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11 Jun 12 Chrome for Windows 8 Metro Coming Soon, Says Google


Google is getting ready to release a version of Chrome that works in Metro mode in Windows 8 Release Preview.

On Thursday Carlos Pizano, Software Engineer and “Metro Gnome” at Google, said that Chrome for Windows 8 Release Preview will arrive soon.

According to Pizano’s blog entry, Chrome will run in both Metro and desktop environments of Windows 8 on x86. However Chrome will not be released for Windows RT — the version of Windows 8 running on ARM-based chips — because Microsoft is reportedly not allowing browsers other than Internet Explorer on the platform.

“The initial releases of Chrome in Metro mode will include integration with the basic Windows 8 system functionality, such as charms and snap view,” he said. “Over the next few months, we’ll be smoothing out the UI on Metro and improving touch support, so please feel free to file bugs. We’re committed to bringing the speed, simplicity, and security of Chrome into Windows 8, and we look forward to working with you on it.”

Consumers running Windows 8 Release Preview will be able to try the Chrome browser in Metro mode in the next Chrome Dev channel release by setting it as the default browser. Based on a screenshot provided by Pizano, the browser won’t look any different than it does on Windows 7 or other desktop operating systems, keeping with the standard Google design.

Microsoft is following Apple’s lead by denying 3rd-party browsers besides its own stock Internet Explorer on Windows RT tablets with ARM-based processors. The desktop version of Windows 8 won’t have the same restriction although users won’t be able to run more than one browser in Metro mode at any given time.

In addition to Google, Mozilla is also working on a Metro version of Firefox. The company recently published a blog stating that users of Windows RT also deserve a choice of browsers, and called on Microsoft to remain firm on its user choice principles.

“Windows on ARM -as currently designed- restricts user choice, reduces competition and chills innovation,” wrote Mozilla General Council Harvey Anderson. “By allowing only IE to perform the advanced functions of a modern Web browser, third-party browsers are effectively excluded from the platform. This matters for users of today’s tablets and tomorrow’s PCs.”

“Because Windows on ARM relies upon so many traditional Windows assets, including brand, code, footprint, and experience, the decision to exclude other browsers may also have antitrust implications,” Anderson added.

Sounds like a threat, doesn’t it?

Article source: http://www.tomshardware.com/news/Chrome-Metro-Windows-8-Windows-RT-Carlos-Pizano,15962.html

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09 Jun 12 Chrome set to appear on Windows 8 Metro mode


The Chromium team is set to release its first a version of the Chrome browser for the Metro mode of Windows 8, the open-source project announced on Thursday.

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Windows 8 Release Preview: Read the review

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The version will run in both the Metro and desktop environments that come with Windows 8, but it will only run on the traditional x86 flavour of the operating system. As has already been established to some consternation, third-party browsers are locked out of the ‘Windows RT’ version that is designed to run on ARM-based tablets.

The Chromium project is open source, but the code it produces forms the basis for Google’s Chrome browser.

“The initial releases of Chrome in Metro mode will include integration with the basic Windows 8 system functionality, such as charms and snap view,” Google software engineer Carlos Pizano said in a blog post. “Over the next few months, we’ll be smoothing out the UI on Metro and improving touch support, so please feel free to file bugs.”

Those developers wanting to access the early versions of Chrome in Metro mode will need to set it as their default browser in the Chrome Dev channel, which releases new test iterations of the browser once or twice a week.

Microsoft’s decision to ensure the only browser on Windows RT is Internet Explorer has drawn criticism from rival browser-makers such as Mozilla, and European antitrust regulators said last month that they were keeping an eye on the situation.

Microsoft has famously clashed with these regulators before over the issue of browser choice, having been forced in 2009 to stop bundling IE with Windows.

Article source: http://rss.feedsportal.com/c/32424/f/469424/s/202d1c11/l/0L0Szdnet0O0Cblogs0Ccommunication0Ebreakdown0E10A0A0A0A0A30A0Cchrome0Eset0Eto0Eappear0Eon0Ewindows0E80Emetro0Emode0Ebut0Efor0Ex860Eonly0E10A0A263530C0Ds0Icid0F938/story01.htm

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09 Jun 12 Google Chrome Coming to Windows 8 Metro


Google’s Web browser, Chrome, is headed to rival Microsoft’s latest operating system, Windows 8 Metro—sort of. Google began work on a Metro-style enabled desktop browser, a version of Chrome that will run in both the Metro and desktop environments of Windows 8 on x86, back in March. The company didn’t offer a specific release date for Chrome, only noting users will be able to test it out in the next Chrome Dev channel release by setting it as the default browser.

The company also pointed out Chrome won’t run in WinRT (Windows 8 on ARM processors), as Microsoft is not allowing browsers other than Internet Explorer (IE) on the platform. “The initial releases of Chrome in Metro mode will include integration with the basic Windows 8 system functionality, such as charms and snap view,” Google software engineer Carlos Pizano wrote in a blog post. “Over the next few months, we’ll be smoothing out the UI on Metro and improving touch support, so please feel free to file bugs. We’re committed to bringing the speed, simplicity, and security of Chrome into Windows 8, and we look forward to working with you on it.”

Microsoft has a lot riding on the latest version of its Windows 8 Metro operating system, which is expected to launch sometime this fall. The design aesthetic, user interface, currently found on Windows Phone and the latest Xbox dashboard, has profound influence on Windows 8: In place of the “traditional” desktop that defined previous editions of Windows, the newest operating system will open with a Metro start screen of colorful, touchable tiles linked to applications. In theory, this will help port Windows 8 onto tablets and other touch-happy form factors; users will have the ability to download Metro apps to their machine via an online storefront.

Google and Microsoft are locked in an escalating battle for browser market share. Google unseated Microsoft as global usage of the Chrome browser passed that of IE for the first time, according to a May report from StatCounter, an independent Website analytics company. Data from more than 15 billion page views (4 billion from the United States; 850 million from the United Kingdom) for the full month of May shows Chrome took 32.43 percent of the worldwide market, compared with 32.12 percent for IE. Microsoft still holds a comfortable lead in the United States with the IE browser, however, capturing 38.35 percent of the market in May, while Chrome trailed with 23.66 percent.



Article source: http://www.eweek.com/c/a/Search-Engines/Google-Chrome-Coming-to-Windows-8-Metro-535034/

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09 Jun 12 Google Readies Chrome for Windows 8 Metro


Coming soon to Windows 8 Preview: Google Chrome. Illustration: Webmonkey

Google is hard at work on a version of its Chrome browser that will work with Windows 8′s Metro environment. The Chromium blog recently announced that the next build of Chrome’s dev channel will run in both the Metro and desktop environments of Windows 8.

If you’d like to try it out a version of Chrome on Windows 8 once it’s available — most likely later today or perhaps over the weekend — you’ll need to switch over to the Chrome dev channel.

While Chrome will run in Windows 8′s Metro interface on desktop PCs, Google faces the same Microsoft platform restrictions Mozilla has spoken out against and as of now there will be no version of Chrome for WinRT, the version of Windows 8 designed to run on ARM processors.

Since WinRT is the most likely candidate for tablets that means any Windows 8 tablets will be Chrome-free.

Google has stopped short of being as vocal as Mozilla — which has called WinRT “a return to the digital dark ages. The Chromium blog merely notes that “Microsoft is not allowing browsers other than Internet Explorer on the platform,” though there is a link in that sentence to Mozilla’s original post decrying Microsoft’s restrictions.

The crux of Mozilla’s gripe — which Google seems to be tacitly endorsing as well — is that in Windows RT Microsoft gives its own Internet Explorer access to special APIs other web browsers can’t use.

Mozilla’s Asa Dotzler has previously pointed out that at least part of what makes this different than Apple’s iOS — which imposes similar restrictions on software — is that Microsoft still has binding agreements with the EU about browser choice on Windows, and Windows RT is still Windows.

It’s possible that Microsoft will change its mind about third-party web browsers on WinRT (or be legally compelled to change its mind) before any Windows 8 tablets arrive, but in the mean time at least you’ll soon be able to use Chrome with Windows 8 on desktop machines.

Article source: http://www.webmonkey.com/2012/06/google-readies-chrome-for-windows-8-metro/

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08 Jun 12 Chrome for Windows 8 Metro Coming Soon


Google announced this week that it will soon release a version of its Chrome browser for Windows 8 Metro mode.

Chrome for Metro will be available in the next Chrome Dev channel release by setting it as your default browser, Carlos Pizano, a Google software engineer and “Metro Gnome,” wrote in a blog post. It will work with the Release Preview of Windows 8, which Microsoft released last week.

Google first announced plans for a Metro-style Chrome browser in March. “Our goal is to be able to offer our users a speedy, simple, secure Chrome experience across all platforms, which includes both the desktop and Metro versions of Windows 8,” Google said at the time.

Pizano said today that the “initial releases of Chrome in Metro mode will include integration with the basic Windows 8 system functionality, such as charms and snap view.” But in the lead-up to the expected late-2012 release of Windows 8, Google will be “smoothing out the UI on Metro and improving touch support, so please feel free to file bugs,” Pizano wrote.

“We’re committed to bringing the speed, simplicity, and security of Chrome into Windows 8, and we look forward to working with you on it,” he concluded.

Google was sure to bring up the fact that the Windows on ARM version of the upcoming Windows 8 OS will not support browsers other than Internet Explorer. “Chrome won’t run in WinRT,” Pizano said simply.

Like the other versions of Windows 8, Windows RT will include two environments: the classic Windows interface and the more Windows Phone-esque Metro style option. Last month, however, Mozilla complained publicly that “Windows on ARM prohibits any browser except for Internet Explorer from running in the privileged ‘Windows Classic’ environment.” Google soon chimed in that it shared Mozilla’s concerns.

Microsoft has not commented on the controversy, but the Senate Judiciary Committee said it is examining whether Windows RT runs afoul of any antitrust regulations.

For more, see Who’s Ready for Microsoft’s Windows RT? Also check out PCMag’s Hands On With Windows 8 Release Preview and the slideshow below.

For more from Chloe, follow her on Twitter @ChloeAlbanesius.


View Slideshow
See all (24) slides


Windows 8 Multi-Monitor


Windows 8 Lock Screen


Charms and Status


Sports App


For the top stories in tech, follow us on Twitter at @PCMag.

Article source: http://www.pcmag.com/article2/0,2817,2405532,00.asp

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08 Jun 12 Google touts pending debut of Chrome on Windows 8 Metro


Google on Thursday announced it would soon release a preview of its Chrome browser capable of running in the Windows 8 Metro environment.

Chrome will be the first non-Microsoft browser to appear in Metro.

The company did not set a release date for the preview, saying in a post to the Chromium blog only that it would appear in “the next Chrome Dev channel release.”

Google operates multiple “channels,” or versions of Chrome, with escalating levels of stability and reliability. The least stable and earliest public build is dubbed “Dev;” others include “Beta” and “Stable.” The last is Google’s equivalent for a final, production-grade version.

When questioned later on Thursday, a Google spokeswoman declined to offer a specific date, saying, “It’s hard to provide precise timing.”

The Dev channel of Chrome is now on version 21, which it first reached May 21. But because Google updates each version on the Dev line multiple times — nine for Chrome 20 between April 10 and May 17, for instance — the Metro-ized Chrome could easily appear within the next week.

The browser will run in both Windows 8′s traditional x86/64 “desktop” mode — which sports a user interface (UI) very similar to Windows 7′s — and in the tablet- and touch-centric “Metro” mode, where programs are called “apps” and run in a full-screen, or at best, split view.

Under Microsoft’s rules, a browser must be selected by the user as the operating system’s default browser to run in Metro.

Carlos Pizano, who listed his title as “software engineer and Metro gnome,” warned that the first Metro version of Chrome is unfinished.

“The initial releases of Chrome in Metro mode will include integration with the basic Windows 8 system functionality, such as charms and snap view,” wrote Pizano. “Over the next few months, we’ll be smoothing out the UI on Metro and improving touch support.”

He did not give an estimate on when Google would add the Metro browser to the beta or stable builds.

Google first acknowledged that it was working on a Windows 8-specific version of Chrome in mid-March, about a month after rival Mozilla said the same about its Firefox browser. But while Mozilla has provided several updates on its Metro progress, until now, Google has been silent on the subject.

Microsoft has allowed other browser makers to access the desktop’s Win32 APIs (application programming interfaces) from within Metro, in effect leveling the playing field on Windows 8.

  • Microsoft tips how Windows 8 store will promote desktop apps
  • Google touts pending debut of Chrome on Windows 8 Metro
  • Intel, ARM trade barbs over Windows 8, RT
  • Asus tablet prompts speculation on competitors’ offers
  • Microsoft assimilates Flash in Metro’s IE10
  • Windows 8′s built-in AV to be security of last resort
  • Windows 8 Release Preview: Updated but still uneasy
  • Update: Microsoft confirms $15 Windows 8 upgrade
  • FAQ: Get going with Windows 8 Release Preview
  • Microsoft launches Windows 8 Release Preview

Continuing coverage: Windows 8

Article source: http://www.computerworld.com/s/article/9227895/Google_touts_pending_debut_of_Chrome_on_Windows_8_Metro

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08 Jun 12 Google Readies Chrome for Windows 8 Metro


Coming soon to Windows 8 Preview: Google Chrome. Illustration: Webmonkey

Google is hard at work on a version of its Chrome browser that will work with Windows 8′s Metro environment. The Chromium blog recently announced that the next build of Chrome’s dev channel will run in both the Metro and desktop environments of Windows 8.

If you’d like to try it out a version of Chrome on Windows 8 once it’s available — most likely later today or perhaps over the weekend — you’ll need to switch over to the Chrome dev channel.

While Chrome will run in Windows 8′s Metro interface on desktop PCs, Google faces the same Microsoft platform restrictions Mozilla has spoken out against and as of now there will be no version of Chrome for WinRT, the version of Windows 8 designed to run on ARM processors.

Since WinRT is the most likely candidate for tablets that means any Windows 8 tablets will be Chrome-free.

Google has stopped short of being as vocal as Mozilla — which has called WinRT “a return to the digital dark ages. The Chromium blog merely notes that “Microsoft is not allowing browsers other than Internet Explorer on the platform,” though there is a link in that sentence to Mozilla’s original post decrying Microsoft’s restrictions.

The crux of Mozilla’s gripe — which Google seems to be tacitly endorsing as well — is that in Windows RT Microsoft gives its own Internet Explorer access to special APIs other web browsers can’t use.

Mozilla’s Asa Dotzler has previously pointed out that at least part of what makes this different than Apple’s iOS — which imposes similar restrictions on software — is that Microsoft still has binding agreements with the EU about browser choice on Windows, and Windows RT is still Windows.

It’s possible that Microsoft will change its mind about third-party web browsers on WinRT (or be legally compelled to change its mind) before any Windows 8 tablets arrive, but in the mean time at least you’ll soon be able to use Chrome with Windows 8 on desktop machines.

Article source: http://www.webmonkey.com/2012/06/google-readies-chrome-for-windows-8-metro/

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08 Jun 12 Chrome for Windows 8 Metro Coming Soon


Google announced this week that it will soon release a version of its Chrome browser for Windows 8 Metro mode.

Chrome for Metro will be available in the next Chrome Dev channel release by setting it as your default browser, Carlos Pizano, a Google software engineer and “Metro Gnome,” wrote in a blog post. It will work with the Release Preview of Windows 8, which Microsoft released last week.

Google first announced plans for a Metro-style Chrome browser in March. “Our goal is to be able to offer our users a speedy, simple, secure Chrome experience across all platforms, which includes both the desktop and Metro versions of Windows 8,” Google said at the time.

Pizano said today that the “initial releases of Chrome in Metro mode will include integration with the basic Windows 8 system functionality, such as charms and snap view.” But in the lead-up to the expected late-2012 release of Windows 8, Google will be “smoothing out the UI on Metro and improving touch support, so please feel free to file bugs,” Pizano wrote.

“We’re committed to bringing the speed, simplicity, and security of Chrome into Windows 8, and we look forward to working with you on it,” he concluded.

Google was sure to bring up the fact that the Windows on ARM version of the upcoming Windows 8 OS will not support browsers other than Internet Explorer. “Chrome won’t run in WinRT,” Pizano said simply.

Like the other versions of Windows 8, Windows RT will include two environments: the classic Windows interface and the more Windows Phone-esque Metro style option. Last month, however, Mozilla complained publicly that “Windows on ARM prohibits any browser except for Internet Explorer from running in the privileged ‘Windows Classic’ environment.” Google soon chimed in that it shared Mozilla’s concerns.

Microsoft has not commented on the controversy, but the Senate Judiciary Committee said it is examining whether Windows RT runs afoul of any antitrust regulations.

For more, see Who’s Ready for Microsoft’s Windows RT? Also check out PCMag’s Hands On With Windows 8 Release Preview and the slideshow below.

For more from Chloe, follow her on Twitter @ChloeAlbanesius.


View Slideshow
See all (24) slides


Windows 8 Multi-Monitor


Windows 8 Lock Screen


Charms and Status


Sports App


For the top stories in tech, follow us on Twitter at @PCMag.

Article source: http://www.pcmag.com/article2/0,2817,2405532,00.asp?kc=PCRSS03069TX1K0001121

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08 Jun 12 Has Android lost its mojo?


One sad Android

One of the most striking differences between Computex 2011 and this years’ show is how few Android and ARM devices are being shown. There have been a few demos that highlight hardware from Qualcomm and Nvidia, or show Microsoft’s next-gen Windows 8 running on ARM hardware, but these announcements are few and far between.

That’s not to say Android is completely gone from the show — it isn’t — but the mood last year was that Microsoft had missed the boat with Windows 8. While Redmond toiled, its erstwhile partners were clambering aboard the SS Android to set sail for the land of Milk and Tablets.

Xoom tabletThat was before the boat mostly sank. Android as a whole claimed nearly half the tablet market in 2011, but the only device to break away from the pack and make a name for itself was Amazon’s Kindle Fire — a tablet that cost half of what an iPad 2 did, and one that’s sold basically at-cost as a way to hook customers on Amazon Prime. Adding insult to injury is the fact that while the Kindle Fire does run Android, Amazon did a huge amount of work to customize the experience and de-emphasize Google’s OS as a brand. Samsung was bogged down by Apple’s lawsuits, the PlayBook turned out to be pants, and the Xoom xucked.

It’s not clear if there are bad feelings between Google and the various OEMs who bet big money on Android-powered tablets, but the focus during the show is overwhelmingly on Microsoft, Intel, and Windows 8. Most of the demo hardware is x86-based, even though Windows on ARM tablets are supposedly the Next Big Thing — again, you can find them if you look, but there aren’t very many and we’ve seen most of them before. ARM tablets running ICS 4.0 or Jelly Bean 4.2 are even rarer.

This is troubling for several reasons. Microsoft’s numerous ARM restrictions make it clear that the company plans to treat ARM owners like second-class citizens. The company runs the risk of bifurcating the market by creating two de facto Windows standards. x86 devices, be they tablets or notebooks, will be able to install alternate browsers or download applications that aren’t stamped with the MS seal of approval. ARM owners can’t do either. In theory, a strong Android presence in tablets provides an option for customers who aren’t enamored of Microsoft or Apple — but only if manufacturers continue to build around the OS.

Phones: Slow uptake, or business as usual?

The phone situation is markedly different. There’s no danger of Android going anywhere; analyst firms like Gartner expect Android to hold a majority share of the phone market through 2016. What’s more interesting, particularly given the way OEMs have turned away from Android on tablets, is the way Ice Cream Sandwich isn’t gaining traction.

Android Market Share

Seven months after release, Ice Cream Sandwich holds just 7.1% of the market. We know from other sources that Android 2.3 (Gingerbraed) had roughly 40% of the market in October 2011, with another 45% still using the older 2.2 (Froyo) at that time. We consulted WayBackMachine for additional data points on how the transition looked earlier in 2011.

In early March 2011, Android 2.2 held 61.3% of the market, with Android 2.3 (Gingerbread) at just 0.7%. By late June, roughly six months after release, 9.2% of phones were running a flavor of Gingerbread. Our last available data point is for July 18, but it shows devices running Android 2.3.3 – 2.3.4 at 17.6% of the market — almost double the previous month’s total. By October, Froyo and Gingerbread were running neck-and-neck.

That’s good news for phone owners impatient for the next round of Google goodies, especially after missing out on Honeycomb, but it points to a major disconnect between when Google delivers OS updates and when carriers actually start shipping them in volume. If ICS hits true to form, we should see a major spike in its usage rates beginning in July or August.

If it doesn’t, other factors may be in play. Google has rolled out updates to Android before, but Ice Cream Sandwich’s debut kicked off a flurry of requests for OS updates and a substantial amount of user unhappiness when phone companies claimed they needed 5-7 months to release an updated OS. Device manufacturers aren’t that used to interacting directly with customers or having to pay attention to their demands; quality issues and phone problems are almost always handled by the carriers long before they get back to Samsung, HTC, or Motorola. Android’s openness works to break down those walls. By de-prioritizing upgrades, carriers can send a message to Google over who’s really in charge of the OS business.

As for tablets, current evidence suggests that Android’s long-term strength may depend on how consumers respond to Windows 8 when it ships out on tablet devices. We’re hoping to see a vibrant community emerge for both devices, if only to keep Microsoft on its toes. For now, most eyes are tracking Redmond, but if Microsoft can’t counter the iPad 3 — and let’s face it, no one has a great track record there — OEMs may start paying more attention to Android again.

Article source: http://www.extremetech.com/computing/130565-has-android-lost-its-mojo

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07 Jun 12 Chrome For Metro Set To Arrive In Next Dev Channel Release


chromium_logo

As the release of Windows 8 draws closer, all of the major browser vendors are also preparing to launching their applications for the touch-centric Metro UI that will prominently feature in next version of Microsoft’s flagship operating system. Today, Google announced that – assuming you are running the Release Preview of Windows 8 – you’ll soon be able to test Chrome in Windows 8′s Metro mode. Once the next version of Chrome arrives in the Dev channel, you will be able to take Chrome for Metro for a spin after setting it as your default browser.

Google Software Engineer and “Metro Gnome” Carlos Pizano notes that this first version will “ include integration with the basic Windows 8 system functionality, such as charms and snap view.” He also promises that the Chrome team will be “smoothing out the UI on Metro and improving touch support.”

Judging from the first screenshot Google posted today, Chrome for Metro will mostly stick to the standard design Google is also using on the desktop. Unlike Microsoft’s Internet Explorer for Metro, Google isn’t experimenting with any new designs here as far as we can see.

Similar to Apple’s policies, Microsoft doesn’t allow any browsers besides its own Internet Explorer on Windows RT tablets with ARM processors. On the desktop, however, there are no such restrictions besides the fact that users won’t be able to run more than one browser in Metro mode at any given time.

Just like Google, Mozilla is also working on a Metro version of Firefox. While we’ve seen some mockups for Mozilla’s browser for Metro, though, it looks like Google is currently a bit closer to actually releasing a working app.


  • GOOGLE CHROME

Google Chrome is an based on the open source web browser Chromium which is based on Webkit. It was accidentally announced prematurely on September 1, 2008 and slated for release the following day. It premiered originally on Windows only, with Mac OS and Linux versions released in early 2010.

Features include:

Tabbed browsing where each tab gets its own process, leading to faster and more stable browsing. If one tab crashes, the whole browser doesn’t go down with it
A…

Learn more

Article source: http://techcrunch.com/2012/06/07/chrome-for-metro-set-to-arrive-in-next-dev-channel-release/

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