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21 Nov 11 How to control a Mac from your PC using Chrome Remote Desktop


Need to connect to and control a Mac from your PC? One quick and easy solution can be found in Google’s Chrome Remote Desktop feature.

Chrome Remote Desktop is a handy way to control a Mac from your PC.
(Credit: Screenshot by Lance Whitney/CNET)

Released as a beta early last month, the Chrome Remote Desktop extension lets you connect to one computer from another directly through the browser. From there, you can control the other computer using your mouse and keyboard.

Of course, remote desktop software is nothing new. Microsoft includes its Remote Desktop Connection in Windows. It also offers a Mac version of the software, but it only lets you connect to a PC from your Mac — not the other way around. There are certain options for going from PC to Mac, such as setting up a VNC (virtual network computing) connection on your Mac, and then running a VNC client on your PC.

But Chrome Remote Desktop can connect you, no matter what computers reside on both ends. And, as such, it’s an effective way to control a Mac from your PC without having to configure a variety of settings and download other software.

You can set up such a connection by going through the following steps:

  1. Install Google Chrome on both your PC and Mac if it’s not already installed.
  2. Download the Chrome Remote Desktop extension from its page at the Chrome web store, and install it on both computers.
  3. After installation, launch Chrome on your Mac and click on the + button at the top to open a new tab; you should see a page displaying any software and extensions that have been installed in Chrome — click on the one for Chrome Remote Desktop. The first time you do this, you’ll receive a message asking for authorisation; click on the Continue button.
  4. The next screen will ask for the necessary permissions for the extension to run; click on the Allow Access button.
  5. The next screen will prompt you to share the computer; click on the Share This Computer button.
  6. You’ll then receive an access code that must be entered on your PC in order to control your Mac; write it down.
  7. Launch Chrome on your PC. Click on the new Tab button, and click on the icon for the Chrome Remote Desktop; again, the first time you run the extension, you’ll need to grant permission for the extension to run.
  8. At the Chrome Remote Desktop Beta Connect screen, click on the link to access a shared computer.
  9. Type in the access code generated on the Mac, and then click the Connect button.
  10. You should now see your Mac displayed in the Chrome browser on your PC. As with any remote desktop application, you can use your mouse and keyboard to move around, open applications, access features, create documents and do virtually anything else you want. You can also minimise Chrome on the Mac, but don’t close it, otherwise the connection will be lost.
  11. Once you’re finished, you simply click on the button that says Disconnect.

The initial process seems lengthy, because you have to grant permission on both sides, but the process runs quicker once you get past that first hurdle.

Chrome Remote Desktop can connect any two computers over the internet, not just on the same network. So, for example, you can use this to remotely connect to the computer of a friend or family member to help troubleshoot a problem. Of course, since it does run over the public internet, there are always security concerns. People who may not want this accessible all the time can uninstall the extension and reinstall it when needed, but, of course, then you have to repeat the initial process each time.

Overall, Chrome Remote Desktop works smoothly. It doesn’t offer some of the bells and whistles and advanced options found in other remote control programs, but it’s a quick and simple solution for PC and Mac users, and one we often rely on when we want to control a Mac Mini without leaving the PC.

Via CNET

Article source: http://www.cnet.com.au/how-to-control-a-mac-from-your-pc-using-chrome-remote-desktop-339326553.htm

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18 Nov 11 How to control a Mac from your PC using Chrome Remote Desktop


Chrome Remote Desktop is a handy way to control a Mac from your PC.

Chrome Remote Desktop is a handy way to control a Mac from your PC.

(Credit:
Screenshot by Lance Whitney/CNET)

Need to connect to and control a
Mac from your PC? One quick and easy solution can be found in Google’s Chrome Remote Desktop feature.

Released as a beta early last month, the Chrome Remote Desktop extension lets you connect to one computer from another directly through the browser. From there, you can control the other computer using your mouse and keyboard.

Of course, remote desktop software is nothing new. Microsoft includes its Remote Desktop Connection in Windows. It also offers a Mac version of the software, but that one only lets you connect to a PC from your Mac, not the other way around. There are certain options for going from PC to Mac, such as setting up a VNC (virtual network computing) connection in your Mac and then running a VNC client on your PC.

But Chrome Remote Desktop can connect you no matter which computers reside on both ends. And as such, it’s an effective way to control a Mac from your PC without having to configure a variety of settings and download other software.

You can set up such a connection by going through the following steps:

  1. First install Google Chrome on both your PC and Mac if it’s not already installed.
  2. Next download the Chrome Remote Desktop extension from its page at the Chrome Web store and install it on both computers.
  3. After installation, launch Chrome on your Mac and click on the + button at the top to open a new tab. You should see a page displaying any software and extensions that have been installed in Chrome. Click on the one for Chrome Remote Desktop. The first time you do this, you’ll receive a message asking for authorization. Click on the Continue button.
  4. The next screen will ask for the necessary permissions for the extension to run. Click on the Allow Access button.
  5. The next screen will prompt you to share the computer. Click on the Share this Computer button.
  6. You’ll then receive an access code that must be entered on your PC in order to control your Mac. Write down that code.
  7. Next launch Chrome on your PC. Click on the new Tab button and click on the icon for the Chrome Remote Desktop. Again, the first time you run the extension, you’ll need to grant permission for the extension to run.
  8. At the Chrome Remote Desktop BETA Connect screen, click on the link to access a shared computer.
  9. Type in the access code generated on the Mac and then click the Connect button.
  10. You should now see your Mac displayed in the Chrome browser on your PC. As with any remote desktop application, you can use your mouse and keyboard to move around, open applications, access features, create documents, and do virtually anything else you want. You can also minimize Chrome on the Mac but don’t close it otherwise the connection will be lost.
  11. Once you’re finished, you simply click on the button that says Disconnect.

The initial process seems lengthy because you have to grant permission on both sides. But the process runs quicker once you get past that first hurdle.

Chrome Remote Desktop can connect any two computers over the Internet, not just on the same network. So, for example, you can use this to remotely connect to the computer of a friend or family member to help troubleshoot a problem. Of course, since it does run over the public Internet, there are always security concerns. People who may not want this accessible all the time can uninstall the extension and reinstall it when needed, but of course then you have to repeat the initial process each time.

Overall, Chrome Remote Desktop works smoothly. It doesn’t offer some of the bells and whistles and advanced options found in other remote control programs. But it’s a quick and simple solution for PC and Mac users and one I often rely on when I want to control my Mac Mini without leaving my PC.

Article source: http://news.cnet.com/8301-1023_3-57326848-93/how-to-control-a-mac-from-your-pc-using-chrome-remote-desktop/

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17 Nov 11 How to control a Mac from your PC using Chrome Remote Desktop


Chrome Remote Desktop is a handy way to control a Mac from your PC.

Chrome Remote Desktop is a handy way to control a Mac from your PC.

(Credit:
Screenshot by Lance Whitney/CNET)

Need to connect to and control a
Mac from your PC? One quick and easy solution can be found in Google’s Chrome Remote Desktop feature.

Released as a beta early last month, the Chrome Remote Desktop extension lets you connect to one computer from another directly through the browser. From there, you can control the other computer using your mouse and keyboard.

Of course, remote desktop software is nothing new. Microsoft includes its Remote Desktop Connection in Windows. It also offers a Mac version of the software, but that one only lets you connect to a PC from your Mac, not the other way around. There are certain options for going from PC to Mac, such as setting up a VNC (virtual network computing) connection in your Mac and then running a VNC client on your PC.

But Chrome Remote Desktop can connect you no matter which computers reside on both ends. And as such, it’s an effective way to control a Mac from your PC without having to configure a variety of settings and download other software.

You can set up such a connection by going through the following steps:

  1. First install Google Chrome on both your PC and Mac if it’s not already installed.
  2. Next download the Chrome Remote Desktop extension from its page at the Chrome Web store and install it on both computers.
  3. After installation, launch Chrome on your Mac and click on the + button at the top to open a new tab. You should see a page displaying any software and extensions that have been installed in Chrome. Click on the one for Chrome Remote Desktop. The first time you do this, you’ll receive a message asking for authorization. Click on the Continue button.
  4. The next screen will ask for the necessary permissions for the extension to run. Click on the Allow Access button.
  5. The next screen will prompt you to share the computer. Click on the Share this Computer button.
  6. You’ll then receive an access code that must be entered on your PC in order to control your Mac. Write down that code.
  7. Next launch Chrome on your PC. Click on the new Tab button and click on the icon for the Chrome Remote Desktop. Again, the first time you run the extension, you’ll need to grant permission for the extension to run.
  8. At the Chrome Remote Desktop BETA Connect screen, click on the link to access a shared computer.
  9. Type in the access code generated on the Mac and then click the Connect button.
  10. You should now see your Mac displayed in the Chrome browser on your PC. As with any remote desktop application, you can use your mouse and keyboard to move around, open applications, access features, create documents, and do virtually anything else you want. You can also minimize Chrome on the Mac but don’t close it otherwise the connection will be lost.
  11. Once you’re finished, you simply click on the button that says Disconnect.

The initial process seems lengthy because you have to grant permission on both sides. But the process runs quicker once you get past that first hurdle.

Chrome Remote Desktop can connect any two computers over the Internet, not just on the same network. So, for example, you can use this to remotely connect to the computer of a friend or family member to help troubleshoot a problem. Of course, since it does run over the public Internet, there are always security concerns. People who may not want this accessible all the time can uninstall the extension and reinstall it when needed, but of course then you have to repeat the initial process each time.

Overall, Chrome Remote Desktop works smoothly. It doesn’t offer some of the bells and whistles and advanced options found in other remote control programs. But it’s a quick and simple solution for PC and Mac users and one I often rely on when I want to control my Mac Mini without leaving my PC.

Article source: http://news.cnet.com/8301-1023_3-57326848-93/how-to-control-a-mac-from-your-pc-using-chrome-remote-desktop/?part=rss&subj=software&tag=title

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16 Oct 11 Week in IT: Dart, VPNs, and Chrome Remote Desktop


Dear Meg Whitman… Some unsolicited advice on HP’s PC future: HP can still make PCs that make an engineer’s pulse quicken. The question is whether they have the soul left to do it—or more properly, whether the board of HP still has a pulse.

JavaScript has problems. Do we need Dart to solve them?: JavaScript, the linchpin of scripted websites, is not a perfect programming language. Google prefers its own language, Dart. What’s so wrong with JavaScript, and is Google really on the right track?

Die, VPN! We’re all “telecommuters” now—and IT must adjust: Thanks to ubiquitous broadband and high-quality smartphones and laptops, even office workers who don’t “telecommute” have become “telecommuters.” IT departments must embrace working outside the office walls—and they can start by killing most VPNs.

Google aims Dart at “the Visual Basic of the Web”: Google has released a preliminary version of Dart, a new programming language intended to take some of the pain out of developing large applications based on JavaScript for browsers, devices, and servers.

Dennis Ritchie: the giant whose shoulders we stand on: Dennis Ritchie, who died this week at the age of 70, created the C programming language—and with it, open systems and the world of modern computing.

Hands-on: Chrome Remote Desktop Beta free and easy to use, no speed demon: Google has unveiled a remote desktop service allowing connections between any two systems running the Chrome browser, regardless of operating system. As usual with Google, there’s a big emphasis on the “beta” tag in the Chrome Remote Desktop BETA, but it works pretty well for an early version of a product.

Skype’s future under Microsoft: integration everywhere?: Microsoft’s $8.5 billion acquisition of Skype is likely to be finalized soon, but no one knows quite how the two companies will integrate. Here are some ideas.

Ubuntu will power HP’s new cloud service : HP’s cloud service, launched recently in a private beta, will use Ubuntu as the primary host and guest operating system.

Bulldozer design compromises offer mixed bag for desktop use: AMD’s latest desktop hardware, dubbed the FX series, throws tons of hardware at the problem of keeping up with Intel. Unfortunately, its strengths are highly workload dependent, and power consumption is much higher than the competition.

Researchers hack crypto on RFID smart cards used for keyless entry and transit pass: While the manufacturer is working to move customers to new technology, there are over 3 billion Mifare DESfire cards in circulation. And some of them may still be in use at government agencies for access to sensitive facilities and data.

Article source: http://arstechnica.com/business/news/2011/10/week-in-it-dart-vpns-and-chrome-remote-desktop.ars

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14 Oct 11 Chrome Remote Desktop Extension Stretches Chrome OS Horizons


Chrome Remote Desktop Extension Stretches Chrome OS Horizons

by Sam Dean – Oct. 13, 2011Comments (0)

If you’re using a Chromebook and depending on Google’s Chrome OS as your operating system, it’s well worth taking note of the new Chrome Remote Desktop (beta) extension. It works like standard remote control software always has but has lots of positive implications for Chrome OS, given that Chrome OS works on a cloud-centric basis and eschews many local computing practices. Using it, you can share with or get access to another comupter by providing a one-time authentication code.

The most important thing to note about this extension is that you can use it to remotely connect any two computers that are running the Chrome browser, whether the systems are running Windows, Linux, Mac OS, or Chrome OS. Given that Chrome OS doesn’t work with local files and applications as other operating systems do, that can mean a Chrome OS user has potential access to lots of locally stored data on any remote system. For a lot of users, this will extend the flexibility of Chrome OS.

Of course, some business implementing IT strategies based on Chromebooks, because they are inexpensive and emphasize security, will also be interested in the Chrome Remote Desktop extension. It can not only allow easy remote sessions in support scenarios, but IT administrators can use it to take over employees’ systems and solve problems themselves.

You can read much more about this extension here, and it will likely take on new functionality over time. 

 

  • operating systems
  • Chrome
  • Chrome OS
  • Remote Control

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Article source: http://ostatic.com/blog/chrome-remote-desktop-extension-stretches-chrome-os-horizons

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13 Oct 11 Google Chrome Remote Desktop Extension Goes Live


Google (NASDAQ:GOOG) has launched a remote desktop
software extension that will let users access another computer through the
company’s Chrome Web browser from afar.

Available for free download from
Google’s Chrome Web Store, Chrome Remote Desktop Beta enables users access
another computer (or share their own computer with others) using a single
authentication code. The tool, demonstrated by Google operating system, is designed so that access is given
only to the specific person the user identifies for one time only.

“The helpdesk can use the Chrome Remote Desktop BETA
to help another user, while conversely a user can receive help by setting up a
sharing session without leaving their desk,” Google explained in its
release notes.

Google said one practical use for Remote Desktop is the
classic remote IT help desk scenario, where an employee having computer trouble
can file a help ticket and have his or her computer accessed, inspected and
fixed remotely by an IT administrator.

Think of the tool as a Web-based,
lightweight take on software from Dell Kace, CA (NYSE:CA), LogMeIn
(NASDAQ:LOGM), BMC Software (NYSE:BMC) and other vendors.

The search engine provider isn’t storming the castle
walls built by those remote desktop application providers just yet. The company
said its goal with Chrome Remote Desktop BETA — beta is officially part of the
extension name for a reason — is to show off its Chrome Remoting software and
get feedback from users.

Chrome Remote Desktop will enable users to connect any
two computers that have a Chrome browser. That includes Windows, Linux, Mac and
Chromebooks.  The company said it will
eventually allow users access their own computer remotely soon.

EWEEK expects Chrome Remote Desktop will ultimately serve
as one component in a management software suite intended for Chromebooks, which
are low-cost notebooks based on Google’s Chrome Operating system.

These
machines are equipped with minimal Flash storage and let consumers and
businesses download and consume Web applications.

Businesses rent Chromebooks for $28 per user, per month for three years,
enjoying support and hardware upgrades as needed. Schools are eligible
for the same deal but for $20 per user, per month. 

As workplace adoption for these computers grows, it will make sense for Google to add remote computer
management capabilities for its Chromebook for education and business user to
keep IT management costs down.

 

 

 


Article source: http://www.eweek.com/c/a/IT-Management/Google-Chrome-Remote-Desktop-Extension-Goes-Live-862745/

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13 Oct 11 Google Chrome Remote Desktop Extension Goes Live


Google (NASDAQ:GOOG) has launched a remote desktop
software extension that will let users access another computer through the
company’s Chrome Web browser from afar.

Available for free download from
Google’s Chrome Web Store, Chrome Remote Desktop Beta enables users access
another computer (or share their own computer with others) using a single
authentication code. The tool, demonstrated by Google operating system, is designed so that access is given
only to the specific person the user identifies for one time only.

“The helpdesk can use the Chrome Remote Desktop BETA
to help another user, while conversely a user can receive help by setting up a
sharing session without leaving their desk,” Google explained in its
release notes.

Google said one practical use for Remote Desktop is the
classic remote IT help desk scenario, where an employee having computer trouble
can file a help ticket and have his or her computer accessed, inspected and
fixed remotely by an IT administrator.

Think of the tool as a Web-based,
lightweight take on software from Dell Kace, CA (NYSE:CA), LogMeIn
(NASDAQ:LOGM), BMC Software (NYSE:BMC) and other vendors.

The search engine provider isn’t storming the castle
walls built by those remote desktop application providers just yet. The company
said its goal with Chrome Remote Desktop BETA — beta is officially part of the
extension name for a reason — is to show off its Chrome Remoting software and
get feedback from users.

Chrome Remote Desktop will enable users to connect any
two computers that have a Chrome browser. That includes Windows, Linux, Mac and
Chromebooks.  The company said it will
eventually allow users access their own computer remotely soon.

EWEEK expects Chrome Remote Desktop will ultimately serve
as one component in a management software suite intended for Chromebooks, which
are low-cost notebooks based on Google’s Chrome Operating system.

These
machines are equipped with minimal Flash storage and let consumers and
businesses download and consume Web applications.

Businesses rent Chromebooks for $28 per user, per month for three years,
enjoying support and hardware upgrades as needed. Schools are eligible
for the same deal but for $20 per user, per month. 

As workplace adoption for these computers grows, it will make sense for Google to add remote computer
management capabilities for its Chromebook for education and business user to
keep IT management costs down.

 

 

 


Article source: http://www.eweek.com/c/a/IT-Management/Google-Chrome-Remote-Desktop-Extension-Goes-Live-862745/

Tags: , , ,

12 Oct 11 Google Chrome Remote Desktop Extension Goes Live


Google (NASDAQ:GOOG) has launched a remote desktop
software extension that will let users access another computer through the
company’s Chrome Web browser from afar.

Available for free download from
Google’s Chrome Web Store, Chrome Remote Desktop Beta enables users access
another computer (or share their own computer with others) using a single
authentication code. The tool, demonstrated by Google operating system, is designed so that access is given
only to the specific person the user identifies for one time only.

“The helpdesk can use the Chrome Remote Desktop BETA
to help another user, while conversely a user can receive help by setting up a
sharing session without leaving their desk,” Google explained in its
release notes.

Google said one practical use for Remote Desktop is the
classic remote IT help desk scenario, where an employee having computer trouble
can file a help ticket and have his or her computer accessed, inspected and
fixed remotely by an IT administrator.

Think of the tool as a Web-based,
lightweight take on software from Dell Kace, CA (NYSE:CA), LogMeIn
(NASDAQ:LOGM), BMC Software (NYSE:BMC) and other vendors.

The search engine provider isn’t storming the castle
walls built by those remote desktop application providers just yet. The company
said its goal with Chrome Remote Desktop BETA — beta is officially part of the
extension name for a reason — is to show off its Chrome Remoting software and
get feedback from users.

Chrome Remote Desktop will enable users to connect any
two computers that have a Chrome browser. That includes Windows, Linux, Mac and
Chromebooks.  The company said it will
eventually allow users access their own computer remotely soon.

EWEEK expects Chrome Remote Desktop will ultimately serve
as one component in a management software suite intended for Chromebooks, which
are low-cost notebooks based on Google’s Chrome Operating system.

These
machines are equipped with minimal Flash storage and let consumers and
businesses download and consume Web applications.

Businesses rent Chromebooks for $28 per user, per month for three years,
enjoying support and hardware upgrades as needed. Schools are eligible
for the same deal but for $20 per user, per month. 

As workplace adoption for these computers grows, it will make sense for Google to add remote computer
management capabilities for its Chromebook for education and business user to
keep IT management costs down.

 

 

 


Article source: http://www.eweek.com/c/a/IT-Management/Google-Chrome-Remote-Desktop-Extension-Goes-Live-862745/

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11 Oct 11 Google Chrome Remote Desktop app goes beta


Watch out, Internet Explorer. Google Chrome has finally added a business-first feature that will help it seriously challenge your dominance in enterprise settings. Chrome Remote Desktop (formerly referred to as  Chromoting) has finally launched in the Chrome Web Store.

Like other remote desktop solutions, the Chrome app lets you set up one machine as a host and then connect from a second machine. The app utilizes XMPP and SSL to provide secure, zero-config connections in much the same way apps like TeamViewer and Mikogo do. You just need the person who is hosting the session to tell you the access code displayed on their screen in order to connect. Punch it in on your system, and you’re connected a few seconds later.

So why is Chrome Remote Desktop a big deal? For starters, there’s a darn good chance it’s going to be totally free. Other apps can cost thousands of dollars to roll out across a corporate network, so this could be a huge cost saving move that’s relatively easy to implement.

It’s also got the potential to prevent administrative headaches. If your machines are already running the latest version of Google Chrome, all that’s required is a simple in-browser app install –and since it’s not a standard desktop program, Chrome Remote Desktop also doesn’t carry the risk of playing havoc with your other essential apps. If Chrome didn’t cause any problems, neither will the Remote Desktop app.

At some point, Google will no doubt tie Chrome Remote Desktop to the Apps admin panel. That’ll make it an even more attractive remote access option for businesses who run Google Apps, and especially to those who have rolled out Chromebooks. But with Microsoft busily pushing Office 365, Windows Intune, and the much-improved Internet Explorer 9, Google’s not going to get a free pass from the gang in Redmond.

More at the Chrome Web Store, via Google OS


Article source: http://www.geek.com/articles/chips/google-chrome-remote-desktop-app-goes-beta-20111010/

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10 Oct 11 Chrome Remote Desktop Controls Other Computers from a Chrome Tab [Chrome Extensions]


Chrome Remote Desktop Controls Other Computers from a Chrome Tab Chrome: Over the weekend, Google unveiled Chrome Remote Desktop, a new Chrome extension that allows you to remotely control and manage another Mac, Windows, or Linux system through Google Chrome, as long as you have the extension installed on both systems.

Chrome Remote Desktop is currently in beta, and it requires a human be present at both systems in order to work. Once installed, you can initiate a sharing session and the add-on will provide a one-time authentication code that you can provide to another computer, like a support technician looking to connect to your computer, or a friend troubleshooting an issue remotely. Once the other party enters the access code, they’ll be able to see your screen, and be able to access your files, folders, and applications, all through Chrome. The process works in reverse as well: you can remotely troubleshoot a friend or family member’s PC as long as they provide you the access code.

Google says that the service is currently for person-to-person sharing, and they’re looking into expanding it to people who want to access their own computers when they’re away from them in the future. In the meantime, Chrome Remote Desktop is available now anywhere Chrome works. For more remote troubleshooting apps, check out our article on how to manage another PC remotely.

Chrome Remote Desktop | Chrome Web Store via Google Operating System


You can reach Alan Henry, the author of this post, at alan@lifehacker.com, or better yet, follow him on Twitter or Google+.

Article source: http://lifehacker.com/5848179/chrome-remote-desktop-controls-other-computers-from-a-chrome-tab

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