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13 Jun 12 Google delivers Metro Chrome preview


Computerworld - Google yesterday released its first preview of Chrome that runs in the Windows 8 Metro environment, making good on a promise from last week.

The browser, labeled 21.0.1171.0, shipped Monday to Google’s “Dev” channel.

Google maintains multiple “channels,” or versions of Chrome, with escalating levels of stability and reliability. Dev is the least stable and earliest public build, but others include “Beta” and “Stable,” the last being Google’s tag for a final, production-grade edition.

The company announced it would ship a Metro version of Chrome last Thursday, but at the time would not pin itself to a date.

After the new Dev version is installed, Chrome will run in both Windows 8′s traditional x86/64 “desktop” mode — the half that resembles Windows 7′s user interface (UI) — and in the tablet-, touch-centric “Metro” mode, where apps run in a full-screen, or at best, split view, with minimal UI gewgaws.

Under Microsoft’s rules, a browser must be chosen as the operating system’s default browser by the user to run in Metro.

Chrome in Metro also includes Flash, courtesy of Google’s long-bundling of the Adobe software with the browser. That puts Chrome in the same category as Microsoft’s own Internet Explorer 10 (IE10), which in Metro can also render Flash.

Even though Metro is supposed to be plug-in free, both Google and Microsoft have circumvented the rule by integrating Flash Player with their browsers.

Mozilla, which is working on a Metro-ized version of Firefox for Windows 8, and has blasted Microsoft for giving itself an unfair edge on Windows RT, had mixed thoughts on the trend.

“We think there should be equal access to platform capabilities and while we encourage healthy competition, believe there should be no circumstances that give any browser an unfair advantage,” said Asa Dotzler, director of Firefox, in an email reply to questions about IE10′s use of Flash last week. “[But] if other browsers can bring Flash or plug-ins in general to Metro, then it doesn’t seem to be a problem. But that isn’t clear at this time.”

Dotzler comment was made before Google rolled out the Metro preview of Chrome with Flash included.

Chrome’s deviations from the norm also include a decidedly different take on the Metro UI.

As others reported Monday — including ZDNet blogger Ed Bott — Google has seriously strayed from Microsoft’s Metro design guidelines for Chrome, to the point where it puts up a desktop-like context-sensitive menu in lieu of the standard Metro app bar, and adds a full drop-down menu accessed by clicking on an icon in the upper right.

More: Browser Topic Center

Article source: http://www.computerworld.com/s/article/9228017/Google_delivers_Metro_Chrome_preview

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12 Jun 12 Google delivers Metro Chrome preview


Computerworld - Google yesterday released its first preview of Chrome that runs in the Windows 8 Metro environment, making good on a promise from last week.

The browser, labeled 21.0.1171.0, shipped Monday to Google’s “Dev” channel.

Google maintains multiple “channels,” or versions of Chrome, with escalating levels of stability and reliability. Dev is the least stable and earliest public build, but others include “Beta” and “Stable,” the last being Google’s tag for a final, production-grade edition.

The company announced it would ship a Metro version of Chrome last Thursday, but at the time would not pin itself to a date.

After the new Dev version is installed, Chrome will run in both Windows 8′s traditional x86/64 “desktop” mode — the half that resembles Windows 7′s user interface (UI) — and in the tablet-, touch-centric “Metro” mode, where apps run in a full-screen, or at best, split view, with minimal UI gewgaws.

Under Microsoft’s rules, a browser must be chosen as the operating system’s default browser by the user to run in Metro.

Chrome in Metro also includes Flash, courtesy of Google’s long-bundling of the Adobe software with the browser. That puts Chrome in the same category as Microsoft’s own Internet Explorer 10 (IE10), which in Metro can also render Flash.

Even though Metro is supposed to be plug-in free, both Google and Microsoft have circumvented the rule by integrating Flash Player with their browsers.

Mozilla, which is working on a Metro-ized version of Firefox for Windows 8, and has blasted Microsoft for giving itself an unfair edge on Windows RT, had mixed thoughts on the trend.

“We think there should be equal access to platform capabilities and while we encourage healthy competition, believe there should be no circumstances that give any browser an unfair advantage,” said Asa Dotzler, director of Firefox, in an email reply to questions about IE10′s use of Flash last week. “[But] if other browsers can bring Flash or plug-ins in general to Metro, then it doesn’t seem to be a problem. But that isn’t clear at this time.”

Dotzler comment was made before Google rolled out the Metro preview of Chrome with Flash included.

Chrome’s deviations from the norm also include a decidedly different take on the Metro UI.

As others reported Monday — including ZDNet blogger Ed Bott — Google has seriously strayed from Microsoft’s Metro design guidelines for Chrome, to the point where it puts up a desktop-like context-sensitive menu in lieu of the standard Metro app bar, and adds a full drop-down menu accessed by clicking on an icon in the upper right.

More: Browser Topic Center

Article source: http://www.computerworld.com/s/article/9228017/Google_delivers_Metro_Chrome_preview

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12 Jun 12 Google delivers Metro Chrome preview


Computerworld - Google yesterday released its first preview of Chrome that runs in the Windows 8 Metro environment, making good on a promise from last week.

The browser, labeled 21.0.1171.0, shipped Monday to Google’s “Dev” channel.

Google maintains multiple “channels,” or versions of Chrome, with escalating levels of stability and reliability. Dev is the least stable and earliest public build, but others include “Beta” and “Stable,” the last being Google’s tag for a final, production-grade edition.

The company announced it would ship a Metro version of Chrome last Thursday, but at the time would not pin itself to a date.

After the new Dev version is installed, Chrome will run in both Windows 8′s traditional x86/64 “desktop” mode — the half that resembles Windows 7′s user interface (UI) — and in the tablet-, touch-centric “Metro” mode, where apps run in a full-screen, or at best, split view, with minimal UI gewgaws.

Under Microsoft’s rules, a browser must be chosen as the operating system’s default browser by the user to run in Metro.

Chrome in Metro also includes Flash, courtesy of Google’s long-bundling of the Adobe software with the browser. That puts Chrome in the same category as Microsoft’s own Internet Explorer 10 (IE10), which in Metro can also render Flash.

Even though Metro is supposed to be plug-in free, both Google and Microsoft have circumvented the rule by integrating Flash Player with their browsers.

Mozilla, which is working on a Metro-ized version of Firefox for Windows 8, and has blasted Microsoft for giving itself an unfair edge on Windows RT, had mixed thoughts on the trend.

“We think there should be equal access to platform capabilities and while we encourage healthy competition, believe there should be no circumstances that give any browser an unfair advantage,” said Asa Dotzler, director of Firefox, in an email reply to questions about IE10′s use of Flash last week. “[But] if other browsers can bring Flash or plug-ins in general to Metro, then it doesn’t seem to be a problem. But that isn’t clear at this time.”

Dotzler comment was made before Google rolled out the Metro preview of Chrome with Flash included.

Chrome’s deviations from the norm also include a decidedly different take on the Metro UI.

As others reported Monday — including ZDNet blogger Ed Bott — Google has seriously strayed from Microsoft’s Metro design guidelines for Chrome, to the point where it puts up a desktop-like context-sensitive menu in lieu of the standard Metro app bar, and adds a full drop-down menu accessed by clicking on an icon in the upper right.

More: Browser Topic Center

Article source: http://www.computerworld.com/s/article/9228017/Google_delivers_Metro_Chrome_preview

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12 Jun 12 Google launches Metro-style Chrome browser for Windows 8 — and it rocks


Google has released its first attempt at making its popular Chrome browser work with Windows 8′s Metro-style design aesthetic, and because the app ignores some of Microsoft’s Metro mandates, it’s actually quite good.

A few months back, we heard that both Google and Mozilla would release a version of their popular Chrome and Firefox browsers targeting Windows 8. Both companies rightly should, considering that if they don’t get on the ball, they could potentially not have their browser tested and ready to go on Windows 8′s release day (whenever that is).

To get access to Metro-style Chrome on Windows 8, you have to subscribe to the Chrome Dev channel for Windows and download the latest version (21.0.1171.0). Once you have Chrome as your default browser and pinned to the Win 8 Start screen, you’re good to go.

I downloaded Metro-style Chrome, and I love that it’s a far cry from Internet Explorer 10, the default browser in Windows 8. Whereas IE10 feels way different from IE9, this version of Chrome ignores some of the Metro design ideas that Microsoft has been pushing. When you right-click or press “Windows key + Z,” there should be an App bar that pops up at the bottom of the screen. Google, being Google, has instead opted to put a more traditional menu bar in the top right corner that you can click for settings and app changes. There’s also standard tabbed browsing that works smoothly.

However, like IE10, Chrome includes Flash Player built into the browser for viewing all kinds of Flash content. But here it differs slightly too, because IE10 uses an approved list of sites and Flash content, where Chrome displays everything.

One of my biggest problems with Windows 8 and Metro apps is how much it’s forcing me to change from my established habits for work and play. But Chrome works great here because it falls between old and new instead of just being NEW.

You can check out more screens of Metro-style Chrome in Windows 8 below:

Google has released a great new version of its Chrome browser that works with Windows 8′s Metro-style interface.

chrome-win-8chrome-win-8-1Screenshot (21)Screenshot (19)Screenshot (16)Screenshot (17)

Article source: http://venturebeat.com/2012/06/11/hands-on-google-chrome-windows-8/

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10 May 12 Apple patches Safari, blocks outdated Flash Player


Computerworld -

Apple on Wednesday patched four security vulnerabilities in Safari and blocked outdated versions of Adobe’s Flash Player from running in its browser.

The Flash blocking move was similar to one Apple made last month when it stopped the Java plug-in from launching automatically.

Safari 5.1.7, which runs on OS X 10.6 and 10.7 — Snow Leopard and Lion, respectively — as well as on Windows XP, Vista and Windows 7, was released alongside another update for Lion that included a slightly-older version of the browser. Lion users must download and install both updates to push Safari to version 5.1.7.

The four security flaws fixed were the same ones patched Tuesday in iOS 5.1.1 for the iPhone, iPad and iPod Touch. All were labeled as bugs in WebKit, the open-source rendering engine that powers Safari as well as Google’s Chrome.

In fact, one of the vulnerabilities was first revealed by a researcher at the “Pwnium” hacking contest Google hosted last March. The researcher, Sergey Glazunov, was awarded $60,000 for pairing the flaw with another bug to bring down Chrome.

Glazunov was credited by Apple with reporting a second WebKit vulnerability, while another was attributed to a pair of engineers on the Chrome security team.

Along with the four patches, Apple also yanked Adobe’s Flash Player from Safari if the plug-in was older than version 10.1.102.64, which released in November 2010. Since then, Adobe has shipped Flash Player 11 for the Mac. It has also continued to maintain the older version 10, which now stands at version 10.3.183.19.

“This update disables Adobe Flash Player if it is older than 10.1.102.64 by moving its files to a new directory,” Apple’s advisory stated Wednesday. “This update presents the option to install an updated version of Flash Player from the Adobe website.”

Apple stopped bundling Flash Player with OS X in the fall of 2010, but users have been free to download and install the plug-in on their own. Microsoft last distributed Flash with the nearly-11-year-old Windows XP. Neither Windows Vista or Windows 7 included a preinstalled version of Adobe’s software.

Blocking Flash was the second such move by Apple in a month: On April 12, the company issued an OS X update that disabled automatic execution of Java applets by the Java browser plug-in. Apple took the step because of Flashback, a malware family that used a Java vulnerability to infect hundreds of thousands of Macs in a spree that still continues.

“As a security hardening measure, the Java browser plug-in and Java Web Start are deactivated if they are unused for 35 days,” Apple said at the time.

Java Web Start is an Oracle technology that lets users single-click launch a Java app from within a browser without first downloading the app to the machine.

And Apple wasn’t the only browser maker to recently block Adobe software. On Friday, Mozilla added the Adobe Reader plug-in to its Firefox blocklist, citing compatibility problems that resulted in blank pages appearing when users clicked on a link to a PDF document.

Mozilla maintains a blocklist for extensions or plug-ins that cause significant security or performance issues in Firefox. The browser automatically queries the blocklist and notifies users before disabling the targeted plug-in.

According to Mozilla, it’s working with Adobe on a fix to Reader but will keep the plug-in on its blocklist until one is available.

Safari 5.1.7 can be downloaded from Apple’s website. Mac users will be notified of the new version automatically by OS X’s Software Update, while Windows users already running Safari will be alerted by a separate tool bundled with the browser.

covers Microsoft, security issues, Apple, Web browsers and general technology breaking news for Computerworld. Follow Gregg on Twitter at Twitter @gkeizer, on Google+ or subscribe to Gregg’s RSS feed Keizer RSS. His email address is gkeizer@computerworld.com.

See more by Gregg Keizer on Computerworld.com.

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More in Apple Update

Read more about Mac OS in Computerworld’s Mac OS Topic Center.

Article source: http://www.computerworld.com/s/article/9227038/Apple_patches_Safari_blocks_outdated_Flash_Player

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08 May 12 Flash Player sandbox available for Firefox


Ryan Naraine is a journalist and social media enthusiast specializing in Internet and computer security issues. He is currently security evangelist at Kaspersky Lab, an anti-malware company with operations around the globe. He is taking a leadership role in developing the company’s online community initiative around secure content management technologies.

Prior to joining Kaspersky Lab, Ryan was Editor-at-Large/Security at eWEEK, leading the magazine’s and Web site’s coverage of Internet and computer security issues and managing the popular SecurityWatch blog, covering the daily threats, vulnerabilities and IT security technologies. He also covered IT security, hacker attacks and secure content management topics for Jupiter Media’s internetnetnews.com.

Ryan can be reached at naraine SHIFT 2 gmail.com. For daily updates on Ryan’s activities, follow him on Twitter.

Article source: http://www.zdnet.com/blog/security/flash-player-sandbox-available-for-firefox/11995

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07 May 12 Adobe preps silent Flash updates for Macs


Computerworld - Adobe last week released a new beta of Flash Player that includes silent updates for Macs.

Adobe first included silent updates for OS X in the Flash Player beta a month ago; the version shipped Friday was tagged as “Beta 3.”

Adobe introduced silent updates for Flash Player on Windows in late March. At the time, the company committed to creating the same feature on OS X, but did not set a timetable.

As far as users are concerned, the Mac version is identical to the Windows tool: It pings Adobe’s servers every hour until it gets a response. If it reaches Adobe and finds no ready update, the tool re-checks the servers 24 hours later. Found updates, however, are applied entirely in the background, and do not display notices on the screen or require the user to take any action.

By default, Flash 11.3 has silent updates switched on, but users can change the setting to continue to receive on-screen alerts.

In the six weeks since Adobe released silent updates for Flash Player on Windows, it has shipped a pair of updates, including one last Friday that patched a “zero-day” vulnerability attackers were already exploiting.

Silent updates will not affect users who rely solely on Google’s Chrome, as that browser bundles Flash Player, and updates the Adobe software using its own background update service.

Another prominent feature in Flash Player 11.3 is a “sandboxed” plug-in for Mozilla’s Firefox on Windows Vista and Windows 7, second step in Adobe’s plan to stymie attacks that exploit unpatched Flash bugs.

A sandbox isolates processes on the computer, preventing or at least hindering malware that tries to push code onto a machine. Adobe sandboxed Flash Player for Chrome in late 2010 after working with Google engineers; the February release of a sandboxed plug-in for Firefox came after similar cooperation from Mozilla engineers.

Adobe plans to ship the final version of Flash Player 11.3 before the end of June.

Users who want to test drive the preview can download it from Adobe’s website.

Gregg Keizer covers Microsoft, security issues, Apple, Web browsers and general technology breaking news for Computerworld. Follow Gregg on Twitter at Twitter@gkeizer, or subscribe to Gregg’s RSS feed Keizer RSS. His e-mail address is gkeizer@ix.netcom.com.

Read more about Internet in Computerworld’s Internet Topic Center.

Article source: http://www.computerworld.com/s/article/9226921/Adobe_preps_silent_Flash_updates_for_Macs

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05 May 12 Adobe Patches New Flash Zero-day Bug With Emergency Update


Adobe today warned that hackers are exploiting a critical vulnerability in its popular Flash Player program, and issued an emergency update to patch the bug.

“There are reports that the vulnerability is being exploited in the wild in active targeted attacks designed to trick the user into clicking on a malicious file delivered in an email message,” the Friday advisory said.

Microsoft Internet ExplorerMicrosoft Internet ExplorerAlthough all editions of Flash Player contain the vulnerability and should be patched, the active exploit is targeting only users of Microsoft’s Internet Explorer (IE).

Flash Player for IE is an ActiveX plug-in, the Microsoft-only standard; other browsers, including Firefox and Chrome, use a different plug-in structure.

The update was pegged with Adobe’s priority rating of “1,” used to label patches for actively-exploited vulnerabilities or bugs that will likely be exploited. For such updates, Adobe recommends that customers install the new version within 72 hours.

Adobe disclosed relatively few details about the vulnerability — its usual practice — other than to label it an “object confusion vulnerability,” note the Common Vulnerabilities Exposures ID of CVE-2012-0779, and acknowledge that triggering the bug “could cause the application to crash and potentially allow an attacker to take control of the affected system.”

It’s unclear how extensive the active attacks are, although Adobe’s calling them “targeted” hints at a low volume of attempts aimed at specific individuals or companies.

Today’s Flash Player update was the fourth this year — the latest before Friday was on March 28 — putting the frequently-patched program on about the same pace as last year, when Adobe issued a total of nine Flash security updates.

In March, Adobe addressed the frequent updating pain point — at least for Windows users — by shipping Flash Player 11.2, which uses a silent, background update mechanism. The silent update is supposed to kick in in some situations to automatically patch the plug-in in IE, Firefox, Safari and Opera on Windows without notifying or bothering users.

At the time, Adobe said it would switch on silent updates ” on a case-by-case basis,” but hinted that the service would primarily be used to distribute patches for zero-day vulnerabilities, such as today’s.

Friday, Adobe confirmed that it has, in fact, enabled Flash silent updates for Windows in this instance.

A Computerworld Windows 7 system, however, was not silently updated to 11.2.202.235, the patched version, within an hour of booting the PC, the interval the tool uses to check for new updates. Adobe was unable to explain the problem, other than to suggest an initial failure by those browsers to connect to its servers. In that case, the silent updater is designed to stop pinging Adobe for 24 hours before resuming.

The current stable version of Chrome — Google’s browser is the only one that includes the Adobe software in its updates — reports running the patched 11.2.202.235 edition of Flash Player. Google shipped that version of Chrome, 18.0.1025.168, on Monday, April 30, giving it a four-day jump on Adobe’s plug-in patching.

It was Chrome’s largest-ever lead: previously, Google has beaten Adobe to Flash Player patching by hours, or at most a day.

Adobe today again explained Chrome’s faster Flash patching by noting that it hands Flash updates to Google as “soon as we updated the code,” but needs more time on its part to test fixes on scores of operating system and browser combinations before it’s confident enough to ship the update to all users.

Microsoft’s vulnerability research group reported the Flash vulnerability to Adobe.

The patched versions of Flash Player for Windows, Mac, Linux and Solaris can be downloaded from Adobe’s website. Windows users can wait for the silent updater to kick in, run Flash’s update tool or wait for the software to prompt them that a new version is available.

Android users will be able to download the new version from Google Play, formerly the Android Market, later today, said Adobe.

To determine which version of Flash Player is running in any particular browser, users can steer to this Adobe page.

Gregg Keizer covers Microsoft, security issues, Apple, Web browsers and general technology breaking news for Computerworld. Follow Gregg on Twitter at @gkeizer, on Google+ or subscribe to Gregg’s RSS feed. His email address is gkeizer@computerworld.com

Article source: http://www.pcworld.com/article/255083/adobe_patches_new_flash_zeroday_bug_with_emergency_update.html

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10 Apr 12 Google Chrome 18 Fixes Flash and Canvas2D


Among the “big fix” items in the new Chrome 18.0.1025.151 release is a Flash player security update, that only Google Chrome is receiving. Google Chrome is the only browser that directly integrates Adobe Flash.

“The Chrome update includes fixes to two memory corruption vulnerabilities that were specific to Adobe Flash Player integrated with Google Chrome,” Wiebke Lips, Senior Manager of Corporate Communications at Adobe, told eSecurityPlanet. “In other words, these vulnerabilities do not impact Flash Player for any other browser or platform.”

The Flash player flaws were additional vulnerabilities that were initially fixed in an Adobe Flash Player 11.2.202.228 update issued at the end of March. That update ushered in silent updates for Windows users of Flash Player on Firefox and Internet Explorer. Google’s Chrome browser has provided silent updates for the integrated browser and flash solution since its initial release.

While security is always a top concern in Google Chrome updates, so too are bug fixes. In Chrome 18.0.1025.151, Google is fixing a Canvas 2D drawing bug related to GPU acceleration. Canvas 2D is an HTML5 element that enables interactive content to run in a browser. As part of the initial Chrome 18 release, Google debuted GPU hardware based acceleration for Canvas 2D in an effort to enable more complex and detailed HTML5 games on Chrome.

Read the full story at eSecurityPlanet:
Google Patches Chrome 18 for Flash Flaws

Sean Michael Kerner is a senior editor at InternetNews.com, the news service of the IT Business Edge Network, the network for technology professionals Follow him on Twitter @TechJournalist.

Article source: http://www.internetnews.com/security/google-chrome-18-fixes-flash-and-canvas2d.html

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08 Apr 12 Google Chrome update fixes 12 security bugs


Google has updated its Chrome Web browser and fixed 12 security vulnerabilities, several of which could be exploited to gain unauthorized access to your system.

Released April 5, Chrome version 18.0.125.151 addresses seven high-risk, user-after-free bugs that could permit an attacker to run arbitrary code on infected computers. In accordance with its bug bounty hunting program, Google paid researchers $6,000 for reporting the bugs, Dennis Fisher from Kaspersky Lab reported.

This is Google’s second Chrome update in about a week; on March 29, the company released Chrome 18.0.1025.142, which tackled nine security glitches and included the newest version of Adobe Flash Player. The new Chrome, released today, contains another, updated Flash Player, Fisher said.

Chrome should install itself automatically, but if you want to see if you’re using the most up-to-date version, click on the wrench icon in the top right corner of our browser, and then select “About Google Chrome.” If your browser hasn’t yet updated itself, an “Update Now” tab will prompt you to do so.

© 2012 SecurityNewsDaily. All rights reserved

Article source: http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/46976509/ns/technology_and_science-security/

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