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12 Feb 12 Chrome for android: Is it as good as it sounds?


Chrome for android: Is it as good as it sounds?

Remember the time when Firefox used to rule the roost? Yeah, the naive, good-old days. Along came Google’s bastion Chrome, born out of the open-source ambitious Chromium project that sought to make the web better by making it simpler.. Every time we talked about mobile web browsers, the question of why Chrome wasn’t on Android stuck out like a sore thumb, demanding immediate attention. Lo and behold people, the wait is finally over. Google released a beta version of the distinguished browser for their mobile platform last week, to much aplomb.

With quite a few new tricks up its sleeve, Chrome brings most of its signature feature-set to the portable world. There’s the omnibox (the unified address cum search bar), true tabbed browsing, Autofill and Autocomplete baked in and Incognito browsing, all delivered to you at the precipitous rate you’ve come to expect.

Advanced aspects like multiprocess browsing (allowing you to sign in with different credentials on different tabs, with tab sandboxing that isolates each tab process as a cushion against crashes), full Chrome Sync support (which can even sync your entire session between the mobile and desktop version, in real-time) and tab scrolling (intuitive flick-based tab views at a glance, akin to a deck of cards) also cement their way into the app, implanting it with tremendous potential.

There’s still much to be desired, though. The confirmed lack of Flash support (forever) may not affect many, but is still odd, and let’s just say that with the Chrome Web Store doing as well as it is, we’d love to see extensibility implemented here. Never mind the fact that the release only works on Ice Cream Sandwich gadgets right now. If you own an ICS-enabled device, though, you can get it right now on the Android Marketplace.

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Article source: http://www.deccanchronicle.com/channels/sci-tech/gadgets/chrome-android-it-good-it-sounds-509

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17 Dec 11 How to set up multiple profiles in Chrome


There’s a ton of reasons to love Chrome, but syncing isn’t one of them–yet. Google has just built a new feature into Chrome 16 that could make multiple account management much better.

Multiple-user support is similar to Chrome’s Sync feature, but it’s more of a complementary feature than a must-use. Sync allows you to always have access to the same bookmarks, history, themes, and preferences. Multiuser support allows you to share a computer or maintain separate Google identities without logging out of the operating system. This could be useful for single-computer households or small businesses, but it’s really good for people who want to maintain more than one Gmail or Google account at a time.

Here’s how you do it:

Step 1: Create a new profile by going to the Wrench menu’s new “Sign into Chrome” option. If you’re already using Chrome’s sync, you’ll see your account listed as “Signed in as…”

Step 2: Go back to the Wrench, choose Options (Preferences on a
Mac,) then Personal Stuff, and “Add new user.” This will open a new Chrome window.

Step 3: The new user must repeat the “Sign into Chrome” procedure. This associates the Google account with the profile.

Step 4: Bask in the glory of being able to manage two accounts from the same browser without crossing your Google streams.

You can also customize the profile’s name and icon, and Google has provided some cutesy icons such as an alien, a flower, and a ninja. Once set up, you can jump accounts at will on the left of the tab bar.

By the way, a word of caution: the multiuser profile support is not intended to secure your private data against other users’ prying eyes, literally. Although your synced data might be secured on the server, if you’re logged in to Chrome with multiple profiles, anybody with keyboard and mouse access can switch profiles and get at your personal “stuff,” as the Goog likes to call it.

This is far less secure than forcing people to re-enter passwords before each opening of a second profile, but it is more convenient if you’re the only person who uses that particular computer. Basically, if your addiction to Google services is deep and spans multiple accounts, the new multiprofile switch is a small step toward making you a happier Googler.

Article source: http://news.cnet.com/8301-11310_39-57344541-285/how-to-set-up-multiple-profiles-in-chrome/

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17 Dec 11 How to set up multiple profiles in Chrome


There’s a ton of reasons to love Chrome, but syncing isn’t one of them–yet. Google has just built a new feature into Chrome 16 that could make multiple account management much better.

Multiple-user support is similar to Chrome’s Sync feature, but it’s more of a complementary feature than a must-use. Sync allows you to always have access to the same bookmarks, history, themes, and preferences. Multiuser support allows you to share a computer or maintain separate Google identities without logging out of the operating system. This could be useful for single-computer households or small businesses, but it’s really good for people who want to maintain more than one Gmail or Google account at a time.

Here’s how you do it:

Step 1: Create a new profile by going to the Wrench menu’s new “Sign into Chrome” option. If you’re already using Chrome’s sync, you’ll see your account listed as “Signed in as…”

Step 2: Go back to the Wrench, choose Options (Preferences on a
Mac,) then Personal Stuff, and “Add new user.” This will open a new Chrome window.

Step 3: The new user must repeat the “Sign into Chrome” procedure. This associates the Google account with the profile.

Step 4: Bask in the glory of being able to manage two accounts from the same browser without crossing your Google streams.

You can also customize the profile’s name and icon, and Google has provided some cutesy icons such as an alien, a flower, and a ninja. Once set up, you can jump accounts at will on the left of the tab bar.

By the way, a word of caution: the multiuser profile support is not intended to secure your private data against other users’ prying eyes, literally. Although your synced data might be secured on the server, if you’re logged in to Chrome with multiple profiles, anybody with keyboard and mouse access can switch profiles and get at your personal “stuff,” as the Goog likes to call it.

This is far less secure than forcing people to re-enter passwords before each opening of a second profile, but it is more convenient if you’re the only person who uses that particular computer. Basically, if your addiction to Google services is deep and spans multiple accounts, the new multiprofile switch is a small step toward making you a happier Googler.

Article source: http://howto.cnet.com/8301-11310_39-57344541-285/how-to-set-up-multiple-profiles-in-chrome/?part=rss&subj=latest-news&tag=title

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14 Dec 11 Chrome gets multiple-user support


New in Chrome 16: Multiple-user support in a single instance of Chrome.

(Credit:
Screenshot by Seth Rosenblatt/CNET)

More than one person can now use Chrome and keep personal data separate from other users on the same computer, thanks to today’s update to Google’s browser.

Google Chrome 16.0.912.63 stable for Windows (download), Mac (download), Linux (download), and Chrome Frame also adds an option to sync your Omnibox History, and it includes a number of security fixes.

Multiple-user support is similar to Chrome’s Sync feature, but it’s more of a complementary feature than a must-use. Sync allows you to always have access to the same bookmarks, history, themes, and preferences. Multi-user support allows you to share a computer and maintain separate identities without logging out of the operating system. This could be useful for single-computer households or small businesses, although it potentially means that Chromebook users will have two ways to switch profiles.

Creating a new profile first requires signing into Chrome, via the Wrench menu’s new “Sign into Chrome” option. Then, to add a new user, you must go back to the Wrench, choose Options (Mac users select Preferences,) then Personal Stuff, and finally “Add new user.” This will open a new Chrome window, and from here the new user must repeat the “Sign into Chrome” procedure. The new user can also go to the Personal Stuff menu in the new window and change the user name and icon.

When more than one account profile is synced to Chrome, a new drop-down appears in the upper left corner to make it easier to switch profiles. But it’s not particularly secure from prying eyes.

(Credit:
Screenshot by Seth Rosenblatt/CNET)

Chrome will open separate windows when switching between each profile.

Google cautions in its blog post announcing the feature that the multi-user profile support is not intended to secure your private data against other users. That means although your synced data might be secured on the server, if you’re logged in to Chrome with multiple profiles, anybody can switch profiles and access your personal “stuff,” as Google likes to call it. This is far less secure than forcing people to re-enter passwords before each opening of a second profile.

Along with the multiple profile support, Chrome 16 now lets adventurous types sync open tabs. You have to go through the about:flags config screen to enable it, but it does indicate that this long-missing sync option is getting close to being ready for stable Chrome users.

Other improvements in Chrome 16 are mainly security fixes, including six labeled “high.” There were no security fixes in this release marked “critical.” Check out the Chrome changelog published by Google.

Article source: http://download.cnet.com/8301-2007_4-57342468-12/chrome-gets-multiple-user-support/?part=rss&subj=software&tag=title

Tags: , , ,

14 Dec 11 Chrome gets multiple-user support


New in Chrome 16: Multiple-user support in a single instance of Chrome.

(Credit:
Screenshot by Seth Rosenblatt/CNET)

More than one person can now use Chrome and keep personal data separate from other users on the same computer, thanks to today’s update to Google’s browser.

Google Chrome 16.0.912.63 stable for Windows (download), Mac (download), Linux (download), and Chrome Frame also adds an option to sync your Omnibox History, and it includes a number of security fixes.

Multiple-user support is similar to Chrome’s Sync feature, but it’s more of a complementary feature than a must-use. Sync allows you to always have access to the same bookmarks, history, themes, and preferences. Multi-user support allows you to share a computer and maintain separate identities without logging out of the operating system. This could be useful for single-computer households or small businesses, although it potentially means that Chromebook users will have two ways to switch profiles.

Creating a new profile first requires signing into Chrome, via the Wrench menu’s new “Sign into Chrome” option. Then, to add a new user, you must go back to the Wrench, choose Options (Mac users select Preferences,) then Personal Stuff, and finally “Add new user.” This will open a new Chrome window, and from here the new user must repeat the “Sign into Chrome” procedure. The new user can also go to the Personal Stuff menu in the new window and change the user name and icon.

When more than one account profile is synced to Chrome, a new drop-down appears in the upper left corner to make it easier to switch profiles. But it’s not particularly secure from prying eyes.

(Credit:
Screenshot by Seth Rosenblatt/CNET)

Chrome will open separate windows when switching between each profile.

Google cautions in its blog post announcing the feature that the multi-user profile support is not intended to secure your private data against other users. That means although your synced data might be secured on the server, if you’re logged in to Chrome with multiple profiles, anybody can switch profiles and access your personal “stuff,” as Google likes to call it. This is far less secure than forcing people to re-enter passwords before each opening of a second profile.

Along with the multiple profile support, Chrome 16 now lets adventurous types sync open tabs. You have to go through the about:flags config screen to enable it, but it does indicate that this long-missing sync option is getting close to being ready for stable Chrome users.

Other improvements in Chrome 16 are mainly security fixes, including six labeled “high.” There were no security fixes in this release marked “critical.” Check out the Chrome changelog published by Google.

Article source: http://download.cnet.com/8301-2007_4-57342468-12/chrome-gets-multiple-user-support/

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