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27 May 12 What the Browser Wars Say About Facebook


The following video is part of our “Motley Fool Conversations” series, in which Chief Technology Officer Jeremy Phillips and senior technology analyst Eric Bleeker discuss topics across the investing world.

Microsoft continues its inexorable decline in the browser wars. Certain studies are now showing Chrome has passed Internet Explorer. Given enough time, it’s a veritable certainty Chrome will become the dominant browser. As Eric explains, Chrome’s winning in and of itself doesn’t mean a whole lot for Google investors. The point of Chrome was to push forward the progress of the Web as the browser came out at a time when Microsoft hadn’t updated Internet Explorer in a historically long period. Whether or not Chrome continues racking up market share, the company has forced Microsoft from its inaction and into supporting a browser which enables many of the next-generation features Google desired. 

Looking longer term, Eric compares the browser wars to a larger trend: the inability to determine value from a new technology platform. Initially, investors believed ISPs like AOL would be insanely valuable, but that turned out to be false. Likewise, Microsoft fought for its browser to be dominant while initially ignoring search. History has told us that browsers ended up being of little value while search emerged as a huge industry. Likewise, Facebook just IPO’d to huge multiples on the promise of a huge user base. In this video, Eric discusses how the inability to forecast the value of fledgling platforms could be an ominous sign for Facebook.

Facebook recently became the largest company ever to IPO. Yet all the buzz around this social media monster could prove off-base, as Facebook has deep problems converting its millions of members to revenue. We’ve created a new report, “Forget Facebook — Here’s the Tech IPO You Should Be Buying,” that details a much better social media stock that has a longer runway for growth than Facebook. The report won’t be available forever, so click here to get access today — it’s totally free.

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Article source: http://www.dailyfinance.com/2012/05/26/what-the-browser-wars-say-about-facebook/

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02 May 12 Create Chrome Extensions to dominate local markets


Chrome is the second most-used browser globally, and dominates many local markets including Brazil and Russia. Creating a Chrome Extension helps companies gain distribution in many local markets via official resources such as the Google Chrome WebStore.

Alexandria, VA (PRWEB) May 02, 2012

The worldwide market shares by browser indicate that Internet Explorer still dominates overall (35%), with Chrome in the second most popular position (29%), and Firefox not far behind (24%). Safari (6%) and Opera (2%) complete the overall shares.

However, the market shares by browser vary greatly region by region. From the diagrams below you can see that in Latin America, Chrome is the number one browser, taking 45% of the market share. The situation is similar in Russia, where Chrome dominates the market with a 29% share.

Browsers such as Mozilla Firefox and Opera have made Add-ons a fundamental point in their strategy, which has helped lead Firefox to success and market domination in many markets. But Chrome is the most successful in this strategy, amplifying Extensions with Apps and transforming its Add-ons Gallery to the Chrome Web Store, which has proven to be a very successful channel of distribution.

According to a Besttoolbars market study, Chrome has about a 50% higher installation rate from their directories compared to Firefox. The Internet Explorer Gallery is in its infancy.

As a result, creating Chrome Extensions and Apps becomes crucial part of any marketing strategy for web apps and web services, due to its highly developed distribution channel and significant market share.

Learn more at http://besttoolbars.net/services/browser_addons_development/whitepaper/

About Besttoolbars:

Formed in 2003, Besttoolbars is known as the leader in toolbar software. Besttoolbars focuses on browser toolbar, add-ons and extensions solutions and also offers a toolbar and add-ons frameworks. Besttoolbars has created desktop products for leading Internet companies including AOL.com, Web.de, and Skype.com. More than 7000 companies worldwide use Besttoolbars solutions.

Andrew Kudrin
Besttoolbars
703.881.3167
Email Information

Article source: http://news.yahoo.com/create-chrome-extensions-dominate-local-markets-133238764.html

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28 Apr 12 Should you make Gmail the default mail client in Google Chrome?


Reader Bob recently started seeing an unexpected message in his Google Chrome Web browser: Should he allow Chrome to act as “the default Gmail client”?

Bob’s response: Yes or no? Why or why not? What does it mean?

As PC World reported a couple months ago, Google updated Chrome to allow it to open e-mail links in Gmail. That’s why you’re seeing the message: the browser wants to know if you want to take advantage of this new capability.

Do you? It depends on a few things. Based on your e-mail address, Bob, you’re obviously a Gmail user. The question is, how do you interact with Gmail? Do you open it in Chrome proper, or do you send and retrieve mail via a software-based client like Microsoft Outlook or Windows Live Mail?

If you’re in the latter camp, and you click an e-mail link inside a Web page (like, say, this one: hasslefree@pcworld.com), you’d probably want your regular mail program to open.

However, if you typically access Gmail in your browser (in this case Chrome), it stands to reason you’d want that mail link to take you directly to the service and create a new message to the address you clicked. In other words, you want Chrome to act as the default Gmail client.

Ah, but what if you also use, say, Yahoo? Or Hotmail? And you want one of those services to be the default destination for mail links clicked in Chrome? Check out GmailDefaultMaker, a simple utility that, its name notwithstanding, will change your browser’s default mail client to AOL, Gmail, Hotmail, or Yahoo.

Contributing Editor Rick Broida writes about business and consumer technology. Ask for help with your PC hassles at hasslefree@pcworld.com, or try the treasure trove of helpful folks in the PC World Community Forums. Sign up to have the Hassle-Free PC newsletter e-mailed to you each week.

Article source: http://www.itworld.com/software/270764/should-you-make-gmail-default-mail-client-google-chrome

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24 Apr 12 Should You Make Gmail the Default Mail Client in Google Chrome?


GmailReader Bob recently started seeing an unexpected message in his Google Chrome Web browser: Should he allow Chrome to act as “the default Gmail client”?

Bob’s response: Yes or no? Why or why not? What does it mean?

As PC World reported a couple months ago, Google updated Chrome to allow it to open e-mail links in Gmail. That’s why you’re seeing the message: the browser wants to know if you want to take advantage of this new capability.

Do you? It depends on a few things. Based on your e-mail address, Bob, you’re obviously a Gmail user. The question is, how do you interact with Gmail? Do you open it in Chrome proper, or do you send and retrieve mail via a software-based client like Microsoft Outlook or Windows Live Mail?

If you’re in the latter camp, and you click an e-mail link inside a Web page (like, say, this one: hasslefree@pcworld.com), you’d probably want your regular mail program to open.

However, if you typically access Gmail in your browser (in this case Chrome), it stands to reason you’d want that mail link to take you directly to the service and create a new message to the address you clicked. In other words, you want Chrome to act as the default Gmail client.

Ah, but what if you also use, say, Yahoo? Or Hotmail? And you want one of those services to be the default destination for mail links clicked in Chrome? Check out GmailDefaultMaker, a simple utility that, its name notwithstanding, will change your browser’s default mail client to AOL, Gmail, Hotmail, or Yahoo.

Contributing Editor Rick Broida writes about business and consumer technology. Ask for help with your PC hassles at hasslefree@pcworld.com, or try the treasure trove of helpful folks in the PC World Community Forums. Sign up to have the Hassle-Free PC newsletter e-mailed to you each week.

Article source: http://www.pcworld.com/article/254297/should_you_make_gmail_the_default_mail_client_in_google_chrome.html

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23 Apr 12 Should You Make Gmail the Default Mail Client in Google Chrome?


GmailReader Bob recently started seeing an unexpected message in his Google Chrome Web browser: Should he allow Chrome to act as “the default Gmail client”?

Bob’s response: Yes or no? Why or why not? What does it mean?

As PC World reported a couple months ago, Google updated Chrome to allow it to open e-mail links in Gmail. That’s why you’re seeing the message: the browser wants to know if you want to take advantage of this new capability.

Do you? It depends on a few things. Based on your e-mail address, Bob, you’re obviously a Gmail user. The question is, how do you interact with Gmail? Do you open it in Chrome proper, or do you send and retrieve mail via a software-based client like Microsoft Outlook or Windows Live Mail?

If you’re in the latter camp, and you click an e-mail link inside a Web page (like, say, this one: hasslefree@pcworld.com), you’d probably want your regular mail program to open.

However, if you typically access Gmail in your browser (in this case Chrome), it stands to reason you’d want that mail link to take you directly to the service and create a new message to the address you clicked. In other words, you want Chrome to act as the default Gmail client.

Ah, but what if you also use, say, Yahoo? Or Hotmail? And you want one of those services to be the default destination for mail links clicked in Chrome? Check out GmailDefaultMaker, a simple utility that, its name notwithstanding, will change your browser’s default mail client to AOL, Gmail, Hotmail, or Yahoo.

Contributing Editor Rick Broida writes about business and consumer technology. Ask for help with your PC hassles at hasslefree@pcworld.com, or try the treasure trove of helpful folks in the PC World Community Forums. Sign up to have the Hassle-Free PC newsletter e-mailed to you each week.

Article source: http://www.pcworld.com/article/254297/should_you_make_gmail_the_default_mail_client_in_google_chrome.html

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24 Feb 12 Chrome to support Do Not Track privacy feature


Google has agreed to build support for Do Not Track into Chrome so its Web browser can tell Web sites when people don’t want advertisers scrutinizing their behavior.

The Do Not Track technology modifies communications between browsers and servers so people can signal that they don’t want their browsing behavior to become the basis for ad targeting.

Mozilla developed Do Not Track and built it into its Firefox Web browser. Microsoft followed suit not long after with Internet Explorer, Apple has enabled it as an option for developers in Safari 5.1, and Opera is building it into the forthcoming Opera 12.

Now Google’s getting on board, too, with Chrome.

“We plan to implement Do Not Track across our browser and advertising systems by the end of the year,” a Google representative said today in a statement.

Why not earlier? Do Not Track wasn’t mature enough an idea for Google, apparently: We have always thought the idea of DNT was interesting, but there didn’t seem to be a wide consensus on what “tracking” really means. We didn’t feel it was responsible to allow users to send a header in Chrome that largely had no effect and no agreed-upon meaning. Going forward, the scope is now clear, and we know that the header will be respected by the industry.

Do Not Track has been somewhat academic because it requires cooperation from Web sites to respect the feature. But Google, Microsoft, Yahoo, AOL, and other Internet powers just pledged to support Do Not Track on their sites, making the feature much more important.

“We’re pleased to join a broad industry agreement to respect the ‘Do Not Track’ header in a consistent and meaningful way that offers users choice and clearly explained browser controls,” Susan Wojcicki, Google’s senior vice president of advertising, said in a statement.

The Do Not Track news is emerging in conjunction with the U.S. president Barack Obama administration’s proposed Consumer Privacy Bill of Rights being unveiled later today.

The Wall Street Journal first reported the Chrome support for Do Not Track. The Journal also said Apple will make Do Not Track a standard feature in the Mac OS X 10.8 Mountain Lion operating system due to arrive this summer.

For the impatient, there’s also the Do Not Track Plus browser extension that works with Chrome, IE, Firefox, and Safari. It will support Opera at a later date.

Article source: http://www.zdnetasia.com/chrome-to-support-do-not-track-privacy-feature-62303987.htm

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23 Feb 12 Google Agrees On “Do Not Track” Button For Chrome, Acts The Holy Fool


By at least one account, Google has withdrawn from the finger-pointing game of who’s responsible for making consumer privacy vulnerable and acknowledged the plea of consumers that say, “Hey, seriously, we really don’t want you following us everywhere we go on the internet.” Following this week’s scandal that Google was circumventing privacy settings on both Safari and Internet Explorer in order to continue tracking and logging the browsing information of people, the company has now said that it will implement a “Do Not Track” button in its web browser, Chrome.

Google’s decision to include the “Do Not Track” button wasn’t a completely independent change of heart, though. The move is part of a larger concert involving other tech giants like Microsoft, Yahoo, and AOL to adhere to President Obama’s Consumer Privacy Bill of Rights, a new regulation that aims to enhance the amount of control people have with how their personal info is collected. The Wall Street Journal details seven ways in which the Privacy Bill of Rights will work, such as restoring individual control of information to consumers and improving transparency in companies’ policies. However, the Privacy Bill of Rights still permits companies to collect information from people – it just might not get used in the same way.

The new do-not-track button isn’t going to stop all Web tracking. The companies have agreed to stop using the data about people’s Web browsing habits to customize ads, and have agreed not to use the data for employment, credit, health-care or insurance purposes. But the data can still be used for some purposes such as “market research” and “product development” and can still be obtained by law enforcement officers.

Curiously, the “Do Not Track” button will not affect the way Facebook tracks user information via the “Like” button that you seen on virtually every website these days.

Google championed itself today for agreeing to the terms of the Obama Administration’s initiative. In a statement released today, Google Senior Vice President of Advertising Susan Wojcicki said, “We’re pleased to join a broad industry agreement to respect the ‘do-not-track’ header in a consistent and meaningful way that offers users choice and clearly explained browser controls.”

At this point, Google is assuming the defense of the holy fool by acting as if it is news that people might not want all of their browsing habits tracked, indexed, and then distributed back to them in various commercial ways. The fact remains that users of both Safari and Internet Explorer had already selected a privacy option to not be tracked by websites yet, because there was a way around it, Google assumed its manifest destiny to chase after the users’ information anyways. Google’s saccharine agreement to offer a “Do Not Track” button on Chrome is less meaningful than it is conciliatory to remedy a bad public relations week.

In short, it shouldn’t have had come to this. People selecting an option to prevent websites from following them, regardless of how outdated the security feature is, should not be regarded by a company as Google as a challenge to be overcome; it should be regarded as a clear indication that people don’t want companies following them, period.

Article source: http://www.webpronews.com/google-acts-the-holy-fool-agrees-on-do-not-track-button-for-chrome-2012-02

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23 Feb 12 Chrome to support Do Not Track privacy feature


Google found Do Not Track “interesting” but too vague, but now says the technology for blocking behavioral ad targeting is mature enough to use.

Google Chrome logo

Google has agreed to build support for Do Not Track into Chrome so its Web browser can tell
Web sites when users don’t want advertisers scrutinizing their behavior.

The Do Not Track technology modifies communications between browsers and servers so people can signal that they don’t want their browsing behavior to become the basis for ad targeting.

Mozilla developed Do Not Track and built it into its
Firefox Web browser. Microsoft followed suit not long after with Internet Explorer, and Apple has enabled it as an option for developers in
Safari 5.1.

Now Google’s getting on board, too, with Chrome.

“We plan to implement Do Not Track across our browser and advertising systems by the end of the year,” a Google representative said in a statement.

Why not earlier? Do Not Track wasn’t mature enough an idea for Google, apparently:

We have always thought the idea of DNT was interesting, but there didn’t seem to be a wide consensus on what “tracking” really means. We didn’t feel it was responsible to allow users to send a header in Chrome that largely had no effect and no agreed-upon meaning. Going forward, the scope is now clear, and we know that the header will be respected by the industry.

Do Not Track has been somewhat academic because it requires cooperation from Web sites to respect the feature. But Google, Microsoft, Yahoo, AOL, and other Internet powers just pledged to support Do Not Track on their Web sites, making the feature much more important.

“We’re pleased to join a broad industry agreement to respect the ‘Do Not Track’ header in a consistent and meaningful way that offers users choice and clearly explained browser controls,” said Susan Wojcicki, Google’s senior vice president of advertising, in a statement.

The Do Not Track news is emerging in conjunction with the Obama administration’s proposed Consumer Privacy Bill of Rights being unveiled later today.

The Wall Street Journal first reported the Chrome support for Do Not Track. It also said that Apple will make Do Not Track a standard feature in its forthcoming Mac OS X 10.8 Mountain Lion operating system due to arrive this summer, the Journal also reported.

For the impatient, there’s also the Do Not Track Plus browser extension that works with Chrome, IE, Firefox, and Safari, and that will also support Opera later.

Mozillas explanation of the Do Not Track technique for letting people opt out of behaviorally targeted advertising.

Mozilla’s explanation of the Do Not Track technique for letting people opt out of behaviorally targeted advertising.

(Credit:
Mozilla)

Article source: http://news.cnet.com/8301-30685_3-57383362-264/chrome-to-support-do-not-track-privacy-feature/?part=rss&subj=software&tag=title

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11 Nov 11 Listening to Life: Letting my mind wander on Chrome’s little tabs… wait …


Photo with no caption


If you use a computer for work or play, the following fun read is a must, intentionally written just a wee bit choppy, it will make sense to most everyone who has ever experienced

Nowadays, I think in tabs. Multiple tabs, and my cyber mind is subject to bouts of sudden amnesia, which along with this kink in my neck I’d be suffering today, but for my ability to make choices in life.

Last night about 8:30, I was sitting at my brain on a screen, perusing my mind on tabs, enjoying my multifaceted queries of the world: Let’s see, there’s this here on narcissism, oh, and here’s that new one on the 9-year-old who got arrested for spitting sometimes it’s fun to read the hilarious comments at the end, and there’s this one here on Oprah’s six-word memoir contest, sounds interesting, I think I’ll enter, and aww, here’s that Harper’s essay by award-winning writer William T. Vollmann, he wrote an essay on allowing homeless people to live in his parking lot, ah!, and here, four tabs I need on the research I did for the article on the Artists-In-Residence programs, a couple tabs here for the article on magazine covers, one on submission guidelines for National Geographic, and oh!, my long lost niece Grace has found me and sent me a friend request on Facebook and ting!, got AOL mail!

Boy, I was having some fun playing in my mental life on tabs, and suddenly, something shifted, and I had a thought from a different dimension, what I now refer to as my “higher Chrome,” which usually weighs in at about 98.6 degrees and enjoys a couple Advil now and then: “The verdict on the Internet social thing,” it said, “is still out, in my book and speaking of my book, think I’ll read the paragraphs I crafted yesterday and see how they feel and a six word memoir? I’m gonna enter” ..oop, what’s this? .a pop up on my Chrome? Oh, go away you little pester (X for delete) uh oh another one oh no

Just like that, Chrome, which by the way is currently my best and wisest friend — we don’t always get along, but anyway, Chrome went through an unprovoked ceremonious upgrade again last night. I couldn’t stop it, much as I tried. It was like watching a horror movie in slow motion. My multi-tabbed brain crashed. My mind on URL’s wiped out in a few instants — no recovery, no prompt to open closed synapses, just a new screen informing me my Chrome now had a new look.

A new look?! I didn’t ask for a new look! I blinked a few times in disbelief. I felt my veins throbbing with high blood pressure. I could have puked.

Now being a little wizened in my years, I’ve learned a few things about all relationships, primarily, if I can’t change it to my liking, at least (in this case) don’t let it rob me of my peace of higher Chrome. I quickly decided (1) I couldn’t change it. Then, (2) I accepted it. Further, (3) I decided to do the best I could to remedy my situation.

I settled back against the wall at the head of my bed, my laptop fan whirring away the swelter of my 64 bit OS, and I began a methodic history search of my digital memories. It wasn’t fun, it was tedious, but I did it.

Today, but for that nagging pain at the base of my skull, I am back in business and one thing I know for sure. Those little buggers, the pop-ups, like intrusive little aches in my brain; sometimes I can just X them out, delete and ignore, and other times, they will just keep popping up, and I can deal with that. I have a choice how I respond to any situation. In fact, I can choose to even turn it into a positive.

Peruse. Update. Crash. Accept. Restore. Life.

I’m as likely as anyone else to win the contest, but really, I have already won something much more valuable. Just Google “peace or serenity” and you’ll see what I mean.

- – -

Nori St. Paul is a writer. Connect with her on Facebook to join her pages “Listening to Life” for engaging discourse, and Meditate a Minute for mindful briefs.

Article source: http://www.naplesnews.com/news/2011/nov/11/listening-to-life-letting-my-mind-wander-on-tabs/

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