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22 Dec 12 Flipboard Proves — Again — That Android Tablet Apps Don’t Have to Suck


Flipboard’s new tablet-optimized Android app proves, yet again, that Android tablet apps don’t have to be lousy. Photo: Ariel Zambelich/Wired

Flipboard’s tablet-optimized version of its Android app is everything you expect if you’ve ever used Flipboard on another gadget, which is to say it’s awesome. And it’s exactly what other big-time app makers should be doing, but too many aren’t.

The elegant app puts Twitter, Facebook, Rdio, Spotify, Instagram, Dropbox, eBay, Yelp, Foursquare and everyone else on notice: Your Android tablet apps don’t have to suck, and if they do, it’s because you’re lazy. It isn’t that these companies can’t make apps that look as great as they work, it’s just that they chose not to.

Flipboard’s app looks and works fantastically on both 7-inch and 10-inch slates. The stiff board turns seen in Flipboard’s other apps are just as responsive on the Nexus 7 and Nexus 10 tablets we tested the app on. My Twitter, Google+, YouTube, Flickr, SoundCloud, Tumblr and Facebook feeds appeared without a hitch. So did articles and videos pulled from dozens of sources around the web. Everything was laid out in Flipboard’s lovely magazine-like user interface — exactly as expected.

The app responds to the various screen sizes found in Android tablets, taking full advantage of the platform’s widescreen displays and perfectly scaling as needed. Flipboard said it spent more than a year working with Samsung to ensure its app works seamlessly on the Galaxy Tab and Galaxy Note tablets, but you can also run it on any other Android tablet, including Amazon’s Kindle Fire and Barnes Noble’s Nook.

Flipboard isn’t alone in making a slick Android tablet app. Netflix, Hulu, Plume, Mint, Instapaper and Tiny Co. offer tablet-optimized apps that rock. Google has released plenty of design tools for tablet-optimized Android apps and practically begged developers to get on board. And of course Google builds fantastic tablet apps, providing many examples for others to follow.

But Flipboard remains remarkable. The app that Steve Jobs loved on his iPad has lost nothing in its translation to Android tablets and makes full use of their different form factors. This is significant, because it proves once again that good Android tablet apps are possible and gives users the great experience they deserve.

Article source: http://www.wired.com/gadgetlab/2012/12/flipboard-tablet-optimized-android-app/

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29 Apr 12 How a Non-Tablet Changed the Tablet Market


What does it say about the market for tablet computers that the best-selling tab running Android is not really a tablet.

It’s an e-reader that was invented to help sell the public on e-books, whose components don’t have to be manufactured, printed or mailed but retail for close to the same price, vastly increasing profits to booksellers like Kindle developer Amazon.

The leading Android tablet is actually Amazon’s Kindle Fire — an e-book reader built up into a general-purpose tablet that became the main competitor to Apple’s dominant iPad immediately after the Kindle Fire was launched in November 2011.

Within three weeks after launch, the Fire had grabbed 14 percent of all tablet sales, compared to 57 percent for iPad, according to iSuppli Market Research.

By the end of February sales of Kindle Fire had grown to 54.4 percent of the Android market, up from 29 percent at the end of December, according to sales tracking analysts ComScore.

Kindle Fire’s best feature is its ability as an e-book reader, according to reviewers. It is much more, however. For a list price of $199, customers get a seven-inch display, 8GB of RAM, free storage on Amazon’s cloud, WiFi and USB connections, the ability to run any Android-compatible app or game and automagical connections to media (for which you can pay Amazon) including e-books, music, movies and anything else you can find on the Internet.

Fire’s list price is $430 lower than the list price of the latest edition of the iPadand $249 less than Amazon’s discount price for a new 10-inch Samsung Galaxy tablet and $50 less than the 7-inch Samsung Galaxy.

Price alone makes Kindle Fire a good competitor for the higher-cost Android tablets, but a rumored upgrade with a 10-inch display will improve its chances even more. Comscore estimates that 10-inch tablets sell 39 percent more than seven-inch tablets, regardless of manufacturer or other features included.

Amazon may also come out with a six-inch version to expand options for readers even further.

However, the Fire won’t make much more progress against iPad, iSupply predicted. Of the 124 million tablets iSupply predicts will be shipped this year, 52 percent will be iPads.

The newest iPad’s high-resolution display and momentum as market leader will keep the iPad at the top of the heap iSuppli predicts for 2012, while now-discounted iPad 2 models will compete directly with the lower-end, lower-cost Kindle Fire.

Best-Selling Tablet is Not a Tablet?

The oddest-seeming factor in the market-share battle is that tablets act as often as BYOD work devices as they do conveniences for home users – not a role most users or manufacturers expect an e-reader to fill. Barnes Noble’s Nook, in fact, does not even try to fill that niche. It remains a specialized reading machine, but still lists for $249.

Kindle Fire’s price, easy access to a huge library of media, weight (14.6 ounces) and ultra-fast browser make it very attractive to tablet users, but function for function is more competitive with the Nook, according to analysts quoted in a September, 2011 Computerworld story.

Kindle’s Silk browser can be installed on any Android machine, however; users can root Kindle Fire the way they can any other Android device, to add or get access to 5GB more storage space on the same machine, expand the list of file types it can handle, add far more useful apps than an e-reader supplies, and replace its utilitarian interface with something more attractive.

Plus, refurbs are now selling for less than $150.

That sounds an awful lot like a full-function tablet to me, except for the price, which makes Kindle Fire waaaay more attractive to anyone but a dedicated iOS user than any other tablet on the market, even though it was designed as an e-reader.

Why does the e-reader thing matter?

First, because people buy hardware to have access to one app or function, then take the other things it can do as an additional benefit.

Kindle Fire was designed small, for a market that demands electronics be cheap, light, easy to use and have ridiculously long battery life.

Building extra functions on top of a platform meeting those requirements gives you a high-performing tablet that can do more than just display e-books.

Downsizing a “real” computer to a tablet, or even building a giant smartphone both leave designers stretching their existing designs to meet the potential of a new size, or dumbing down all the specifications they consider standard.

That ends up delivering either a big phone with lousy battery life and iffy touchscreen control, or a dumbed-down PC that is more appropriate as a way to fill in for the PC when a user can’t sit in front of a laptop, which is the way designers at PC companies appear to think of it.

Second, a machine designed for the computer-illiterate to operate without a manual is guaranteed to be more reliable and easier to lean than even a simplistic smartphone interface.

That combination – a surprisingly rich set of functions, a simple, fast interface and a price so low nothing else even competes with it – are what pushed Kindle to the top of the tablet market.

Its users still seem to see it as an e-reader with extra richness than as a tablet for general computing, however.

Kindle Fire Splits Tablet Market into Tabs and Almost-Tabs

Despite its success in the U.S., Kindle Fire hasn’t taken off overseas. Part of the reason is price. Most of the reason is that, overseas, the Netflix, Hulu Plus, Amazon Prime and other streaming media services that make Kindle Fire a good media tablet even for non-e-book readers, aren’t available.

Is that a problem?

Yes, if Amazon wants to take over the top tablet spot from Apple.

No, if you look at it from a customer’s perspective.

Kindle Fire isn’t competing for people who would otherwise buy an iPad. It’s competing for people who want to read e-books, but don’t to waste time and money on a single-function device.

They’re far happier to get something close to an iPad-quality machine for the cost of an e-reader; in making that choice, they expand and enrich the market for tablets – beyond the limited number who would pay $500 to $700 for something less capable than a laptop, while providing something very close in power to a laptop at the price of a decent Android phone.

The question isn’t whether Kindle Fire will continue to lead the Android market.

The question is whether Nook will morph into a tablet that can compete with Fire, and whether Samsung, RIM, Lenovo, Acer and other tablet makers will take note of the Kindle Fire equation and try to offer their own iteration.

Given the historical inability of PC makers to squeeze premium features into smaller boxes at lower prices (doing it at the same or higher prices is a different market entirely), I doubt they’ll be able to match the Fire any time soon.

Barnes Noble could compete by beefing up the Nook. But it’s already working at a deficit, trying to sell a less-capable machine in competition with a powerful one whose price is artificially low because the manufacturer subsidizes the cost in order to sell more books and other media.

In e-reader quality, accessibility and usability, Barnes Noble might hope to compete with Amazon. It can’t compete with Amazon’s deep pockets and drive to make the Kindle Fire as inexpensive and easy to use as possible.

It also can’t compete with Amazon’s ability to sell a product that’s neither fish nor fowl, while getting customers to appreciate a little something in between because it’s better and cheaper than either a traditional e-reader or a full-scale tablet.

Unfortunately for makers of full-scale tablets, no one buys a tab for the power it packs.

With the exception of size, which Amazon will solve with a 10-inch version of Fire, the Kindle Fire compares favorably with almost all the features of the leading tablets.

It will continue to do so, I think, leading the non-iPad tablet market by underpricing everything else available, while not really competing with the iPad because it’s not as powerful and (more importantly) isn’t a Mac.

Odd as it seems, the market looks as if it will remain divided, for the near future, into three segments: basic e-readers, tablets with a range of features, specifications and prices, and iPads.

Nooks will continue to lead the first category.

Kindle Fire will lead the second. iPads, for the foreseeable future, will lead the third, probably until laptops evolve into tablet formats, or smartphones evolve into something that makes tablets unnecessary.

Predicting winners and results of competition in any tech category is a losing prospect. Even when you’re right, development moves quickly enough that you can’t stay right for very long.

In this case, though, until some major new change in the size, portability and cost of everything on the market except Kindle Fire, the only two questions prospective tablet users have to answer are:

  • iPad or not-an-iPad

and

  • Kindle Fire or something more expensive?

Read more of Kevin Fogarty’s CoreIT blog and follow the latest IT news at ITworld. Follow Kevin on Twitter at @KevinFogarty. For the latest IT news, analysis and how-tos, follow ITworld on Twitter and Facebook.

Article source: http://www.pcworld.com/article/254672/how_a_nontablet_changed_the_tablet_market.html

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25 Apr 12 Microsoft, Pegatron Ink Patent Deal for Android, Chrome Devices


Microsoft has inked a patent licensing deal with Pegatron that covers Android- and Chrome-based devices.

The agreement means Pegatron can utilize technology covered by Microsoft patents for its Android- and Chrome-based e-readers, smartphones, and tablets.

“We are pleased to have reached this agreement with Pegatron and proud of the continued success of our Android licensing program in resolving IP issues surrounding Android and Chrome devices in the marketplace,” Horacio Gutierrez, corporate vice president and deputy general counsel of Microsoft’s Intellectual Property Group, said in a statement. “With this agreement, Microsoft has now licensed four of the top five Taiwanese ODMs.”

Taiwan-based Pegatron manufactures its own products, but is also a supplier for well-known tech firms, like Apple.

Microsoft has previously signed patent licensing deals with companies like HTC, Samsung, Suanta, Copal Electronics, Wistron, and LG.

When the LG deal was announced in January, Gutierrez said that 70 percent of all Android smartphones sold in the U.S. were covered under Microsoft’s patent portfolio.

Microsoft holds patents relating to navigation and how websites display content; technology used on the Android and Chrome platforms.

Earlier this week, Microsoft and Facebook agreed to a deal that will see Microsoft license or sell many of the patents it picked up from AOL to Facebook for $550 million in cash.

Patent battles have made a number of headlines in recent years, as some of the top tech companies – from Apple and Samsung to Motorola and Microsoft – have gone after one another for patent infringement. Microsoft is currently battling Barnes Noble for violating its patents with its Nook line of e-readers. BN responded by accusing Microsoft of patent abuse, but an International Trade Commission (ITC) judge in January threw out Barnes Noble’s antitrust claims against Redmond.

In February, however, Microsoft filed a formal complaint with the European Commission accusing Google and Motorola Mobility of patent abuse, which eventually resulted in an EU investigation.

For more from Chloe, follow her on Twitter @ChloeAlbanesius.

For the top stories in tech, follow us on Twitter at @PCMag.

Article source: http://www.pcmag.com/article2/0,2817,2403540,00.asp

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14 Apr 12 Google’s Larry Page: We’re Focused On Cheap Android Tablets


Jared Newman / TIME.com

Google CEO Larry Page has lent some credence to rumors of a cheap, Google-branded Android tablet, saying in an earnings call that the company is focused on the low end of the market.

Page said “we’re very excited about tablets” when asked by an analyst about the company’s tablet strategy. Lower-priced Android tablets have been rather successful, Page said, likely referring to Amazon’s Kindle Fire and Barnes Noble’s Nook Tablet, though he didn’t call them out by name.

(MORE: Will Google Race to the Bottom With a $150 Nexus Tablet?)

“[W]e definitely believe that there’s going to be a lot of success at the lower end of the market as well with lower-priced products that will be very significant. And it’s definitely an area we think is important and we’re quite focused on,” Page said, according to Seeking Alpha’s transcript of the earnings call.

Although plenty of Android tablets exist already, Google has not yet made one of its own, in the way that it’s produced several “Nexus” smartphones. But according to a handful of rumors, Google and Asus are working together on a low-price, 7-inch Android tablet, based on the MeMo 370T that Asus showed off in January, priced around $200. Google could launch the tablet in July at the earliest, The Verge reported last week.

With Page dropping hints to investors, the Google tablet can’t be far off. The company’s holding a conference for developers at the end of June, so I’m guessing Google would announce its tablet by then.

(MORE: Apple’s New iPad Should Be Google’s Wake-Up Call)

Article source: http://techland.time.com/2012/04/13/googles-larry-page-were-focused-on-cheap-android-tablets/

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15 Jan 12 LG Electronics and Microsoft Sign Deal on Android and Chrome OS Patents


LG Electronics and Microsoft Sign Deal on Android and Chrome OS Patents

, Sun, Jan 15, 2012

According to recent news, LG Electronics signed a patent agreement with Microsoft Corp. The agreement covers LG’s mobile phones, tablets and any other devices running on Google or Chrome platforms. “We are pleased to have built upon our longstanding relationship with LG to reach a mutually beneficial agreement,” proudly announced Horacio Gutierrez, corporate vice president and deputy general counsel, Intellectual Property Group at Microsoft.

Now Microsoft can pile up 10 similar agreements signed with large tech companies manufacturing Android and Chrome devices, including HTC, Samsung, Acer and now LG. Under the circumstances, the percent of Android phones sold in US covered by Microsoft patent portfolio reached to 70%, announced Microsoft in a press release.

Despite the journalists’ curiosity, the detailed terms of the agreement signed between LG and Microsoft remained still undisclosed. At least for now. On the other hand, tech giants fighting in the second line to get ahead on the market, like Barnes Noble and Motorola Mobility are still standing up to Microsoft and its pressures to sign similar agreements.

While Barnes Noble has its Android powered Nook line-up tablets to fight for, Motorola has a whole range of smartphones running on Android. Barnes Nobles already has to meet Microsoft in courts for patent infringement and although Microsoft has trimmed down its claims recently, still the situation remains dangerous for Barnes Noble. A similar case against Motorola Mobility is held in courts in London.



I firmly believe technology is made to serve our needs and not the other way around. Inventive gadgets and creative start-ups please my eye and mind. My belief is that a symbiosis out of technology and our daily lives is what can propel civilization forward.

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Article source: http://techleash.com/2012/01/lg-electronics-and-microsoft-sign-deal-on-android-and-chrome-os-patents/

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11 Nov 11 Google acquires Apture to boost Chrome team


Google’s latest purchase is Apture, a startup that focuses on providing instant access to information with in-page search technology.

Also self-defined as a “glossary for the web,” Apture’s features include boosting 2D websites into enhanced multimedia experiences in which readers better find related information as the text literally jumps off the page. This contextual search function was designed to increase revenue opportunities for publishers, including such customers as The New York Times and The Financial Times.

For example, you might have noticed some of this technology when reading The NYT’s website, and you might have double-clicked and/or highlighted a word, which then brings up a definition or query.

The beneficiary of the purchase will be Chrome, so we can possibly expect to see some major changes related to this technology in the coming months.

Financial details of the merger as well as an expected date on when the deal will close have not been revealed yet, but there was a note posted on the front door of Apture. Here’s an excerpt:

After enhancing more than a billion pages with our products, we think now is the best time to expand our efforts with another team just down the road that shares our vision of making the web better. :) That’s right — we’ve been acquired by Google and will be joining the Chrome team to continue driving innovation and creating a better user experience on the web. The modern web is an amazing platform, so stay tuned for even more enhancements to your Chrome browsing experience.

As the memo states, Apture’s staff will be joining the Chrome team, but it still isn’t clear whether or not the group will stay put at Apture’s San Francisco office or move down to the Mountain View headquarters.

Related:

Article source: http://www.zdnet.com/blog/btl/google-acquires-apture-to-boost-chrome-team/63155

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29 Oct 11 Microsoft, Compal Sign Patent Deal Covering Android, Chrome


Microsoft has signed a patent agreement with Taiwan’s Compal Electronics that provides coverage under its patent portfolio for Compal’s tablets, mobile phones, e-readers and other consumer devices running Android or the Chrome platform, the company said Sunday.

As a result of the agreement, companies accounting for over half of all Android devices have now entered into patent license agreements with Microsoft, its general counsels, Brad Smith and Horacio Gutierrez said in a blog post.

More than half of the global contract manufacturer industry for Android and Chrome devices is now under license to Microsoft’s patent portfolio, following the agreement with Compal and earlier ones with two other contract manufacturers, Wistron and Quanta Computer, Microsoft said.

The company claims similar success for its licensing program with companies producing devices under their own brand, which it calls original equipment manufacturers (OEMs).

Microsoft announced last month a cross-license patent agreement with Samsung Electronics that gives Microsoft royalties for Samsung’s mobile phones and tablets running the Android mobile platform.

Following the agreement with Samsung, Microsoft now has license agreements in place with OEMs that account for 53 percent of all Android smartphones in the U.S., the general counsels said.

Google did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

Microsoft said the licensing deal with Compal, its tenth around Android so far, would bring it royalties, but did not provide details.

Microsoft has offered a licensing program to makers of Android devices to avoid being sued by the company for allegedly infringing its patents, which was embraced last year by HTC for its mobile phones running Android.

The company’s “license-first” approach hasn’t always worked, and in March it filed legal action against Barnes Noble, and its device makers Foxconn International Holdings and Inventec for alleged patent infringements by Nook devices which run Android.

Microsoft also has ongoing litigation with Motorola Mobility. Google said in August that it has entered into an agreement to acquire Motorola for about US$12.5 billion

“Our firm view remains, however, that licensing is the best way forward for the industry, and we will continue to prefer the licensing path to litigation,” Gutierrez said in March.

John Ribeiro covers outsourcing and general technology breaking news from India for The IDG News Service. Follow John on Twitter at @Johnribeiro. John’s e-mail address is john_ribeiro@idg.com

Article source: http://www.pcworld.com/businesscenter/article/242427/microsoft_compal_sign_patent_deal_covering_android_chrome.html

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24 Oct 11 Microsoft, Compal Sign Patent Deal Covering Android, Chrome


Microsoft has signed a patent agreement with Taiwan’s Compal Electronics that provides coverage under its patent portfolio for Compal’s tablets, mobile phones, e-readers and other consumer devices running Android or the Chrome platform, the company said Sunday.

As a result of the agreement, companies accounting for over half of all Android devices have now entered into patent license agreements with Microsoft, its general counsels, Brad Smith and Horacio Gutierrez said in a blog post.

More than half of the global contract manufacturer industry for Android and Chrome devices is now under license to Microsoft’s patent portfolio, following the agreement with Compal and earlier ones with two other contract manufacturers, Wistron and Quanta Computer, Microsoft said.

The company claims similar success for its licensing program with companies producing devices under their own brand, which it calls original equipment manufacturers (OEMs).

Microsoft announced last month a cross-license patent agreement with Samsung Electronics that gives Microsoft royalties for Samsung’s mobile phones and tablets running the Android mobile platform.

Following the agreement with Samsung, Microsoft now has license agreements in place with OEMs that account for 53 percent of all Android smartphones in the U.S., the general counsels said.

Google did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

Microsoft said the licensing deal with Compal, its tenth around Android so far, would bring it royalties, but did not provide details.

Microsoft has offered a licensing program to makers of Android devices to avoid being sued by the company for allegedly infringing its patents, which was embraced last year by HTC for its mobile phones running Android.

The company’s “license-first” approach hasn’t always worked, and in March it filed legal action against Barnes Noble, and its device makers Foxconn International Holdings and Inventec for alleged patent infringements by Nook devices which run Android.

Microsoft also has ongoing litigation with Motorola Mobility. Google said in August that it has entered into an agreement to acquire Motorola for about US$12.5 billion

“Our firm view remains, however, that licensing is the best way forward for the industry, and we will continue to prefer the licensing path to litigation,” Gutierrez said in March.

John Ribeiro covers outsourcing and general technology breaking news from India for The IDG News Service. Follow John on Twitter at @Johnribeiro. John’s e-mail address is john_ribeiro@idg.com

Article source: http://www.pcworld.com/article/242427/microsoft_compal_sign_patent_deal_covering_android_chrome.html

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23 Oct 11 Another Android and Chrome OS device developer pays Microsoft patent royalties


Original design manufacturer (ODM) Compal Electronics has licensed publicly undisclosed Microsoft patents and is paying Microsoft undisclosed royalties to cover phones, tablets and e-readers it makes that run Android and the Chrome OS.

Microsoft and Compal announced they had signed a patent agreement on October 23.

Microsoft officials said that with the addition of Compal to its patent-protection roster, Microsoft now has “more than half of the world’s ODM industry for Android and Chrome devices … now under license to Microsoft’s patent portfolio.” (Other ODMs who are paying Microsoft for Android and Chrome patent protection include Wistron and Quanta Computer. Quanta is the ODM for the Amazon Kindle Fire and RIM’s PlayBook.)

“We are proud of the continued success of our licensing program in resolving IP issues surrounding Android and Chrome,” said Horacio Gutierrez, Corporate Vice President and Deputy General Counsel for Intellectual Property at Microsoft, according to a statement in Microsoft’s latest press release.

Microsoft has not publicly disclosed which of its patents that it contends are infringed by Android and Chrome. Barnes Noble officials said earlier this year, Microsoft officials require OEMs and ODMs to sign non-disclosure statements before sharing with them the details about their alleged infringements. (Barnes Noble and Motorola Mobility are still engaged in legal battles with Microsoft over Microsoft’s claims that their Android-based devices infringe Microsoft patents.)

Speaking of Motorola Mobility, the International Trade Commission — which is investigating patent-infringement complaints by Microsoft and Apple against Motorola Mobility — has extended the target completion date for those decisions by six weeks due to case backlog, according to Florian Mueller of the FOSS Patents blog. (Mueller repeats in his post his disclosure that he is doing a Microsoft-commissioned study on the worldwide use of FRAND-pledged patents, for what it’s worth.) The initial decision on the Microsoft-Motorola case is now slated for December 16, 2011, with the final decision target date now April 16, 2012.

Article source: http://www.zdnet.com/blog/microsoft/another-android-and-chrome-os-device-developer-pays-microsoft-patent-royalties/11062

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23 Oct 11 Another Android and Chrome OS developer pays Microsoft patent royalties


Original design manufacturer (ODM) Compal Electronics has licensed publicly undisclosed Microsoft patents and is paying Microsoft undisclosed royalties to cover phones, tablets and e-readers it makes that run Android and the Chrome OS.

Microsoft and Compal announced they had signed a patent agreement on October 23.

Microsoft officials said that with the addition of Compal to its patent-protection roster, Microsoft now has “more than half of the world’s ODM industry for Android and Chrome devices … now under license to Microsoft’s patent portfolio.” (Other ODMs who are paying Microsoft for Android and Chrome patent protection include Wistron and Quanta Computer. Quanta is the ODM for the Amazon Kindle Fire and RIM’s PlayBook.)

“We are proud of the continued success of our licensing program in resolving IP issues surrounding Android and Chrome,” said Horacio Gutierrez, Corporate Vice President and Deputy General Counsel for Intellectual Property at Microsoft, according to a statement in Microsoft’s latest press release.

Microsoft has not publicly disclosed which of its patents that it contends are infringed by Android and Chrome. Barnes Noble officials said earlier this year, Microsoft officials require OEMs and ODMs to sign non-disclosure statements before sharing with them the details about their alleged infringements. (Barnes Noble and Motorola Mobility are still engaged in legal battles with Microsoft over Microsoft’s claims that their Android-based devices infringe Microsoft patents.)

Speaking of Motorola Mobility, the International Trade Commission — which is investigating patent-infringement complaints by Microsoft and Apple against Motorola Mobility — has extended the target completion date for those decisions by six weeks due to case backlog, according to Florian Mueller of the FOSS Patents blog. (Mueller repeats in his post his disclosure that he is doing a Microsoft-commissioned study on the worldwide use of FRAND-pledged patents, for what it’s worth.) The initial decision on the Microsoft-Motorola case is now slated for December 16, 2011, with the final decision target date now April 16, 2012.

Article source: http://www.zdnet.com/blog/microsoft/another-android-and-chrome-os-developer-pays-microsoft-patent-royalties/11062

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