may now try out an early version of Metro-style Google Chrome by installing the browser’s developer build.

To access the Metro-style browser, users must installChromethroughthedevchannel, then set Chrome as the default browser. Once they do, the Chrome icon in the Windows 8 Start menu will change to show that it’s a Metro-style app.

The Metro-style version of Chrome is similar to its desktop counterpart, but it has larger tabs that are more conducive to touchscreens. Unlike Internet Explorer 10, Chrome shows all open tabs at all times — IE hides them until the user right-clicks or swipes upward on a touchscreen — so it’s a good option for users who need to quickly switch between tabs. The browser also supports Incognito mode and all Adobe Flash content, whereas Internet Explorer uses a whitelist of approved Flash content.

Google Chrome Gets Early Metro-Style App for Windows 8Chrome also supports some of Windows 8’s Metro features. Through the charms bar, users can share links with other apps, but the universal search function in Windows 8 doesn’t seem to work. The browser supports side-by-side snapping of other apps, so you can keep an eye on Twitter or e-mail as you surf the Web.

But as EdBottpointsout, Chrome violates Metro design principles with the browser’s right-click functionality. In Windows 8, right-clicking is supposed to do the same thing as swiping upward on a touchscreen, but that’s not the case in Metro-style Chrome. Swiping upward toggles full-screen browsing in Chrome, while right-clicking shows a pop-up context menu, as it does in the desktop browser.

I don’t have a tablet for testing Windows 8, but when using Splashtop’s Win8 MetroTestbedapp on the iPad, scrolling didn’t work in Chrome. If this is a problem with all tablets, I’m sure it will be fixed with future versions. But I also hope Google goes back and follows Metro design principles for right-clicks and upward swipes.

Google Chrome Gets Early Metro-Style App for Windows 8A few other nitpicks: There’s currently no way to send a Web page from Metro-style Chrome to the desktop, and the “New window” command opens a new tab instead. (Some sort of windowing function for Metro-style Chrome would be great for tab junkies.) Metro-style Chrome also has a “Pin to Start Screen” button that, at the moment, only crashes the browser.

If you’re running a preview version of Windows 8 and want to give Chrome a try, keep in mind that only the default browser may run as a Metro-style app, so Internet Explorer will only run on the desktop once you switch. To switch back to Metro-style IE, you must open the desktop version, go to “Internet Options,” click the “Programs” tab and click the link to “Make Internet Explorer the default browser.”

Article source: http://www.pcworld.com/article/257427/google_chrome_gets_early_metrostyle_app_for_windows_8.html

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12 Jun 12 Google Chrome Gets Early Metro-Style App for Windows 8


Windows 8 users may now try out an early version of Metro-style Google Chrome by installing the browser’s developer build.

To access the Metro-style browser, users must installChromethroughthedevchannel, then set Chrome as the default browser. Once they do, the Chrome icon in the Windows 8 Start menu will change to show that it’s a Metro-style app.

The Metro-style version of Chrome is similar to its desktop counterpart, but it has larger tabs that are more conducive to touchscreens. Unlike Internet Explorer 10, Chrome shows all open tabs at all times — IE hides them until the user right-clicks or swipes upward on a touchscreen — so it’s a good option for users who need to quickly switch between tabs. The browser also supports Incognito mode and all Adobe Flash content, whereas Internet Explorer uses a whitelist of approved Flash content.

Google Chrome Gets Early Metro-Style App for Windows 8Chrome also supports some of Windows 8’s Metro features. Through the charms bar, users can share links with other apps, but the universal search function in Windows 8 doesn’t seem to work. The browser supports side-by-side snapping of other apps, so you can keep an eye on Twitter or e-mail as you surf the Web.

But as EdBottpointsout, Chrome violates Metro design principles with the browser’s right-click functionality. In Windows 8, right-clicking is supposed to do the same thing as swiping upward on a touchscreen, but that’s not the case in Metro-style Chrome. Swiping upward toggles full-screen browsing in Chrome, while right-clicking shows a pop-up context menu, as it does in the desktop browser.

I don’t have a tablet for testing Windows 8, but when using Splashtop’s Win8 MetroTestbedapp on the iPad, scrolling didn’t work in Chrome. If this is a problem with all tablets, I’m sure it will be fixed with future versions. But I also hope Google goes back and follows Metro design principles for right-clicks and upward swipes.

Google Chrome Gets Early Metro-Style App for Windows 8A few other nitpicks: There’s currently no way to send a Web page from Metro-style Chrome to the desktop, and the “New window” command opens a new tab instead. (Some sort of windowing function for Metro-style Chrome would be great for tab junkies.) Metro-style Chrome also has a “Pin to Start Screen” button that, at the moment, only crashes the browser.

If you’re running a preview version of Windows 8 and want to give Chrome a try, keep in mind that only the default browser may run as a Metro-style app, so Internet Explorer will only run on the desktop once you switch. To switch back to Metro-style IE, you must open the desktop version, go to “Internet Options,” click the “Programs” tab and click the link to “Make Internet Explorer the default browser.”

Article source: http://www.pcworld.com/article/257427/google_chrome_gets_early_metrostyle_app_for_windows_8.html

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12 Jun 12 Google Chrome Gets Early Metro-Style App for Windows 8


Google Chrome Gets Early Metro-Style App for Windows 8Windows 8 users may now try out an early version of Metro-style Google Chrome by installing the browser’s developer build.

To access the Metro-style browser, users must installChromethroughthedevchannel, then set Chrome as the default browser. Once they do, the Chrome icon in the Windows 8 Start menu will change to show that it’s a Metro-style app.

The Metro-style version of Chrome is similar to its desktop counterpart, but it has larger tabs that are more conducive to touchscreens. Unlike Internet Explorer 10, Chrome shows all open tabs at all times — IE hides them until the user right-clicks or swipes upward on a touchscreen — so it’s a good option for users who need to quickly switch between tabs. The browser also supports Incognito mode and all Adobe Flash content, whereas Internet Explorer uses a whitelist of approved Flash content.

Google Chrome Gets Early Metro-Style App for Windows 8Chrome also supports some of Windows 8’s Metro features. Through the charms bar, users can share links with other apps, but the universal search function in Windows 8 doesn’t seem to work. The browser supports side-by-side snapping of other apps, so you can keep an eye on Twitter or e-mail as you surf the Web.

But as EdBottpointsout, Chrome violates Metro design principles with the browser’s right-click functionality. In Windows 8, right-clicking is supposed to do the same thing as swiping upward on a touchscreen, but that’s not the case in Metro-style Chrome. Swiping upward toggles full-screen browsing in Chrome, while right-clicking shows a pop-up context menu, as it does in the desktop browser.

I don’t have a tablet for testing Windows 8, but when using Splashtop’s Win8 MetroTestbedapp on the iPad, scrolling didn’t work in Chrome. If this is a problem with all tablets, I’m sure it will be fixed with future versions. But I also hope Google goes back and follows Metro design principles for right-clicks and upward swipes.

Google Chrome Gets Early Metro-Style App for Windows 8A few other nitpicks: There’s currently no way to send a Web page from Metro-style Chrome to the desktop, and the “New window” command opens a new tab instead. (Some sort of windowing function for Metro-style Chrome would be great for tab junkies.) Metro-style Chrome also has a “Pin to Start Screen” button that, at the moment, only crashes the browser.

If you’re running a preview version of Windows 8 and want to give Chrome a try, keep in mind that only the default browser may run as a Metro-style app, so Internet Explorer will only run on the desktop once you switch. To switch back to Metro-style IE, you must open the desktop version, go to “Internet Options,” click the “Programs” tab and click the link to “Make Internet Explorer the default browser.”

Article source: http://www.pcworld.com/article/257427/google_chrome_gets_early_metrostyle_app_for_windows_8.html

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18 May 12 Chrome 19: The Best Web browser just keeps getting better


With Chrome 19 you can sync tabs between PCs and Android smartphones.

With Chrome 19 you can sync tabs between PCs and Android smartphones.

The Google Chrome Web browser just keeps getting better and better. The just released Chrome 19 is a perfect example of this.

Besides fixing a slew of security problems, Chrome 19’s niftiest new feature is tab syncing. Chrome has long given you the power to sync your bookmarks, apps, extensions, history, themes, and other settings. Now, you can sync your open tabs as well between computers, and if you’re lucky enough to have an Android smartphone with Ice Cream Sandwich, which supports the beta Chrome for Android, you can sync them with your phone as well.

Here’s how it works. When you’re signed in to Google, your open tabs are automatically synced across all your devices. To get to them, simply open a new tab on your browser and on the bottom left there’s an “Other devices” menu on the center-left of the bottom of the page. From it, you can see all your other Chrome sessions and their open tabs. Want to open one on tabs from say your work computer? Just click on it and you’re on way.

This is neat. This makes it easier than ever to never lose track of what you were doing in your various browsers.

It’s also just a wee-bit creepy. If you share your Google log-in with other people on other PCs, you’ll be able to see what they’re looking at on their Chrome sessions. Mind you, for security reasons you shouldn’t be doing that anyway, but it is something to keep in mind. Or, to flip it around, if you’re in the habit of leaving your work computer on and you left Chrome running while you were logged in, someone could come by your office desk and see what tabs you have open on Chrome on your home PC. In short, don’t be careless when you’re using this feature.

On the other hand, Chrome gives you many privacy-tweaking settings. To get to those, go to the Options menu, and from there, head to the Under the Hood tab. Once there, you can control what happens with cookies, including Flash cookies now; image displays; JavaScript; plug-ins; pop-ups, and location information. You can also turn on Chrome’s built-in Adobe Flash plug-in and PDF reader. Both of these are turned off by default.

If like me, you’re a little tired of the endless flood of Adobe security problems, you’ll welcome Chrome’s version of them. Even if they go wrong in Chrome, at least they’ll be stuck inside Chrome’s sandbox where they won’t be able to do mischief in the rest of your computer.

Some people have been having trouble with Chrome 18 on Windows 7 64-bits. Their problems seemed to show up most often when they were running lots of tabs at once with a heavy Adobe Flash use. So, I decided to see if I could duplicate their problems on my test PC.

My Web browser testing system is a Gateway DX4710 running Windows 7 SP1. This PC is powered by a 2.5-GHz Intel Core 2 Quad processor and has 6GBs of RAM and an Intel GMA (Graphics Media Accelerator) 3100 for graphics. It’s hooked to the Internet via a Netgear Gigabit Ethernet switch, which, in turn, is hooked up to a 100Mbps (Megabit per second) cable Internet connection.

On it, I opened 40 plus tabs at once multiple times in the last 24-hours. Half of them, like YouTube, included a lot of active Flash content. I couldn’t get a single lock-up or crash from it. I then left them running for six hours, thinking perhaps a memory leak problem was to blame. Again, everything went fine afterwards.

I can’t say that you won’t have problems with this new version of Chrome. All I can say is that on my Windows 7 box, and on my various Linux and Mac boxes as well, Chrome 19 never faltered no matter how heavy a load I put on it.

As for the basics, Chrome 19 remains as easy to install and use on Linux, Mac OS X, and Windows as ever. You simply download it from the site, run the program and in less than two minutes you’ll be up and running it.

Chrome’s interface is also as clean as ever. The Omnibox, the combined search and location box is still on top. Underneath it, you’ll find the tabs, on the right top you’ll find the bookmark icon and that’s about it. There are only a handful of control buttons. If you want to adjust the browser’s looks and behavior you’ll need to go to the wrench icon and look at the menus it hides.

Once there, you’ll discover there’s not a lot you can do with Chrome’s looks. If you want to give your Web browser a make-over to get it looking and working just they way you want Firefox is still the browser for you.

Chrome on the Benchmark Rank

Moving on to the benchmarks, Chrome gets a perfect score on the Acid 3 compatibility test, which checks how well a browser complies with various Web standards such as CSS, JavaScript, and Extensible Markup Language (XML). But, then all modern browsers score perfectly on this test these days. If your browser doesn’t get a perfect score-update it. Now.

On the HTML5 Test, which checks to see how compliant the Web browser is with the HTML5 Web page standard, Chrome 19 scored 402 out of a possible 500. The new Firefox 12 was way behind with 345 points. Internet Explorer 9? It scored a dismal 138 points.

For my first benchmark I used Google’sJavaScript V8 Benchmark Suite, where higher scores are better. As you might expect, Chrome crushed Firefox and IE with a score of 9,091. Firefox took a distant second with 5,505. IE was way behind the open-source browsers with a score of 2,112.

On the old, SunSpider 0.9.1, JavaScript test where lower results are better, Chrome did OK with a score of 256.9ms. IE nosed ahead though with a score of 252.7ms to take first place. Firefox came in last with 296.5ms.

On the Peacekeeper Web browser test suite, which looks at JavaScript performance and looks in on HTML5 compatibility, video codec support and other Web browser features, higher scores are better. On Peacekeeper, Chrome won once more. On this benchmark, where higher is better and Chrome took first with a score of 2,241. Firefox followed with a far slower 1,557 and IE was back in the rear with 1,347.

The bottom line is that Chrome is simply the fastest Web browser out there. It’s also, from where I sit, one of the most secure browsers and I really like its clean interface and its features. As far as I’m concerned, Chrome is still easily the best browser out there. As always, you don’t have to take my word for it. Try Chrome yourself. I think you’ll find, as hundreds of millions of other Chrome users have, that Chrome will become your first choice in Web browsers.

Related Stories:

Google Chrome 19 is out

Will the Google Chrome Web browser come to Apple’s iPads and iPhones?

Is Microsoft blocking Chrome and Firefox from native Windows RT a big deal?

Google joins Windows 8 browser war with plans for Metro Chrome

Do I have to leave Google Chrome behind?

Article source: http://www.zdnet.com/blog/networking/chrome-19-the-best-web-browser-just-keeps-getting-better/2391

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17 May 12 Chrome 19: The Best Web browser just keeps getting better


With Chrome 19 you can sync tabs between PCs and Android smartphones.

With Chrome 19 you can sync tabs between PCs and Android smartphones.

The Google Chrome Web browser just keeps getting better and better. The just released Chrome 19 is a perfect example of this.

Besides fixing a slew of security problems, Chrome 19’s niftiest new feature is tab syncing. Chrome has long given you the power to sync your bookmarks, apps, extensions, history, themes, and other settings. Now, you can sync your open tabs as well between computers, and if you’re lucky enough to have an Android smartphone with Ice Cream Sandwich, which supports the beta Chrome for Android, you can sync them with your phone as well.

Here’s how it works. When you’re signed in to Google, your open tabs are automatically synced across all your devices. To get to them, simply open a new tab on your browser and on the bottom left there’s an “Other devices” menu on the center-left of the bottom of the page. From it, you can see all your other Chrome sessions and their open tabs. Want to open one on tabs from say your work computer? Just click on it and you’re on way.

This is neat. This makes it easier than ever to never lose track of what you were doing in your various browsers.

It’s also just a wee-bit creepy. If you share your Google log-in with other people on other PCs, you’ll be able to see what they’re looking at on their Chrome sessions. Mind you, for security reasons you shouldn’t be doing that anyway, but it is something to keep in mind. Or, to flip it around, if you’re in the habit of leaving your work computer on and you left Chrome running while you were logged in, someone could come by your office desk and see what tabs you have open on Chrome on your home PC. In short, don’t be careless when you’re using this feature.

On the other hand, Chrome gives you many privacy-tweaking settings. To get to those, go to the Options menu, and from there, head to the Under the Hood tab. Once there, you can control what happens with cookies, including Flash cookies now; image displays; JavaScript; plug-ins; pop-ups, and location information. You can also turn on Chrome’s built-in Adobe Flash plug-in and PDF reader. Both of these are turned off by default.

If like me, you’re a little tired of the endless flood of Adobe security problems, you’ll welcome Chrome’s version of them. Even if they go wrong in Chrome, at least they’ll be stuck inside Chrome’s sandbox where they won’t be able to do mischief in the rest of your computer.

Some people have been having trouble with Chrome 18 on Windows 7 64-bits. Their problems seemed to show up most often when they were running lots of tabs at once with a heavy Adobe Flash use. So, I decided to see if I could duplicate their problems on my test PC.

My Web browser testing system is a Gateway DX4710 running Windows 7 SP1. This PC is powered by a 2.5-GHz Intel Core 2 Quad processor and has 6GBs of RAM and an Intel GMA (Graphics Media Accelerator) 3100 for graphics. It’s hooked to the Internet via a Netgear Gigabit Ethernet switch, which, in turn, is hooked up to a 100Mbps (Megabit per second) cable Internet connection.

On it, I opened 40 plus tabs at once multiple times in the last 24-hours. Half of them, like YouTube, included a lot of active Flash content. I couldn’t get a single lock-up or crash from it. I then left them running for six hours, thinking perhaps a memory leak problem was to blame. Again, everything went fine afterwards.

I can’t say that you won’t have problems with this new version of Chrome. All I can say is that on my Windows 7 box, and on my various Linux and Mac boxes as well, Chrome 19 never faltered no matter how heavy a load I put on it.

As for the basics, Chrome 19 remains as easy to install and use on Linux, Mac OS X, and Windows as ever. You simply download it from the site, run the program and in less than two minutes you’ll be up and running it.

Chrome’s interface is also as clean as ever. The Omnibox, the combined search and location box is still on top. Underneath it, you’ll find the tabs, on the right top you’ll find the bookmark icon and that’s about it. There are only a handful of control buttons. If you want to adjust the browser’s looks and behavior you’ll need to go to the wrench icon and look at the menus it hides.

Once there, you’ll discover there’s not a lot you can do with Chrome’s looks. If you want to give your Web browser a make-over to get it looking and working just they way you want Firefox is still the browser for you.

Chrome on the Benchmark Rank

Moving on to the benchmarks, Chrome gets a perfect score on the Acid 3 compatibility test, which checks how well a browser complies with various Web standards such as CSS, JavaScript, and Extensible Markup Language (XML). But, then all modern browsers score perfectly on this test these days. If your browser doesn’t get a perfect score-update it. Now.

On the HTML5 Test, which checks to see how compliant the Web browser is with the HTML5 Web page standard, Chrome 19 scored 402 out of a possible 500. The new Firefox 12 was way behind with 345 points. Internet Explorer 9? It scored a dismal 138 points.

For my first benchmark I used Google’sJavaScript V8 Benchmark Suite, where higher scores are better. As you might expect, Chrome crushed Firefox and IE with a score of 9,091. Firefox took a distant second with 5,505. IE was way behind the open-source browsers with a score of 2,112.

On the old, SunSpider 0.9.1, JavaScript test where lower results are better, Chrome did OK with a score of 256.9ms. IE nosed ahead though with a score of 252.7ms to take first place. Firefox came in last with 296.5ms.

On the Peacekeeper Web browser test suite, which looks at JavaScript performance and looks in on HTML5 compatibility, video codec support and other Web browser features, higher scores are better. On Peacekeeper, Chrome won once more. On this benchmark, where higher is better and Chrome took first with a score of 2,241. Firefox followed with a far slower 1,557 and IE was back in the rear with 1,347.

The bottom line is that Chrome is simply the fastest Web browser out there. It’s also, from where I sit, one of the most secure browsers and I really like its clean interface and its features. As far as I’m concerned, Chrome is still easily the best browser out there. As always, you don’t have to take my word for it. Try Chrome yourself. I think you’ll find, as hundreds of millions of other Chrome users have, that Chrome will become your first choice in Web browsers.

Related Stories:

Google Chrome 19 is out

Will the Google Chrome Web browser come to Apple’s iPads and iPhones?

Is Microsoft blocking Chrome and Firefox from native Windows RT a big deal?

Google joins Windows 8 browser war with plans for Metro Chrome

Do I have to leave Google Chrome behind?

Article source: http://www.zdnet.com/blog/networking/chrome-19-the-best-web-browser-just-keeps-getting-better/2391

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10 Apr 12 Google Patches 12 Flaws in Chrome


Google has 12 vulnerabilities in Chrome, including seven high-risk flaws. The new release of Chrome also includes an updated version of the Adobe Flash player.

This is the second update for Chrome in the last few days from Google. The company updates its browser on a rolling basis, pushing out a new release whenever there’s sufficient volume of security issues to address or when there’s a high-priority vulnerability that warrants a quick fix. As part of its bug bounty program, Google paid out $6,000 in rewards to researchers who reported vulnerabilities to the company. Among the researchers who qualified this time around are Sergey Glazunov and Miaubiz, both of whom regularly get payouts from Google for their research.

The security fixes included in the latest Chrome release are:

[$500] [106577] Medium CVE-2011-3066: Out-of-bounds read in Skia clipping. Credit to miaubiz.
[117583] Medium CVE-2011-3067: Cross-origin iframe replacement. Credit to Sergey Glazunov.
[$1000] [117698] High CVE-2011-3068: Use-after-free in run-in handling. Credit to miaubiz.
[$1000] [117728] High CVE-2011-3069: Use-after-free in line box handling. Credit to miaubiz.
[118185] High CVE-2011-3070: Use-after-free in v8 bindings. Credit to Google Chrome Security Team (SkyLined).
[118273] High CVE-2011-3071: Use-after-free in HTMLMediaElement. Credit to pa_kt, reporting through HP TippingPoint ZDI (ZDI-CAN-1528).
[118467] Low CVE-2011-3072: Cross-origin violation parenting pop-up window. Credit to Sergey Glazunov.
[$1000] [118593] High CVE-2011-3073: Use-after-free in SVG resource handling. Credit to Arthur Gerkis.
[$500] [119281] Medium CVE-2011-3074: Use-after-free in media handling. Credit to Sławomir Błażek.
[$1000] [119525] High CVE-2011-3075: Use-after-free applying style command. Credit to miaubiz.
[$1000] [120037] High CVE-2011-3076: Use-after-free in focus handling. Credit to miaubiz.
[120189] Medium CVE-2011-3077: Read-after-free in script bindings. Credit to Google Chrome Security Team (Inferno).

Commenting on this Article will be automatically closed on July 5, 2012.

Article source: http://threatpost.com/en_us/blogs/google-patches-12-flaws-chrome-040512

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29 Mar 12 Faster graphics for older PCs in Chrome 18


(Credit:
Google)

Google Chrome 18 brings two methods of improved graphics support to both newer and older computers. Released today, Google Chrome 18 stable for Windows (download), Mac (download), Linux (download), and Chrome Frame improves both WebGL and Canvas2D.

To help along WebGL in Chrome on older Windows and
Mac computers, it now gets a boost from a software rasterizer called SwiftShader, licensed from TransGaming. SwiftShader only works when Chrome’s baked-in graphics processor acceleration doesn’t run, and in the blog post announcing the update, Google said that it sought out this third-party solution so that “more users will have access to basic 3D content on the web.”

The Canvas2D changes will allow the same older PCs to process game and animation graphics faster. When Google originally debuted the improved Canvas2D in Chrome beta, the company noted that the multitude of older hardware configurations caused significant delays in implementing the improvements. The feature doesn’t yet work for Linux.

In the offing for Chrome 19, due around six weeks from today, and Chrome 20, due just before June’s Google I/O conference, are full implementation of Google’s Native Client (NaCl) tech. Already partially available in the Chrome 19 developer’s version, NaCl and its API set known as Pepper will allow, the company says, gaming support in the browser that will come close to console-quality graphics.

Chrome 18 also updates the Adobe Flash plug-in to its latest version, and makes numerous security and bug fixes. There were no “critical” security fixes, but there were a few “high”-level fixes, out of nine security fixes reported.

You can read the Chrome 18 changelog here.

Article source: http://download.cnet.com/8301-2007_4-57405953-12/faster-graphics-for-older-pcs-in-chrome-18/

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29 Mar 12 Faster graphics for older PCs in Chrome 18


(Credit:
Google)

Google Chrome 18 brings two methods of improved graphics support to both newer and older computers. Released today, Google Chrome 18 stable for Windows (download), Mac (download), Linux (download), and Chrome Frame improves both WebGL and Canvas2D.

To help along WebGL in Chrome on older Windows and
Mac computers, it now gets a boost from a software rasterizer called SwiftShader, licensed from TransGaming. SwiftShader only works when Chrome’s baked-in graphics processor acceleration doesn’t run, and in the blog post announcing the update, Google said that it sought out this third-party solution so that “more users will have access to basic 3D content on the web.”

The Canvas2D changes will allow the same older PCs to process game and animation graphics faster. When Google originally debuted the improved Canvas2D in Chrome beta, the company noted that the multitude of older hardware configurations caused significant delays in implementing the improvements. The feature doesn’t yet work for Linux.

In the offing for Chrome 19, due around six weeks from today, and Chrome 20, due just before June’s Google I/O conference, are full implementation of Google’s Native Client (NaCl) tech. Already partially available in the Chrome 19 developer’s version, NaCl and its API set known as Pepper will allow, the company says, gaming support in the browser that will come close to console-quality graphics.

Chrome 18 also updates the Adobe Flash plug-in to its latest version, and makes numerous security and bug fixes. There were no “critical” security fixes, but there were a few “high”-level fixes, out of nine security fixes reported.

You can read the Chrome 18 changelog here.

Article source: http://download.cnet.com/8301-2007_4-57405953-12/faster-graphics-for-older-pcs-in-chrome-18/?part=rss&subj=software&tag=title

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15 Mar 12 Google Working on Metro-Style Chrome for Windows 8


Following the lead of Mozilla, Google has confirmed that it is working on a version of its Chrome Web browser optimized for the new Microsoft Windows 8 “Metro” interface.

“Our goal is to be able to offer our users a speedy, simple, secure Chrome experience across all platforms, which includes both the desktop and Metro versions of Windows 8,” a Google spokesperson said in a statement.

“To that end, we’re in the process of building a Metro version of Chrome along with improving desktop Chrome in Windows 8, such as adding enhanced touch support,” the spokesperson continued.

The new version of Chrome will be based on the desktop browser, not the Android version. Google did not provide any other details about its plans.

The story was first reported by Mashable.

Windows 8 will include the “classic” interface, which is similar to Windows 7, and Metro, which resembles the tiled Windows Phone interface. Metro is designed for tablets but will also work on the desktop.

Those who use the Metro interface will have several browsers from which to choose. Mozilla last month said it is crafting a Metro-style Firefox for Windows 8. Adding Firefox to Windows 8 classic will be a “simple evolution,” but adding it to Metro will require “a new Firefox front end and system integration points,” Mozilla said.

Windows 8 Metro adopters will also be able to use Internet Explorer 10. However, the Metro-style version of Internet Explorer 10 on Windows 8 will not support plugins, meaning it will not support Adobe Flash, Microsoft said. If you use the desktop version of IE10, however, plugin support will remain.

Meanwhile Opera is looking into Windows 8, but has yet to confirm whether it has begun developing a Metro-style version of its browser, CNET reported. And, Apple has not said whether it plans to optimize its Safari browser for Windows 8.

For more, see PCMag’s hands on with the Windows 8 consumer preview. Also check out our unboxing of the Windows 8 developer preview PC and 8 Things You Need To Know About Windows 8, as well as Installing Windows 8 on a MacBook Air.

Editor’s Note: This story was updated at 11:40am ET with comment from Google.

For the top stories in tech, follow us on Twitter at @PCMag.

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Article source: http://www.pcmag.com/article2/0,2817,2401550,00.asp?kc=PCRSS03069TX1K0001121

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14 Mar 12 Google Working on Metro-Style Chrome for Windows 8


Following the lead of Mozilla, Google has confirmed that it is working on a version of its Chrome Web browser optimized for the new Microsoft Windows 8 “Metro” interface.

“Our goal is to be able to offer our users a speedy, simple, secure Chrome experience across all platforms, which includes both the desktop and Metro versions of Windows 8,” a Google spokesperson said in a statement.

“To that end, we’re in the process of building a Metro version of Chrome along with improving desktop Chrome in Windows 8, such as adding enhanced touch support,” the spokesperson continued.

The new version of Chrome will be based on the desktop browser, not the Android version. Google did not provide any other details about its plans.

The story was first reported by Mashable.

Windows 8 will include the “classic” interface, which is similar to Windows 7, and Metro, which resembles the tiled Windows Phone interface. Metro is designed for tablets but will also work on the desktop.

Those who use the Metro interface will have several browsers from which to choose. Mozilla last month said it is crafting a Metro-style Firefox for Windows 8. Adding Firefox to Windows 8 classic will be a “simple evolution,” but adding it to Metro will require “a new Firefox front end and system integration points,” Mozilla said.

Windows 8 Metro adopters will also be able to use Internet Explorer 10. However, the Metro-style version of Internet Explorer 10 on Windows 8 will not support plugins, meaning it will not support Adobe Flash, Microsoft said. If you use the desktop version of IE10, however, plugin support will remain.

Meanwhile Opera is looking into Windows 8, but has yet to confirm whether it has begun developing a Metro-style version of its browser, CNET reported. And, Apple has not said whether it plans to optimize its Safari browser for Windows 8.

For more, see PCMag’s hands on with the Windows 8 consumer preview. Also check out our unboxing of the Windows 8 developer preview PC and 8 Things You Need To Know About Windows 8, as well as Installing Windows 8 on a MacBook Air.

Editor’s Note: This story was updated at 11:40am ET with comment from Google.

For the top stories in tech, follow us on Twitter at @PCMag.

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