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21 May 12 Google Chrome Now the No. 1 Browser in the World


Google‘s Chrome web browser just passed Microsoft’s Internet Explorer to become the most-used browser in the world, says the latest data from a digital analytics service.

Although Chrome has edged out IE before for short periods, the last week marks the first time Chrome was the No. 1 browser for a sustained period of one week. Exactly 31.88% of the world’s web traffic was done on Chrome, according to StatCounter, while IE is a close second at 31.47%.

[More from Mashable: The State of Windows 8: Cheap Upgrades, Better Apps [RUMORS]]

Although the difference is slight, Chrome has been trending up for some time, while IE has been trending down. IE is still the top browser in many regions, including North America, but Chrome is extremely popular in both India and South America — the latter being a region where Google’s Orkut social network also has significant market share.

Source: StatCounter Global Stats – Browser Market Share

[More from Mashable: Chrome Now Syncs Tabs Across Devices]

IE is still king in most other regions, though, for obvious reasons: It’s the default web browser for Windows machines, which still constitute about 90% of the world’s computers. Tech-savvy Internet users tend to prefer Chrome, however, due to its minimal user interface and loading speed.

The browser trends are expected to continue at least until the general release of Internet Explorer 10 later this year. IE10 is tied to the launch of Windows 8, and it may introduce a wild card into the browser game.

While the desktop version of Windows 8 will support third-party browsers just like Windows has in the past, there’s some question whether certain Windows tablets will limit their functionality, in effect forcing users toward using IE10 if they want the abilities of a full web browser.

SEE ALSO: Google Confirms It’s Working on Chrome for Windows 8

While StatCounter’s numbers, which are based on page-view data on 3 million websites, are often seen as a reliable barometer on browser popularity, other services that look at unique visitors to determine market share tell a different story. The most recent numbers from Net Applications, for example, show IE with a commanding lead of 54% to Chrome’s 19%. Mozilla Firefox is slightly more popular, at 20%.

Which data do you think is more reliable? Have your say in the comments.

Image courtesy of iStockphoto, andrearoad

This story originally published on Mashable here.

Article source: http://news.yahoo.com/google-chrome-now-no-1-browser-world-111324988.html

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19 May 12 Google releases Chrome 19, adds tab sync and patches 20 bugs


Google on Tuesday released Chrome 19, patched 20 vulnerabilities in the browser and doled out $16,500 in bug bounties and rewards to independent researchers.

Chrome 19′s most obvious change is the new support for tab synchronization. Like the already available bookmark, password, app and extension sync, open tabs will now be kept in step on all copies of Chrome, on multiple platforms, including Android, that are linked to the same Google account.

Although Chrome 19 supports the feature, synchronization will not be enabled for all users immediately, said Raz Mathias, a Chrome software engineer. “The tab sync feature will be rolled out gradually over the coming weeks, Mathias said in a Tuesday blog.

Chrome is not breaking ground here.

Mozilla has had tab sync since Firefox 4, which shipped more than a year ago, and third-party extensions, like Xmarks, sync open tabs across browsers from different vendors.

Chrome was last upgraded seven weeks ago. Google releases a new “stable” version about every six to eight weeks and has been on a slightly slower schedule recently than rival Mozilla’s strict every-six-weeks tempo.

Chrome 19 also includes patches for 20 security vulnerabilities: Eight were ranked “high,” Google’s second-most-serious threat rating, seven were marked “medium,” and five were labeled “low.”

Seven of the vulnerabilities were described in Google’s brief advisory as “out-of-bounds” read or write flaws, a category of memory bugs where a function does not check that input doesn’t exceed allocated buffers.

Google paid $7,500 in bounties to six researchers for reporting nine vulnerabilities, including two that were not strictly within Chrome. One of the latter was a bug in a Linux Nvidia driver, for example.

The 11 remaining bugs were uncovered by Google’s own security team or were credited to Microsoft, or were not significant enough to rate a bounty.

Google also handed over an additional $9,000 to half-a-dozen researchers, some of whom collected other cash rewards, for reporting bugs that were patched by Google earlier in Chrome 19′s development process.

So far this year, Google has paid more than $230,000 to outside researchers for submitting Chrome vulnerabilities. More than half of that — $120,000 — was laid out in March at “Pwnium,” a Google-sponsored hacking challenge.

Tuesday’s update was the 13th this year that patched one or more vulnerabilities.

According to the latest figures from metric company Net Applications, Chrome has a usage share of about 19%. Irish measurement firm StatCounter, on the other hand, pegged Chrome’s share for April at 31%.

Chrome 19 can be downloaded for Windows, Mac OS X and Linux from Google’s website. The browser is updated automatically through its silent service.

Gregg Keizer covers Microsoft, security issues, Apple, Web browsers and general technology breaking news for Computerworld. Follow Gregg on Twitter at @gkeizer, on Google+ or subscribe to Gregg’s RSS feed. His email address is gkeizer@computerworld.com.

See more by Gregg Keizer on Computerworld.com.

Read more about browsers in Computerworld’s Browsers Topic Center.

Article source: http://www.itworld.com/software/277314/google-releases-chrome-19-adds-tab-sync-and-patches-20-bugs

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18 May 12 Google Releases Chrome 19, Adds Tab Sync and Patches 20 Bugs


Google on Tuesday released Chrome 19, patched 20 vulnerabilities in the browser and doled out $16,500 in bug bounties and rewards to independent researchers.

Chrome 19′s most obvious change is the new support for tab synchronization. Like the already available bookmark, password, app and extension sync, open tabs will now be kept in step on all copies of Chrome, on multiple platforms, including Android, that are linked to the same Google account.

Although Chrome 19 supports the feature, synchronization will not be enabled for all users immediately, said Raz Mathias, a Chrome software engineer. “The tab sync feature will be rolled out gradually over the coming weeks, Mathias said in a Tuesday blog.

Chrome is not breaking ground here.

Mozilla has had tab sync since Firefox 4, which shipped more than a year ago, and third-party extensions, like Xmarks, sync open tabs across browsers from different vendors.

Chrome was last upgraded seven weeks ago. Google releases a new “stable” version about every six to eight weeks and has been on a slightly slower schedule recently than rival Mozilla’s strict every-six-weeks tempo.

Chrome 19 also includes patches for 20 security vulnerabilities: Eight were ranked “high,” Google’s second-most-serious threat rating, seven were marked “medium,” and five were labeled “low.”

Seven of the vulnerabilities were described in Google’s brief advisory as “out-of-bounds” read or write flaws, a category of memory bugs where a function does not check that input doesn’t exceed allocated buffers.

Google paid $7,500 in bounties to six researchers for reporting nine vulnerabilities, including two that were not strictly within Chrome. One of the latter was a bug in a Linux Nvidia driver, for example.

The 11 remaining bugs were uncovered by Google’s own security team or were credited to Microsoft, or were not significant enough to rate a bounty.

Google also handed over an additional $9,000 to half-a-dozen researchers, some of whom collected other cash rewards, for reporting bugs that were patched by Google earlier in Chrome 19′s development process.

So far this year, Google has paid more than $230,000 to outside researchers for submitting Chrome vulnerabilities. More than half of that — $120,000 — was laid out in March at “Pwnium,” a Google-sponsored hacking challenge.

Tuesday’s update was the 13th this year that patched one or more vulnerabilities.

According to the latest figures from metric company Net Applications, Chrome has a usage share of about 19%. Irish measurement firm StatCounter, on the other hand, pegged Chrome’s share for April at 31%.

Chrome 19 can be downloaded for Windows, Mac OS X and Linux from Google’s website. The browser is updated automatically through its silent service.

Gregg Keizer covers Microsoft, security issues, Apple, Web browsers and general technology breaking news for Computerworld. Follow Gregg on Twitter at @gkeizer, on Google+ or subscribe to Gregg’s RSS feed. His email address is gkeizer@computerworld.com.

See more by Gregg Keizer on Computerworld.com.

Read more about browsers in Computerworld’s Browsers Topic Center.

Article source: http://www.pcworld.com/article/255654/google_releases_chrome_19_adds_tab_sync_and_patches_20_bugs.html

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16 May 12 Google Releases Chrome 19, Adds Tab Sync and Patches 20 Bugs


Google on Tuesday released Chrome 19, patched 20 vulnerabilities in the browser and doled out $16,500 in bug bounties and rewards to independent researchers.

Chrome 19′s most obvious change is the new support for tab synchronization. Like the already available bookmark, password, app and extension sync, open tabs will now be kept in step on all copies of Chrome, on multiple platforms, including Android, that are linked to the same Google account.

Although Chrome 19 supports the feature, synchronization will not be enabled for all users immediately, said Raz Mathias, a Chrome software engineer. “The tab sync feature will be rolled out gradually over the coming weeks, Mathias said in a Tuesday blog.

Chrome is not breaking ground here.

Mozilla has had tab sync since Firefox 4, which shipped more than a year ago, and third-party extensions, like Xmarks, sync open tabs across browsers from different vendors.

Chrome was last upgraded seven weeks ago. Google releases a new “stable” version about every six to eight weeks and has been on a slightly slower schedule recently than rival Mozilla’s strict every-six-weeks tempo.

Chrome 19 also includes patches for 20 security vulnerabilities: Eight were ranked “high,” Google’s second-most-serious threat rating, seven were marked “medium,” and five were labeled “low.”

Seven of the vulnerabilities were described in Google’s brief advisory as “out-of-bounds” read or write flaws, a category of memory bugs where a function does not check that input doesn’t exceed allocated buffers.

Google paid $7,500 in bounties to six researchers for reporting nine vulnerabilities, including two that were not strictly within Chrome. One of the latter was a bug in a Linux Nvidia driver, for example.

The 11 remaining bugs were uncovered by Google’s own security team or were credited to Microsoft, or were not significant enough to rate a bounty.

Google also handed over an additional $9,000 to half-a-dozen researchers, some of whom collected other cash rewards, for reporting bugs that were patched by Google earlier in Chrome 19′s development process.

So far this year, Google has paid more than $230,000 to outside researchers for submitting Chrome vulnerabilities. More than half of that — $120,000 — was laid out in March at “Pwnium,” a Google-sponsored hacking challenge.

Tuesday’s update was the 13th this year that patched one or more vulnerabilities.

According to the latest figures from metric company Net Applications, Chrome has a usage share of about 19%. Irish measurement firm StatCounter, on the other hand, pegged Chrome’s share for April at 31%.

Chrome 19 can be downloaded for Windows, Mac OS X and Linux from Google’s website. The browser is updated automatically through its silent service.

Gregg Keizer covers Microsoft, security issues, Apple, Web browsers and general technology breaking news for Computerworld. Follow Gregg on Twitter at @gkeizer, on Google+ or subscribe to Gregg’s RSS feed. His email address is gkeizer@computerworld.com.

See more by Gregg Keizer on Computerworld.com.

Read more about browsers in Computerworld’s Browsers Topic Center.

Article source: http://www.pcworld.com/article/255654/google_releases_chrome_19_adds_tab_sync_and_patches_20_bugs.html

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29 Nov 11 Recover Lost Form Data in Google Chrome


Quick note: I first wrote about Lazarus for Firefox. Now that I’m a full-time Chrome user, I felt obligated to update the post accordingly.

This happens to me with alarming (and annoying) regularity: After completing a lengthy Web form, I click Next or Save or whatever, and poof: my browser crashes, the server times out, or my Internet connection dies (thank you, Comcast)–in other words, all my hard work is gone.

As someone who blogs for living (a task that relies heavily on Web forms), this particular nightmare is not only annoying, it’s also a productivity-killer. But this can happen to anyone. Suppose, for example, you just typed a lengthy explanation of a computer problem into a tech-support form. You click Submit, only to see a Page Not Found error or the like. Talk about wanting to tear your hair out!

Fortunately, there’s a simple, effective “do over” in the form of Lazarus, a Chrome add-on that makes it easy to recover lost form data.

How does it work? Lazarus automatically (and securely, with a password if you prefer) saves every keystroke you enter into any Web form, blog tool, comment box, or what have you.

To bring back your data, just look for the little Lazarus symbol in the top-right corner of whatever box you were typing in. Click it, then choose the text you want to recover. Presto! It reappears like magic.

Although Chrome itself can restore text in the event of a browser or system crash, it won’t help you with accidental deletions, server timeouts, and the like. My advice: if you use Chrome, you must use Lazarus. I’ve relied on this add-on for years, starting in Firefox, and consider it an essential part of my Web life.

Contributing Editor Rick Broida writes about business and consumer technology. Ask for help with your PC hassles at hasslefree@pcworld.com, or try the treasure trove of helpful folks in the PC World Community Forums. Sign up to have the Hassle-Free PC newsletter e-mailed to you each week.

Article source: http://www.pcworld.com/article/245036/recover_lost_form_data_in_google_chrome.html/

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29 Nov 11 Recover Lost Form Data in Google Chrome


Quick note: I first wrote about Lazarus for Firefox. Now that I’m a full-time Chrome user, I felt obligated to update the post accordingly.

This happens to me with alarming (and annoying) regularity: After completing a lengthy Web form, I click Next or Save or whatever, and poof: my browser crashes, the server times out, or my Internet connection dies (thank you, Comcast)–in other words, all my hard work is gone.

As someone who blogs for living (a task that relies heavily on Web forms), this particular nightmare is not only annoying, it’s also a productivity-killer. But this can happen to anyone. Suppose, for example, you just typed a lengthy explanation of a computer problem into a tech-support form. You click Submit, only to see a Page Not Found error or the like. Talk about wanting to tear your hair out!

Fortunately, there’s a simple, effective “do over” in the form of Lazarus, a Chrome add-on that makes it easy to recover lost form data.

How does it work? Lazarus automatically (and securely, with a password if you prefer) saves every keystroke you enter into any Web form, blog tool, comment box, or what have you.

To bring back your data, just look for the little Lazarus symbol in the top-right corner of whatever box you were typing in. Click it, then choose the text you want to recover. Presto! It reappears like magic.

Although Chrome itself can restore text in the event of a browser or system crash, it won’t help you with accidental deletions, server timeouts, and the like. My advice: if you use Chrome, you must use Lazarus. I’ve relied on this add-on for years, starting in Firefox, and consider it an essential part of my Web life.

Contributing Editor Rick Broida writes about business and consumer technology. Ask for help with your PC hassles at hasslefree@pcworld.com, or try the treasure trove of helpful folks in the PC World Community Forums. Sign up to have the Hassle-Free PC newsletter e-mailed to you each week.

Article source: http://www.pcworld.com/article/245036/recover_lost_form_data_in_google_chrome.html

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