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All about Google Chrome & Google Chrome OS
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22 May 12 How to Keep Facebook, Bookmarks Handy in Chrome


Chrome has some handy ways to keep your myriad bookmarks just a click away, and for Facebook junkies to keep status updates front and center.

Chrome’s Bookmarks Bar puts my most frequently visited sites across the top of the browser, just one click away.

The problem is that I have so many favorites, they don’t all fit. Instead, they get squeezed out of view, requiring me to click the little double-arrow on the right end of the Bookmarks Bar. Then I’m stuck perusing a drop-down menu, which takes, like, all day.

The solution I’ve found is to condense those favorites icons, or favicons, by eliminating the text that accompanies them. It takes a bit of time, but I think it’s worth the effort. Here’s how:

1. Right-click any icon in your Bookmarks Bar, then click Edit.

2. Remove the text from the Name field, then click Save.

3. Presto! Now you’ve got just the favicon for that favorite.

4. Repeat the process for all the other icons in your Bookmarks Bar.

Keep in mind that because not every Web site has an easily identifiable favicon, you might not want to take this approach for each and every favorite.

For example, sites like Facebook, Ebay, and PC World have instantly recognizable favicons. But others are more vague, and if you have any bookmarklets, those are usually represented by nothing more than a gray globe — and therefore shouldn’t be shortened.

Thus, you’ll want to fiddle with this to find the best arrangement for your particular setup. You could always reduce a favicon’s name to an abbreviation, like “LMI” for LogMeIn (which has a fairly generic-looking favicon). That would allow you to condense your Bookmarks Bar while keeping your icons easy to identify.

Now, for all your Facebook addicts, here’s a neat way to keep Facebook Status updates in your view.

Right now, you probably find yourself hopping back and forth between a Facebook tab and whatever else you happen to be doing in your browser. That’s not terribly productive.

You can use Chrome’s MyStatusBar extension to add a Facebook status bar to the bottom of your browser, where it stays visible in every tab you have open. That way you can keep up with the latest messages, friend requests, and notifications, all without clicking away from your current page.

Here’s how to get set up with MyStatusBar:

1. Head to the extension’s page in the Chrome Store, then click Add to Chrome.

2. Wait until you see a new tab, then click the Login to Facebook button at the bottom.

3. That’ll open a pop-up window, where you’ll click Log in with Facebook.

4. Now you’ll see a permissions list. You’ll probably want to allow them all to get the maximum benefit from MyStatusBar, but you can certainly disable any you’re uncomfortable with. (Needless to say, using an extension like this requires access to your account.)

5. On my system, I had to click the X in the bottom-right corner of that window, the one just above the blue MyStatusBar bar, to make the Allow button visible. Without clicking that button, you can’t finish the setup.

And that’s it! Now just open a new tab and you’ll see your Facebook status bar at the bottom. Neat!

It works much like the standard status bar, but adds a Search field and a handy “Share this page” button (useful for sharing any page that doesn’t have its own Facebook button). My only complaint is that when you click, say, the message or notification icon, it opens a new Facebook tab rather than a pop-up showing the actual content.

That said, you can scroll through status updates by clicking the up/down arrows, which is definitely nice. As something a Facebook junkie myself, I’m liking this add-on a lot.

Article source: http://www.pcworld.com/article/255993/how_to_keep_facebook_bookmarks_handy_in_chrome.html

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22 May 12 How to Keep Facebook, Bookmarks Handy in Chrome


Chrome has some handy ways to keep your myriad bookmarks just a click away, and for Facebook junkies to keep status updates front and center.

Chrome’s Bookmarks Bar puts my most frequently visited sites across the top of the browser, just one click away.

The problem is that I have so many favorites, they don’t all fit. Instead, they get squeezed out of view, requiring me to click the little double-arrow on the right end of the Bookmarks Bar. Then I’m stuck perusing a drop-down menu, which takes, like, all day.

The solution I’ve found is to condense those favorites icons, or favicons, by eliminating the text that accompanies them. It takes a bit of time, but I think it’s worth the effort. Here’s how:

1. Right-click any icon in your Bookmarks Bar, then click Edit.

2. Remove the text from the Name field, then click Save.

3. Presto! Now you’ve got just the favicon for that favorite.

4. Repeat the process for all the other icons in your Bookmarks Bar.

Keep in mind that because not every Web site has an easily identifiable favicon, you might not want to take this approach for each and every favorite.

For example, sites like Facebook, Ebay, and PC World have instantly recognizable favicons. But others are more vague, and if you have any bookmarklets, those are usually represented by nothing more than a gray globe — and therefore shouldn’t be shortened.

Thus, you’ll want to fiddle with this to find the best arrangement for your particular setup. You could always reduce a favicon’s name to an abbreviation, like “LMI” for LogMeIn (which has a fairly generic-looking favicon). That would allow you to condense your Bookmarks Bar while keeping your icons easy to identify.

Now, for all your Facebook addicts, here’s a neat way to keep Facebook Status updates in your view.

Right now, you probably find yourself hopping back and forth between a Facebook tab and whatever else you happen to be doing in your browser. That’s not terribly productive.

You can use Chrome’s MyStatusBar extension to add a Facebook status bar to the bottom of your browser, where it stays visible in every tab you have open. That way you can keep up with the latest messages, friend requests, and notifications, all without clicking away from your current page.

Here’s how to get set up with MyStatusBar:

1. Head to the extension’s page in the Chrome Store, then click Add to Chrome.

2. Wait until you see a new tab, then click the Login to Facebook button at the bottom.

3. That’ll open a pop-up window, where you’ll click Log in with Facebook.

4. Now you’ll see a permissions list. You’ll probably want to allow them all to get the maximum benefit from MyStatusBar, but you can certainly disable any you’re uncomfortable with. (Needless to say, using an extension like this requires access to your account.)

5. On my system, I had to click the X in the bottom-right corner of that window, the one just above the blue MyStatusBar bar, to make the Allow button visible. Without clicking that button, you can’t finish the setup.

And that’s it! Now just open a new tab and you’ll see your Facebook status bar at the bottom. Neat!

It works much like the standard status bar, but adds a Search field and a handy “Share this page” button (useful for sharing any page that doesn’t have its own Facebook button). My only complaint is that when you click, say, the message or notification icon, it opens a new Facebook tab rather than a pop-up showing the actual content.

That said, you can scroll through status updates by clicking the up/down arrows, which is definitely nice. As something a Facebook junkie myself, I’m liking this add-on a lot.

Article source: http://www.pcworld.com/article/255993/how_to_keep_facebook_bookmarks_handy_in_chrome.html

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19 May 12 Monitor Facebook Status Updates While You Use Chrome


Are you a Facebook junkie? If so, you probably find yourself hopping back and forth between a Facebook tab and whatever else you happen to be doing in your browser. That’s not terribly productive.

If you’re a Google Chrome user, you can keep Facebook front and center with MyStatusBar. This extension adds a Facebook status bar to the bottom of your browser, where it stays visible in every tab you have open. That way you can keep up with the latest messages, friend requests, and notifications, all without clicking away from your current page.

Here’s how to get set up with MyStatusBar:

1. Head to the extension’s page in the Chrome Store, then click Add to Chrome.

2. Wait until you see a new tab, then click the Login to Facebook button at the bottom.

3. That’ll open a pop-up window, where you’ll click Log in with Facebook.

4. Now you’ll see a permissions list. You’ll probably want to allow them all to get the maximum benefit from MyStatusBar, but you can certainly disable any you’re uncomfortable with. (Needless to say, using an extension like this requires access to your account.)

5. On my system, I had to click the X in the bottom-right corner of that window, the one just above the blue MyStatusBar bar, to make the Allow button visible. Without clicking that button, you can’t finish the setup.

And that’s it! Now just open a new tab and you’ll see your Facebook status bar at the bottom. Neat!

It works much like the standard status bar, but adds a Search field and a handy “Share this page” button (useful for sharing any page that doesn’t have its own Facebook button). My only complaint is that when you click, say, the message or notification icon, it opens a new Facebook tab rather than a pop-up showing the actual content.

That said, you can scroll through status updates by clicking the up/down arrows, which is definitely nice. As something a Facebook junkie myself, I’m liking this add-on a lot.

Contributing Editor Rick Broida writes about business and consumer technology. Ask for help with your PC hassles at hasslefree@pcworld.com, or try the treasure trove of helpful folks in the PC World Community Forums. Sign up to have the Hassle-Free PC newsletter e-mailed to you each week.

Article source: http://www.pcworld.com/article/255857/monitor_facebook_status_updates_while_you_use_chrome.html

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19 May 12 Monitor Facebook Status Updates While You Use Chrome


Are you a Facebook junkie? If so, you probably find yourself hopping back and forth between a Facebook tab and whatever else you happen to be doing in your browser. That’s not terribly productive.

If you’re a Google Chrome user, you can keep Facebook front and center with MyStatusBar. This extension adds a Facebook status bar to the bottom of your browser, where it stays visible in every tab you have open. That way you can keep up with the latest messages, friend requests, and notifications, all without clicking away from your current page.

Here’s how to get set up with MyStatusBar:

1. Head to the extension’s page in the Chrome Store, then click Add to Chrome.

2. Wait until you see a new tab, then click the Login to Facebook button at the bottom.

3. That’ll open a pop-up window, where you’ll click Log in with Facebook.

4. Now you’ll see a permissions list. You’ll probably want to allow them all to get the maximum benefit from MyStatusBar, but you can certainly disable any you’re uncomfortable with. (Needless to say, using an extension like this requires access to your account.)

5. On my system, I had to click the X in the bottom-right corner of that window, the one just above the blue MyStatusBar bar, to make the Allow button visible. Without clicking that button, you can’t finish the setup.

And that’s it! Now just open a new tab and you’ll see your Facebook status bar at the bottom. Neat!

It works much like the standard status bar, but adds a Search field and a handy “Share this page” button (useful for sharing any page that doesn’t have its own Facebook button). My only complaint is that when you click, say, the message or notification icon, it opens a new Facebook tab rather than a pop-up showing the actual content.

That said, you can scroll through status updates by clicking the up/down arrows, which is definitely nice. As something a Facebook junkie myself, I’m liking this add-on a lot.

Contributing Editor Rick Broida writes about business and consumer technology. Ask for help with your PC hassles at hasslefree@pcworld.com, or try the treasure trove of helpful folks in the PC World Community Forums. Sign up to have the Hassle-Free PC newsletter e-mailed to you each week.

Article source: http://www.pcworld.com/article/255857/monitor_facebook_status_updates_while_you_use_chrome.html

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26 Apr 12 Chrome : Google simplifie la création de thèmes


Mon thème ChromeAlors que le navigateur Chrome devient de plus en plus populaire, Google a simplifié au maximum la création de thèmes avec une nouvelle application officielle.

En février 2010, nous présentions le service web Chrometheme.net permettant de construire à la volée un thème pour le navigateur de Google. Après avoir choisi des images de fond au format PNG pour le cadre de l’application, la barre des favoris, les onglets et la page de démarrage, l’internaute est invité à sélectionner les couleurs pour chacun des éléments de l’interface utilisateur.

Au sein de son Chrome Store, Google propose une nouvelle application web baptisée « Mon thème Chrome ». Celle-ci facilite encore plus le développement de thèmes spécifiquement conçus pour le navigateur. L’internaute devra choisir une image de fond pour l’écran d’accueil (ou speedial) puis déterminer la teinte de la barre d’outils, de l’onglet actif et des onglets inactifs grâce à une palette de couleurs prédéfinies.

L’application se chargera de générer le fichier .crx et proposera soit d’installer le thème ou de le partager via un lien dédié.

Mon thème ChromeMon thème ChromeMon thème Chrome

Article source: http://www.clubic.com/navigateur-internet/google-chrome/actualite-488708-chrome-google-simplifie-creation-themes.html

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06 Apr 12 Chrome Store Updated with Trending Apps, Subcategories, Badges



And more

Google’s Chrome Store, the marketplace for any Chrome browser user that has an eye for applications and extensions, has been updated to support the increasing number of content. The update has been live since yesterday and its new features can be experienced globally.

One of the features Google brought to the Chrome store is the “Trending” view. Here, users can sort apps, extensions and any other type of browser-compatible software into categories based on how often they are installed. These are labeled with health tags ranging from “warm” to “on fire”, the last one representing apps that grew the fastest inside the store.

Speaking of categories, subcategories were introduced to allow users an even deeper navigation inside the marketplace. As example, subcategories split “Entertainment” into Music and Radio, Books, Photos, TV Movies and Online Video.

Badges were also added, tagging existing programs based on their functionality. For starters, the Chrome Store comes with “offline” and “playable on Google+” badges, the first one tagging content that can be experienced without an internet connection. Officials plan to extend this feature in the future.

These Badges can be seen on the landing page of each extension or application, which possesses one of the above stated capabilities, and clicking them will reveal a list of programs in the same segment.

The Google Chrome store is home to over ten thousand applications and games, which can only be experienced using an appropriate browser. As with any other marketplace, watch out for malware.

Source: Chrome Blog

Article source: http://www.itproportal.com/2012/04/05/chrome-store-updated-trending-apps-subcategories-badges/

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28 Mar 12 Shoplifters hit up Chrome Store for Facebook data



Then Kaspersky’s Fabio Assolini, a lab expert, said one bit of malware especially caught his team’s attention because the malicious extension was hosted on Google’s own Chrome Web Store. “At this time,” Assolini said in a March 23 blog, “the malicious app has 923 users.”

The extension presented itself as Adobe Flash Player. After installation, the extension could gain complete control of the victim’s first by downloading a script file. The script file had instructions to send commands to the victim’s Facebook profile. The result was the eventual spread of a malicious message, inviting more users to install the fake extension.

So what’s in such a scheme for the malware makers? Profit, in the form of selling Facebook “likes” to businesses looking for (ironically) a reputation boost and may be willing to pay the $27 charged for 1,000 “likes.”

According to reports, Google personnel removed the malicious extension after Kaspersky informed them of the hustle – titled Trojan.JS.Agent.bxo—which the Kaspersky experts had discovered on March 6 in a previous similar attack.

According to Ars Technica, a Google response was, “When we detect items containing malware or learn of them through reports, we remove them from the Chrome and from active Chrome instances. We’ve already removed several of these extensions, and we are improving our automated systems to help detect them even faster.”

Beyond the Store, one security plus for Google was the launch, earlier this year, of Bouncer, which scans the Android Market for malicious apps. The scan happens when developers first upload an app to the Market and then periodically after that.

The Bouncer safeguard does not, however, seem to console observers over thieves who find ways to outsmart Facebook and Google.

Those behind the cash-for-likes scheme “are uploading new extensions regularly, in a cat and mouse game,” said Kaspersky’s Assolini.

Kaspersky Lab noticed a “huge wave” of attacks in Brazil. Without naming the miscreants, Assolini’s column warning users to “think twice” before installing Chrome extensions simply referred to “Brazil’s bad guys” turning their attention to Chrome and Facebook, which are now Brazil’s two key go-to places on the Internet. Recent statistics show that Google has become the most popular browser in Brazil with more than 45 percent of market share. is the most popular social network in Brazil, with 42 million users, displacing Orkut.

More information: http://www.securel … e_extensions

© 2012 PhysOrg.com

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Article source: http://www.physorg.com/news/2012-03-shoplifters-chrome-facebook.html

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30 Nov 11 Your custom robot army is here


My Robot Nation is aiming to make it possible for almost anyone to design their own 3D robot model–and have it delivered to their door. Eventually, the company wants to expand to a wide variety of products but is using robots as a way to establish itself.

(Credit:
My Robot Nation)

The robots have arrived.

This morning, My Robot Nation officially launched, offering customers around the world the ability to design the droid of their dreams–and have it quickly 3D printed and sent to them.

Note: Please come back tomorrow for a behind-the-scenes story looking at how My Robot Nation’s founders spent launch day.

A month ago, as reported first by CNET, the service launched into beta, and for the first time, people in the U.S., Canada, and Europe were able to use My Robot Nation’s simple Web-based design tools to craft their own miniature robots. Since then, hundreds of people have done so, and within days, each got delivery of a package containing a ceramic-like figurine meant to be displayed wherever buyers like to show off their small collectibles.

The tools make it possible for anyone to make an almost infinite number of choices about the design of their robot, much as someone would do to create a video game avatar. That makes sense, given that My Robot Nation founders Sarah Stocker and Mark Danks have years of experience working at game companies like Electronic Arts and Sony. The finished products will be between two inches and six inches tall and run customers between $18 and $170.

For today’s launch–the service actually hit its 1.0 state last night–My Robot Nation is expanding globally and has worked out a number of kinks in its system. It has also streamlined its social sharing strategy, making it easy for the public to “like” others’ robots, and for every buyer’s creation to have a chance to be voted one of the site’s favorites. It is also offering a set of holiday-oriented flourishes for users’ robots, including Santa hats, holly leaves, and more.

And Google is clearly on board with what the company is trying to do. My Robot Nation’s beta launch was tied to that of the re-launch of the Chrome Store, and since then, Chrome’s Facebook page has become a virtual billboard for the service. Yesterday, for example, four of the five pictures at the top of the page were of robots crafted using the service. And despite more than 7.4 million people who follow Chrome on Facebook, the service has identified only two entities that it likes–Angry Birds, and My Robot Nation.

The Google Chrome Facebook page demonstrates that the search giant is strongly supporting My Robot Nation. Four of the five pictures atop the Chrome Facebook page feature My Robot Nation creations.

(Credit:
Screenshot by Daniel Terdiman/CNET)

Just the beginning

Although My Robot Nation is launching with user-created droids, the company sees that as a Trojan horse. The longer-term plan is to expand its offerings to a wide range of custom-designed and 3D printed consumer products, although the company hasn’t yet said what those will be. That’s a smart move, as there appears to be a hunger on the part of a variety of big-name companies to allow people to create their own versions of branded products, and 3D printing is likely the best production method for such offerings, given that it makes it economically viable to manufacture a single custom item.

My Robot Nation is the epitome of a lean Silicon Valley startup. The company’s founders generally work in their home offices in Berkeley, Calif., and San Rafael, Calif.,–both within 20 minutes of San Francisco–or in coffee shops in between. When they need to meet with their far-flung workforce, they hop on Skype.

This means that for now, the company’s costs are low, allowing Stocker and Danks to bootstrap My Robot Nation entirely with their own funds. And that gives the two the flexibility, at least in the short term, to pivot as necessary, and to take on better established competitors in the custom 3D printing field. Among those are Freedom of Creation, Shapeways, and Ponoko, each of which has their own business model. But My Robot Nation thinks that its WebGL-based tools give it a leg up on the others, because almost anyone–not just people with 3D modeling skills–can design and purchase its products.

“Because WebGL is integrated with the latest HTML technology, we can provide you with a seamless creation experience,” the company’s FAQ reads. “This means that the robot you see on your screen is just like the one you will receive in the mail.”

Article source: http://news.cnet.com/8301-17938_105-57333455-1/your-custom-robot-army-is-here/

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