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31 Dec 12 LG Nexus 4 vs Samsung Galaxy Nexus: Camera shootout


We had a run-in with Google’s flagship smartphone today and we put it to work right away. The Nexus 4 is built by LG and follows the Galaxy Nexus very closely in terms of design and aesthetics. We’ll have an in-depth first impressions of the phone for you very soon, but first, how about a little camera showdown against the Galaxy Nexus. The camera in the previous phone was only good if all the conditions were ideal like a bright summer’s day. Anything else and you might as well not bother taking the phone out of your pocket. The Nexus 4 on the other hand has an 8MP BSI sensor from Sony, so we can expect great things from it, especially in low light.

We will be comparing it with other handsets like the iPhone 5, Lumia 920, etc in the future but for now, we just want to see how much of an improvement it is over its predecessor.

On Video

We’ve shot a quick hands-on video of the LG Nexus 4, highlighting its design and build as well as a quick comparison with the Galaxy Nexus itself. We also get to see the new powerful Qualcomm SoC in action through a quick lap of NFS: Most Wanted.

Good detail on both but the Nexus 4 edges out the GNex with better depth of field

Good detail on both but the Nexus 4 edges out the GNex with better depth of field

 

In the first out door test, both cameras appear to capture very good amount of detail. However, the colours are a bit exaggerated in the Galaxy Nexus as compared the Nexus 4. Also, the depth of field is stronger in the Nexus 4 as the blue wall and shrubs in the background are more blurred out.

No real competition here

No real competition here

 

Our second test was indoors, under sufficient ambient lighting. Here, the BSI sensor come into play by offering a much better white balance as well as a lot more detail. The Galaxy Nexus is simply unable to capture enough detail and colours in this sort of lighting.

Good detail and accurate colours from the Nexus 4

Good detail and accurate colours from the Nexus 4

 

We finally come to our macro test. Once again, the Nexus 4 came out on top with better white balance and much better contrast. The detail is also a lot better.

There’s no word when the Nexus 4 will actually launch in India but latest rumours state a possibility of an early Jan launch. You can buy the handset right now from the gray market for approximately Rs 36,000 for the 16GB model. You can read our in-depth first impressions of the handset right here.

Product sourced from: Cell Point, Shop No.76, Heerapanna. Contact no:+91 9819 031 860

Article source: http://tech2.in.com/features/smartphones/lg-nexus-4-vs-samsung-galaxy-nexus-camera-shootout/664542

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28 Dec 12 LG Nexus 4 vs Samsung Galaxy Nexus : Camera shootout


We had a run-in with Google’s flagship smartphone today and we put it to work right away. The Nexus 4 is built by LG and follows the Galaxy Nexus very closely in terms of design and aesthetics. We’ll have an in-depth first impressions of the phone for you very soon, but first, how about a little camera showdown against the Galaxy Nexus. The camera in the previous phone was only good if all the conditions were ideal like a bright summer’s day. Anything else and you might as well not bother taking the phone out of your pocket. The Nexus 4 on the other hand has an 8MP BSI sensor from Sony, so we can expect great things from it, especially in low light.

We will be comparing it with other handsets like the iPhone 5, Lumia 920, etc in the future but for now, we just want to see how much of an improvement it is over its predecessor.

On Video

We’ve shot a quick hands-on video of the LG Nexus 4, highlighting its design and build as well as a quick comparison with the Galaxy Nexus itself. We also get to see the new powerful Qualcomm SoC in action through a quick lap of NFS: Most Wanted.

Good detail on both but the Nexus 4 edges out the GNex with better depth of field

Good detail on both but the Nexus 4 edges out the GNex with better depth of field

 

In the first out door test, both cameras appear to capture very good amount of detail. However, the colours are a bit exaggerated in the Galaxy Nexus as compared the Nexus 4. Also, the depth of field is stronger in the Nexus 4 as the blue wall and shrubs in the background are more blurred out.

No real competition here

No real competition here

 

Our second test was indoors, under sufficient ambient lighting. Here, the BSI sensor come into play by offering a much better white balance as well as a lot more detail. The Galaxy Nexus is simply unable to capture enough detail and colours in this sort of lighting.

Good detail and accurate colours from the Nexus 4

Good detail and accurate colours from the Nexus 4

 

We finally come to our macro test. Once again, the Nexus 4 came out on top with better white balance and much better contrast. The detail is also a lot better.

There’s no word when the Nexus 4 will actually launch in India but latest rumours state a possibility of an early Jan launch. You can buy the handset right now from the gray market for approximately Rs 30,000 for the 16GB model. Stay tuned for our first impressions on the Nexus 4 coming up shortly. 


Product sourced from: Cell Point, Shop No.76, Heerapanna. Contact no:+91 9819 031 860

Article source: http://tech2.in.com/features/smartphones/lg-nexus-4-vs-samsung-galaxy-nexus-camera-shootout/664542

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07 Feb 12 German Information Security Officials Choose Google Chrome as Most Secure Browser


The German Federal Office for Information Security (Bundesamt für Sicherheit in der Informationstechnik or BSI) has chosen Google Chrome as the most secure browser for Microsoft Windows users.

According to Dr. Wieland Holfelder, German Extraordinaire, and Travis McCoy, Security Aficionado, the best practice guide from BSI is part of the agency’s general guidelines and recommendations for Cyber Security.

German officials clarified that web browsers are the key elements of online services security, pointing out that sandboxing is the core focus of Google Chrome and found that rival browsers had either insufficient or weak security.

The BSI recognized these security benefits in their report, saying,

“The browser is the central component for using any online service on the Web and therefore is the most critical attack surface for cyber attacks. Therefore, if possible, you should use a browser with sandbox technology. The browser that currently most consistently implements this protection is Google Chrome (https://www.google.com/chrome). Comparable mechanisms implemented in other browsers are either weaker, or non-existent. By using Google Chrome, in addition to the other mechanisms we mentioned, you can significantly reduce the risk of a successful IT attack.”

The other Google Chrome element that pointed out is its silent update mechanism, making sure that the web browser keeps updated, including the embedded Flash player.

german information security officials chooses google chrome as most secure browser German Information Security Officials Choose Google Chrome as Most Secure Browser

Image: TopRank Blog via Flickr (CC)

“Equally positive is the auto-update functionality of Google Chrome, which includes a bundled version of the Adobe Flash Player. By bundling it with Chrome, the Adobe Flash Player will also always be kept up to date.”

For other online services, such as email, BSI encourages the use of Windows Live Mail or Mozilla Thunderbird; and Microsoft Security Essentials, Avira Free Antivirus and avast! Free Antivirus for free antivirus applications.

 

Source

Article source: http://socialbarrel.com/german-information-security-officials-choose-google-chrome-as-most-secure-browser/31724/

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06 Feb 12 German government endorses Chrome as most secure browser


Germany’s cyber security agency has recommended that Windows 7 users run Google’s Chrome browser, citing the application’s sandbox and auto-update features.

In a security best practices guideline, Germany’s Federal Office for Information Security, known by its German initials of BSI, said Chrome was the best browser.


“Your internet browser is the key component for the use of services on the Web and thus represents the main target for cyber-attacks,” said BSI in its published advice. “By using Google Chrome in conjunction with the other measures outlined above, you can significantly reduce the risk of a successful IT attack.”

BSI ticked off Chrome’s anti-exploit sandbox technology, which isolates the browser from the operating system and the rest of the computer; its silent update mechanism and Chrome’s habit of bundling Adobe Flash, as its reasons for the recommendation.

“This [sandbox] protection is implemented most consistently in Chrome…[and] similar mechanisms in other browsers are currently either weaker or non-existent,” explained BSI.

BSI, for “Bundesamt fuer Sicherheit in der Informationstechnik,” has a habit of making software recommendations, particularly about browsers, unlike U.S. agencies. Two years ago, for example, BSI urged Germans to stop using Internet Explorer (IE) until Microsoft patched a vulnerability that had allegedly been used by Chinese hackers to break into networks owned by Google and dozens of other Western companies.

Unlike in the U.S., where Windows 7 users are automatically handed IE as the default browser, Germans are shown a browser ballot screen when they first run Windows. The ballot screen lets users choose which browser they want to set as the default, and if necessary, download and install it.

That selection process stems from a settlement Microsoft reached with European Union antitrust regulators in 2009, two years after Opera Software officially complained that IE’s bundling with Windows and the browser’s default status stifled competition.

Not surprisingly, Google was happy about the recommendation. “We’re particularly honored to see several of [Chrome's] security benefits recognized in the report,” wrote Wieland Holfelder, who heads Google’s engineering efforts in Germany, in a Friday post to Chrome’s official blog .

BSI also recommended Adobe Reader X — the version of the popular PDF reader that, like Chrome, relies on a sandbox to protect users from exploits — and urged citizens to use Windows’ Auto Update feature to keep their PCs abreast of all OS security fixes.

To update applications, BSI gave a nod to Secunia’s Personal Software Inspector (PSI), a free utility that scan a computer for outdated software and point users to appropriate downloads.

Chrome currently accounts for just 14.3% of all browsers used in Germany, according to Irish Web measurement company StatCounter. Mozilla’s Firefox has 51% of the German market, while IE accounts for 24.8%.

While Mozilla is making progress on silent updates for Firefox, the company won’t wrap up the project until June at the earliest. Nor does Firefox include a Chrome-esque sandbox, although developers have been working on separating each tab’s process, something Chrome also offers, to make its browser more resilient to crashes.

Worldwide, Chrome is more popular: StatCounter’s data shows that Chrome’s 28.4% share put it in second place behind IE’s 37.5% but ahead of Firefox’s 24.8%.

The BSI best practice guides for consumers and small businesses can be found on the agency’s website. Both documents are in German.

Article source: http://www.macworld.co.uk/digitallifestyle/news/index.cfm?newsid=3335172

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06 Feb 12 Google Chrome most secure browser, says German government


Google Chrome has been recommended to Windows 7 users by Germany’s cybersecurity agency because of the browser’s sandbox and auto-update features.

In a security best practices guideline, Germany’s Federal Office for Information Security, known by its German initials of BSI, said Chrome was the best browser.

“Your internet browser is the key component for the use of services on the web and thus represents the main target for cyber-attacks,” said BSI. “By using Google Chrome in conjunction with the other measures outlined above, you can significantly reduce the risk of a successful IT attack.”

BSI ticked off Chrome’s anti-exploit sandbox technology, which isolates the browser from the operating system and the rest of the computer; its silent update mechanism and Chrome’s habit of bundling Adobe Flash, as its reasons for the recommendation.

Sandbox protection

“This sandbox protection is implemented most consistently in Chrome and similar mechanisms in other browsers are currently either weaker or non-existent,” explained BSI.

BSI, for “Bundesamt fuer Sicherheit in der Informationstechnik,” has a habit of making software recommendations, particularly about browsers, unlike US agencies. Two years ago, for example, BSI urged Germans to stop using Internet Explorer (IE) until Microsoft patched a vulnerability that had allegedly been used by Chinese hackers to break into networks owned by Google and dozens of other Western companies.

Unlike in the US, where Windows 7 users are automatically handed IE as the default browser, Germans are shown a browser ballot screen when they first run Windows. The ballot screen lets users choose which browser they want to set as the default, and if necessary, download and install it.

Adobe Reader X recommended

That selection process stems from a settlement Microsoft reached with European Union antitrust regulators in 2009, two years after Opera Software officially complained that IE’s bundling with Windows and the browser’s default status stifled competition.

Not surprisingly, Google was happy about the recommendation. “We’re particularly honored to see several of Chrome’s security benefits recognised in the report,” wrote Wieland Holfelder, who heads Google’s engineering efforts in Germany.

BSI also recommended Adobe Reader X – the version of the popular PDF reader that, like Chrome, relies on a sandbox to protect users from exploits – and urged citizens to use Windows’ Auto Update feature to keep their PCs abreast of all OS security fixes.

To update applications, BSI gave a nod to Secunia’s Personal Software Inspector (PSI), a free utility that scan a computer for outdated software and point users to appropriate downloads.

Silent updates for Firefox

Chrome currently accounts for just 14.3% of all browsers used in Germany, according to Irish Web measurement company StatCounter. Mozilla’s Firefox has 51% of the German market, while IE accounts for 24.8%.

While Mozilla is making progress on silent updates for Firefox, the company won’t wrap up the project until June at the earliest. Nor does Firefox include a Chrome-esque sandbox, although developers have been working on separating each tab’s process, something Chrome also offers, to make its browser more resilient to crashes.

Worldwide, Chrome is more popular: StatCounter’s data shows that Chrome’s 28.4% share put it in second place behind IE’s 37.5% but ahead of Firefox’s 24.8%.

The BSI best practice guides for consumers and small businesses can be found on the agency’s website. Both documents are in German.

Article source: http://rss.feedsportal.com/c/270/f/470440/s/1c6eebf4/l/0Lnews0Btechworld0N0Csecurity0C33352420Cgoogle0Echrome0Emost0Esecure0Ebrowser0Esays0Egerman0Egovernment0C0Dolo0Frss/story01.htm

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06 Feb 12 German government recommends Chrome browser


The most common web browsers in most countries are Google Chrome, Firefox, and Internet Explorer. While in the US, our government doesn’t recommend specific software for security when you’re online, in Germany it’s a different story. Germany’s federal office of information security, known by the German initials of BSI, on the other hand, often recommends software to German citizens for the security.

The BSI has announced that it recommends Google’s Chrome browser for German citizens as the most secure for surfing the web. The reason Chrome is recommended over other available browsers by BSI is that the browser isolates itself from the operating system of the computer, and because it has a silent update mechanism. BSI also cites the bundling of Adobe Flash as another reason for its recommendation.

BSI said, “This [sandbox] protection is implemented most consistently in Chrome…[and] similar mechanisms in other browsers are currently either weaker or non-existent.”

Right now, only 14.3% of web surfers in Germany use Google Chrome. The most common browser is Firefox with 51% of the German market, and Microsoft Internet Explorer has 24.8% of the market. Globally, Google Chrome is the second most common browser in market share worldwide. The most popular browser globally is Internet Explorer.

[via ComputerWorld]

Article source: http://www.slashgear.com/german-government-recommends-chrome-browser-06212198/

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06 Feb 12 German agency recommends Chrome to keep PC users safe


Germany’s Federal Office for Information Security (BSI) has released its best practice recommendations for PC users, and those of you in-tune with the browser wars will be interested to hear that the agency chose Chrome as the safest option. The BSI cites the browser’s built-in sandboxing, auto-updating, and bundled (always-up-to-date) Adobe Flash player in its decision. While people in many countries decide to switch from the default Internet Explorer, those in Germany (and the rest of Europe) have to choose which browser to use by default the very first time they turn on their machines, thanks to an anti-monopoly settlement between Microsoft and the European Commission in 2009.

Alongside Chrome, the BSI has a complete document full of recommendations for PC users that covers everything from purchase, installation, use, and disposal. In addition to your typical guidelines to keep your machine up-to-date, the agency recommends some specific programs. It notes that unless you need specific features like child controls and email monitoring, you’re better off with a free anti-virus solution like Microsoft Security Essentials, Avira, or Avast (we’re inclined to agree), and that its recommended free email option is Gmail. Some other top safety tips for PC use include uninstalling unused demo programs that come pre-installed and backing up your machine at least once a week.

Article source: http://www.theverge.com/2012/2/5/2771834/german-agency-google-chrome-safety

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04 Feb 12 German gov’t endorses Chrome as most secure browser


Computerworld -

Germany’s cyber security agency today recommended that Windows 7 users run Google’s Chrome browser, citing the application’s sandbox and auto-update features.

In a security best practices guideline, Germany’s Federal Office for Information Security, known by its German initials of BSI, said Chrome was the best browser.

“Your internet browser is the key component for the use of services on the Web and thus represents the main target for cyber-attacks,” said BSI in its published advice. “By using Google Chrome in conjunction with the other measures outlined above, you can significantly reduce the risk of a successful IT attack.”

BSI ticked off Chrome’s anti-exploit sandbox technology, which isolates the browser from the operating system and the rest of the computer; its silent update mechanism and Chrome’s habit of bundling Adobe Flash, as its reasons for the recommendation.

“This [sandbox] protection is implemented most consistently in Chrome…[and] similar mechanisms in other browsers are currently either weaker or non-existent,” explained BSI.

BSI, for “Bundesamt fuer Sicherheit in der Informationstechnik,” has a habit of making software recommendations, particularly about browsers, unlike U.S. agencies. Two years ago, for example, BSI urged Germans to stop using Internet Explorer (IE) until Microsoft patched a vulnerability that had allegedly been used by Chinese hackers to break into networks owned by Google and dozens of other Western companies.

Unlike in the U.S., where Windows 7 users are automatically handed IE as the default browser, Germans are shown a browser ballot screen when they first run Windows. The ballot screen lets users choose which browser they want to set as the default, and if necessary, download and install it.

That selection process stems from a settlement Microsoft reached with European Union antitrust regulators in 2009, two years after Opera Software officially complained that IE’s bundling with Windows and the browser’s default status stifled competition.

Not surprisingly, Google was happy about the recommendation. “We’re particularly honored to see several of [Chrome's] security benefits recognized in the report,” wrote Wieland Holfelder, who heads Google’s engineering efforts in Germany, in a Friday post to Chrome’s official blog.

BSI also recommended Adobe Reader X — the version of the popular PDF reader that, like Chrome, relies on a sandbox to protect users from exploits — and urged citizens to use Windows’ Auto Update feature to keep their PCs abreast of all OS security fixes.

To update applications, BSI gave a nod to Secunia’s Personal Software Inspector (PSI), a free utility that scan a computer for outdated software and point users to appropriate downloads.

Chrome currently accounts for just 14.3% of all browsers used in Germany, according to Irish Web measurement company StatCounter. Mozilla’s Firefox has 51% of the German market, while IE accounts for 24.8%.

While Mozilla is making progress on silent updates for Firefox, the company won’t wrap up the project until June at the earliest. Nor does Firefox include a Chrome-esque sandbox, although developers have been working on separating each tab’s process, something Chrome also offers, to make its browser more resilient to crashes.

Worldwide, Chrome is more popular: StatCounter’s data shows that Chrome’s 28.4% share put it in second place behind IE’s 37.5% but ahead of Firefox’s 24.8%.

The BSI best practice guides for consumers and small businesses can be found on the agency’s website. Both documents are in German.

covers Microsoft, security issues, Apple, Web browsers and general technology breaking news for Computerworld. Follow Gregg on Twitter at Twitter @gkeizer, on Google+ or subscribe to Gregg’s RSS feed Keizer RSS. His e-mail address is gkeizer@computerworld.com.

See .

More: Browser Topic Center

Read more about Browsers in Computerworld’s Browsers Topic Center.

Article source: http://www.computerworld.com/s/article/9223957/German_gov_t_endorses_Chrome_as_most_secure_browser_

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03 Feb 12 German gov't endorses Chrome as most secure browser


Computerworld -

Germany’s cyber security agency today recommended that Windows 7 users run Google’s Chrome browser, citing the application’s sandbox and auto-update features.

In a security best practices guideline, Germany’s Federal Office for Information Security, known by its German initials of BSI, said Chrome was the best browser.

“Your internet browser is the key component for the use of services on the Web and thus represents the main target for cyber-attacks,” said BSI in its published advice. “By using Google Chrome in conjunction with the other measures outlined above, you can significantly reduce the risk of a successful IT attack.”

BSI ticked off Chrome’s anti-exploit sandbox technology, which isolates the browser from the operating system and the rest of the computer; its silent update mechanism and Chrome’s habit of bundling Adobe Flash, as its reasons for the recommendation.

“This [sandbox] protection is implemented most consistently in Chrome…[and] similar mechanisms in other browsers are currently either weaker or non-existent,” explained BSI.

BSI, for “Bundesamt fuer Sicherheit in der Informationstechnik,” has a habit of making software recommendations, particularly about browsers, unlike U.S. agencies. Two years ago, for example, BSI urged Germans to stop using Internet Explorer (IE) until Microsoft patched a vulnerability that had allegedly been used by Chinese hackers to break into networks owned by Google and dozens of other Western companies.

Unlike in the U.S., where Windows 7 users are automatically handed IE as the default browser, Germans are shown a browser ballot screen when they first run Windows. The ballot screen lets users choose which browser they want to set as the default, and if necessary, download and install it.

That selection process stems from a settlement Microsoft reached with European Union antitrust regulators in 2009, two years after Opera Software officially complained that IE’s bundling with Windows and the browser’s default status stifled competition.

Not surprisingly, Google was happy about the recommendation. “We’re particularly honored to see several of [Chrome's] security benefits recognized in the report,” wrote Wieland Holfelder, who heads Google’s engineering efforts in Germany, in a Friday post to Chrome’s official blog.

BSI also recommended Adobe Reader X — the version of the popular PDF reader that, like Chrome, relies on a sandbox to protect users from exploits — and urged citizens to use Windows’ Auto Update feature to keep their PCs abreast of all OS security fixes.

To update applications, BSI gave a nod to Secunia’s Personal Software Inspector (PSI), a free utility that scan a computer for outdated software and point users to appropriate downloads.

Chrome currently accounts for just 14.3% of all browsers used in Germany, according to Irish Web measurement company StatCounter. Mozilla’s Firefox has 51% of the German market, while IE accounts for 24.8%.

While Mozilla is making progress on silent updates for Firefox, the company won’t wrap up the project until June at the earliest. Nor does Firefox include a Chrome-esque sandbox, although developers have been working on separating each tab’s process, something Chrome also offers, to make its browser more resilient to crashes.

Worldwide, Chrome is more popular: StatCounter’s data shows that Chrome’s 28.4% share put it in second place behind IE’s 37.5% but ahead of Firefox’s 24.8%.

The BSI best practice guides for consumers and small businesses can be found on the agency’s website. Both documents are in German.

covers Microsoft, security issues, Apple, Web browsers and general technology breaking news for Computerworld. Follow Gregg on Twitter at Twitter @gkeizer, on Google+ or subscribe to Gregg’s RSS feed Keizer RSS. His e-mail address is gkeizer@computerworld.com.

See .

More: Browser Topic Center

Read more about Browsers in Computerworld’s Browsers Topic Center.

Article source: http://www.computerworld.com/s/article/9223957/German_gov_t_endorses_Chrome_as_most_secure_browser

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