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21 Dec 12 Send one-click automated Gmail replies with Chrome extension


Do you find that you are forced to repeat yourself throughout the workday? If this repetition occurs via e-mail, then you might give GmailWiz a try. This Chrome extension adds up to four buttons to Gmail that send automated responses.


(Credit:
Screenshot by Matt Elliott/CNET)

After installing GmailWiz, a thumbs-up Like button gets added to the right of Gmail’s reply button. You won’t see this button when viewing your inbox; it shows up only when you are reading an e-mail message. You’ll also see that wand icon gets added just above, in the row with the print and open in new window buttons. Click on the wand to go to GmailWiz’s settings.

In settings, you can choose to enable any of the four available instant-reply buttons. They are: Like, TL;DR (too long; didn’t read), Got it, and Let’s Discuss. Each of the buttons comes with a default response, but you can change it if you’d like. Also in settings, you can choose whether these instant replies will go to only the sender or everyone on the thread.


(Credit:
Screenshot by Matt Elliott/CNET)

In use, GmailWiz’s buttons are truly one-click responses; you do not need to hit send or reply after clicking one of them. After you click one of the GmailWiz buttons, the extension loads your reply and off it goes.

(Via AddictiveTips)

Article source: http://howto.cnet.com/8301-11310_39-57560304-285/send-one-click-automated-gmail-replies-with-chrome-extension/

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16 Jun 12 Take quick notes on your Android tablet with Hovernote


Hovernote on the home screen of the Samsung Galaxy Tab 10.1.

(Credit:
Screenshot by Nicole Cozma/CNET)

Android is great about multitasking in the sense that background applications will be suspended where you left them. That means you can go back and look at the previous app you were using, but it’s going to be in full-screen covering whatever you’re trying to look at now. This makes note-taking for research really difficult when you’re always having to tab back and forth and can only see one app at a time.

Hovernote seeks to remedy this issue by adding a floating notepad to your Android tablet screen. That way, you can read a Web site and take your notes at the same time.

Download a copy of Hovernote for your
Android device. Despite being optimal for
tablets, you can use this app on any Android device — though I’m not sure how useful it will be on a smaller screen.

Tap on the small h icon in the notification area. On your tablet, this will likely be the bottom right-hand corner. On a phone, it will be at the top in the notification shade.

Hovernote for Android before resizing the text window.

(Credit:
Screenshot by Nicole Cozma/CNET)

You can start typing right away, but you can also make a couple of adjustments if you like. For starters, the window can be dragged around the screen by pressing and holding on the hovernote text at the bottom of the window. That way you can move it out of the way if what you’re reading is being covered. You can also change the size of the window by pressing and holding on the dots in the bottom right-hand corner. Luckily the window even allows copy and pasting functions, so you can clip quotes from the Web.

Hovernote for Android after resizing the text window.

(Credit:
Screenshot by Nicole Cozma/CNET)

When you’re done taking notes, you can save them by sharing to Google Drive, Dropbox, Gmail, or several other services. And when you’re ready to close the app, just tap the menu button in the bottom left-hand corner and then the X. 

In the future, it would be really nice to see apps like Evernote or Google Drive (Docs) implement this floating window feature.

(Via AndroidPolice)

Article source: http://howto.cnet.com/8301-11310_39-57454457-285/take-quick-notes-on-your-android-tablet-with-hovernote/

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12 Jun 12 How to browse Instagram on your desktop with Chrome


Instagram, the popular mobile social network for sharing photos, can be fun and addictive. However, unlike Facebook or Twitter, Instagram doesn’t have an official desktop presence to go along with its mobile app. If you’re already on your computer, picking up your
Android or iOS device just to check your Instagram feed is less than ideal.

Nicole Cozma recently went over using Extagram, a Web site that allows you to browse Instagram on the Web. Another desktop solution is a Chrome extension that allows you to check your feed directly from the Chrome browser. Here’s how to set up and use Instagram for Chrome:

Set up Instagram for Chrome
After installing Instagram for Chrome, left-click on the button that appears in the Chrome toolbar. Next, let Instagram for Chrome access your Instagram account. You’ll need to be logged in to your Instagram account on the Web to allow authorization.

Authorize Instagram for Chrome(Credit:
Screenshot by Ed Rhee/CNET)

Use Instagram for Chrome
To use Instagram for Chrome, left-click on the button from the toolbar. You can scroll through your feed, like photos, and leave comments, just like on the Instagram mobile app. You can also click on the three dots in the upper left-hand corner for more browsing options.

Using Instagram for Chrome(Credit:
Screenshot by Ed Rhee/CNET)

Delete Instagram for Chrome and revoke access
If you decide you don’t like the extension, delete it from Chrome and revoke its access to your account. To revoke access, go to the Manage Applications section from your Instagram account on the Web. Find Instagram for Chrome, then click on the Revoke Access button.

Revoke access(Credit:
Screenshot by Ed Rhee/CNET)

That’s it. Now you can quickly check your Instagram feed from your desktop, then get back to work or browsing.

(Via Addictive Tips)

Article source: http://howto.cnet.com/8301-11310_39-57450885-285/how-to-browse-instagram-on-your-desktop-with-chrome/?part=rss&tag=feed&subj=

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12 Jun 12 How to browse Instagram on your desktop with Chrome


Instagram, the popular mobile social network for sharing photos, can be fun and addictive. However, unlike Facebook or Twitter, Instagram doesn’t have an official desktop presence to go along with its mobile app. If you’re already on your computer, picking up your
Android or iOS device just to check your Instagram feed is less than ideal.

Nicole Cozma recently went over using Extagram, a Web site that allows you to browse Instagram on the Web. Another desktop solution is a Chrome extension that allows you to check your feed directly from the Chrome browser. Here’s how to set up and use Instagram for Chrome:

Set up Instagram for Chrome
After installing Instagram for Chrome, left-click on the button that appears in the Chrome toolbar. Next, let Instagram for Chrome access your Instagram account. You’ll need to be logged in to your Instagram account on the Web to allow authorization.

Authorize Instagram for Chrome(Credit:
Screenshot by Ed Rhee/CNET)

Use Instagram for Chrome
To use Instagram for Chrome, left-click on the button from the toolbar. You can scroll through your feed, like photos, and leave comments, just like on the Instagram mobile app. You can also click on the three dots in the upper left-hand corner for more browsing options.

Using Instagram for Chrome(Credit:
Screenshot by Ed Rhee/CNET)

Delete Instagram for Chrome and revoke access
If you decide you don’t like the extension, delete it from Chrome and revoke its access to your account. To revoke access, go to the Manage Applications section from your Instagram account on the Web. Find Instagram for Chrome, then click on the Revoke Access button.

Revoke access(Credit:
Screenshot by Ed Rhee/CNET)

That’s it. Now you can quickly check your Instagram feed from your desktop, then get back to work or browsing.

(Via Addictive Tips)

Article source: http://howto.cnet.com/8301-11310_39-57450885-285/how-to-browse-instagram-on-your-desktop-with-chrome/?part=rss&tag=feed&subj=

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05 Jun 12 Waste less time online with a Chrome extension


I read once that Jonathan Franzen writes his novels using an old laptop because it does not have a wireless antenna. He also took the extra precaution of gluing an Ethernet jack into the Ethernet port and then clipping the cable so that there was no way — wired or wirelessly — he could access the Internet while writing.

Knowing Franzen needed to take such measures to stay focused made me feel a little better about myself and my time-wasting ways on the Internet. If you need some assistance staying on point (and off Facebook) during the workday, WasteNoTime could be of help.

This Chrome extension lets you set up white and black lists of Web sites, and it lets you set a time limit for sites on which you regularly waste time. It also tracks the time you spend each day, week, or month on the sites you visit the most and presents the data in a revealing bar chart.

(Credit:
Screenshot by Matt Elliott/CNET)

When you install WasteNoTime, it places a small button (with a clock icon) in Chrome’s toolbar to the right of the URL bar. Click on the button to access the settings to set up the sites you’d like to block or, alternatively, allow.

To block a site, click on the WasteNoTime button when you are currently viewing a site you’d like to block and click the Block Site link. You can also click the Settings link in WasteNoTime’s pop-up window to open a new tab with the extension’s settings. Here you can add sites to the Block List and the Allow List. The Allow List comes into effect if you initiate an Instant Lockdown, which you can do to block out all site or all sites with the exception of those on your Allow List. When you set up an Instant Lockdown, you can do so for a specified period of time.

(Credit:
Screenshot by Matt Elliott/CNET)

A few well-spaced breaks throughout the workday are beneficial. If you subscribe to this line of thinking, you can grant yourself a certain amount of time (say, 30 minutes) to visit Facebook, Twitter, and other site on your Block List. From WasteNoTime’s settings page, click the Time Allowed button to specify the days and time range for this feature to be in effect. I set it up for weekdays from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m., for example, and gave myself 30 minutes. The time allowed is a global amount, meaning it’s the amount of time you can spend on all of your blocked sites together and not a time to spend on each individually. When you reach your time limit, you will see a page like this when you attempt to visit a site on your blocked list:

(Credit:
Screenshot by Matt Elliott/CNET)

Lastly, click on the Time Tracker link from either WasteNoTime’s pop-up window or the settings page to see just where your day or week or month went. It shows you a bar graph of the time you have spent on the top 10 most visited sites.

(Credit:
Screenshot by Matt Elliott/CNET)

WasteNoTime is also available for Safari. Do you have any effective time-management tips? If so, help me help myself and comment below.

(Via AddictiveTips)

Article source: http://howto.cnet.com/8301-11310_39-57446796-285/waste-less-time-online-with-a-chrome-extension/?part=rss&tag=feed&subj=

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26 May 12 Chrome now world's top browser, but beware the math


Chrome overtakes Internet Explorer, according to StatCounter.

Chrome overtakes Internet Explorer, according to StatCounter.

(Credit:
Screenshot by Don Reisinger/CNET)

There’s no debating Google Chrome continues to gain momentum and put pressure on Internet Explorer. But according to one browser-tracking firm, it’s now more popular than Microsoft’s alternative.

Analytics site StatCounter has revealed that for the first time, Google Chrome overtook Internet Explorer last week to become the world’s most popular browser. According to the data the company compiled, during the week of May 14 to May 20, Chrome secured 32.76 percent market share, compared to Microsoft’s 31.94 percent.

At the start of this week, however, Chrome has come back down to 31.88 percent, just inching out Internet Explorer’s 31.47 percent share.

Chrome surprised some Web users back in March when it was revealed by StatCounter that the browser overtook Internet Explorer for one day that month. Soon after, it fell back to second place behind Microsoft’s software. StatCounter CEO Aodhan Cullen said at that time that Chrome has quickly become the top choice for users on weekends.

“Whether Chrome can take the lead in the browser wars in the long term remains to be seen, however the trend towards Chrome usage at weekends is undeniable,” Cullen said at the time. “At weekends, when people are free to choose what browser to use, many of them are selecting Chrome in preference to Internet Explorer.”

Still, it’s important to note that StatCounter’s method of counting data is slightly different than those from other analytics firms. StatCounter counts raw page views, but doesn’t correct its data for geographic differences between global browsing patterns and its own network usage. StatCounter only recently started removing prerendered pages which are not viewed from its stats.

Despite its worldwide success, Chrome still has a ways to go to catch Internet Explorer in the U.S. In fact, StatCounter’s data shows that the week Chrome overtook Internet Explorer, Google’s browser held just 23.83 percent market share, compared to Microsoft’s 37.81 percent. Chrome’s success appears to have come in large part from Europe, where the browser outpaced Internet Explorer by more than 1 percentage point.

Article source: http://news.cnet.com/8301-1023_3-57438097-93/chrome-now-worlds-top-browser-but-beware-the-math/?part=rss&subj=news&tag=title

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25 May 12 Capture, annotate screenshots with Chrome extension


I’ve been on a screenshot
bent lately, and here is a screenshot tip that will appeal to both
Mac and PC users. If you take a lot of screenshots of Web pages, check out Awesome Screenshot, a handy little Chrome extension that’s easy to use, with just the right amount of features.

When it installs, it adds a small button to the Chrome toolbar. Click on the button, which looks like a camera lens, to see the three capture options: Capture Visible Part of Page, Capture Selected Area, and Capture Entire Page.

(Credit:
Screenshot by Matt Elliott/CNET)

When you capture a screenshot, Awesome Screenshot opens up a new tab with your screenshot. Above the screenshot is a row of annotation tools. You can crop or add arrows, rectangles, ovals, lines, and text. There is also a very good blur tool so you can obscure any personal information. To the right of the row of tools is an undo button. Click Done when you are done and you’ll be able to save it online (temporarily for three days on Awesomescreenshot.com or permanently on Diigo.com), save it locally, or print it.

(Credit:
Screenshot by Matt Elliott/CNET)

Do you have a favorite screenshot app? If so, please let me know in the comments below.

Article source: http://howto.cnet.com/capture-annotate-screenshots-with-chrome-extension/8301-11310_39-57441817-285.html

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24 May 12 Meet Yahoo’s new Web browser Axis



Axis replaces the standard search results page with a horizontal, scrollable list of thumbnails. iPad version shown.
(Credit: Screenshot by Rafe Needleman/CNET)

Yahoo is announcing tonight that it’s getting into the browser business with its new Axis browser. There are versions for iPad and iPhone, and plug-ins for the desktop browsers Chrome, Firefox, IE, and Safari.

The design goal, according to Ethan Batraski, head of product for the Search Innovation Group at Yahoo, is to eliminate the middle step in the usual Web search process: Enter a query, see the results, go to a page. With Axis, you’re supposed to be able to go directly from query to page, skipping the step of surfing a sea of links.

The implication that Axis entirely bypasses the need to pick from search results is false, but Axis does nonetheless have a much better way of getting you from searching to visiting a Web page. The browser works well. This is an aggressive product for the struggling Yahoo to launch out of its search group.

Here’s why: Yahoo, which still generates more than a billion dollars a year in revenue from its search division, makes a lot of that money from that second step in the search process. It runs ads on search result pages.
On Axis, there are no search result pages.

Instead, what you get when you search, at least 80 percent of the time, Batraski says, is a horizontal display of Web page thumbnails. (The other 20 percent of the time you get text boxes with results in them.) It’s easy to see if one of the pages is what you’re looking for, and then you can go there directly. To see the tiles again and go to other results, you just pull down the page from the top. To move forward or backward in the list of results directly from a page you’re on, you drag your finger from the right or left. bypassing the results list entirely.

So, to be clear, there actually is a list of search results. It just looks a lot better because it’s integrated into the browser. Ads will get inserted into the list of search tiles eventually, assuming the product is a success with users. But for the time being, the more successful Axis is, the more it will drive Yahoo traffic away from search revenues–which only this last quarter began to recover after years of sliding.


The iPhone version’s interface is a little hemmed-in, but still very usable.

(Credit: Screenshot by Rafe Needleman/CNET)

As a tactic for launching the browser, focusing on the user experience above all and forgoing search revenues is probably very wise, since it may be difficult for the browser to make a dent in the market. I asked Batraski about other alterna-browsers that struggled to win major market share, and mostly failed: Flock, Rockmelt, Opera, ATT’s Pogo, and others. Why does Yahoo think it can pull a Chrome with its product?

Distribution, says Batraski. There are 700 million people using Yahoo, and they can all be marketed to. Also, Yahoo distributes browsers (mostly IE with the Yahoo embedded toolbar) to 80 million people a year. The company knows how to get browsers out there, at least on desktop operating systems. But Axis on the desktop is actually not its own browser, but rather a plug-in that works with the browser a user already has. If you use the plug-in’s URL and search box in the lower-left of your browser, you’ll get Yahoo’s results. If you forget it’s there and use the browser’s standard URL/search box, you get whatever you’ve already been getting.

One gets the feeling that the desktop versions of Axis exist primarily as accessories to the mobile versions, so users can move between platforms and keep their open tabs and histories intact. When you’re logged in, Axis knows what you do on each device and makes it easy to pick up on one where you left off on another.

Mobile is where the action is, so it makes sense that Yahoo threw the bulk of its development love into the tablet and smartphone versions. On the iPad, Axis is simply a great browser. The integrated search feature is intuitive, and being able to move through search results without having to go back to search makes sense. After only a few minutes using it I thought, Why hasn’t Google done this yet? It’s that good.

Although mobile devices like the iPad come with embedded browsers, Batraski says the product has Apple’s blessing. He also said that Apple reps have told him they’re not throwing many resources into Apple’s own iOS browser, Safari. Axis takes the best that Safari has to offer–its core rendering engine, Webkit — and really does make it better. But no matter what Apple says, it’s not yet fully behind alternative browsers like Axis: On iOS, you can’t change your default browser (unless you jailbreak your device). Click a link in an e-mail message or another app, and your device will open it up in Safari, no matter how in love with Axis you are.

Batraski is convinced this will change eventually, and that if it doesn’t, Apple will have a Microsoft-scale antitrust issue on its hands.

What about Android? The Android version of Axis is still in development, and while it’s much easier for a user to get an alternative browser installed and embedded in an Android product, it’s a pretty safe bet that Google isn’t exactly going to roll out the welcome mat for Yahoo’s browser. Google already has two of its own browsers for mobile, the Android browser and the still-in-beta Android version of Chrome. And those drive traffic to Google’s ads, not Yahoo’s. (Firefox, by the way, defaults to using Google for search, so even when people use it instead of Chrome, Google still wins.)

The Axis browser may not conquer the world, but it is a very strong mobile product with an important new design concept for search. It’s also a gutsy business move from Yahoo. It’s rather refreshing.

Via CNET News

Article source: http://asia.cnet.com/meet-yahoos-new-web-browser-axis-62215665.htm

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16 May 12 Is Chrome coming to iOS?


Chrome for Android will graduate from beta soon. Could Chrome for iOS be next?

(Credit:
Screenshot by Stephen Shankland/CNET)

Apple’s iOS will see a version of Google Chrome before the year’s out, and possibly before the end of Q2 — at least according to research firm Macquarie Group.

The equity research group claims that Chrome for iOS is due for several reasons, all of which can be summed up as part of the current “browser wars.” These include Google’s interest in reducing costs. It currently pays Apple for, among other things, each person using Google services in Apple’s default
Safari browser; getting people to use the services through its own browser would potentially offset those costs.

When asked to comment on whether an iOS version of Chrome was in the works, a Google representative said, “We do not comment on rumor or speculation.”

However, other points made by Macquarie’s analysts are harder to take at face value. While it’s true that Chrome for PCs has been an enormous success, as the firm notes, and that early reviews of Chrome for Android have also been positive, iOS is a very different beast from those two environments.

Chrome has been widely available on Windows since 2008, and on
Mac OS X and Linux since 2010. The Google browser gained early adoption because it offered a combination of speed, stability, and features that surpassed others. While Chrome is still a driving force, it’s no longer the far-and-away leader in the field, as Mozilla and Microsoft, respectively, have worked harder to maintain their market share for
Firefox and Internet Explorer.

The Android version of Chrome is a solid, fast browser, even in beta, but it faces a very different problem: platform support. It works only on Android 4.0 Ice Cream Sandwich, currently running on 1 percent to 2 percent of Android devices, and Google has said it has no plans for making it work on legacy Android versions.

It’s not out of the realm of possibility that Google would be working on Chrome for iPhones and iPads. Both Chrome and Safari are powered by the WebKit rendering engine. But unlike Google does with Android, Apple doesn’t let third-party browser makers change iOS’ default browser from Safari. So even if you use a third-party browser on iOS as your primary browser, all links will still open in Safari, effectively handicapping any efforts to provide a true Safari alternative.

Google has also shown itself to be resistant to pushing the Chrome brand on Android. The default, nameless Android browser is WebKit-powered, but doesn’t bear the Chrome name in large part because it wasn’t based on Chromium, Chrome’s open-source foundation. It is unlikely that Google would contradict itself and submit anything to Apple labeled Chrome that didn’t have that Chromium core.

That doesn’t mean that Chrome on iOS couldn’t be useful to Google. Mozilla has a Firefox Home app so that people with iOS can sync tabs, bookmarks, and passwords from other full iterations of Firefox. The mobile-only Dolphin has a version for iOS and Android that allows cross-platform syncing too. Some people may feel that the limited third-party browsing experience on iOS is worth the hassle to stay with Chrome.

But even if Google is able to replicate the vast majority of the Chrome experience on iOS, the chances of Apple letting Google, of all companies, into its walled garden are extremely small.

(h/t GigaOm)

Article source: http://news.cnet.com/8301-17939_109-57434950-2/is-chrome-coming-to-ios/

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16 May 12 Is Chrome coming to iOS?


Chrome for Android will graduate from beta soon. Could Chrome for iOS be next?

(Credit:
Screenshot by Stephen Shankland/CNET)

Apple’s iOS will see a version of Google Chrome before the year’s out, and possibly before the end of Q2 — at least according to research firm Macquarie Group.

The equity research group claims that Chrome for iOS is due for several reasons, all of which can be summed up as part of the current “browser wars.” These include Google’s interest in reducing costs. It currently pays Apple for, among other things, each person using Google services in Apple’s default
Safari browser; getting people to use the services through its own browser would potentially offset those costs.

When asked to comment on whether an iOS version of Chrome was in the works, a Google representative said, “We do not comment on rumor or speculation.”

However, other points made by Macquarie’s analysts are harder to take at face value. While it’s true that Chrome for PCs has been an enormous success, as the firm notes, and that early reviews of Chrome for Android have also been positive, iOS is a very different beast from those two environments.

Chrome has been widely available on Windows since 2008, and on
Mac OS X and Linux since 2010. The Google browser gained early adoption because it offered a combination of speed, stability, and features that surpassed others. While Chrome is still a driving force, it’s no longer the far-and-away leader in the field, as Mozilla and Microsoft, respectively, have worked harder to maintain their market share for
Firefox and Internet Explorer.

The Android version of Chrome is a solid, fast browser, even in beta, but it faces a very different problem: platform support. It works only on Android 4.0 Ice Cream Sandwich, currently running on 1 percent to 2 percent of Android devices, and Google has said it has no plans for making it work on legacy Android versions.

It’s not out of the realm of possibility that Google would be working on Chrome for iPhones and iPads. Both Chrome and Safari are powered by the WebKit rendering engine. But unlike Google does with Android, Apple doesn’t let third-party browser makers change iOS’ default browser from Safari. So even if you use a third-party browser on iOS as your primary browser, all links will still open in Safari, effectively handicapping any efforts to provide a true Safari alternative.

Google has also shown itself to be resistant to pushing the Chrome brand on Android. The default, nameless Android browser is WebKit-powered, but doesn’t bear the Chrome name in large part because it wasn’t based on Chromium, Chrome’s open-source foundation. It is unlikely that Google would contradict itself and submit anything to Apple labeled Chrome that didn’t have that Chromium core.

That doesn’t mean that Chrome on iOS couldn’t be useful to Google. Mozilla has a Firefox Home app so that people with iOS can sync tabs, bookmarks, and passwords from other full iterations of Firefox. The mobile-only Dolphin has a version for iOS and Android that allows cross-platform syncing too. Some people may feel that the limited third-party browsing experience on iOS is worth the hassle to stay with Chrome.

But even if Google is able to replicate the vast majority of the Chrome experience on iOS, the chances of Apple letting Google, of all companies, into its walled garden are extremely small.

(h/t GigaOm)

Article source: http://download.cnet.com/8301-2007_4-57434950-12/is-chrome-coming-to-ios/?part=rss&subj=iphoneatlas&tag=title

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