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12 May 12 How to schedule Google+ posts in Chrome


(Credit:
Google)

If you’re a fan of services like HootSuite which let you schedule tweets, Facebook posts, and even LinkedIn notes, then you’ll probably like Do Share for Google Chrome, as well. Unfortunately, sites like HootSuite haven’t rolled out the ability to schedule posts on Google+ to all of their users. So if you’re interested in scheduling a notice about a product launch, a reminder to a friend, or just your random thoughts, Do Share can help you out. 

This browser extension is very simple to install, and even easier to use. Here’s how to get started:

Download a copy of Do Share for your Google Chrome browser.

Note: Chrome has to be running, connected to the Internet and logged into Google for Do Share to send posts to Google+, since they are saved in your browser until the scheduled time — per the notes for the extension.

Step 1: Click then button for the extension on your browser’s toolbar, then click on Create new post and then fill in the details of your message.

(Credit:
Screenshot by Nicole Cozma/CNET)

Step 2:To adjust which circles will see your post, click on Add more people.

(Credit:
Screenshot by Nicole Cozma/CNET)

Step 3: From here, you can decide to send the post to your drafts, schedule the post, or share it immediately.

(Optional) Step 4: If you choose Schedule, you’ll need to input a date and time for the post to go live.

(Credit:
Screenshot by Nicole Cozma/CNET)

(Optional) Step 5: View the drafts and scheduled tweets at the bottom of the page. Simply click on any tweet you need to delete or adjust.

While this method isn’t as easy as scheduling posts in HootSuite, it’s the next closest thing. What types of posts do you schedule in advance?

Also, if you love efficiency while using Chrome, you might want to check out these time-saving extensions.

(Via AddictiveTips)

Article source: http://howto.cnet.com/how-to-schedule-google-posts-in-chrome/8301-11310_39-57432808-285.html

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12 May 12 How to schedule Google+ posts in Chrome


(Credit:
Google)

If you’re a fan of services like HootSuite which let you schedule tweets, Facebook posts, and even LinkedIn notes, then you’ll probably like Do Share for Google Chrome, as well. Unfortunately, sites like HootSuite haven’t rolled out the ability to schedule posts on Google+ to all of their users. So if you’re interested in scheduling a notice about a product launch, a reminder to a friend, or just your random thoughts, Do Share can help you out. 

This browser extension is very simple to install, and even easier to use. Here’s how to get started:

Download a copy of Do Share for your Google Chrome browser.

Note: Chrome has to be running, connected to the Internet and logged into Google for Do Share to send posts to Google+, since they are saved in your browser until the scheduled time — per the notes for the extension.

Step 1: Click then button for the extension on your browser’s toolbar, then click on Create new post and then fill in the details of your message.

(Credit:
Screenshot by Nicole Cozma/CNET)

Step 2:To adjust which circles will see your post, click on Add more people.

(Credit:
Screenshot by Nicole Cozma/CNET)

Step 3: From here, you can decide to send the post to your drafts, schedule the post, or share it immediately.

(Optional) Step 4: If you choose Schedule, you’ll need to input a date and time for the post to go live.

(Credit:
Screenshot by Nicole Cozma/CNET)

(Optional) Step 5: View the drafts and scheduled tweets at the bottom of the page. Simply click on any tweet you need to delete or adjust.

While this method isn’t as easy as scheduling posts in HootSuite, it’s the next closest thing. What types of posts do you schedule in advance?

Also, if you love efficiency while using Chrome, you might want to check out these time-saving extensions.

(Via AddictiveTips)

Article source: http://howto.cnet.com/8301-11310_39-57432808-285/how-to-schedule-google-posts-in-chrome/?part=rss&subj=software&tag=title

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08 May 12 Socialcam for Android is a bust


Notice all of the empty space under the All Videos tab.

(Credit:
Screenshot by Jaymar Cabebe/CNET)

While Socialcam appears to be one of the better video-sharing apps on iPhone, I certainly can’t say the same about its sibling on the
Android platform. See, after taking some time to review Socialcam for Android, I realized that the app is wrought with problems and in dire need of some attention from its developers.

The first problem I encountered was that Socialcam on Android only offers you the option to log in using Facebook, and much of the time even that doesn’t work. I tried logging in using two different accounts on two different devices and found this most basic of actions to be hit-or-miss, with the app force closing or freezing on several occasions. This was not a good start, to say the least.

Once I was finally able to get into Socialcam, the problems continued. The app failed to load any user videos, except for a single promo piece published by Socialcam staff, which means I wasn’t able to browse other users’ content or find anyone interesting to follow. In other words, I wasn’t able to interact with the community at all. And from what I know, that is supposed to be a major part of the Socialcam experience.

Fortunately, Socialcam for Android was capable of shooting and sharing video — but that’s not saying much, considering that’s the very minimum of what it should be able to do. Nevertheless, after all the problems, I was pleased that I could tap the camera icon, record video, and post to Socialcam fairly easily. The app also let me add a title, tag friends, and share to Facebook, Twitter, and more. Sure, it worked, but if that’s the extent of Socialcam’s capabilities on Android, then that’s not a very compelling value proposition. I can shoot and share video with tons of other apps, including my device’s default camera.

With not a single update since August of last year, it’s easy to see that the Android app has become something of an afterthought to Socialcam’s developers. In fact, there isn’t even a Google Play download link on Socialcam’s official site. That said, I’m still optimistic that the app will one day get its update, and will function as it should. Otherwise, they’d be missing out on a potentially huge pool of users. Isn’t that right, Instagram?

Article source: http://download.cnet.com/8301-2007_4-57429506-12/socialcam-for-android-is-a-bust/

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05 May 12 Learn a new language while Web surfing in Chrome


Language Immersion for Chrome.

(Credit:
Screenshot by Nicole Cozma/CNET)

You’ve probably heard that immersion is the fastest and most comprehensive way to learn a new language. However, immersion is not an easy task when you don’t live in a country where your target language is natively spoken. To help with this issue there’s an awesome extension called Language Immersion for Chrome.

With this extension you can add as much or as little of a new language to your everyday Web surfing habits as you like. The extension supports most of the languages offered by Google Translate (roughly 64 of them), and can help you learn the target language by translating random words, sentences and even paragraphs. So as you read a Web page on the novice setting you’ll see a word or phrase in your chosen language every 30 to 40 words of your native language. And in case you’re a little more advanced than that, you can turn the difficulty level up to Intermediate or even Fluent so larger chunks of the text will be translated.

Settings for Language Immersion for Chrome.

(Credit:
www.useallfive.com)

First you’ll need to grab a copy of the Language Immersion for Chrome extension. Just click on the blue Add to Chrome button. After that, you’ll want to adjust the difficulty setting and make sure the extension is switched on. This can be done by clicking on the extension’s button in your Chrome toolbar. You may also want to enable “Speak translations” by clicking on the wrench icon and then the check box.

(Credit:
Screenshot by Nicole Cozma/CNET)

Now you’re ready to start surfing the Web. If you want an easy start, read something that you’ve read before. This will make piecing together the words or phrases that you are not familiar with much easier. Each time you come across a word translated to the target language, you can click on it to hear it spoken (provided you have this enabled) and to show the translation in your native language. While some slang will get lost in translation, you can still use this extension to build a vocabulary base and learn how to say the words or phrases without too much of a hassle. Plus, turning the extension off can be done with just a few clicks if you need a break from learning.

An example of Language Immersion for Chrome.

(Credit:
Screenshot by Nicole Cozma/CNET)

You may also want to check out Babbel Mobile for Android if you’re looking for something to complement the Chrome extension when you’re away from your computer.

What tools do you use on the Web or your mobile device to start learning new languages? 


(Via Lifehacker)

Article source: http://howto.cnet.com/8301-11310_39-57428023-285/learn-a-new-language-while-web-surfing-in-chrome/?part=rss&subj=software&tag=title

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28 Apr 12 Add a Facebook status bar to every page in Chrome


(Credit:
Facebook)

If you leave Facebook open in a separate tab or check your smartphone every couple of minutes for notifications, you might be slightly (or seriously) addicted to Facebook. On days where you can’t get enough of the chatter there’s MyStatusBar. This Chrome extension allows you to see new posts and notifications on every page you open, letting you close off that second tab or put down the smartphone.

MyStatusBar integrates itself by adding a blue status bar to the bottom of each page you’re viewing. Think of it as a floating social media bar, but only for Facebook. You can also search or launch Facebook just a few mouse clicks. Here’s how to add it to Chrome:


Step 1: Head to the extension page for MyStatusBar on the Chrome Web Store.

Step 2: Click the blue Add to Chrome button.

(Credit:
Screenshot by Nicole Cozma/CNET)

Step 3: On the new tab that opens, press the Login to Facebook button on the bar at the bottom of the page.

(Credit:
Screenshot by Nicole Cozma/CNET)

Choose permissions for the MyStatusBar extension.

(Credit:
Screenshot by Nicole Cozma/CNET)

Step 4: When the pop-up loads, click Login again, and then choose the permissions settings you feel comfortable with.

Tip: You may need to close the Facebook bar with the small X that loads near the top right-hand side of it in order to see the Allow button.

(Credit:
Screenshot by Nicole Cozma/CNET)

Step 5: Start Web surfing in a new tab, and you’ll see MyStatusBar load at the bottom of each page.

The advertisement that the extension posts on your Facebook Wall.

(Credit:
Screenshot by Nicole Cozma/CNET)

Note: Approving this app will post a message on your Facebook that advertises the extension. You can easily delete it if you don’t like advertisements on your Wall.

Now you can check out Newsfeed posts, friend requests, notifications and messages from MyStatusBar. This will allow you to stay connected to your friends without always getting stuck on the Facebook tab in your browser.

(Via AddictiveTips

Article source: http://howto.cnet.com/8301-11310_39-57422875-285/add-a-facebook-status-bar-to-every-page-in-chrome/?part=rss&subj=software&tag=title

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27 Apr 12 Control music in Chrome without switching tabs


By midafternoon, I usually have so many tabs open, I can’t keep track of them all. It’s really a nuisance when I have music playing on one of my many tabs and can’t locate it quickly to mute the song that’s playing to answer the phone. Enter Music Controller, a Chrome extension that adds a button to the right of your URL bar. The button, which features a music note, provides access to any song currently playing on any tab in your current Chrome window.

(Credit:
Screenshot by Matt Elliott/CNET)

Music Controller claims to work with Google Music, Grooveshark, Mog, Rdio, Pandora, and YouTube. Using a
Mac, I could not get it to work with Google Music. And it recognized Rdio but failed to list any tracks played with that service. For the others, however, it worked as advertised. Click on the button to open a small window that lists any song (with artist info) currently playing or paused in any of the above services. Next to each song listed is a pause button and, if you are listening to a playlist, fast-forward and rewind buttons. Thumbs-up and -down buttons are present if the music service has a rating system. A mute button at the top lets you quickly mute any song playing, and if you click on a song, you’ll be taken to the tab where that song is playing.

Music Controller works only with music services accessed via Chrome, so it doesn’t work with apps such as iTunes and Spotify. If you use either of those on a Mac, Skip Tunes will prove useful.

(Via AddictiveTips)

Article source: http://howto.cnet.com/8301-11310_39-57422249-285/control-music-in-chrome-without-switching-tabs/?part=rss&tag=feed&subj=

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26 Apr 12 Control music in Chrome without switching tabs


By midafternoon, I usually have so many tabs open, I can’t keep track of them all. It’s really a nuisance when I have music playing on one of my many tabs and can’t locate it quickly to mute the song that’s playing to answer the phone. Enter Music Controller, a Chrome extension that adds a button to the right of your URL bar. The button, which features a music note, provides access to any song currently playing on any tab in your current Chrome window.

(Credit:
Screenshot by Matt Elliott/CNET)

Music Controller claims to work with Google Music, Grooveshark, Mog, Rdio, Pandora, and YouTube. Using a
Mac, I could not get it to work with Google Music. And it recognized Rdio but failed to list any tracks played with that service. For the others, however, it worked as advertised. Click on the button to open a small window that lists any song (with artist info) currently playing or paused in any of the above services. Next to each song listed is a pause button and, if you are listening to a playlist, fast-forward and rewind buttons. Thumbs-up and -down buttons are present if the music service has a rating system. A mute button at the top lets you quickly mute any song playing, and if you click on a song, you’ll be taken to the tab where that song is playing.

Music Controller works only with music services accessed via Chrome, so it doesn’t work with apps such as iTunes and Spotify. If you use either of those on a Mac, Skip Tunes will prove useful.

(Via AddictiveTips)

Article source: http://howto.cnet.com/8301-11310_39-57422249-285/control-music-in-chrome-without-switching-tabs/

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26 Apr 12 Google Drive for Android is a beefier Google Docs app


If you haven’t noticed, Google Docs for
Android has just morphed into Google Drive. Or perhaps more accurately, it has been sucked up by the brand-new file-syncing and file-sharing app. This means that not only does it give you access to all of your old Docs, it also lets you access and store any kind of file in your cloud-enabled Google Drive account.

Similar to the experience on the Web, Google Drive for Android opens up to a main navigation panel, from which you can see a list of all your files (My Drive), files that have been shared with you, starred files, recently modified files, or offline files. There’s also a button at the top of the screen that lets you create new documents or spreadsheets, or upload a file to be stored on your Drive.

(Credit:
Screenshot by Jaymar Cabebe/CNET)

Next to each item in your list, there’s a tiny arrow icon that brings up options like Share, Rename, Delete, and Send. This should feel familiar to anyone who previously used the Google Docs app. There’s also an option to make files available offline, which is a godsend when traveling to areas with questionable data coverage.

Just as it was in Google Docs, file editing with the Google Drive app is pretty basic. The Documents editor offers a few alignment options, lists, Bold, Italic, and Underline, as well as a rudimentary color tool. The Spreadsheets editor isn’t any better, though, as it offers a slightly clunky interface for editing cells. Meanwhile, you can’t edit presentations or drawings through the mobile app, which isn’t much of a loss, since these types of documents are typically better handled with a mouse and full-size monitor.

(Credit:
Screenshot by Jaymar Cabebe/CNET)

On top of all the old Google Docs functionality, Google Drive is really just a simple file storage platform. Like Dropbox, it automatically syncs with the cloud, so that everything is consistent across all of your devices. Also, it lets you share (add collaborators to) any kind of file, including music, images, and videos. Altogether, it is a fantastic option for storing, syncing, sharing, and collaborating.

But as great as as the new Google Docs, er, Google Drive app is, it is still missing a few key features. For one, it’s impossible to move files around within your drive from the app. You can’t transfer files between collections (folders) or even create new collections. This means that all of your housekeeping will need to be done from a desktop.

Also, Google Drive doesn’t let you share files with download links. This is something that Dropbox does exceptionally well. It would be nice to be able to create a download link for any file in my drive, and send it to friends who don’t use Google Drive.

Finally, and this may be nitpicky, I wish the app would let you sort files by type. With so many different types supported, it wouldmake life a lot easier for power users who store massive numbers of files in the cloud.

Regardless of its shortcomings, I still highly recommend downloading the Google Drive app for Android. It nicely integrates all of the Docs functionality, plus it gives you the extra power to access and share other types of files.

Google Drive (download) is available now for free on Google Play. But before downloading, make sure you’ve enabled Drive on your Google account.

Article source: http://reviews.cnet.com/8301-19736_7-57421518-251/google-drive-for-android-is-a-beefier-google-docs-app/

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25 Apr 12 How to use Google Drive on Android


You may have noticed shortly after the official announcement of Google Drive that Google Docs was no longer on your
Android device. Instead, you can find the Google Drive app in its place. If for some reason your Google Docs app hasn’t made the switch yet, you can download the Google Drive update to your device from Google Play. Let’s take a look at how the Android app integrates and works with Google Drive.

(Credit:
Screenshot by Jason Cipriani/CNET)

The main screen of Google Drive provides a few options for navigating the new service. You will have quick access to files in your Drive, any documents that have been shared with you, any files or folders you have starred, recently opened, or edited, as well as any files you have downloaded for offline access.

The account name (blurred out in the screenshot) at the top of the screen acts just like it does in all other Google apps; tapping on it will allow you to quickly switch between Google accounts and the respective Drive accounts.

(Credit:
Screenshot by Jason Cipriani/CNET)

To create a new item on your Drive, tap on the menu icon then select New. You will then be given the option of creating a document, spreadsheet, document from photo, or to upload a file. If you used Google Docs on your device previously, you should be familiar with the first three options. Upload, however, is new and specific to Google Drive.

When you select upload, you’re able to browse and upload files stored on your Android device to your Drive account. One important thing to note, however, is that installing a file manager, such as Astro File Manager, is required to browse files outside of your music and photo galleries.

Keep in mind if you want to place the new item in a specific folder, you will need to navigate to that folder in the app before you upload or create it. If you create a new item from the home screen, it will be placed in the root directory of your Drive.

(Credit:
Screenshot by Jason Cipriani/CNET)

The settings for the Google Drive app allow you to set the amount of data you will want the app to cache, starting at 50MB topping out at 250MB. You can also enable/disable encryption of offline documents as well as enable a reminder to be displayed when you are updating files over a wireless connection, not Wi-Fi.

(Credit:
Screenshot by Jason Cipriani/CNET)

When viewing your folders and files, you can favorite any item by tapping on the star located next to the item name. If you tap on the arrow icon located on the right-hand side of the listing, you are presented with a list of options.

These options allow you to save the file for offline viewing, sharing, sending, renaming, deleting, and opening with another app.

You can share, rename, and delete entire folders, but you cannot make them available for offline viewing or send them.

At anytime in the app you can tap on the familiar search icon and search for a specific document or folder. The items stored in your Drive aren’t automatically updated in the Android app. So, if you have recently placed new items on your Drive and they aren’t yet appearing in the Android app, tap on the menu icon and select refresh.

If you have any extra tips or tricks we missed for Google Drive on Android, please share them below in the comments.

Article source: http://howto.cnet.com/how-to-use-google-drive-on-android/8301-11310_39-57420195-285.html

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24 Apr 12 Hide YouTube Comments with Chrome extension


My kids love watching videos on YouTube and now that my daughter has learned how to read, I worry about the words she may encounter in the comments section below a video she’s watching. Thankfully, I found a Chrome extension, YouTube Options for Google Chrome, which lets me tweak the appearance of the video player page on YouTube.

(Credit:
Screenshot by Matt Elliott/CNET)

After installing the extension, a small icon shows up on the right edge of your URL bar when you view a YouTube video. (It’s a small red button with the letters YTO.) Click on it and a narrow window opens below it with a small, sample YouTube page. You can click on the various components of the page — header, title, description, comments, suggested videos, footer, playlist — to toggle between hiding and showing them. You can also adjust the size of the video player, and if you click the Options link at the bottom of this window, you’ll be taken to the extension’s settings page where you can tweak further options. The extension remembers your preferences for subsequent visits.

(Credit:
Screenshot by Matt Elliott/CNET)

In related news, you can replace YouTube comments with Facebook comments with another Chrome extension.

Article source: http://howto.cnet.com/8301-11310_39-57419340-285/hide-youtube-comments-with-chrome-extension/?part=rss&tag=feed&subj=

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