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26 Apr 12 Your lover left you? Don’t worry, Google Chrome can get her back


(Credit:
Screenshot: Chris Matyszczyk/CNET)

Who among us hasn’t wept over a lover parting ways, declaring that she could find better?

Who among us has not had second thoughts about getting her back? Because, oh, there was her smile, her legs, her cooking, and perhaps the small fact that the break-up was our fault, not hers.

There is a solution. Google Chrome.

Yes, those might seem like two phrases in search of a sequitur, but I can assure you that all you need to do to bring your lover back is to download Google’s fine browser and then use your imagination.

How do I know? Because a new Google Chrome ad told me and I have learned most of what I know from ads.

I blow a wistful kiss to TechCrunch for discovering this emotive candle in the wind. It tells the story of Mark Potter, who is being driven potty by the idea of the lover he let go.

It seems that he didn’t treat Jen so well. So, in order to regain her favor, he sends her a very fine Google doc to open. Because what says romance — far more than roses, candlelight, or a black American Express card — than a Google doc?

This Google doc is full of reasons why Jen should reconsider. Reconsider staying in the same country as Potter? No, reconsider sharing his bed again.

Mark Potter, no doubt Harry’s older and less successful cousin, tries to show Jen all the lovely things they shared when they were together. He calls her, on one particular date, a “good sport.” This seems a term from some early 20th century novel where boys were boys and girls were gals.

Still, he has co-opted her friends in this effort. So we must assume that they, too, believed this was a wonderful relationship — albeit one in which the idea of being Mrs. Potter didn’t seem to enthrall Jen sufficiently.

Yes, Mark spent too much time at the office. Sadly, too, he rarely seems to have admitted that she was right.

Are the tears of recognition coursing down your cheeks and onto your keyboard? Are you already downloading Google Chrome, so that you, too, can create little Google maps of all the places that remind you of your long-lost lover?

Of course, I did too. Google has tried very hard to appeal to human beings, once it suddenly dawned on the company that human beings are sentient.

However, now I am merely wondering what Jen might reply (if at all). Will she remind him that he got her best friend pregnant? Will she declare that he never let her re-organize the furniture every day, so that the feng shui would be just so?

Will she agree to have that coffee with him (Yes, Mark wants coffee. Has he learned nothing?).

It could be, you see, that Jen thinks Mark is the biggest Potter she’s ever met in her life.

I do hope that Google continues to tell the story of this broken Chromance. We need to know if Jen is missing her Potter. We need to see how she might use Chrome to communicate this.

Because Google Chrome always works. At least, that’s what unmarried, forlorn browser obsessives always tell me.

Article source: http://news.cnet.com/8301-17852_3-57421291-71/your-lover-left-you-dont-worry-google-chrome-can-get-her-back/

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26 Apr 12 Your lover left you? Don't worry, Google Chrome can get her back


(Credit:
Screenshot: Chris Matyszczyk/CNET)

Who among us hasn’t wept over a lover parting ways, declaring that she could find better?

Who among us has not had second thoughts about getting her back? Because, oh, there was her smile, her legs, her cooking, and perhaps the small fact that the break-up was our fault, not hers.

There is a solution. Google Chrome.

Yes, those might seem like two phrases in search of a sequitur, but I can assure you that all you need to do to bring your lover back is to download Google’s fine browser and then use your imagination.

How do I know? Because a new Google Chrome ad told me and I have learned most of what I know from ads.

I blow a wistful kiss to TechCrunch for discovering this emotive candle in the wind. It tells the story of Mark Potter, who is being driven potty by the idea of the lover he let go.

It seems that he didn’t treat Jen so well. So, in order to regain her favor, he sends her a very fine Google doc to open. Because what says romance — far more than roses, candlelight, or a black American Express card — than a Google doc?

This Google doc is full of reasons why Jen should reconsider. Reconsider staying in the same country as Potter? No, reconsider sharing his bed again.

Mark Potter, no doubt Harry’s older and less successful cousin, tries to show Jen all the lovely things they shared when they were together. He calls her, on one particular date, a “good sport.” This seems a term from some early 20th century novel where boys were boys and girls were gals.

Still, he has co-opted her friends in this effort. So we must assume that they, too, believed this was a wonderful relationship — albeit one in which the idea of being Mrs. Potter didn’t seem to enthrall Jen sufficiently.

Yes, Mark spent too much time at the office. Sadly, too, he rarely seems to have admitted that she was right.

Are the tears of recognition coursing down your cheeks and onto your keyboard? Are you already downloading Google Chrome, so that you, too, can create little Google maps of all the places that remind you of your long-lost lover?

Of course, I did too. Google has tried very hard to appeal to human beings, once it suddenly dawned on the company that human beings are sentient.

However, now I am merely wondering what Jen might reply (if at all). Will she remind him that he got her best friend pregnant? Will she declare that he never let her re-organize the furniture every day, so that the feng shui would be just so?

Will she agree to have that coffee with him (Yes, Mark wants coffee. Has he learned nothing?).

It could be, you see, that Jen thinks Mark is the biggest Potter she’s ever met in her life.

I do hope that Google continues to tell the story of this broken Chromance. We need to know if Jen is missing her Potter. We need to see how she might use Chrome to communicate this.

Because Google Chrome always works. At least, that’s what unmarried, forlorn browser obsessives always tell me.

Article source: http://news.cnet.com/8301-17852_3-57421291-71/your-lover-left-you-dont-worry-google-chrome-can-get-her-back/?part=rss&tag=feed&subj=TechnicallyIncorrect

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23 Mar 12 Context Is King: OneReceipt’s Chrome Extension Sheds More Light On Your Bank …


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I’m going to admit something right here for everyone to see — I like buying things, a lot. Perhaps too much. I really don’t think I’m alone on that front, but it’s still a bit of a puzzle trying to work out exactly what I bought on Amazon for $62 three weeks ago from my online credit card statement (as it turns out, a memory card, a GalNex screen protector, and a LensPen).

Thankfully, there’s no shortage of help out there. OneReceipt is one such assistant — they launched their receipt tracking service back in November and now with between 50-75 million transactions tracked, they’re looking to use their new Chrome extension to bring some much-needed context to users’ online bank statements and Mint accounts.

Here’s how it works. Once the Chrome extension is installed and you mosey on over to one of the supported bank or credit card sites, you’ll begin to see little black receipt icons sitting next to some of your purchases. Those are the ones that OneReceipt has recognized from your account, and one click on that icon will bring up a list of all the individual items that comprise that purchase. Simple, no?

(Just in case you were wondering, that’s not me buying the Almondina up there.)

OneReceipt’s Chrome extension was originally developed with Mint in mind, as the popular personal finance service aggregates purchases from across all of a person’s accounts and credit cards. As co-founder Sam Fine mentioned to me when OneReceipt first launched in November though, he feels that Mint is more of a “balance sheet” that only highlights total expenditures. The same goes for supported sites like American Express, Citibank, and Bank of America — all of them give you purchase totals, but don’t acknowledge that they’re made up of constituent products.

It makes sense then that the OneReceipt Chrome extension takes that next step of breaking down those purchases even further to give users more insight into their purchases. In my case, for example, there’s a very real chance I could be spending far too much on retro Japanese sci-fi memorabilia (I wish I was kidding), but my Mint account would just tell me I buy a lot from Amazon.

And if you don’t use Chrome? Fine tells me that a Firefox add-on is currently in the works, though Chrome was a bigger target because of their strong web store.

I love the concept, but it’s not without its drawbacks. OneReceipt’s biggest stumbling block is that while emailed receipts from retailers are automatically pulled into OneReceipt’s system, users have to get into the habit of taking pictures of their receipts and sending them to their @onereceipt.com email address for inclusion in their records. It’s not the biggest deal, but the whole process just adds a little bit more friction to a process that could really do without it.

That too is poised to change. Fine tells me that the company’s iOS app will soon be submitted to Apple for inclusion in the App Store, and with it users can snap photos of their receipts and have them pushed straight into their accounts — no pesky emails required. Between that forthcoming app and the new Chrome extension, personal finance buffs and noobs alike will have plenty to like about the OneReceipt ecosystem but whether or not they heed their financial data’s warnings are another thing entirely.


  • ONERECEIPT

OneReceipt is a faster and simpler way for people to organize their receipts and analyze their spending habits. OneReceipt works directly with Gmail / Google Apps to automatically understand e-receipts. Registration is quick and accounts get synced automatically. For paper receipts, users need to take a picture with their phone and email it to their personal @onereceipt.com address. This data is presented to the user through an easily navigated interface. OneReceipt also provides tools like monthly spending reports and…

Learn more

Article source: http://techcrunch.com/2012/03/22/context-is-king-onereceipts-chrome-extension-sheds-more-light-on-your-bank-statements/

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