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20 Dec 12 Google planning cheaper Nexus 7, report claims


Google may be aiming for a Nexus 7 that is priced below $149 and eventually as low as $99.

Google may be aiming for a Nexus 7 that is priced below $149 and eventually as low as $99.


(Credit:
Google)

Google is planning low-ball itself with an even cheaper
Nexus 7, according to an Asia-based report.

Google and Asus wowed consumers with the $199 Nexus 7 and now they’re aiming at price points below $150, ultimately going as low as $99, according to Taipei-based Digitimes, citing sources at display component maker O-Film Tech.

The lower-priced Nexus 7 should be released by the second quarter of next year, said the technology site, which covers device manufacturers and component suppliers in Asia.

O-Film started shipping components for the lower-priced Nexus 7 in December, the report said. The company’s touch-screen glass-glass film technology will contribute to lower production costs and make it thinner, Digitimes said.

The cost-reduction measures could eventually lead to a $99 Nexus 7 but this may not happen initially. The cheaper Nexus 7 may first be priced in the $129 to $149 range, according to the report.

Shipment estimates of the new Nexus 7 are in the range of 500,000 to 600,000 in the first quarter of shipments.

Needless to say, a Nexus 7 priced below $150 and eventually going to $99 would make Google’s
tablet even more competitively priced against the $329
iPad Mini — even allowing for the high-quality build that Apple typically achieves with its tablets.

And, as always, this Digitimes report is coming from the supply chain, which can be very unpredictable. Orders for an unconfirmed new component or new product can be canceled at any time.

Also note that there are rumors already about a $99 Asus tablet that could be a forerunner to an upcoming Nexus 7.

Google and Asus are currently shipping about one million Nexus 7 devices per month, according to recent statements from Asus executives.

A cheaper Nexus 7 might give consumers pause when considering the iPad Mini.

A cheaper Nexus 7 might give consumers pause when considering the iPad Mini.


(Credit:
Apple)

Article source: http://news.cnet.com/8301-1035_3-57560175-94/google-planning-cheaper-nexus-7-report-claims/

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25 May 12 Google announces in-app subscriptions for Android apps


The new in-app subscription feature should open up new revenue opportunities.

(Credit:
Google)

Google today announced a new feature for
Android applications offered through the Google Play store. Available immediately for Android developers, in-app subscriptions will allow users to pay for monthly or annual subscriptions directly inside of apps. And as detailed by Google, the feature is set to auto-renew by default with transactions managed by the Google Play store.

In addition to adding a new level of convenience, the move opens the door to added revenue streams and even new types of content through Google Play. Looking forward, today’s announcement could entice magazines and news journals to offer subscriptions to consumers directly through Google Play.

After introducing in-app billing a year ago, Google now says that it has become quite profitable for developers. According to the Android Developers blog, 23 of the 24 top-grossing apps in Google Play take advantage of the feature, and the total revenue generated from in-app purchases exceeds that from traditional in-store purchases.

The first apps to implement the in-app subscription feature are expected to arrive in the coming days. Glu Mobile, a popular Android game developer, advises that it will release updated versions of its top titles with subscriptions through custom VIP currency packages.

Developers interested in offering in-app subscriptions are encouraged to log in to the Android dashboard and review the in-app billing documentation. Google advises that it has already enabled back-end support for devices running Google Play 3.5 or higher and that users can begin buying subscriptions immediately.

Article source: http://reviews.cnet.com/8301-19736_7-57441195-251/google-announces-in-app-subscriptions-for-android-apps/

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12 Apr 12 Device syncing on-deck for Chrome


Chrome now offers Other Devices for tab syncing.

(Credit:
Google)

Google has started to warm up Chrome with features designed to make it interact more smoothly with
Android and other computers, as the summer’s Google I/O conference and a possible final street-ready version of Native Client wait in the wings.

Google Chrome 19 beta for Windows, Mac, Linux, and Chrome Frame landed today, updated with Other Device support. The new feature lets you access your Chrome tabs from other computers, and includes Chrome for Android if you’ve got an Ice Cream Sandwich device. The Other Devices option is available at the bottom of the New Tab page, next to the Recently Closed drop-down menu. Along with syncing open tabs, it also syncs that particular tab’s history, so you can navigate forward and back when you open it on a new device.

Today also saw the arrival of the developer’s build of Chrome 20 (download for Windows, Mac, Linux), which had given people access to Other Device support previously but now comes with a Chrome to Mobile option that lets you send a page directly to Chrome for Android. You still have enable the option in about:flags, but it does give you the ability to send a URL directly to Chrome for Android. It’s basically Google’s in-house version of Chrome to Phone.

Google has made available the full revision logs for Chrome 19 beta and Chrome 20 dev. As of yet, there’s been no official Native Client progress update . That’s likely to change as work progresses on Chrome 19 and Chrome 20.

Article source: http://news.cnet.com/8301-1001_3-57412763-92/device-syncing-on-deck-for-chrome/

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12 Apr 12 Device syncing on-deck for Chrome


Chrome now offers Other Devices for tab syncing.

(Credit:
Google)

Google has started to warm up Chrome with features designed to make it interact more smoothly with
Android and other computers, as the summer’s Google I/O conference and a possible final street-ready version of Native Client wait in the wings.

Google Chrome 19 beta for Windows, Mac, Linux, and Chrome Frame landed today, updated with Other Device support. The new feature lets you access your Chrome tabs from other computers, and includes Chrome for Android if you’ve got an Ice Cream Sandwich device. The Other Devices option is available at the bottom of the New Tab page, next to the Recently Closed drop-down menu. Along with syncing open tabs, it also syncs that particular tab’s history, so you can navigate forward and back when you open it on a new device.

Today also saw the arrival of the developer’s build of Chrome 20 (download for Windows, Mac, Linux), which had given people access to Other Device support previously but now comes with a Chrome to Mobile option that lets you send a page directly to Chrome for Android. You still have enable the option in about:flags, but it does give you the ability to send a URL directly to Chrome for Android. It’s basically Google’s in-house version of Chrome to Phone.

Google has made available the full revision logs for Chrome 19 beta and Chrome 20 dev. As of yet, there’s been no official Native Client progress update . That’s likely to change as work progresses on Chrome 19 and Chrome 20.

Article source: http://download.cnet.com/8301-2007_4-57412763-12/device-syncing-on-deck-for-chrome/?part=rss&subj=software&tag=title

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14 Jan 12 Google uncloaks Chrome’s top security goals


Chrome’s privacy controls.

(Credit:
Screenshot by Seth Rosenblatt/CNET)

Google’s Chrome security team unveiled yesterday its guiding principles on how they build a safer browser.

The manifesto declares seven key guidelines for Chrome security. The first one, “Don’t get in the way,” both echoes Google’s unofficial motto, “Don’t be evil,” and reflects what many Windows security vendors have learned the hard way about keeping people safe. If security negatively affects performance, users will look to alternatives. For a browser which has built its user base on speed, sluggish response times have the potential to wreak great havoc.

“It’s great to see invisibility and automatic background updates as the first principal. Good security is transparent and inescapable,” said Chris Wysopal, chief technology officer at Veracode. “The less security decisions that involve the user the better. Every security decision made by the user is a chance that something with be postponed or forgotten or worse, an opportunity for social engineering.”

Privacy is not mentioned in the list of principles, and that may raise the hackles of some security experts. “I think Google’s approach to privacy is a little bit different than others,” said Jeremiah Grossman, WhiteHat Security’s chief technology officer. “They make the assumption that you trust them, but if you don’t trust them then you have to separate the two. You can’t protect your data that’s on Google, from Google, because it’s contrary to their business model.”

(Credit:
Google)

Google does have a site dedicated to explaining privacy in Chrome, and it does have a company-wide privacy policy that applies to Chrome. However, there isn’t a company policy statement on Chrome privacy like the new security manifesto.

A Google representative told me that the Chrome security team works in close conjunction with Google’s overall security team, as well as the Chrome team itself. “We protect users by embedding security deeply into our culture, as well as our process for designing and developing products. This relentless focus on security often benefits the web more broadly as well, either through our own action or through others who adopt similar approaches,” the representative said.

The need for speed has found its way into Chrome security, and the representative pointed to regular release note updates as evidence of this. “We’ve demonstrated that we will shine a light on security topics that are relevant to our users, even when most companies wouldn’t,” he said, with tough benchmarks set for response time and how long systems are left unpatched.

Of course, Google is hardly the only company to take this approach. Mozilla also regularly publishes security update release notes, and Microsoft has become so regular at publishing security updates to Internet Explorer and its other software that Patch Tuesday has become lingua franca in the computer security world.

Microsoft recently touted a decade of security achievements, and it’s practically universally accepted that the company learned some tough lessons in the past 10 years.

Not surprisingly, Microsoft’s current policies of a company-wide approach to security echo Google’s similar stance with Chrome. Chrome’s third core principle states that security is a “team responsibility,” which was explained to me as meaning that browser security concerns go beyond the realm of just the Chrome security team to include Google’s general security group and the general Chrome group. While this may sound obvious to some, cross-department communication has had an impact on the browser’s development, said the Google representative.

“Engaging the security community makes Google part of the security community. More technology companies should take this approach. They have set up a cooperative and non-adversarial posture. Microsoft pioneered this approach, but Google has taken it a step further with their bug bounties,” said Wysopal.

Google has said that the quality of the bug reports has helped it fix vulnerabilities much faster. The company has paid out more than $200,000 for Chrome and Chromium-related security bugs found by bug hunters. The open-source progenitor of Chrome, Chromium was around for a year before Google debuted Chrome.

While likely familiar to many who keep tabs on browser security, the principles document stands as a place where Google can point to its achievements in the field as well as its goals. Some of the Chrome features referenced in the document include the mention of anti-exploit technologies such as JIT hardening along with Google-sourced innovations like the Safe Browsing API. The “Make the Web safer for everyone” section notes numerous public security standards like public key pinning, SPDY, and Native Client.

Grossman concluded that despite some concerns about Chrome, that the project has been a boon for the Web. “I think they’re doing a lot more right than wrong when it comes to browser speed and security,” he said.

Correction 4:41 p.m. PT: This story originally misstated the amount of money rewarded to bug hunters working on Chrome and Chromium. The correct sum is more than $200,000.
Update 4:45 p.m. PT: The story has been updated with a link to Google’s company-wide privacy policy, which it says also applies to Chrome.

Article source: http://download.cnet.com/8301-2007_4-57359066-12/google-uncloaks-chromes-top-security-goals/

Tags: , , ,

14 Jan 12 Google uncloaks Chrome's top security goals


Chrome’s privacy controls.

(Credit:
Screenshot by Seth Rosenblatt/CNET)

Google’s Chrome security team unveiled yesterday its guiding principles on how they build a safer browser.

The manifesto declares seven key guidelines for Chrome security. The first one, “Don’t get in the way,” both echoes Google’s unofficial motto, “Don’t be evil,” and reflects what many Windows security vendors have learned the hard way about keeping people safe. If security negatively affects performance, users will look to alternatives. For a browser which has built its user base on speed, sluggish response times have the potential to wreak great havoc.

“It’s great to see invisibility and automatic background updates as the first principal. Good security is transparent and inescapable,” said Chris Wysopal, chief technology officer at Veracode. “The less security decisions that involve the user the better. Every security decision made by the user is a chance that something with be postponed or forgotten or worse, an opportunity for social engineering.”

Privacy is not mentioned in the list of principles, and that may raise the hackles of some security experts. “I think Google’s approach to privacy is a little bit different than others,” said Jeremiah Grossman, WhiteHat Security’s chief technology officer. “They make the assumption that you trust them, but if you don’t trust them then you have to separate the two. You can’t protect your data that’s on Google, from Google, because it’s contrary to their business model.”

(Credit:
Google)

Google does have a site dedicated to explaining privacy in Chrome, and it does have a company-wide privacy policy that applies to Chrome. However, there isn’t a company policy statement on Chrome privacy like the new security manifesto.

A Google representative told me that the Chrome security team works in close conjunction with Google’s overall security team, as well as the Chrome team itself. “We protect users by embedding security deeply into our culture, as well as our process for designing and developing products. This relentless focus on security often benefits the web more broadly as well, either through our own action or through others who adopt similar approaches,” the representative said.

The need for speed has found its way into Chrome security, and the representative pointed to regular release note updates as evidence of this. “We’ve demonstrated that we will shine a light on security topics that are relevant to our users, even when most companies wouldn’t,” he said, with tough benchmarks set for response time and how long systems are left unpatched.

Of course, Google is hardly the only company to take this approach. Mozilla also regularly publishes security update release notes, and Microsoft has become so regular at publishing security updates to Internet Explorer and its other software that Patch Tuesday has become lingua franca in the computer security world.

Microsoft recently touted a decade of security achievements, and it’s practically universally accepted that the company learned some tough lessons in the past 10 years.

Not surprisingly, Microsoft’s current policies of a company-wide approach to security echo Google’s similar stance with Chrome. Chrome’s third core principle states that security is a “team responsibility,” which was explained to me as meaning that browser security concerns go beyond the realm of just the Chrome security team to include Google’s general security group and the general Chrome group. While this may sound obvious to some, cross-department communication has had an impact on the browser’s development, said the Google representative.

“Engaging the security community makes Google part of the security community. More technology companies should take this approach. They have set up a cooperative and non-adversarial posture. Microsoft pioneered this approach, but Google has taken it a step further with their bug bounties,” said Wysopal.

Google has said that the quality of the bug reports has helped it fix vulnerabilities much faster. The company has paid out more than $200,000 for Chrome and Chromium-related security bugs found by bug hunters. The open-source progenitor of Chrome, Chromium was around for a year before Google debuted Chrome.

While likely familiar to many who keep tabs on browser security, the principles document stands as a place where Google can point to its achievements in the field as well as its goals. Some of the Chrome features referenced in the document include the mention of anti-exploit technologies such as JIT hardening along with Google-sourced innovations like the Safe Browsing API. The “Make the Web safer for everyone” section notes numerous public security standards like public key pinning, SPDY, and Native Client.

Grossman concluded that despite some concerns about Chrome, that the project has been a boon for the Web. “I think they’re doing a lot more right than wrong when it comes to browser speed and security,” he said.

Correction 4:41 p.m. PT: This story originally misstated the amount of money rewarded to bug hunters working on Chrome and Chromium. The correct sum is more than $200,000.
Update 4:45 p.m. PT: The story has been updated with a link to Google’s company-wide privacy policy, which it says also applies to Chrome.

Article source: http://download.cnet.com/8301-2007_4-57359066-12/google-uncloaks-chromes-top-security-goals/?part=rss&subj=software&tag=title

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