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14 Dec 12 Chrome to better integrate alternative search engines





Google plans to better integrate other search engines in its browser by giving developers access to a new Embedded Search API. On the Chromium blog, Chrome software engineer David Holloway has explained how the development team is currently working on the implementation details that will allow other providers to display a search box on Chrome’s New Tab Page (NTP). Currently, the search engine in Chrome can only be changed for the browser’s “omnibox” (which combines search functionality with the address bar).

Apparently, the developers found that, even with the omnibox preferences changed, many users still navigate to the web sites of the search engines anyway. By allowing search providers to customise the NTP, the developers want “to save people time by helping them search and navigate the web faster”, says Holloway. Google will begin to roll out a number of different implementations of the new feature to “a small set of users” of the Chrome Dev channel on Windows and Chrome OS. They will currently only be offered to users who have their search preference set to Google’s search; those users should “begin seeing variations of the new experience”. An implementation on the Mac version of Chrome is planned to come soon.

The blog post does not specify when the new feature will be available in the Chrome builds for Linux. The developers are soliciting for feedback via the Chromium bug tracker from users who do receive one of the new implementations.

(fab)

Article source: http://www.h-online.com/open/news/item/Chrome-to-better-integrate-alternative-search-engines-1769570.html

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12 Jun 12 Google launches Metro-style Chrome browser for Windows 8 — and it rocks


Google has released its first attempt at making its popular Chrome browser work with Windows 8′s Metro-style design aesthetic, and because the app ignores some of Microsoft’s Metro mandates, it’s actually quite good.

A few months back, we heard that both Google and Mozilla would release a version of their popular Chrome and Firefox browsers targeting Windows 8. Both companies rightly should, considering that if they don’t get on the ball, they could potentially not have their browser tested and ready to go on Windows 8′s release day (whenever that is).

To get access to Metro-style Chrome on Windows 8, you have to subscribe to the Chrome Dev channel for Windows and download the latest version (21.0.1171.0). Once you have Chrome as your default browser and pinned to the Win 8 Start screen, you’re good to go.

I downloaded Metro-style Chrome, and I love that it’s a far cry from Internet Explorer 10, the default browser in Windows 8. Whereas IE10 feels way different from IE9, this version of Chrome ignores some of the Metro design ideas that Microsoft has been pushing. When you right-click or press “Windows key + Z,” there should be an App bar that pops up at the bottom of the screen. Google, being Google, has instead opted to put a more traditional menu bar in the top right corner that you can click for settings and app changes. There’s also standard tabbed browsing that works smoothly.

However, like IE10, Chrome includes Flash Player built into the browser for viewing all kinds of Flash content. But here it differs slightly too, because IE10 uses an approved list of sites and Flash content, where Chrome displays everything.

One of my biggest problems with Windows 8 and Metro apps is how much it’s forcing me to change from my established habits for work and play. But Chrome works great here because it falls between old and new instead of just being NEW.

You can check out more screens of Metro-style Chrome in Windows 8 below:

Google has released a great new version of its Chrome browser that works with Windows 8′s Metro-style interface.

chrome-win-8chrome-win-8-1Screenshot (21)Screenshot (19)Screenshot (16)Screenshot (17)

Article source: http://venturebeat.com/2012/06/11/hands-on-google-chrome-windows-8/

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11 Jun 12 Chrome for Windows 8 Metro Coming Soon, Says Google


Google is getting ready to release a version of Chrome that works in Metro mode in Windows 8 Release Preview.

On Thursday Carlos Pizano, Software Engineer and “Metro Gnome” at Google, said that Chrome for Windows 8 Release Preview will arrive soon.

According to Pizano’s blog entry, Chrome will run in both Metro and desktop environments of Windows 8 on x86. However Chrome will not be released for Windows RT — the version of Windows 8 running on ARM-based chips — because Microsoft is reportedly not allowing browsers other than Internet Explorer on the platform.

“The initial releases of Chrome in Metro mode will include integration with the basic Windows 8 system functionality, such as charms and snap view,” he said. “Over the next few months, we’ll be smoothing out the UI on Metro and improving touch support, so please feel free to file bugs. We’re committed to bringing the speed, simplicity, and security of Chrome into Windows 8, and we look forward to working with you on it.”

Consumers running Windows 8 Release Preview will be able to try the Chrome browser in Metro mode in the next Chrome Dev channel release by setting it as the default browser. Based on a screenshot provided by Pizano, the browser won’t look any different than it does on Windows 7 or other desktop operating systems, keeping with the standard Google design.

Microsoft is following Apple’s lead by denying 3rd-party browsers besides its own stock Internet Explorer on Windows RT tablets with ARM-based processors. The desktop version of Windows 8 won’t have the same restriction although users won’t be able to run more than one browser in Metro mode at any given time.

In addition to Google, Mozilla is also working on a Metro version of Firefox. The company recently published a blog stating that users of Windows RT also deserve a choice of browsers, and called on Microsoft to remain firm on its user choice principles.

“Windows on ARM -as currently designed- restricts user choice, reduces competition and chills innovation,” wrote Mozilla General Council Harvey Anderson. “By allowing only IE to perform the advanced functions of a modern Web browser, third-party browsers are effectively excluded from the platform. This matters for users of today’s tablets and tomorrow’s PCs.”

“Because Windows on ARM relies upon so many traditional Windows assets, including brand, code, footprint, and experience, the decision to exclude other browsers may also have antitrust implications,” Anderson added.

Sounds like a threat, doesn’t it?

Article source: http://www.tomshardware.com/news/Chrome-Metro-Windows-8-Windows-RT-Carlos-Pizano,15962.html

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11 Jun 12 Chrome for Windows 8 Metro Coming Soon, Says Google


Google is getting ready to release a version of Chrome that works in Metro mode in Windows 8 Release Preview.

On Thursday Carlos Pizano, Software Engineer and “Metro Gnome” at Google, said that Chrome for Windows 8 Release Preview will arrive soon.

According to Pizano’s blog entry, Chrome will run in both Metro and desktop environments of Windows 8 on x86. However Chrome will not be released for Windows RT — the version of Windows 8 running on ARM-based chips — because Microsoft is reportedly not allowing browsers other than Internet Explorer on the platform.

“The initial releases of Chrome in Metro mode will include integration with the basic Windows 8 system functionality, such as charms and snap view,” he said. “Over the next few months, we’ll be smoothing out the UI on Metro and improving touch support, so please feel free to file bugs. We’re committed to bringing the speed, simplicity, and security of Chrome into Windows 8, and we look forward to working with you on it.”

Consumers running Windows 8 Release Preview will be able to try the Chrome browser in Metro mode in the next Chrome Dev channel release by setting it as the default browser. Based on a screenshot provided by Pizano, the browser won’t look any different than it does on Windows 7 or other desktop operating systems, keeping with the standard Google design.

Microsoft is following Apple’s lead by denying 3rd-party browsers besides its own stock Internet Explorer on Windows RT tablets with ARM-based processors. The desktop version of Windows 8 won’t have the same restriction although users won’t be able to run more than one browser in Metro mode at any given time.

In addition to Google, Mozilla is also working on a Metro version of Firefox. The company recently published a blog stating that users of Windows RT also deserve a choice of browsers, and called on Microsoft to remain firm on its user choice principles.

“Windows on ARM -as currently designed- restricts user choice, reduces competition and chills innovation,” wrote Mozilla General Council Harvey Anderson. “By allowing only IE to perform the advanced functions of a modern Web browser, third-party browsers are effectively excluded from the platform. This matters for users of today’s tablets and tomorrow’s PCs.”

“Because Windows on ARM relies upon so many traditional Windows assets, including brand, code, footprint, and experience, the decision to exclude other browsers may also have antitrust implications,” Anderson added.

Sounds like a threat, doesn’t it?

Article source: http://www.tomshardware.com/news/Chrome-Metro-Windows-8-Windows-RT-Carlos-Pizano,15962.html

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09 Jun 12 Chrome set to appear on Windows 8 Metro mode


The Chromium team is set to release its first a version of the Chrome browser for the Metro mode of Windows 8, the open-source project announced on Thursday.

Read this

Windows 8 Release Preview: Read the review

Read more

The version will run in both the Metro and desktop environments that come with Windows 8, but it will only run on the traditional x86 flavour of the operating system. As has already been established to some consternation, third-party browsers are locked out of the ‘Windows RT’ version that is designed to run on ARM-based tablets.

The Chromium project is open source, but the code it produces forms the basis for Google’s Chrome browser.

“The initial releases of Chrome in Metro mode will include integration with the basic Windows 8 system functionality, such as charms and snap view,” Google software engineer Carlos Pizano said in a blog post. “Over the next few months, we’ll be smoothing out the UI on Metro and improving touch support, so please feel free to file bugs.”

Those developers wanting to access the early versions of Chrome in Metro mode will need to set it as their default browser in the Chrome Dev channel, which releases new test iterations of the browser once or twice a week.

Microsoft’s decision to ensure the only browser on Windows RT is Internet Explorer has drawn criticism from rival browser-makers such as Mozilla, and European antitrust regulators said last month that they were keeping an eye on the situation.

Microsoft has famously clashed with these regulators before over the issue of browser choice, having been forced in 2009 to stop bundling IE with Windows.

Article source: http://rss.feedsportal.com/c/32424/f/469424/s/202d1c11/l/0L0Szdnet0O0Cblogs0Ccommunication0Ebreakdown0E10A0A0A0A0A30A0Cchrome0Eset0Eto0Eappear0Eon0Ewindows0E80Emetro0Emode0Ebut0Efor0Ex860Eonly0E10A0A263530C0Ds0Icid0F938/story01.htm

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09 Jun 12 Google Chrome Coming to Windows 8 Metro


Google’s Web browser, Chrome, is headed to rival Microsoft’s latest operating system, Windows 8 Metro—sort of. Google began work on a Metro-style enabled desktop browser, a version of Chrome that will run in both the Metro and desktop environments of Windows 8 on x86, back in March. The company didn’t offer a specific release date for Chrome, only noting users will be able to test it out in the next Chrome Dev channel release by setting it as the default browser.

The company also pointed out Chrome won’t run in WinRT (Windows 8 on ARM processors), as Microsoft is not allowing browsers other than Internet Explorer (IE) on the platform. “The initial releases of Chrome in Metro mode will include integration with the basic Windows 8 system functionality, such as charms and snap view,” Google software engineer Carlos Pizano wrote in a blog post. “Over the next few months, we’ll be smoothing out the UI on Metro and improving touch support, so please feel free to file bugs. We’re committed to bringing the speed, simplicity, and security of Chrome into Windows 8, and we look forward to working with you on it.”

Microsoft has a lot riding on the latest version of its Windows 8 Metro operating system, which is expected to launch sometime this fall. The design aesthetic, user interface, currently found on Windows Phone and the latest Xbox dashboard, has profound influence on Windows 8: In place of the “traditional” desktop that defined previous editions of Windows, the newest operating system will open with a Metro start screen of colorful, touchable tiles linked to applications. In theory, this will help port Windows 8 onto tablets and other touch-happy form factors; users will have the ability to download Metro apps to their machine via an online storefront.

Google and Microsoft are locked in an escalating battle for browser market share. Google unseated Microsoft as global usage of the Chrome browser passed that of IE for the first time, according to a May report from StatCounter, an independent Website analytics company. Data from more than 15 billion page views (4 billion from the United States; 850 million from the United Kingdom) for the full month of May shows Chrome took 32.43 percent of the worldwide market, compared with 32.12 percent for IE. Microsoft still holds a comfortable lead in the United States with the IE browser, however, capturing 38.35 percent of the market in May, while Chrome trailed with 23.66 percent.



Article source: http://www.eweek.com/c/a/Search-Engines/Google-Chrome-Coming-to-Windows-8-Metro-535034/

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08 Jun 12 Chrome for Windows 8 Metro Coming Soon


Google announced this week that it will soon release a version of its Chrome browser for Windows 8 Metro mode.

Chrome for Metro will be available in the next Chrome Dev channel release by setting it as your default browser, Carlos Pizano, a Google software engineer and “Metro Gnome,” wrote in a blog post. It will work with the Release Preview of Windows 8, which Microsoft released last week.

Google first announced plans for a Metro-style Chrome browser in March. “Our goal is to be able to offer our users a speedy, simple, secure Chrome experience across all platforms, which includes both the desktop and Metro versions of Windows 8,” Google said at the time.

Pizano said today that the “initial releases of Chrome in Metro mode will include integration with the basic Windows 8 system functionality, such as charms and snap view.” But in the lead-up to the expected late-2012 release of Windows 8, Google will be “smoothing out the UI on Metro and improving touch support, so please feel free to file bugs,” Pizano wrote.

“We’re committed to bringing the speed, simplicity, and security of Chrome into Windows 8, and we look forward to working with you on it,” he concluded.

Google was sure to bring up the fact that the Windows on ARM version of the upcoming Windows 8 OS will not support browsers other than Internet Explorer. “Chrome won’t run in WinRT,” Pizano said simply.

Like the other versions of Windows 8, Windows RT will include two environments: the classic Windows interface and the more Windows Phone-esque Metro style option. Last month, however, Mozilla complained publicly that “Windows on ARM prohibits any browser except for Internet Explorer from running in the privileged ‘Windows Classic’ environment.” Google soon chimed in that it shared Mozilla’s concerns.

Microsoft has not commented on the controversy, but the Senate Judiciary Committee said it is examining whether Windows RT runs afoul of any antitrust regulations.

For more, see Who’s Ready for Microsoft’s Windows RT? Also check out PCMag’s Hands On With Windows 8 Release Preview and the slideshow below.

For more from Chloe, follow her on Twitter @ChloeAlbanesius.


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Windows 8 Multi-Monitor


Windows 8 Lock Screen


Charms and Status


Sports App


For the top stories in tech, follow us on Twitter at @PCMag.

Article source: http://www.pcmag.com/article2/0,2817,2405532,00.asp

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08 Jun 12 Google touts pending debut of Chrome on Windows 8 Metro


Google on Thursday announced it would soon release a preview of its Chrome browser capable of running in the Windows 8 Metro environment.

Chrome will be the first non-Microsoft browser to appear in Metro.

The company did not set a release date for the preview, saying in a post to the Chromium blog only that it would appear in “the next Chrome Dev channel release.”

Google operates multiple “channels,” or versions of Chrome, with escalating levels of stability and reliability. The least stable and earliest public build is dubbed “Dev;” others include “Beta” and “Stable.” The last is Google’s equivalent for a final, production-grade version.

When questioned later on Thursday, a Google spokeswoman declined to offer a specific date, saying, “It’s hard to provide precise timing.”

The Dev channel of Chrome is now on version 21, which it first reached May 21. But because Google updates each version on the Dev line multiple times — nine for Chrome 20 between April 10 and May 17, for instance — the Metro-ized Chrome could easily appear within the next week.

The browser will run in both Windows 8′s traditional x86/64 “desktop” mode — which sports a user interface (UI) very similar to Windows 7′s — and in the tablet- and touch-centric “Metro” mode, where programs are called “apps” and run in a full-screen, or at best, split view.

Under Microsoft’s rules, a browser must be selected by the user as the operating system’s default browser to run in Metro.

Carlos Pizano, who listed his title as “software engineer and Metro gnome,” warned that the first Metro version of Chrome is unfinished.

“The initial releases of Chrome in Metro mode will include integration with the basic Windows 8 system functionality, such as charms and snap view,” wrote Pizano. “Over the next few months, we’ll be smoothing out the UI on Metro and improving touch support.”

He did not give an estimate on when Google would add the Metro browser to the beta or stable builds.

Google first acknowledged that it was working on a Windows 8-specific version of Chrome in mid-March, about a month after rival Mozilla said the same about its Firefox browser. But while Mozilla has provided several updates on its Metro progress, until now, Google has been silent on the subject.

Microsoft has allowed other browser makers to access the desktop’s Win32 APIs (application programming interfaces) from within Metro, in effect leveling the playing field on Windows 8.

  • Microsoft tips how Windows 8 store will promote desktop apps
  • Google touts pending debut of Chrome on Windows 8 Metro
  • Intel, ARM trade barbs over Windows 8, RT
  • Asus tablet prompts speculation on competitors’ offers
  • Microsoft assimilates Flash in Metro’s IE10
  • Windows 8′s built-in AV to be security of last resort
  • Windows 8 Release Preview: Updated but still uneasy
  • Update: Microsoft confirms $15 Windows 8 upgrade
  • FAQ: Get going with Windows 8 Release Preview
  • Microsoft launches Windows 8 Release Preview

Continuing coverage: Windows 8

Article source: http://www.computerworld.com/s/article/9227895/Google_touts_pending_debut_of_Chrome_on_Windows_8_Metro

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