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05 May 12 Getting started with Google’s Cloud Print


Sometime soon, you’ll likely have something to print—and there’s no guarantee you’ll be at your home or office when the need strikes. You could make a reminder for yourself to print that e-mail or document the next time you’re at your Mac or PC, or you could harness the power of the cloud to remove those traditional workplace boundaries and bring the printer to you.

Cloud printing has been around for a few years now, and it’s actually very easy to set up. Google is the reigning champ in this space, with a product aptly named Cloud Print. With a few minutes of setup, you can have your Android, iPhone, Mac, or PC printing to printers in faraway places—even FedEx offices—from wherever and whenever you wish.

But what about AirPrint? Apple’s wireless printing platform, first released in 2010 with iOS 4.2, is unfortunately limited to local networks. Even when connected to a home or office network over VPN, networked AirPrint-capable printers simply fail to identify. Perhaps, eventually, that will change. For now, Google is running the show.

Cloud Print can be set up in one of two ways. A number of manufacturers, including HP, Kodak, Epson, and Canon, already sell cloud-ready printers that “connect directly to the web and don’t require a PC to set up.” But what if you have a so-called “classic” printer, one that can’t go online? You can still set that up too.

Because Cloud Print was initially conceived for use with Chrome OS, the setup process is handled entirely in Google’s Chrome browser. To enable Cloud Print, head over to Chrome’s Settings page, and select “Under the Hood.” From there, you should see the option to enable Cloud Print from the bottom of the page.

Setting up Cloud Print requires you to go under the hood.

The process is relatively painless from here. If you already have a printer installed in Windows or OS X, Cloud Print is smart enough to identify the device and prepare it for remote printing. You don’t even need to keep Chrome open. A helper process runs in the background and listens for new print jobs. The only caveat, of course, is that both the printer and computer must remain on for cloud printing to work.

From here, you’re probably going to want to, you know, print something. If you’re using Chrome on any other Windows, Mac, or Linux computer, this too is easy. Any Chrome installation synced to your Google account has the ability to print to your cloud printers. If a friend or coworker has an existing Cloud Print setup, they can share their cloud-enabled printer with you, too. This can be useful in small business or team scenarios where multiple people can be given access to a shared printer in a remote location that is managed by someone else.

To print, simply select the Cloud Print option from Chrome’s print page dialog. Doing so will open a browser pop-up that lists all of your cloud-enabled printers, in addition to any other printers that friends or co-workers have shared with your Google address.

Of course, you’re not just limited to printing from Chrome (though this is the simplest way to get going). OS X users can use a third-party app called Cloud Printer to print a variety of documents from a local machine—and, with a few extra steps, can set up Cloud Printer to act as a virtual printer in any Mac app. Windows users can download a similar app called Paperless Printer. Both are free.

Google Cloud Print's web-based queue. Everything printed successfully.

Mobile use is, admittedly, a little more difficult. Unlike a desktop OS, mobile applications on Android and iOS require printer support to be included on a per-application basis, and every implementation is a little different. In other words, you won’t necessarily be able to use Cloud Print with every application that also supports printing.

On Android, you’ll be able to print from Google’s mobile Chrome browser, for example, or within the native Google Docs app. There are also other capable apps listed on Google’s website, as well as on the Play store. On iOS, however, native options are slim. Google says that the in-browser versions of its mobile apps support Cloud Print, and some websites apparently feature a Cloud Print button. However, perhaps the best approach is to use an alternative to remote printing all together. An app available for Windows and OS X called WePrint can monitor an e-mail address for new file attachments and print them using a local printer when received. Or, if you’re a Dropbox user on OS X and feel more comfortable setting things up yourself, you can use Automator to automatically print any file synced to a local Dropbox folder.

It’s not quite the same as having native print support in a given application, but it beats not being able to print at all.

Article source: http://arstechnica.com/getting-it-done/2012/05/getting-started-with-cloud-print.ars?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=rss

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19 Apr 12 Google Pumps Up Their Cloud Print Service With New FedEx Partnership


cloudprint

The amount of harried printing situations I’ve been party to has dropped dramatically since I finished school, but Google’s new update to their Cloud Print service should have you covered if you can’t say the same.

According to a post on the official Chrome blog Google has baked the ability to print to any FedEx Office location right into Cloud Print, so you’ll be push your documents from Chrome, Google Docs, or your Android device to a participating store and pick up it whenever you need to.

When I took the service for a spin, the process of actually creating the job took a shade under 30 seconds seconds — from there, I was greeted with an email mentioning that my document was now ready to print at a local FedEx Office. As long as you’ve remember to keep the retrieval code from the email handy, you’re all set to pick up your sales report (or printed copy of Charge of the Like Brigade) when you need to.

It isn’t a dealbreaker if you can’t get down there immediately though, as the document will continue to live in the cloud for ten days. After that, you’re plumb out of luck (unless you pop into Chrome and Cloud Print it again). I imagine that not everyone will be too pleased with this development — companies like Breezy have working to remove the friction from mobile printing for quite a while, and now they’ve got other competitor to deal with.

Strangely enough, Google also announced that Cloud Print can now send documents to Ice Cream Sandwich-powered devices that have the Chrome for Android beta installed. It doesn’t strike me as a huge improvement over, say, just sticking it in Google Docs, but it’ll do in a pinch if you’re ever in need of a slightly-clunkier version of Instapaper.

Article source: http://techcrunch.com/2012/04/18/google-pumps-up-their-cloud-print-service-with-new-fedex-partnership/

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19 Apr 12 Chrome now prints to FedEx


Chrome Cloud Print now supports FedEx Office locations.

(Credit:
Google)

Google’s Cloud Print in Chrome might not be for everybody, but if you’re on the go and must print something in a hurry — and in the United States — it could be exactly the service you want thanks to a new partnership with FedEx Office.

Cloud Print will now offer a “Print to FedEx Office” option so that you can print from Chrome directly to a FedEx Office location (formerly known as Kinko’s). When you use it, Google says that you’ll receive a retrieval code for use on any FedEx Print and Go self-service kiosk. FedEx Office has more than 1,800 stores around the U.S.

With this update, Canon printers have been added to Google’s list of Cloud Print Ready options, and Chrome for
Android beta can now be used as a destination to send documents via Cloud Print. It’s not really clear at this time how that’s better than just using Google Docs to access a document on your phone or
tablet, but being able to print work documents or concert tickets on the fly could be immensely useful as necessary.

Article source: http://download.cnet.com/8301-2007_4-57415912-12/chrome-now-prints-to-fedex/?part=rss&subj=software&tag=title

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18 Apr 12 Chrome now prints to FedEx


Chrome Cloud Print now supports FedEx Office locations.

(Credit:
Google)

Google’s Cloud Print in Chrome might not be for everybody, but if you’re on the go and must print something in a hurry — and in the United States — it could be exactly the service you want thanks to a new partnership with FedEx.

Cloud Print will now offer a “Print to FedEx Office” option so that you can print from Chrome directly to a FedEx Office location (formerly known as Kinko’s.) When you use it, Google says that you’ll receive a retrieval code for use on any FedEx Print and Go self-service kiosk. FedEx has more than 1,800 stores around the U.S.

With this update, Canon printers have been added to Google’s list of Cloud Print Ready options, and Chrome for
Android beta can now be used as a destination to send documents to via Cloud Print. It’s not really clear at this time how that’s better than just using Google Docs to access a document on your phone or
tablet, but being able to print work documents or concert tickets on the fly could be immensely useful as necessary.

Article source: http://download.cnet.com/8301-2007_4-57415912-12/chrome-now-prints-to-fedex/

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07 Apr 12 Making the Most of Chrome in the Cloud


The more devices that I accumulate, the more I’d like to move seamlessly from one to another. I’m finding more and more that I’m hopping from one device to another, and one Web browser to another.

I’ve got a mini-laptop hooked up to my TV, a larger laptop on my desk, a 7-inch tablet in my back pocket for reading at coffee shops, a 10-incher that floats around the loft and rarely goes outside, and a 4.3-inch smartphone that works well on crowded transportation systems — all lacking in synchronicity.

I’ve been playing with Chrome as a possible solution. Although Chrome for Android is only available on the latest Ice Cream Sandwich version of the Android operating system, you can take advantage of Chrome’s cloud connectivity through the PC version to manage your disparate devices.

Chrome to Phone Extension and App

Here’s how to perform a search on a roomy PC and send the result to a tablet or phone for portability. This extension lets you send links and other stuff from your desktop Chrome browser to your Android device.

It’s good for sending links, Web page phone numbers to the phone dialer, and desktop- directions to the phone’s more compact map.

Install Chrome

Install Chrome on the PC by performing a search for “Google Chrome” within any browser. Then follow the prompts to install the Chrome browser.

Allow the browser to launch and click on the wrench icon adjacent to the address bar. Look for the “Extensions” tab and choose “Get More Extensions.”

Install Chrome to Phone for PC

Search for the free “Google Chrome to Phone Extension” in the Chrome Web Store’s “Search the Store” search box.

Click on the “Sign In to Add” button and then the “Add to Chrome” button. Allow the extension to install on the PC.

Install Chrome to Phone App

Download the app onto your phone by searching for
“Chrome to Phone” in the phone’s Play store. Install the app by following the prompts.

Browse to any Web page on the PC’s Chrome browser and then click on the phone icon that will now be adjacent to the wrench icon you clicked earlier.

The Web page will be sent and displayed on the now linked tablet or phone.

Google Cloud Print Beta

Here’s how to connect your home-base printers to the Web using Chrome, making the printers available for your phone and tablet:

Enable the Connector

Launch the PC’s Chrome browser and click on the wrench icon again. Choose “Settings” and then “Under the Hood.” Scroll down the page and choose “Enable Google (Nasdaq: GOOG) Cloud Print Connector.” Follow the prompts, and you should ultimately see a list of the printers that are already connected and used by the PC.

Install the App

Install Paulo Fernandes’ free
Cloud Print app onto your tablet or phone. Search for it in Google Play. Then follow the prompts to configure it. Choose “Other Printers” when prompted on the device, and select a default printer from the list. The list should be identical to the PC’s list presented in the previous step, and should include your home-base printer.

Share the Doc

Select “Share” or “Share page” from within any tablet or phone app — the browser, for example — and follow the prompts. The Web page will print via Cloud Print from the tablet or phone onto your home-base printer. The printer must be switched on and connected to a switched on PC.

Other Native Chrome Cloud Products

The Google cloud-oriented Docs, Calendar and Gmail products are tightly integrated with Chrome and the Android operating system. Try the
Google Docs Chrome extension and Android app for generating cloud-based documents across devices.

Follow the same procedure that you used to install Chrome to Phone and Cloud Print by installing the Chrome extension for Docs on the PC, and then the Docs app on the Android device. Make sure that the Google accounts match across extension and app because that’s what ties the cloud data between Chrome browser and Android app.

Want to Ask a Tech Question?

Is there a piece of tech you’d like to know how to operate properly? Is there a gadget that’s got you confounded? Please
send your tech questions to me, and I’ll try to answer as many as possible in this column.

And use the Talkback feature below to add your comments!


Article source: http://www.technewsworld.com/story/74791.html

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05 Apr 12 Making the Most of Chrome in the Cloud


The more devices that I accumulate, the more I’d like to move seamlessly from one to another. I’m finding more and more that I’m hopping from one device to another, and one Web browser to another.

I’ve got a mini-laptop hooked up to my TV, a larger laptop on my desk, a 7-inch tablet in my back pocket for reading at coffee shops, a 10-incher that floats around the loft and rarely goes outside, and a 4.3-inch smartphone that works well on crowded transportation systems — all lacking in synchronicity.

I’ve been playing with Chrome as a possible solution. Although Chrome for Android is only available on the latest Ice Cream Sandwich version of the Android operating system, you can take advantage of Chrome’s cloud connectivity through the PC version to manage your disparate devices.

Chrome to Phone Extension and App

Here’s how to perform a search on a roomy PC and send the result to a tablet or phone for portability. This extension lets you send links and other stuff from your desktop Chrome browser to your Android device.

It’s good for sending links, Web page phone numbers to the phone dialer, and desktop- directions to the phone’s more compact map.

Install Chrome

Install Chrome on the PC by performing a search for “Google Chrome” within any browser. Then follow the prompts to install the Chrome browser.

Allow the browser to launch and click on the wrench icon adjacent to the address bar. Look for the “Extensions” tab and choose “Get More Extensions.”

Install Chrome to Phone for PC

Search for the free “Google Chrome to Phone Extension” in the Chrome Web Store’s “Search the Store” search box.

Click on the “Sign In to Add” button and then the “Add to Chrome” button. Allow the extension to install on the PC.

Install Chrome to Phone App

Download the app onto your phone by searching for
“Chrome to Phone” in the phone’s Play store. Install the app by following the prompts.

Browse to any Web page on the PC’s Chrome browser and then click on the phone icon that will now be adjacent to the wrench icon you clicked earlier.

The Web page will be sent and displayed on the now linked tablet or phone.

Google Cloud Print Beta

Here’s how to connect your home-base printers to the Web using Chrome, making the printers available for your phone and tablet:

Enable the Connector

Launch the PC’s Chrome browser and click on the wrench icon again. Choose “Settings” and then “Under the Hood.” Scroll down the page and choose “Enable Google (Nasdaq: GOOG) Cloud Print Connector.” Follow the prompts, and you should ultimately see a list of the printers that are already connected and used by the PC.

Install the App

Install Paulo Fernandes’ free
Cloud Print app onto your tablet or phone. Search for it in Google Play. Then follow the prompts to configure it. Choose “Other Printers” when prompted on the device, and select a default printer from the list. The list should be identical to the PC’s list presented in the previous step, and should include your home-base printer.

Share the Doc

Select “Share” or “Share page” from within any tablet or phone app — the browser, for example — and follow the prompts. The Web page will print via Cloud Print from the tablet or phone onto your home-base printer. The printer must be switched on and connected to a switched on PC.

Other Native Chrome Cloud Products

The Google cloud-oriented Docs, Calendar and Gmail products are tightly integrated with Chrome and the Android operating system. Try the
Google Docs Chrome extension and Android app for generating cloud-based documents across devices.

Follow the same procedure that you used to install Chrome to Phone and Cloud Print by installing the Chrome extension for Docs on the PC, and then the Docs app on the Android device. Make sure that the Google accounts match across extension and app because that’s what ties the cloud data between Chrome browser and Android app.

Want to Ask a Tech Question?

Is there a piece of tech you’d like to know how to operate properly? Is there a gadget that’s got you confounded? Please
send your tech questions to me, and I’ll try to answer as many as possible in this column.

And use the Talkback feature below to add your comments!


Article source: http://www.technewsworld.com/rsstory/74791.html

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20 Dec 11 Review: Chrome, the Sweet 16 Web Browser?


Say hello to Chrome 16: Google's lastest browser.

Say hello to Chrome 16: Google’s latest browser.

Mozilla, bless its heart, keeps trying to make Firefox relevant again with its speedy update schedule, but it just hasn’t been working out. Google, on the other hand, with its new Chrome sweet 16 release keeps getting better than ever.

No, there’s nothing new in capital letters in this release. It’s still fast, but as fast as it once was, and it includes a couple of nice, useful improvements. Under the hood, as always, there are several important security improvements.

If you haven’t tried Chrome yet, here are the basics. The Chrome Web browser has a minimalist interface. Instead of a tool-bar, the basic interface has a combination address and search bar, the Omnibox, at the top with tabs above that. The handful of visible control buttons consist of Back, Forward, a combined Stop/Reload button, and a preferences wrench icon. That’s it.

If you add extensions, they’ll appear as icons on the right of the Omnibox. If you like having lots of tool-bars and endless interface tweaking power, Chrome is not for you. If you want a clean, fast Web browser Chrome is for you.

That’s not to say you can’t add a lot of extra stuff to Chrome. The whole point of a Chromebook, for example, is that you can do pretty much anything you need to do on a computer with just a Web browser and a bunch of cloud-based applications and extensions. To find these with Chrome, head over to the Chrome Web Store.

Which of the big five Web Browsers is the Best? (Review)

Chrome 16 does come with two new features that you might like. The first is you can now print any Web page to any Google Cloud Print printer you’re allowed to use. Cloud Print is a Google service you can use that enables you to turn any printer into an Internet-connected printer. You control who can print to your Cloud Print-connected printers.

With Chrome, you can now print across the Internet.

With Chrome, you can now print across the Internet.

The second, and this one at this point I don’t see as being that useful, is you can sync multiple users to one copy of Chrome. So, for example, you can have multiple people via their Gmail accounts, running their own Chrome settings. So, for example, when I log into my Google account on my laptop’s copy of Chrome, I get my applications, bookmarks, and settings. When my buddy logs in, she’ll get her settings.

So far, so good, but, there’s no security between logins. She can see all my settings and I can see hers. You may be OK with that, but I’m not and I can’t see it in a work environment where people share PCs. Once they have some rudimentary security between sessions I’ll find this feature much more useful. You may find it useful now.

To use this multi-user function, go to the wrench icon, Personal Stuff, and you’ll see a new option: Users. Once there, slect the add a new user and your friend or co-worker be up and running in a minute.

Chrome 16 won't let you run out-of-date applets unless you tell it to.

Chrome 16 won’t let you run out of date applets unless you give it express permission to run them.

Thinking of security, besides the usual array of security fixes that any browser gets with a new release, Chrome now won’t let you run any out of date plug-ins unless you explicitly agree to let it run. So, for example, if you try to run an old copy of Flash, you must, on every page, agree to let it run. Considering how many security problems can be laid to the door of browser plug-ins these days, I think this is a good move. I’d like to see other Web browser developers adopt this policy.

Moving along to the basics, Chrome is still great at observing Web standards. Like almost all modern browsers, it gets a perfect score on the Acid 3 compatibility test, which checks how well a browser complies with various Web standards such as CSS, JavaScript, and Extensible Markup Language (XML),

On the HTML5 Test, which checks to see how compliant the Web browser is with the HTML5 Web page standard, Chrome 15 scored 344 out of a possible 450. The next best is Firefox 8 with a score of 314.

When it comes to performance, I ran Chrome against latest releases of Firefox, 8.01, and Internet Explorer, 9.08, on a Gateway DX4710 Windows 7 SP1 test box. This PC is powered by a 2.5-GHz Intel Core 2 Quad processor and has 6GBs of RAM and an Intel GMA (Graphics Media Accelerator) 3100 for graphics. It’s hooked to the Internet via a Netgear Gigabit Ethernet switch, which, in turn, is hooked up to a 60Mbps (Megabit per second) cable Internet connection.

For my first test, Chrome went up against the others on Mozilla’s Kraken 1.1 benchmark. In Kraken, which like most Web browser benchmarks measures JavaScript performance, lower scores are better. Here, Chrome left Firefox and IE in the dust with a score of 3990.9ms. Firefox came in next with a score of 6792.9ms followed by IE with an awful 16,630.7ms.

Google has its own JavaScript V8 Benchmark Suite, where higher scores are better, Chrome, to no surprise, won again. This time it scored 7,661. Firefox came in next at 3,775, with IE behind it with 2,193.

On the grand-daddy of JavaScript tests, SunSpider 0.9.1, where lower results are better, Chrome didn’t do that well. IE won with a score of 252.6ms, Firefox came in second with 303.5ms, and Chrome came in last with 319.7.

On the Peacekeeper Web browser test suite, which looks at JavaScript performance and beyond to HTML5 compatibility, video codec support and other Web browser features as well, Chrome won again. On this benchmark, where higher is better and Chrome once more won out with a score of 2,673. Firefox and IE were both far behind with scores of 1,699 and 1,626 respectively.

What it all means in the final number-crunching is that Chrome 16 is actually slightly slower than Chrome 15. Still, generally speaking it’s still faster than the other major Web browsers, experts agree that it’s the most secure Web browsers, and its features make it the best of the current Web browsers. Put it all-together and Chrome at its sweet 16th release is still the Web browser to beat.

Related Stories:

Google wants you to buy a Chromebook: Should you? (Review)

The Chromebook at work (gallery)

New study claims that Chrome is the most secure browser

Is Firefox toast?

Which of the big five Web Browsers is the Best? (Review)

Article source: http://www.zdnet.com/blog/networking/review-chrome-the-sweet-16-web-browser/1759

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16 Dec 11 Google Cloud Print Connects 6M Printers Via Chrome


Google (NASDAQ:GOOG) said Google Cloud Print has
connected more than 6 million printers via the Google Chrome Web browser, the
first time the search engine giant-turned business computing provider has
released statistics for its Web-based printing service.

More importantly, the new Chrome 16 build lets anyone
using the browser on Windows, Mac and Linux computers will print any webpage to
Google Cloud Print. Previously, this capability was only available via
Chromebooks.

Google introduced Google Cloud Print in April 2010 to let any application print to any
printer from any computing device using Google’s cloud computing
infrastructure.

The Web service was designed to enable printing for
notebook computers based on its Chrome Operating System, a Web-based operating
system that eschews drivers. Google, which is positioning Chrome OS as a way to
extend its cloud and mobile computing efforts, said it did not want to build a
bunch of printer drivers for every computing device and operating system.

Thus Cloud Print, which the companyformally rolled out this year and gained support from printer power
Hewlett-Packard in April 2011.

Chrome OS-based Chromebooks rolled out from Samsung and Acer rolled out this
past summer, but adoption of the machines has been tepid at best.Both companies are now selling the machines for $300.

Despite the lukewarm reception to Chromebooks, Google Cloud Print Product Manager Akshay
Kannan said
in a blog post Google has seen “a surge of enthusiasm from
users and developers.”

In addition to the 6 million Cloud Print-connected
printers, he said dozens of cloud-ready printers have been released or
announced by Epson, HP and Kodak. Also, developers have built applications and
extensions to port the service to run on mobile devices based on Apple’s (NASDAQ:AAPL) iOS and Google’s own
Android platform.

Kannan also noted that Google now enables Cloud Print
users to their printers with friends and family, while users can now save their
online receipts and confirmation pages to the Google Docs collaboration
app. 

Webmasters can add the print button
element to their Website to enable printing functionality for tablets and
mobile phones, and Google turned on print preview for Chromebooks.

Google plans to enable Cloud Print from more Google apps
and work with partners to add more printers and printing services.

 


Article source: http://www.eweek.com/c/a/Printers/Google-Cloud-Print-Connects-6M-Printers-Via-Chrome-254938/

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16 Dec 11 Google Chrome Adds Cloud Print Option, Multiple Profile Support


The newest version of Google Chrome now has an option to print any webpage using Cloud Print and multiple profile support for users on one computer to maintain separate settings. The additions are available in version 16 for Windows, Mac and Linux users. Here’s a quick look at what’s new to Chrome 16.

Print to the cloud

Google Chrome Adds Cloud Print Option, Multiple Profile SupportGoogle Cloud Print, which launched in January, lets you print to your home or office printer from almost any Web-enabled device. But using Cloud Print was restricted to webpages with a special Cloud Print button, specific Google apps such as Docs or desktop apps such as Cloud Printer for Mac. Now, any user can use Chrome to print to a Cloud Print-ready printer or a computer acting as a Cloud Print server.

To use Cloud Print select Print from Chrome’s menu options underneath the wrench icon. This will take you to a print preview page where you can select “Print with Google Cloud Print” from the “Destination” dropdown menu on the left-hand side of the screen. Then select “Print” at the top of the print dialog when you’re ready to put ink to paper.

Multiple profiles

Google Chrome Adds Cloud Print Option, Multiple Profile SupportMultiple profiles first appeared in Chrome’s beta channel in November as way for multiple users to keep their bookmarks, Web apps and other settings separate. This can be a handy feature if you have more than one user clamoring to use a household PC, but you can’t be bothered to switch user profiles using your PC’s operating system.

To get started, click on Chrome’s wrench icon and select “Preferences” to open the browser’s settings page in a new tab. Then, on the left-hand side, click on “Personal Stuff.” Alternatively, just type in “chrome://settings/personal” in an empty browser tab.

Google Chrome Adds Cloud Print Option, Multiple Profile SupportThe second item from the top should be called “Users.” Select “Add new user.” A new browser window will open with a blank profile using a generic name such as “Fluffy” or “Awesome” and one of Chrome’s 26 user avatars. The active user’s avatar will appear in the upper-right corner of the Chrome browser in Mac and on the left-hand side for Windows. You can edit each profile’s username and avatar under “chrome://settings/personal.”

Each user can also sign in separately to their Google account to sync Chrome settings stored online. This is a handy feature if you want access to your Chrome settings on a PC that isn’t yours. But as my colleague Jared Newman pointed out in November, just make sure that you erase your user profile on any computers that aren’t yours. Chrome profiles are not secure, there is no password protection so anyone using the same PC will have access to your browser settings.

Connect with Ian Paul (@ianpaul ) and Today@PCWorld on Twitter for the latest tech news and analysis.

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Article source: http://www.pcworld.com/article/246285/google_chrome_adds_cloud_print_option_multiple_profile_support.html

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15 Dec 11 Chrome, Cloud Print finally get a proper handshake


Google’s Cloud Print now is the default print manager in Chrome.

(Credit:
Screenshot by Seth Rosenblatt/CNET)

Google’s remote printing feature called Cloud Print got a big boost with Chrome 16, the company announced today. Cloud Print now comes directly integrated into the browser, along with a host of useful changes to the service.

The update expands Cloud Print into a more robust tool, which Google said has more than 6 million connected printers and numerous
Android and iOS apps to support it since its debut in April. Along with the Chrome integration, the new Cloud Print update gives Chromebook users a full, traditional Print Preview option, and the service now lets you save Web pages such as receipts and confirmation pages to Google Docs.

Cloud Print now can share and control printer access; its interface has been tweaked to be more
tablet-friendly; and the Print button has been developed into an element that site designers can add independently to their Web sites.

Hitting Control+P (or Command+P on a
Mac) will now default to the Cloud Print interface, although your local printer will still be selected. Cloud Print is an option from the drop-down on the left, and there’s an option below it to choose to run the print job through your operating system’s print manager.

A Google spokesperson clarified that Chrome previously had limited Cloud Print integration that depended on a Web app or Chrome extension, but it didn’t use the browser’s print flow directly. This means that both Chrome the browser and the Chrome OS have identical Cloud Print workflow.

Article source: http://download.cnet.com/8301-2007_4-57343264-12/chrome-cloud-print-finally-get-a-proper-handshake/?part=rss&subj=software&tag=title

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