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14 Mar 12 Windows 8 version of Chrome browser coming


MOUNTAIN VIEW, Calif., March 13 (UPI) — U.S. search giant Google says it is working on a version of its Chrome Web browser for Windows 8 that will run in the operating system’s Metro interface.

“Our goal is to be able to offer our users a speedy, simple, secure Chrome experience across all platforms, which includes both the desktop and Metro versions of Windows 8,” a Google spokesperson told Mashable.

The Google announcement follows a similar one last month from Mozilla, which said it has been developing a version of its Firefox browser that includes both a Metro and desktop interface in a single application.

Google confirmed Chrome for Windows 8 will be optimized for touch support, enabling users to use Chrome on any Windows 8 tablets as well as desktop computers, slashgear.com reported Tuesday.

In the current Windows 8 Consumer Preview, one version of Microsoft’s own Internet Explorer runs specifically on Metro, and doesn’t support Flash, while the other runs in the traditional desktop interface, both sporting radically different interfaces, slashgear.com said.

Article source: http://www.upi.com/Science_News/2012/03/13/Windows-8-version-of-Chrome-browser-coming/UPI-92621331670625/

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13 Mar 12 Google Confirms It’s Working on Chrome for Windows 8


google-chrome-600Google says it’s working on a version of Chrome that will run in the Metro environment. The news follows the revelation that Mozilla is building Firefox for Metro as well.

A Google spokesperson told Mashable that the new version of Chrome would be based on the desktop browser (as opposed to the Android version).

“Our goal is to be able to offer our users a speedy, simple, secure Chrome experience across all platforms, which includes both the desktop and Metro versions of Windows 8,” the rep said. “To that end we’re in the process of building a Metro version of Chrome along with improving desktop Chrome in Windows 8 such as adding enhanced touch support.”

That means when Windows 8 tablets start to appear later this year, customers will be able to use the same browsers they use in Windows 7, but re-imagined for the Metro interface.

Metro is the touch-friendly way of interacting for Windows 8 that’s ideally suited for tablets, though it also works with a mouse and keyboard. Users can either use Metro or the Windows traditional desktop.

SEE ALSO: Hands On With Google Chrome for Android

However, there was some question until recently whether Microsoft would even allow browsers other than the in-house Internet Explorer to run in Metro. In a recently published white paper, the company revealed that other Metro browsers were welcome, and they’d even get some privileges other Metro apps don’t have (like multitasking). The downside: users will only be able to run a single browser in Metro, the default one.

So what will the touch-enabled version of Chrome be like? Google’s history and Chrome for Android can offer some guidance: Think automatic syncing with your phone and Google account, tabs that you can swipe through and extensions galore.

What would you like to see in a Metro version of Chrome? Leave your suggestions in the comments.

Image courtesy of iStockphoto, andrearoad


BONUS: Microsoft Unveils the Windows 8 Consumer Preview




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Article source: http://mashable.com/2012/03/12/chrome-windows-8/

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13 Mar 12 Google Confirms It's Working on Chrome for Windows 8


Google says it’s working on a version of Chrome that will run in the Metro environment. The news follows the revelation that Mozilla is building Firefox for Metro as well.

A Google spokesperson told Mashable that the new version of Chrome would be based on the desktop browser (as opposed to the Android version).

[More from Mashable: Facebook Makes It Harder to Post From Google Blogger]

“Our goal is to be able to offer our users a speedy, simple, secure Chrome experience across all platforms, which includes both the desktop and Metro versions of Windows 8,” the rep said. “To that end we’re in the process of building a Metro version of Chrome along with improving desktop Chrome in Windows 8 such as adding enhanced touch support.”

That means when Windows 8 tablets start to appear later this year, customers will be able to use the same browsers they use in Windows 7, but re-imagined for the Metro interface.

[More from Mashable: Top 10 Tech This Week [PICS]]

Metro is the touch-friendly way of interacting for Windows 8 that’s ideally suited for tablets, though it also works with a mouse and keyboard. Users can either use Metro or the Windows traditional desktop.

SEE ALSO: Hands On With Google Chrome for Android

However, there was some question until recently whether Microsoft would even allow browsers other than the in-house Internet Explorer to run in Metro. In a recently published white paper, the company revealed that other Metro browsers were welcome, and they’d even get some privileges other Metro apps don’t have (like multitasking). The downside: users will only be able to run a single browser in Metro, the default one.

So what will the touch-enabled version of Chrome be like? Google’s history and Chrome for Android can offer some guidance: Think automatic syncing with your phone and Google account, tabs that you can swipe through and extensions galore.

What would you like to see in a Metro version of Chrome? Leave your suggestions in the comments.

Image courtesy of iStockphoto, andrearoad


BONUS: Microsoft Unveils the Windows 8 Consumer Preview


Windows 8 at Mobile World Congress

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This story originally published on Mashable here.

Article source: http://news.yahoo.com/google-confirms-working-chrome-windows-8-185329800.html

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05 Mar 12 Google’s Chrome shares drop from PageRank demotion, suggest statistics


Chrome’s pre-rendering feature – where the browser loads pages in the background that the user may view - kicked off last August with version 13, and was enhanced in Chrome 17 that launched about a month ago.

As users type in search strings. whether at Google.com or in the browser’s combined address bar/search field, dubbed the “omnibox,” Google loads one or more hidden pages that it thinks the user will select from the ensuing search links.

Net Applications admitted that it had given Chrome a larger share than the browser deserved. “[Pre-rendering] creates unviewed visits that should not be counted in Chrome’s usage share,” said Net Applications on its website yesterday.

Starting with the data from February, Net Applications has adjusted Chrome’s share – which is derived from the page views attributed to the browser – by tossing aside unused pre-loaded pages and counting only those the user actually sees.

“Pre-rendering in February 2012 accounted for 4.3 percent of Chrome’s daily unique visitors,” said Net Applications.

Chrome is the only major browser that offers pre-rendering.

Punishing itself with a 60-day PageRank demotion

Under the new methodology, Chrome’s share fell about one half of a percentage point to end February with 18.9 percent, off its peak of 19.1 percent last December. The browser remained in the No. 3 slot, behind both IE and Mozilla’s Firefox.

Last month, Net Applications linked Chrome’s decline to Google’s January decision to demote the PageRank – a rating Google assigns based on how many other sites link to a URL – for Chrome’s download site after it confirmed a marketing campaign had violated the company’s own rules against paid links.

At the time, Google said it would punish its own browser with a 60-day PageRank demotion; the time-out ends in a few days, after which Google will presumably restore the download page’s prominence in search results for “browser.”

There was little movement by any of the top three browsers: Chrome has been stalled the last two months, as its flat line shows. (Data: Net Applications.)

Currently, Firefox is the top result of such searches, while Opera Software’s Opera is third, Apple’s Safari is fifth and IE is seventh.

IE lost just over one-tenth of a percentage point to account for 52.8 percent of all browsers used on desktop and notebook personal computers, while Firefox stayed flat at 20.9 percent.

Safari’s share grew the most of any browser last month, adding three-tenths of a percentage point to reach 5.2 percent, an all-time high in Net Applications’ tracking. Safari’s spike wasn’t a surprise: The share of Mac OS X, whose users also comprise the bulk of Safari’s users, climbed by a record amount last month, too.

IE9 accounts for 30.2% of the world’s browsers

Among the multiple editions of IE, the 11-year-old IE6 lost the most share, falling by more than a percentage point to 6.9 percent, while the newer IE7 fell to 4.7 percent.

Meanwhile, IE8 and IE9 gained four-tenths of a point and almost a full point, respectively. IE9 saw its share climb to 12.6 percent worldwide.

IE9 on Windows 7, which Microsoft again said was its “core metric”, now accounts for 30.1 percent of the world’s browsers used on that operating system, and owns a 40.5 percent share of the Windows 7 browser market in the US.

On Wednesday, Microsoft issued the fifth so-called “Platform Preview” of IE10, the next browser in its line, as part of the Windows 8 Consumer Preview. The preview – essentially an alpha edition – also runs on Windows 7, but will not work on either Windows XP or Vista.

Net Applications has not yet begun tracking IE10 share.

Rival Irish measurement company StatCounter painted a gloomier picture of IE’s position, saying that Microsoft’s browser had dropped 1.7 points to 35.8 percent, while Chrome was in the No. 2 spot with 29.8 percent – an increase of 1.4 points – and Firefox held steady at third with 24.9 percent.

Net Applications calculates browser usage share with data obtained from more than 160 million unique visitors who browse 40,000 Web sites that the company monitors. More browser statistics can be found on the company’s site.

Article source: http://www.computerworlduk.com/news/it-business/3342030/googles-chrome-shares-drop-from-pagerank-demotion-suggest-statistics/

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02 Mar 12 It’s March Madness for Chrome and Internet Explorer


Trouble looms ahead this month for Chrome, while Internet Explorer is poised for a growth surge. Behind this March Madness both browsers share something in common — their ties to either Google or Microsoft other products or services. Chrome will be penalized for one, while IE is set to gain from the other.

Chrome is one of the decade’s stunning success stories, in part because of Google’s rapid innovation that puts out a new version about every six weeks. But Google also benefits from ties to its other products and services, with search being high among them. Recent browser usage share growth reversals reveal just how much — in January and February stats compiled by Net Applications.

NetApps plans to close a technical loophole that helped Chrome game the system, so to speak, although Google’s intention surely was more about keeping/getting users than raising usage stats. Concurrent with Chrome 13′s release, Google started prerendering hidden pages from its search portal to speed up queries. With Chrome 17, Google extended the capability to the browser’s “omnibox”.

“Chrome is the only major desktop browser that currently has this feature, which creates unviewed visits that should not be counted in Chrome’s usage share,” according to NetApps. “However, the pages that are eventually viewed by the user should be treated normally”.

In February prerendering “accounted for 4.3 percent of Chrome’s daily unique visitors. These visits will now be excluded from Chrome’s desktop browser share”.

That could work out to a significant nip, in March, to Chrome usage share growth, which already hit a wall in January. Through December 2011, Chrome usage share grew for 14 consecutive months. On January 3, Google announced a temporary downgrading of Chrome’s page rank — how high it appears in searches — following a minor scandal with a third-party ad agency. The marketer paid bloggers to write about Chrome, which violates Google policies on sponsored links. The search and information giant treated itself like other advertisers, lowering Chrome’s search ranking for 60 days.

The result: Chrome usage share declined in January, and again last month. NetApps released February data today. From December to January, Google usage share fell from 19.11 percent to 18.94 percent — and to 18 percent last month. Google is scheduled to lift Chrome’s page rank over the weekend. The questions: How much lower would the browser’s usage share be without the prerendering benefit? How will its absence affect March, even as Google pushes up Chrome’s search ranking? There may be answer when this month’s stats are released on April Fools Day.

Internet Explorer’s situation is just the opposite. Chrome’s January usage drain was IE’s gain. Usage share rose 1.1 points month on month to 52.96 percent share, but dipped to 52.84 percent in February.

Yesterday, Microsoft released Windows 8 Consumer Preview, which already passed 1 million downloads today. The operating system comes with Internet Explorer 10 Platform Preview 5. Integration into Windows benefits IE.

The question: Will enough people download Windows 8 and use IE10 to boost browser usage share? Surely there has to be some benefit, say, if someone mostly or mainly using Chrome switches to IE10, even temporarily, to test the browser. Usage share isn’t finite like market share. The latter typically tracks X over Y time period. The other measure takes into account that people can, and do, use multiple browsers — and that’s more likely when testing a new version of Windows.

So as Chrome looks down, IE conceptually looks up — and movement for either browser can affect others. In February, Firefox usage share was 20.92 percent, up from 20.88 percent. Safari also gained, rising to 5.24 percent from 4.9 percent a month earlier. Chrome losses could be their gains.

Photo Credit: camicuibus/Shutterstock

Article source: http://betanews.com/2012/03/01/its-march-madness-for-chrome-and-internet-explorer/

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