msgbartop
All about Google Chrome & Google Chrome OS
msgbarbottom

12 Apr 12 Device syncing on-deck for Chrome


Chrome now offers Other Devices for tab syncing.

(Credit:
Google)

Google has started to warm up Chrome with features designed to make it interact more smoothly with
Android and other computers, as the summer’s Google I/O conference and a possible final street-ready version of Native Client wait in the wings.

Google Chrome 19 beta for Windows, Mac, Linux, and Chrome Frame landed today, updated with Other Device support. The new feature lets you access your Chrome tabs from other computers, and includes Chrome for Android if you’ve got an Ice Cream Sandwich device. The Other Devices option is available at the bottom of the New Tab page, next to the Recently Closed drop-down menu. Along with syncing open tabs, it also syncs that particular tab’s history, so you can navigate forward and back when you open it on a new device.

Today also saw the arrival of the developer’s build of Chrome 20 (download for Windows, Mac, Linux), which had given people access to Other Device support previously but now comes with a Chrome to Mobile option that lets you send a page directly to Chrome for Android. You still have enable the option in about:flags, but it does give you the ability to send a URL directly to Chrome for Android. It’s basically Google’s in-house version of Chrome to Phone.

Google has made available the full revision logs for Chrome 19 beta and Chrome 20 dev. As of yet, there’s been no official Native Client progress update . That’s likely to change as work progresses on Chrome 19 and Chrome 20.

Article source: http://news.cnet.com/8301-1001_3-57412763-92/device-syncing-on-deck-for-chrome/

Tags: , , , , ,

12 Apr 12 Device syncing on-deck for Chrome


Chrome now offers Other Devices for tab syncing.

(Credit:
Google)

Google has started to warm up Chrome with features designed to make it interact more smoothly with
Android and other computers, as the summer’s Google I/O conference and a possible final street-ready version of Native Client wait in the wings.

Google Chrome 19 beta for Windows, Mac, Linux, and Chrome Frame landed today, updated with Other Device support. The new feature lets you access your Chrome tabs from other computers, and includes Chrome for Android if you’ve got an Ice Cream Sandwich device. The Other Devices option is available at the bottom of the New Tab page, next to the Recently Closed drop-down menu. Along with syncing open tabs, it also syncs that particular tab’s history, so you can navigate forward and back when you open it on a new device.

Today also saw the arrival of the developer’s build of Chrome 20 (download for Windows, Mac, Linux), which had given people access to Other Device support previously but now comes with a Chrome to Mobile option that lets you send a page directly to Chrome for Android. You still have enable the option in about:flags, but it does give you the ability to send a URL directly to Chrome for Android. It’s basically Google’s in-house version of Chrome to Phone.

Google has made available the full revision logs for Chrome 19 beta and Chrome 20 dev. As of yet, there’s been no official Native Client progress update . That’s likely to change as work progresses on Chrome 19 and Chrome 20.

Article source: http://download.cnet.com/8301-2007_4-57412763-12/device-syncing-on-deck-for-chrome/?part=rss&subj=software&tag=title

Tags: , , , , ,

29 Mar 12 Faster graphics for older PCs in Chrome 18


(Credit:
Google)

Google Chrome 18 brings two methods of improved graphics support to both newer and older computers. Released today, Google Chrome 18 stable for Windows (download), Mac (download), Linux (download), and Chrome Frame improves both WebGL and Canvas2D.

To help along WebGL in Chrome on older Windows and
Mac computers, it now gets a boost from a software rasterizer called SwiftShader, licensed from TransGaming. SwiftShader only works when Chrome’s baked-in graphics processor acceleration doesn’t run, and in the blog post announcing the update, Google said that it sought out this third-party solution so that “more users will have access to basic 3D content on the web.”

The Canvas2D changes will allow the same older PCs to process game and animation graphics faster. When Google originally debuted the improved Canvas2D in Chrome beta, the company noted that the multitude of older hardware configurations caused significant delays in implementing the improvements. The feature doesn’t yet work for Linux.

In the offing for Chrome 19, due around six weeks from today, and Chrome 20, due just before June’s Google I/O conference, are full implementation of Google’s Native Client (NaCl) tech. Already partially available in the Chrome 19 developer’s version, NaCl and its API set known as Pepper will allow, the company says, gaming support in the browser that will come close to console-quality graphics.

Chrome 18 also updates the Adobe Flash plug-in to its latest version, and makes numerous security and bug fixes. There were no “critical” security fixes, but there were a few “high”-level fixes, out of nine security fixes reported.

You can read the Chrome 18 changelog here.

Article source: http://download.cnet.com/8301-2007_4-57405953-12/faster-graphics-for-older-pcs-in-chrome-18/

Tags: , , ,

29 Mar 12 Faster graphics for older PCs in Chrome 18


(Credit:
Google)

Google Chrome 18 brings two methods of improved graphics support to both newer and older computers. Released today, Google Chrome 18 stable for Windows (download), Mac (download), Linux (download), and Chrome Frame improves both WebGL and Canvas2D.

To help along WebGL in Chrome on older Windows and
Mac computers, it now gets a boost from a software rasterizer called SwiftShader, licensed from TransGaming. SwiftShader only works when Chrome’s baked-in graphics processor acceleration doesn’t run, and in the blog post announcing the update, Google said that it sought out this third-party solution so that “more users will have access to basic 3D content on the web.”

The Canvas2D changes will allow the same older PCs to process game and animation graphics faster. When Google originally debuted the improved Canvas2D in Chrome beta, the company noted that the multitude of older hardware configurations caused significant delays in implementing the improvements. The feature doesn’t yet work for Linux.

In the offing for Chrome 19, due around six weeks from today, and Chrome 20, due just before June’s Google I/O conference, are full implementation of Google’s Native Client (NaCl) tech. Already partially available in the Chrome 19 developer’s version, NaCl and its API set known as Pepper will allow, the company says, gaming support in the browser that will come close to console-quality graphics.

Chrome 18 also updates the Adobe Flash plug-in to its latest version, and makes numerous security and bug fixes. There were no “critical” security fixes, but there were a few “high”-level fixes, out of nine security fixes reported.

You can read the Chrome 18 changelog here.

Article source: http://download.cnet.com/8301-2007_4-57405953-12/faster-graphics-for-older-pcs-in-chrome-18/?part=rss&subj=software&tag=title

Tags: , , ,

11 Feb 12 More hardware acceleration in Chrome beta, dev gets cutting-edge JavaScript


Google Chrome logo

The newly-minted Chrome 18 beta expands the scope of hardware acceleration in the browser to older computers, but it’s still not available to all. Meanwhile, Chrome 19 dev goes bleeding edge with JavaScript.

Released today, Google Chrome 18 beta for Windows, Mac, and Chrome Frame improves 2D Canvas support and introduces a software rasterizer. The new features are not yet available on Chrome 18 beta for Linux.

Basically, this means that games and animations based in the HTML5 Canvas tag ought to run faster and appear smoother. Google noted in its blog post announcing the changes that this was hard for them to implement because of the “numerous hardware and operating system configurations” that people use.

It’s complicated enough that to display 3D content on older computers or those running Windows XP, Google went out and licensed a software rasterizer called SwiftShader from TransGaming. SwiftShader only kicks on when Chrome’s built-in GPU acceleration doesn’t activate.

Adventurous types can see precisely what’s being accelerated by typing chrome://gpu into the location bar, or can force SwiftShader on by adding the–blacklist-accelerated-compositing and–blacklist-webgl flags to the browser’s command line.

Also updated today, the developer’s build of Chrome 19 (download for Windows, Mac, Linux) begins to support the latest version of JavaScript.

Code-named “Harmony” and not due until the end of 2013, Google has nevertheless decided to begin to support some of its components. These include Lexical scoping, weak maps, collections, and proxies.

Harmony support will not work by default; you must enable it by first going to chrome://flags in the location bar and activate “Experimental JavaScript features”. And of course, this is more for developers than for practical application. As few of the Harmony standards have been fully baked, not many sites will have implemented them yet. This continues to push Chrome’s reputation as an early adopter of many technical browser advantages, its lack of Do Not Track support notwithstanding.

Article source: http://download.cnet.com/8301-2007_4-57375098-12/more-hardware-acceleration-in-chrome-beta-dev-gets-cutting-edge-javascript/?part=rss&subj=latest-news&tag=title

Tags: , ,

11 Feb 12 More hardware acceleration in Chrome beta, dev gets latest JS


Google Chrome logo

The newly-minted Chrome 18 beta expands the scope of hardware acceleration in the browser to older computers, but it’s still not available to all. Meanwhile, Chrome 19 dev goes bleeding edge with JavaScript.

Released today, Google Chrome 18 beta for Windows, Mac, and Chrome Frame improves 2D Canvas support and introduces a software rasterizer. The new features are not yet available on Chrome 18 beta for Linux.

Basically, this means that games and animations based in the HTML5 Canvas tag ought to run faster and appear smoother. Google noted in its blog post announcing the changes that this was hard for them to implement because of the “numerous hardware and operating system configurations” that people use.

It’s complicated enough that to display 3D content on older computers or those running Windows XP, Google went out and licensed a software rasterizer called SwiftShader from TransGaming. SwiftShader only kicks on when Chrome’s built-in GPU acceleration doesn’t activate.

Adventurous types can see precisely what’s being accelerated by typing chrome://gpu into the location bar, or can force SwiftShader on by adding the–blacklist-accelerated-compositing and–blacklist-webgl flags to the browser’s command line.

Also updated today, the developer’s build of Chrome 19 (download for Windows, Mac, Linux) begins to support the latest version of JavaScript.

Code-named “Harmony” and not due until the end of 2013, Google has nevertheless decided to begin to support some of its components. These include Lexical scoping, weak maps, collections, and proxies.

Harmony support will not work by default; you must enable it by first going to chrome://flags in the location bar and activate “Experimental JavaScript features”. And of course, this is more for developers than for practical application. As few of the Harmony standards have been fully baked, not many sites will have implemented them yet. This continues to push Chrome’s reputation as an early adopter of many technical browser advantages, its lack of Do Not Track support notwithstanding.

Article source: http://download.cnet.com/8301-2007_4-57375098-12/more-hardware-acceleration-in-chrome-beta-dev-gets-latest-js/?part=rss&subj=software&tag=title

Tags: , , ,

11 Feb 12 More hardware acceleration in Chrome beta, dev gets latest JS


Google Chrome logo

The newly-minted Chrome 18 beta expands the scope of hardware acceleration in the browser to older computers, but it’s still not available to all. Meanwhile, Chrome 19 dev goes bleeding edge with JavaScript.

Released today, Google Chrome 18 beta for Windows, Mac, and Chrome Frame improves 2D Canvas support and introduces a software rasterizer. The new features are not yet available on Chrome 18 beta for Linux.

Basically, this means that games and animations based in the HTML5 Canvas tag ought to run faster and appear smoother. Google noted in its blog post announcing the changes that this was hard for them to implement because of the “numerous hardware and operating system configurations” that people use.

It’s complicated enough that to display 3D content on older computers or those running Windows XP, Google went out and licensed a software rasterizer called SwiftShader from TransGaming. SwiftShader only kicks on when Chrome’s built-in GPU acceleration doesn’t activate.

Adventurous types can see precisely what’s being accelerated by typing chrome://gpu into the location bar, or can force SwiftShader on by adding the–blacklist-accelerated-compositing and–blacklist-webgl flags to the browser’s command line.

Also updated today, the developer’s build of Chrome 19 (download for Windows, Mac, Linux) begins to support the latest version of JavaScript.

Code-named “Harmony” and not due until the end of 2013, Google has nevertheless decided to begin to support some of its components. These include Lexical scoping, weak maps, collections, and proxies.

Harmony support will not work by default; you must enable it by first going to chrome://flags in the location bar and activate “Experimental JavaScript features”. And of course, this is more for developers than for practical application. As few of the Harmony standards have been fully baked, not many sites will have implemented them yet. This continues to push Chrome’s reputation as an early adopter of many technical browser advantages, its lack of Do Not Track support notwithstanding.

Article source: http://download.cnet.com/8301-2007_4-57375098-12/more-hardware-acceleration-in-chrome-beta-dev-gets-cutting-edge-javascript/

Tags: , , ,

09 Feb 12 Chrome 17 nudges speed, download safety


Chrome 17 expands malware detection to some downloads.

(Credit:
Google)

Safer downloads and a cautious expansion of site pre-caching land in Chrome 17 today, continuing Google’s two-tiered approach to browser speed and user safety.

Google Chrome 17 stable for Windows (download), Mac (download), Linux (download), and Chrome Frame includes a number of new extension APIs and security fixes.

As revealed in the Chrome 17 beta version, Chrome’s safe browsing technology will now scan downloads as well as Web sites. It looks for known malware files, and it analyzes installation files starting with Windows-based EXE and MSI. Google hasn’t clarified if the scan will later include other Windows-based file types or installers from
Mac and Linux operating systems. If a file is suspected of being malicious, meaning that it doesn’t match a whitelist, Chrome will check it against Google’s search index to see if the site you’re downloading it from hosts a high number of known malicious downloads. If it determines the download to be unsafe, Chrome will barf up a red warning page.

The feature is important for blocking the threat of ransomware “fake antivirus” programs, among other things.

Speed has always been a focus of Chrome’s developers, and in version 17 the browser extends the site pre-caching feature to the location bar Omnibox. If you have pre-caching activated in Settings, it will pre-load the first site that autocompletes its URL to a site you’re likely to visit. If you choose that site, it will appear to load instantaneously.

Google did not specify what the new extension APIs were, although I recall at least one being related to privacy controls in extensions. Its SVN browser revision log was not working at the time of writing. There were, however, numerous security fixes revealed for Chrome 17. These included one marked Critical, which fixed a race condition after the crash of a utility process; and eight marked High, which fixed problems including use-after-free problems and buffer overflow issues. Click through to read the changelog for Chrome 17 stable.

Article source: http://download.cnet.com/8301-2007_4-57373517-12/chrome-17-nudges-speed-download-safety/?part=rss&subj=latest-news&tag=title

Tags: , , ,

09 Feb 12 Chrome 17 tweaks speed, download security


Chrome 17 expands malware detection to some downloads.

(Credit:
Google)

Safer downloads and a cautious expansion of site pre-caching land in Chrome 17 today, continuing Google’s two-tiered approach to browser speed and user safety.

Google Chrome 17 stable for Windows (download), Mac (download), Linux (download), and Chrome Frame includes a number of new extension APIs and security fixes.

As revealed in the Chrome 17 beta version, Chrome’s safe browsing technology will now scan downloads as well as Web sites. It looks for known malware files, and it analyzes installation files starting with Windows-based EXE and MSI. Google hasn’t clarified if the scan will later include other Windows-based file types or installers from
Mac and Linux operating systems. If a file is suspected of being malicious, meaning that it doesn’t match a whitelist, Chrome will check it against Google’s search index to see if the site you’re downloading it from hosts a high number of known malicious downloads. If it determines the download to be unsafe, Chrome will barf up a red warning page.

The feature is important for blocking the threat of ransomware “fake antivirus” programs, among other things.

Speed has always been a focus of Chrome’s developers, and in version 17 the browser extends the site pre-caching feature to the location bar Omnibox. If you have pre-caching activated in Settings, it will pre-load the first site that autocompletes its URL to a site you’re likely to visit. If you choose that site, it will appear to load instantaneously.

Google did not specify what the new extension APIs were, although I recall at least one being related to privacy controls in extensions. Its SVN browser revision log was not working at the time of writing. There were, however, numerous security fixes revealed for Chrome 17. These included one marked Critical, which fixed a race condition after the crash of a utility process; and eight marked High, which fixed problems including use-after-free problems and buffer overflow issues. Click through to read the changelog for Chrome 17 stable.

Article source: http://download.cnet.com/8301-2007_4-57373517-12/chrome-17-tweaks-speed-download-security/?part=rss&subj=software&tag=title

Tags: , , ,

03 Feb 12 Google Chrome 18.0.1025.3


Google Chrome is a browser that combines a minimal design with sophisticated technology to make the web faster, safer, and easier.

One box for everything
Type in the address bar and get suggestions for both search and web pages.

Thumbnails of your top sites
Access your favorite pages instantly with lightning speed from any new tab.

Incognito mode
Don’t want pages you visit to show up in your web history? Choose incognito mode for private browsing.

Safe browsing
Google Chrome warns you if you’re about to visit a suspected phishing, malware or otherwise unsafe website.

Changelog:

The Dev channel has been updated to 18.0.1025.3 for Windows, Mac, Linux and Chrome Frame.  This build contains the following updates:

All

  • Fixed URL handling of settings page. [Issue: 111900]
  • Fixed crash when unpacking extension. [Issue: 112301]
  • Fixed the case where the utility process crashes after all plugins have been loaded. [Issue: 111935]

Notes:

- Those already running dev channel will be automatically updated.

Full details about what changes are in this build are available in the SVN revision log. Interested in switching release channels? Find out how.

Download: Google Chrome 18.0.1025.3 (Dev Channel, Choose language) | ~24 MB (Freeware)
View: Google Chrome Release Blog

Article source: http://www.neowin.net/news/google-chrome-18010253

Tags: , , ,