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13 Jun 12 Google delivers Metro Chrome preview


Computerworld - Google yesterday released its first preview of Chrome that runs in the Windows 8 Metro environment, making good on a promise from last week.

The browser, labeled 21.0.1171.0, shipped Monday to Google’s “Dev” channel.

Google maintains multiple “channels,” or versions of Chrome, with escalating levels of stability and reliability. Dev is the least stable and earliest public build, but others include “Beta” and “Stable,” the last being Google’s tag for a final, production-grade edition.

The company announced it would ship a Metro version of Chrome last Thursday, but at the time would not pin itself to a date.

After the new Dev version is installed, Chrome will run in both Windows 8′s traditional x86/64 “desktop” mode — the half that resembles Windows 7′s user interface (UI) — and in the tablet-, touch-centric “Metro” mode, where apps run in a full-screen, or at best, split view, with minimal UI gewgaws.

Under Microsoft’s rules, a browser must be chosen as the operating system’s default browser by the user to run in Metro.

Chrome in Metro also includes Flash, courtesy of Google’s long-bundling of the Adobe software with the browser. That puts Chrome in the same category as Microsoft’s own Internet Explorer 10 (IE10), which in Metro can also render Flash.

Even though Metro is supposed to be plug-in free, both Google and Microsoft have circumvented the rule by integrating Flash Player with their browsers.

Mozilla, which is working on a Metro-ized version of Firefox for Windows 8, and has blasted Microsoft for giving itself an unfair edge on Windows RT, had mixed thoughts on the trend.

“We think there should be equal access to platform capabilities and while we encourage healthy competition, believe there should be no circumstances that give any browser an unfair advantage,” said Asa Dotzler, director of Firefox, in an email reply to questions about IE10′s use of Flash last week. “[But] if other browsers can bring Flash or plug-ins in general to Metro, then it doesn’t seem to be a problem. But that isn’t clear at this time.”

Dotzler comment was made before Google rolled out the Metro preview of Chrome with Flash included.

Chrome’s deviations from the norm also include a decidedly different take on the Metro UI.

As others reported Monday — including ZDNet blogger Ed Bott — Google has seriously strayed from Microsoft’s Metro design guidelines for Chrome, to the point where it puts up a desktop-like context-sensitive menu in lieu of the standard Metro app bar, and adds a full drop-down menu accessed by clicking on an icon in the upper right.

More: Browser Topic Center

Article source: http://www.computerworld.com/s/article/9228017/Google_delivers_Metro_Chrome_preview

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12 Jun 12 Google delivers Metro Chrome preview


Computerworld - Google yesterday released its first preview of Chrome that runs in the Windows 8 Metro environment, making good on a promise from last week.

The browser, labeled 21.0.1171.0, shipped Monday to Google’s “Dev” channel.

Google maintains multiple “channels,” or versions of Chrome, with escalating levels of stability and reliability. Dev is the least stable and earliest public build, but others include “Beta” and “Stable,” the last being Google’s tag for a final, production-grade edition.

The company announced it would ship a Metro version of Chrome last Thursday, but at the time would not pin itself to a date.

After the new Dev version is installed, Chrome will run in both Windows 8′s traditional x86/64 “desktop” mode — the half that resembles Windows 7′s user interface (UI) — and in the tablet-, touch-centric “Metro” mode, where apps run in a full-screen, or at best, split view, with minimal UI gewgaws.

Under Microsoft’s rules, a browser must be chosen as the operating system’s default browser by the user to run in Metro.

Chrome in Metro also includes Flash, courtesy of Google’s long-bundling of the Adobe software with the browser. That puts Chrome in the same category as Microsoft’s own Internet Explorer 10 (IE10), which in Metro can also render Flash.

Even though Metro is supposed to be plug-in free, both Google and Microsoft have circumvented the rule by integrating Flash Player with their browsers.

Mozilla, which is working on a Metro-ized version of Firefox for Windows 8, and has blasted Microsoft for giving itself an unfair edge on Windows RT, had mixed thoughts on the trend.

“We think there should be equal access to platform capabilities and while we encourage healthy competition, believe there should be no circumstances that give any browser an unfair advantage,” said Asa Dotzler, director of Firefox, in an email reply to questions about IE10′s use of Flash last week. “[But] if other browsers can bring Flash or plug-ins in general to Metro, then it doesn’t seem to be a problem. But that isn’t clear at this time.”

Dotzler comment was made before Google rolled out the Metro preview of Chrome with Flash included.

Chrome’s deviations from the norm also include a decidedly different take on the Metro UI.

As others reported Monday — including ZDNet blogger Ed Bott — Google has seriously strayed from Microsoft’s Metro design guidelines for Chrome, to the point where it puts up a desktop-like context-sensitive menu in lieu of the standard Metro app bar, and adds a full drop-down menu accessed by clicking on an icon in the upper right.

More: Browser Topic Center

Article source: http://www.computerworld.com/s/article/9228017/Google_delivers_Metro_Chrome_preview

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12 Jun 12 Google delivers Metro Chrome preview


Computerworld - Google yesterday released its first preview of Chrome that runs in the Windows 8 Metro environment, making good on a promise from last week.

The browser, labeled 21.0.1171.0, shipped Monday to Google’s “Dev” channel.

Google maintains multiple “channels,” or versions of Chrome, with escalating levels of stability and reliability. Dev is the least stable and earliest public build, but others include “Beta” and “Stable,” the last being Google’s tag for a final, production-grade edition.

The company announced it would ship a Metro version of Chrome last Thursday, but at the time would not pin itself to a date.

After the new Dev version is installed, Chrome will run in both Windows 8′s traditional x86/64 “desktop” mode — the half that resembles Windows 7′s user interface (UI) — and in the tablet-, touch-centric “Metro” mode, where apps run in a full-screen, or at best, split view, with minimal UI gewgaws.

Under Microsoft’s rules, a browser must be chosen as the operating system’s default browser by the user to run in Metro.

Chrome in Metro also includes Flash, courtesy of Google’s long-bundling of the Adobe software with the browser. That puts Chrome in the same category as Microsoft’s own Internet Explorer 10 (IE10), which in Metro can also render Flash.

Even though Metro is supposed to be plug-in free, both Google and Microsoft have circumvented the rule by integrating Flash Player with their browsers.

Mozilla, which is working on a Metro-ized version of Firefox for Windows 8, and has blasted Microsoft for giving itself an unfair edge on Windows RT, had mixed thoughts on the trend.

“We think there should be equal access to platform capabilities and while we encourage healthy competition, believe there should be no circumstances that give any browser an unfair advantage,” said Asa Dotzler, director of Firefox, in an email reply to questions about IE10′s use of Flash last week. “[But] if other browsers can bring Flash or plug-ins in general to Metro, then it doesn’t seem to be a problem. But that isn’t clear at this time.”

Dotzler comment was made before Google rolled out the Metro preview of Chrome with Flash included.

Chrome’s deviations from the norm also include a decidedly different take on the Metro UI.

As others reported Monday — including ZDNet blogger Ed Bott — Google has seriously strayed from Microsoft’s Metro design guidelines for Chrome, to the point where it puts up a desktop-like context-sensitive menu in lieu of the standard Metro app bar, and adds a full drop-down menu accessed by clicking on an icon in the upper right.

More: Browser Topic Center

Article source: http://www.computerworld.com/s/article/9228017/Google_delivers_Metro_Chrome_preview

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09 Jun 12 Google Readies Chrome for Windows 8 Metro


Coming soon to Windows 8 Preview: Google Chrome. Illustration: Webmonkey

Google is hard at work on a version of its Chrome browser that will work with Windows 8′s Metro environment. The Chromium blog recently announced that the next build of Chrome’s dev channel will run in both the Metro and desktop environments of Windows 8.

If you’d like to try it out a version of Chrome on Windows 8 once it’s available — most likely later today or perhaps over the weekend — you’ll need to switch over to the Chrome dev channel.

While Chrome will run in Windows 8′s Metro interface on desktop PCs, Google faces the same Microsoft platform restrictions Mozilla has spoken out against and as of now there will be no version of Chrome for WinRT, the version of Windows 8 designed to run on ARM processors.

Since WinRT is the most likely candidate for tablets that means any Windows 8 tablets will be Chrome-free.

Google has stopped short of being as vocal as Mozilla — which has called WinRT “a return to the digital dark ages. The Chromium blog merely notes that “Microsoft is not allowing browsers other than Internet Explorer on the platform,” though there is a link in that sentence to Mozilla’s original post decrying Microsoft’s restrictions.

The crux of Mozilla’s gripe — which Google seems to be tacitly endorsing as well — is that in Windows RT Microsoft gives its own Internet Explorer access to special APIs other web browsers can’t use.

Mozilla’s Asa Dotzler has previously pointed out that at least part of what makes this different than Apple’s iOS — which imposes similar restrictions on software — is that Microsoft still has binding agreements with the EU about browser choice on Windows, and Windows RT is still Windows.

It’s possible that Microsoft will change its mind about third-party web browsers on WinRT (or be legally compelled to change its mind) before any Windows 8 tablets arrive, but in the mean time at least you’ll soon be able to use Chrome with Windows 8 on desktop machines.

Article source: http://www.webmonkey.com/2012/06/google-readies-chrome-for-windows-8-metro/

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08 Jun 12 Google Readies Chrome for Windows 8 Metro


Coming soon to Windows 8 Preview: Google Chrome. Illustration: Webmonkey

Google is hard at work on a version of its Chrome browser that will work with Windows 8′s Metro environment. The Chromium blog recently announced that the next build of Chrome’s dev channel will run in both the Metro and desktop environments of Windows 8.

If you’d like to try it out a version of Chrome on Windows 8 once it’s available — most likely later today or perhaps over the weekend — you’ll need to switch over to the Chrome dev channel.

While Chrome will run in Windows 8′s Metro interface on desktop PCs, Google faces the same Microsoft platform restrictions Mozilla has spoken out against and as of now there will be no version of Chrome for WinRT, the version of Windows 8 designed to run on ARM processors.

Since WinRT is the most likely candidate for tablets that means any Windows 8 tablets will be Chrome-free.

Google has stopped short of being as vocal as Mozilla — which has called WinRT “a return to the digital dark ages. The Chromium blog merely notes that “Microsoft is not allowing browsers other than Internet Explorer on the platform,” though there is a link in that sentence to Mozilla’s original post decrying Microsoft’s restrictions.

The crux of Mozilla’s gripe — which Google seems to be tacitly endorsing as well — is that in Windows RT Microsoft gives its own Internet Explorer access to special APIs other web browsers can’t use.

Mozilla’s Asa Dotzler has previously pointed out that at least part of what makes this different than Apple’s iOS — which imposes similar restrictions on software — is that Microsoft still has binding agreements with the EU about browser choice on Windows, and Windows RT is still Windows.

It’s possible that Microsoft will change its mind about third-party web browsers on WinRT (or be legally compelled to change its mind) before any Windows 8 tablets arrive, but in the mean time at least you’ll soon be able to use Chrome with Windows 8 on desktop machines.

Article source: http://www.webmonkey.com/2012/06/google-readies-chrome-for-windows-8-metro/

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27 Dec 11 Google Dev: We Are Making Chrome Out of Kindness to Web


There has been plenty of speculation about Google’s motivation to guarantee Mozilla nearly $1 billion in a 3-year advertising contract that covers the search box in Firefox.

The obvious idea behind this move is Google’s interest in capturing those advertising revenues generated by Mozilla’s 25 percent browser market share and users who are using the box for Google searches. Some rumors suggest that the price for Firefox went up as Microsoft was bidding for the space as well and Google certainly has no interest to handing those search revenues to Bing.

The problem, of course, is Firefox is a rival for Chrome is this respect as it is cheaper for Google to harvest search revenues through Chrome than pay Mozilla. As long as Mozilla has substantial market share that makes economic sense for Google, there is no reason to believe why Google would be dropping Mozilla. However, Chrome developer Peter Kasting does not quite agree and complained that people do not understand why Google is developing Chrome and why Google is supporting Firefox. According to Kasting, Chrome is much more Google’s donation to the world, a welfare project if you will, than a tool that generates revenues.

Kasting argues that “the primary goal of Chrome is to make the web advance as much and as quickly as possible. That’s it. It’s completely irrelevant to this goal whether Chrome actually gains tons of users or whether instead the web advances because the other browser vendors step up their game and produce far better browsers. Either way the web gets better. Job done. The end.”

To continue that thought, Mozilla also aims to make the web better. And since Chrome “cannot be all things to all people”, Google needs to fund Mozilla as Firefox “is an important product because it can be a different product with different design decisions and serve different users well.” Kasting concludes his thoughts with the notion that “Google succeeds (and makes money) when the web succeeds and people use it more to do everything they need to do.” One may wonder where all the advertising business fits into this argument, as Chrome is actually tied directly to advertising via its instant-search engine supported via the location bar.

For some perspective, there is a balancing post from Firefox product manager Asa Dotzler, who has not been especially kind to Google’s intention to build walls around its interests in the web in the past. According to Dotzler, the deal between Mozilla and Google has, of course, to do with selling ads: “This is Google’s business,” he writes. “They sell ads alongside ‘free’ content, and they buy additional traffic to make those ads more valuable.” Contrary to Kasting’s web welfare claims to make the web better, Dotzler says that “Google is not a philanthropist ‘donating’ money to Mozilla or any other traffic acquisition partner.”

In the greater view, the deal makes sense for both parties and Mozilla has clearly come out on top, but the Firefox guys have a rough year ahead to make the money work. Despite Kasting’s thoughts that Mozilla is simply an extension of Google’s intent to make the web better, there may be more interest for Google to keep Mozilla alive and well down the road. The company is already under fire for unfair monopolization of web apps and advertising and the last thing Google needs is an antitrust suit that it killed Firefox in the browser race. Funding it with $1 billion may help avoid such a suit.

Article source: http://www.tomshardware.com/news/google-chrome-web-browser-mozilla-firefox,14378.html

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