msgbartop
All about Google Chrome & Google Chrome OS
msgbarbottom

13 Mar 12 Chrome Succumbs to Pwn2Own Contest Hack


Google’s Chrome fell to researchers’ exploits Wednesday in both hacking challenges running this week at the CanSecWest security conference.

Yesterday was the first of three days for the “Pwn2Own” contest — now in its fifth year — and for Google’s rival upstart, “Pwnium.”

While Chrome went untouched in the last two years of “Pwn2Own,” it was the first to fall to researchers Wednesday when a French team demonstrated a two-vulnerability attack on the browser running in Windows 7.

Meanwhile, Google announced it had received its first “Pwnium” exploit submission, which the company’s Chrome chief executive said qualified for that event’s top-dollar $60,000 reward.

There are two cash-at-stake hacking events at CanSecWest this year because last week Google withdrew its Pwn2Own sponsorship over objections to the contest’s practice of not requiring researchers to divulge “sandbox-escape” exploits.

Google then announced its own Pwnium, which is not a contest per se, but rather a three-day window during which security researchers can demonstrate their Chrome attacks for the company’s security team. Google had promised it would pay up to $1 million — in $20,000, $40,000 and $60,000 awards — for hacks that exploited unknown, or “zero-day,” vulnerabilities.

Chrome Succumbs to Pwn2Own Contest HackAt Pwn2Own, which changed this year to a point system, a team from French security company Vupen hacked Chrome about five minutes after the contest’s starting gun. Vupen was awarded 32 points by HP TippingPoint’s Zero Day Initiative (ZDI) bug bounty program, Pwn2Own’s organizer and sponsor.

The top scoring individual or research team will be handed $60,000 on Friday, with second and third places receiving $30,000 and $15,000, respectively.

Vupen’s exploit leveraged two bugs, said ZDI in a tweet Wednesday, including a “sandbox escape” necessary to break out of the anti-malware isolation technology designed to prevent malware from jumping out of the browser to infect the operating system.

“Google Chrome is the first browser to fall at #pwn2own 2012,” said Vupen in a tweet of its own. “We pwned it using an exploit bypassing DEP/ASLR and the sandbox!”

DEP, for data execution prevention, and ASLR, or address space layout randomization, are anti-exploit defenses baked into Windows.

On the Pwnium side of the aisle, Sundar Pichai, the senior vice president of Chrome, used Google+ to announce the first exploit submission.

“Congrats to long-time Chromium contributor Sergey Glazunov who just submitted our first Pwnium entry,” said Pichai. “Looks like it qualifies as a ‘Full Chrome’ exploit, qualifying for a $60k reward.”

Glazunov has been an active contributor not only to Chromium, the open-source project that feeds code into Chrome proper, but was also last year’s most prolific Chrome bug finder outside Google.

Chrome Succumbs to Pwn2Own Contest HackLast year, Google paid Glazunov nearly $59,000 in bug-reporting bounties, beating the No. 2 researcher, who goes only by the nickname “miabiz,” by almost $20,000.

To qualify for a $60,000 Pwnium prize, Glazunov would have had to uncover two zero-days in Chrome, one that allowed code execution in the browser, the other that broke out of the browser’s sandbox. By Google’s Pwnium rules, both vulnerabilities had to have been in Chrome’s code.

Pichai said that Google was working up a patch to push to Chrome users via the browser’s silent update mechanism, but did not reveal a timeline for the fix’s appearance.

Pwn2Own’s ZDI had predicted last week that no one would take Google up on its Pwnium offer, arguing that a sandbox escape exploit — which are rare — was worth much more then $60,000 on the open market.

To claim a Pwnium prize, researchers must reveal all vulnerabilities and exploits they used. Pwn2Own, however, requires contestants to disclose code execution bugs, but not any sandbox escape exploits.

Gregg Keizer covers Microsoft, security issues, Apple, Web browsers and general technology breaking news for Computerworld. Follow Gregg on Twitter at @gkeizer, or subscribe to Gregg’s RSS feed. His e-mail address is gkeizer@ix.netcom.com.

Read more about security in Computerworld’s Security Topic Center.

Article source: http://www.pcworld.com/article/251505/chrome_succumbs_to_pwn2own_contest_hack.html

Tags: , , ,

11 Mar 12 Chrome succumbs to Pwn2Own contest hack


Computerworld - Google’s Chrome fell to researchers’ exploits Wednesday in both hacking challenges running this week at the CanSecWest security conference.

Yesterday was the first of three days for the “Pwn2Own” contest — now in its fifth year — and for Google’s rival upstart, “Pwnium.”

While Chrome went untouched in the last two years of “Pwn2Own,” it was the first to fall to researchers Wednesday when a French team demonstrated a two-vulnerability attack on the browser running in Windows 7.

Meanwhile, Google announced it had received its first “Pwnium” exploit submission, which the company’s Chrome chief executive said qualified for that event’s top-dollar $60,000 reward.

There are two cash-at-stake hacking events at CanSecWest this year because last week Google withdrew its Pwn2Own sponsorship over objections to the contest’s practice of not requiring researchers to divulge “sandbox-escape” exploits.

Google then announced its own Pwnium, which is not a contest per se, but rather a three-day window during which security researchers can demonstrate their Chrome attacks for the company’s security team. Google had promised it would pay up to $1 million — in $20,000, $40,000 and $60,000 awards — for hacks that exploited unknown, or “zero-day,” vulnerabilities.

At Pwn2Own, which changed this year to a point system, a team from French security company Vupen hacked Chrome about five minutes after the contest’s starting gun. Vupen was awarded 32 points by HP TippingPoint’s Zero Day Initiative (ZDI) bug bounty program, Pwn2Own’s organizer and sponsor.

The top scoring individual or research team will be handed $60,000 on Friday, with second and third places receiving $30,000 and $15,000, respectively.

Vupen’s exploit leveraged two bugs, said ZDI in a tweet Wednesday, including a “sandbox escape” necessary to break out of the anti-malware isolation technology designed to prevent malware from jumping out of the browser to infect the operating system.

“Google Chrome is the first browser to fall at #pwn2own 2012,” said Vupen in a tweet of its own. “We pwned it using an exploit bypassing DEP/ASLR and the sandbox!”

DEP, for data execution prevention, and ASLR, or address space layout randomization, are anti-exploit defenses baked into Windows.

On the Pwnium side of the aisle, Sundar Pichai, the senior vice president of Chrome, used Google+ to announce the first exploit submission.

“Congrats to long-time Chromium contributor Sergey Glazunov who just submitted our first Pwnium entry,” said Pichai. “Looks like it qualifies as a ‘Full Chrome’ exploit, qualifying for a $60k reward.”

Glazunov has been an active contributor not only to Chromium, the open-source project that feeds code into Chrome proper, but was also last year’s most prolific Chrome bug finder outside Google.

Last year, Google paid Glazunov nearly $59,000 in bug-reporting bounties, beating the No. 2 researcher, who goes only by the nickname “miabiz,” by almost $20,000.

To qualify for a $60,000 Pwnium prize, Glazunov would have had to uncover two zero-days in Chrome, one that allowed code execution in the browser, the other that broke out of the browser’s sandbox. By Google’s Pwnium rules, both vulnerabilities had to have been in Chrome’s code.

Pichai said that Google was working up a patch to push to Chrome users via the browser’s silent update mechanism, but did not reveal a timeline for the fix’s appearance.

Pwn2Own’s ZDI had predicted last week that no one would take Google up on its Pwnium offer, arguing that a sandbox escape exploit — which are rare — was worth much more then $60,000 on the open market.

To claim a Pwnium prize, researchers must reveal all vulnerabilities and exploits they used. Pwn2Own, however, requires contestants to disclose code execution bugs, but not any sandbox escape exploits.

Gregg Keizer covers Microsoft, security issues, Apple, Web browsers and general technology breaking news for Computerworld. Follow Gregg on Twitter at Twitter@gkeizer, or subscribe to Gregg’s RSS feed Keizer RSS. His e-mail address is gkeizer@ix.netcom.com.

Read more about Security in Computerworld’s Security Topic Center.

Article source: http://www.computerworld.com/s/article/9225010/Chrome_succumbs_to_Pwn2Own_contest_hack

Tags: , , ,

10 Mar 12 Google gives man $60K for hacking Chrome


1 day

Google

Google Chrome

In an annual security competition, Google offered $60,000 to the person who could successfully hack into Chrome (under very specific parameters), and on the first day, someone won — a first for the heretofore impenetrable browser.

It was inevitable someone, someday would be able to find a “Full Chrome” exploit (using only bugs in Chrome itself, vs. Flash, Windows or a driver), but in the three years its makers offered Chrome to industrious hackers to try to find bugs it could fix, it was like Troy. That is, until Russian university student Sergey Glazunov — a longtime submitter of bugs to the Chromium security team who has already won thousands from Google — found its Trojan horse and executed a “Full Chrome” exploit.

ZDNet reported that Glazunov found a way to bypass Chrome’s “sandbox” – a restriction that normally blocks hackers from being able to take over a user’s device.

Sundar Pichai, a senior VP of Chrome and apps, posted the win in Google+ and promptly reassured users: ”We’re working fast on a fix that we’ll push via auto-update. This is exciting; we launched Pwnium this year to encourage the security community to submit exploits for us to help make the web safer. We look forward to any additional submissions to make Chrome even stronger for our users.”

Glazunov won the $60,000 grand prize on the first day (March 7) of the three-day CanSecWest security conference in Vancouver, as part of the Pwnium competition that offers a big pot of $1 million that goes to reward competitors for exploits. Those who are successful submitting “Partial Chrome exploits” (using at least one bug in Chrome itself, plus other bugs) will receive $40,000.

Even those who successfully submit bugs outside of Chrome will win a $20,000 “Consolation reward, Flash / Windows / other.” So deep are its pockets that Google rationalizes, “Although not specifically Chrome’s issue, we’ve decided to offer consolation prizes because these findings still help us toward our mission of making the entire web safer.”

The original plan called for Google to be a sponsor to the Pwn2Own competition, as it was last year. But, because “contestants are permitted to enter Pwn2Own without having to reveal full exploits (or even all of the bugs used!) to vendors,” the company decided instead to run “this alternative Chrome-specific reward program.” Google explained its decision as a safety issue, in requiring full exploits to be submitted, and the team will in turn immediately send non-Chrome bugs to appropriate vendors.

But in that competition, as in Pwnium, hackers mounted a successful attack and took the browser down in the first five minutes of Pwn2Own, sponsored by HP. But that contest only has a $105,000 pot

Just prior to the hackathon, Google pushed out a Chrome update with 14 patches and rewarded the finders of each patched flaw $1,000 each

Who needs a hacking scam to make money when Google invites — dares, even — such attempts and is willing to give cash rewards for doing so?

Check out Technolog on Facebook, and on Twitter, follow Athima Chansanchai, who is also trying to keep her head above water in the Google+ stream.

2 days

‘From Dust’ headed to Google Chrome

From Dust

4 days

Click a ‘bad’ link and a hacker gets full control of your phone

8 days

New Google privacy policy has law-enforcement holes, say experts

Close post

Article source: http://www.technolog.msnbc.msn.com/technology/technolog/google-gives-man-60k-hacking-chrome-368666

Tags: , , ,

09 Mar 12 Chrome succumbs to Pwn2Own contest hack


Computerworld - Google’s Chrome fell to researchers’ exploits Wednesday in both hacking challenges running this week at the CanSecWest security conference.

Yesterday was the first of three days for the “Pwn2Own” contest — now in its fifth year — and for Google’s rival upstart, “Pwnium.”

While Chrome went untouched in the last two years of “Pwn2Own,” it was the first to fall to researchers Wednesday when a French team demonstrated a two-vulnerability attack on the browser running in Windows 7.

Meanwhile, Google announced it had received its first “Pwnium” exploit submission, which the company’s Chrome chief executive said qualified for that event’s top-dollar $60,000 reward.

There are two cash-at-stake hacking events at CanSecWest this year because last week Google withdrew its Pwn2Own sponsorship over objections to the contest’s practice of not requiring researchers to divulge “sandbox-escape” exploits.

Google then announced its own Pwnium, which is not a contest per se, but rather a three-day window during which security researchers can demonstrate their Chrome attacks for the company’s security team. Google had promised it would pay up to $1 million — in $20,000, $40,000 and $60,000 awards — for hacks that exploited unknown, or “zero-day,” vulnerabilities.

At Pwn2Own, which changed this year to a point system, a team from French security company Vupen hacked Chrome about five minutes after the contest’s starting gun. Vupen was awarded 32 points by HP TippingPoint’s Zero Day Initiative (ZDI) bug bounty program, Pwn2Own’s organizer and sponsor.

The top scoring individual or research team will be handed $60,000 on Friday, with second and third places receiving $30,000 and $15,000, respectively.

Vupen’s exploit leveraged two bugs, said ZDI in a tweet Wednesday, including a “sandbox escape” necessary to break out of the anti-malware isolation technology designed to prevent malware from jumping out of the browser to infect the operating system.

“Google Chrome is the first browser to fall at #pwn2own 2012,” said Vupen in a tweet of its own. “We pwned it using an exploit bypassing DEP/ASLR and the sandbox!”

DEP, for data execution prevention, and ASLR, or address space layout randomization, are anti-exploit defenses baked into Windows.

On the Pwnium side of the aisle, Sundar Pichai, the senior vice president of Chrome, used Google+ to announce the first exploit submission.

“Congrats to long-time Chromium contributor Sergey Glazunov who just submitted our first Pwnium entry,” said Pichai. “Looks like it qualifies as a ‘Full Chrome’ exploit, qualifying for a $60k reward.”

Glazunov has been an active contributor not only to Chromium, the open-source project that feeds code into Chrome proper, but was also last year’s most prolific Chrome bug finder outside Google.

Last year, Google paid Glazunov nearly $59,000 in bug-reporting bounties, beating the No. 2 researcher, who goes only by the nickname “miabiz,” by almost $20,000.

To qualify for a $60,000 Pwnium prize, Glazunov would have had to uncover two zero-days in Chrome, one that allowed code execution in the browser, the other that broke out of the browser’s sandbox. By Google’s Pwnium rules, both vulnerabilities had to have been in Chrome’s code.

Pichai said that Google was working up a patch to push to Chrome users via the browser’s silent update mechanism, but did not reveal a timeline for the fix’s appearance.

Pwn2Own’s ZDI had predicted last week that no one would take Google up on its Pwnium offer, arguing that a sandbox escape exploit — which are rare — was worth much more then $60,000 on the open market.

To claim a Pwnium prize, researchers must reveal all vulnerabilities and exploits they used. Pwn2Own, however, requires contestants to disclose code execution bugs, but not any sandbox escape exploits.

Gregg Keizer covers Microsoft, security issues, Apple, Web browsers and general technology breaking news for Computerworld. Follow Gregg on Twitter at Twitter@gkeizer, or subscribe to Gregg’s RSS feed Keizer RSS. His e-mail address is gkeizer@ix.netcom.com.

Read more about Security in Computerworld’s Security Topic Center.

Article source: http://www.computerworld.com/s/article/9225010/Chrome_succumbs_to_Pwn2Own_contest_hack

Tags: , , ,

08 Mar 12 Chrome Succumbs to Pwn2Own Contest Hack


Google’s Chrome fell to researchers’ exploits Wednesday in both hacking challenges running this week at the CanSecWest security conference.

Yesterday was the first of three days for the “Pwn2Own” contest — now in its fifth year — and for Google’s rival upstart, “Pwnium.”

While Chrome went untouched in the last two years of “Pwn2Own,” it was the first to fall to researchers Wednesday when a French team demonstrated a two-vulnerability attack on the browser running in Windows 7.

Meanwhile, Google announced it had received its first “Pwnium” exploit submission, which the company’s Chrome chief executive said qualified for that event’s top-dollar $60,000 reward.

There are two cash-at-stake hacking events at CanSecWest this year because last week Google withdrew its Pwn2Own sponsorship over objections to the contest’s practice of not requiring researchers to divulge “sandbox-escape” exploits.

Google then announced its own Pwnium, which is not a contest per se, but rather a three-day window during which security researchers can demonstrate their Chrome attacks for the company’s security team. Google had promised it would pay up to $1 million — in $20,000, $40,000 and $60,000 awards — for hacks that exploited unknown, or “zero-day,” vulnerabilities.

Chrome Succumbs to Pwn2Own Contest HackAt Pwn2Own, which changed this year to a point system, a team from French security company Vupen hacked Chrome about five minutes after the contest’s starting gun. Vupen was awarded 32 points by HP TippingPoint’s Zero Day Initiative (ZDI) bug bounty program, Pwn2Own’s organizer and sponsor.

The top scoring individual or research team will be handed $60,000 on Friday, with second and third places receiving $30,000 and $15,000, respectively.

Vupen’s exploit leveraged two bugs, said ZDI in a tweet Wednesday, including a “sandbox escape” necessary to break out of the anti-malware isolation technology designed to prevent malware from jumping out of the browser to infect the operating system.

“Google Chrome is the first browser to fall at #pwn2own 2012,” said Vupen in a tweet of its own. “We pwned it using an exploit bypassing DEP/ASLR and the sandbox!”

DEP, for data execution prevention, and ASLR, or address space layout randomization, are anti-exploit defenses baked into Windows.

On the Pwnium side of the aisle, Sundar Pichai, the senior vice president of Chrome, used Google+ to announce the first exploit submission.

“Congrats to long-time Chromium contributor Sergey Glazunov who just submitted our first Pwnium entry,” said Pichai. “Looks like it qualifies as a ‘Full Chrome’ exploit, qualifying for a $60k reward.”

Glazunov has been an active contributor not only to Chromium, the open-source project that feeds code into Chrome proper, but was also last year’s most prolific Chrome bug finder outside Google.

Chrome Succumbs to Pwn2Own Contest HackLast year, Google paid Glazunov nearly $59,000 in bug-reporting bounties, beating the No. 2 researcher, who goes only by the nickname “miabiz,” by almost $20,000.

To qualify for a $60,000 Pwnium prize, Glazunov would have had to uncover two zero-days in Chrome, one that allowed code execution in the browser, the other that broke out of the browser’s sandbox. By Google’s Pwnium rules, both vulnerabilities had to have been in Chrome’s code.

Pichai said that Google was working up a patch to push to Chrome users via the browser’s silent update mechanism, but did not reveal a timeline for the fix’s appearance.

Pwn2Own’s ZDI had predicted last week that no one would take Google up on its Pwnium offer, arguing that a sandbox escape exploit — which are rare — was worth much more then $60,000 on the open market.

To claim a Pwnium prize, researchers must reveal all vulnerabilities and exploits they used. Pwn2Own, however, requires contestants to disclose code execution bugs, but not any sandbox escape exploits.

Gregg Keizer covers Microsoft, security issues, Apple, Web browsers and general technology breaking news for Computerworld. Follow Gregg on Twitter at @gkeizer, or subscribe to Gregg’s RSS feed. His e-mail address is gkeizer@ix.netcom.com.

Read more about security in Computerworld’s Security Topic Center.

Article source: http://www.pcworld.com/article/251505/chrome_succumbs_to_pwn2own_contest_hack.html

Tags: , , ,