msgbartop
All about Google Chrome & Google Chrome OS
msgbarbottom

31 Dec 12 LG Nexus 4 vs Samsung Galaxy Nexus: Camera shootout


We had a run-in with Google’s flagship smartphone today and we put it to work right away. The Nexus 4 is built by LG and follows the Galaxy Nexus very closely in terms of design and aesthetics. We’ll have an in-depth first impressions of the phone for you very soon, but first, how about a little camera showdown against the Galaxy Nexus. The camera in the previous phone was only good if all the conditions were ideal like a bright summer’s day. Anything else and you might as well not bother taking the phone out of your pocket. The Nexus 4 on the other hand has an 8MP BSI sensor from Sony, so we can expect great things from it, especially in low light.

We will be comparing it with other handsets like the iPhone 5, Lumia 920, etc in the future but for now, we just want to see how much of an improvement it is over its predecessor.

On Video

We’ve shot a quick hands-on video of the LG Nexus 4, highlighting its design and build as well as a quick comparison with the Galaxy Nexus itself. We also get to see the new powerful Qualcomm SoC in action through a quick lap of NFS: Most Wanted.

Good detail on both but the Nexus 4 edges out the GNex with better depth of field

Good detail on both but the Nexus 4 edges out the GNex with better depth of field

 

In the first out door test, both cameras appear to capture very good amount of detail. However, the colours are a bit exaggerated in the Galaxy Nexus as compared the Nexus 4. Also, the depth of field is stronger in the Nexus 4 as the blue wall and shrubs in the background are more blurred out.

No real competition here

No real competition here

 

Our second test was indoors, under sufficient ambient lighting. Here, the BSI sensor come into play by offering a much better white balance as well as a lot more detail. The Galaxy Nexus is simply unable to capture enough detail and colours in this sort of lighting.

Good detail and accurate colours from the Nexus 4

Good detail and accurate colours from the Nexus 4

 

We finally come to our macro test. Once again, the Nexus 4 came out on top with better white balance and much better contrast. The detail is also a lot better.

There’s no word when the Nexus 4 will actually launch in India but latest rumours state a possibility of an early Jan launch. You can buy the handset right now from the gray market for approximately Rs 36,000 for the 16GB model. You can read our in-depth first impressions of the handset right here.

Product sourced from: Cell Point, Shop No.76, Heerapanna. Contact no:+91 9819 031 860

Article source: http://tech2.in.com/features/smartphones/lg-nexus-4-vs-samsung-galaxy-nexus-camera-shootout/664542

Tags: , , , , ,

28 Dec 12 LG Nexus 4 vs Samsung Galaxy Nexus : Camera shootout


We had a run-in with Google’s flagship smartphone today and we put it to work right away. The Nexus 4 is built by LG and follows the Galaxy Nexus very closely in terms of design and aesthetics. We’ll have an in-depth first impressions of the phone for you very soon, but first, how about a little camera showdown against the Galaxy Nexus. The camera in the previous phone was only good if all the conditions were ideal like a bright summer’s day. Anything else and you might as well not bother taking the phone out of your pocket. The Nexus 4 on the other hand has an 8MP BSI sensor from Sony, so we can expect great things from it, especially in low light.

We will be comparing it with other handsets like the iPhone 5, Lumia 920, etc in the future but for now, we just want to see how much of an improvement it is over its predecessor.

On Video

We’ve shot a quick hands-on video of the LG Nexus 4, highlighting its design and build as well as a quick comparison with the Galaxy Nexus itself. We also get to see the new powerful Qualcomm SoC in action through a quick lap of NFS: Most Wanted.

Good detail on both but the Nexus 4 edges out the GNex with better depth of field

Good detail on both but the Nexus 4 edges out the GNex with better depth of field

 

In the first out door test, both cameras appear to capture very good amount of detail. However, the colours are a bit exaggerated in the Galaxy Nexus as compared the Nexus 4. Also, the depth of field is stronger in the Nexus 4 as the blue wall and shrubs in the background are more blurred out.

No real competition here

No real competition here

 

Our second test was indoors, under sufficient ambient lighting. Here, the BSI sensor come into play by offering a much better white balance as well as a lot more detail. The Galaxy Nexus is simply unable to capture enough detail and colours in this sort of lighting.

Good detail and accurate colours from the Nexus 4

Good detail and accurate colours from the Nexus 4

 

We finally come to our macro test. Once again, the Nexus 4 came out on top with better white balance and much better contrast. The detail is also a lot better.

There’s no word when the Nexus 4 will actually launch in India but latest rumours state a possibility of an early Jan launch. You can buy the handset right now from the gray market for approximately Rs 30,000 for the 16GB model. Stay tuned for our first impressions on the Nexus 4 coming up shortly. 


Product sourced from: Cell Point, Shop No.76, Heerapanna. Contact no:+91 9819 031 860

Article source: http://tech2.in.com/features/smartphones/lg-nexus-4-vs-samsung-galaxy-nexus-camera-shootout/664542

Tags: , , , , ,

18 Dec 12 CyanogenMod 10.1 nightlies spread to more Nexus models, ASUS and …


CyanogenMod 10.1 on a Nexus 4

There was a certain degree of irony to the first CyanogenMod 10.1 nightly reaching a lone device that already runs Android 4.2. What about the rest of us? Thankfully, logic is getting the upper hand with the arrival of regular test builds for a much wider hardware selection. All versions of the Galaxy Nexus, Nexus 7 and Nexus 10 get their expected turn at the code. However, the mix also includes devices that weren’t predestined to receive an official update to the latest instance of Jelly Bean, such as ASUS’ Transformer Pad Infinity and Samsung devices ranging from the original Galaxy S through to both Galaxy Tab 2 slates. It’s still throwing caution to the wind by running an unfinished version of unofficial firmware, but we’re sure CyanogenMod’s target audience is comfortable enough with the risks to visit the source link.

Article source: http://www.engadget.com/2012/12/17/cyanogenmod-10-1-nightlies-spread-to-more-nexus-models-asus-and-samsung/

Tags: , , ,

18 Dec 12 Nexus 4 delays blamed on LG’s ‘scarce and erratic’ supply by Google chief


Google UK’s managing director has made a fulsome apology to would-be buyers of the new Nexus 4 smartphone, blaming “scarce and erratic” supplies from manufacturer LG, but admitting that “our communication has been flawed” with both sides.

Dan Cobley, the managing director for the UK, put the apology on his Google+ page following widespread criticism in user forums of erratic and perverse delivery schedules, in which people who ordered the phones online from Google earlier saw shipping dates long after those who made subsequent orders.

The Nexus 4, made by LG to Google’s specifications, runs a “pure Google” version of Android without any handset maker’s alterations. The comparatively low UK price of £239 for the 8GB model of the high-specification handset – which offers a 4.7in, 320ppi screen, 8 megapixel camera, HSPA+ connectivity and NFC – attracted a significant number of buyers seeking to use it for a sim-only contract with a carrier.

But Google hit a series of supply chain problems because demand ran ahead of supply. Google has repeatedly declined to say how many were ordered worldwide, but has been overwhelmed with demand each time it has offered stock through its site, beginning in November.

Cobley said in a comment on one of his own posts told would-be buyers and those who had ordered that “I know what you are going through is unacceptable and we are all working through the nights and weekends to resolve the issue”. He offered an “unreserved apology for our service and communication failures in this process”, adding that he realised that “the people who ordered the Nexus 4 so early are among our most committed and loyal users”.

People who ordered the phones earlier in the month complained that after being told it would be shipped in “3-5 days”, that they then received no further notification from the company, and saw other people who had ordered later receiving shipping notifications. The problems have caused il feeling with a number of buyers.

“I don’t mind (well, I’m a bit miffed) that my phone is late,” wrote one would-be owner, Ben Stewart, on Cobley’s page. “I do mind that first in, first out isn’t being obeyed.” That, together with the lack of communication, “are what’s really annoying”, he said.

The hassles over delivery and shipping have left a number of purchasers dissatisfied over Google’s handling of the provision of phones. The Nexus 4, made by LG, is the fourth “pure Google” Android phone, following the Nexus One made bt HTC, and the Nexus S and Galaxy Nexus made by Samsung.

Google has also struggled with customers complaining that when they have wanted to return Samsung-made Nexus 10 tablets because of problems, but have run into problems getting shipping labels.

Although the Nexus line of phones has been high-profile online, actual sales figures have been comparatively low, with figures released by Samsung during its patent trial with Apple in California over the summer showing that the Nexus S sold around 500,000 units in the year from the second quarter of 2011, when it went on sale there, compared to Samsung’s total phones sales of around 14.5m in the US for the same period.

The Nexus 4 has attracted widespread attention because of the low price at which Google is offering it – equivalent to that for a lower-spec smartphone, rather than the Nokia Lumia, Samsung Galaxy S 3 or iPhone 5 with which it might be compared.

One irked commenter at product-reviews remarked: “Google needs to just buy a company that knows how to manage this process of selling physical items on line and shipping them. What they have now is a joke, If you call their device support, the people are clueless. Their ability to provide tech support for my Nexus 7 [tablet], or order status for my Nexus 4 is nil.”

Google owns the loss-making mobile phone manufacturer Motorola Mobility (MMI). But MMI is in the midst of a retreat from a number of manufacturing and sales positions outside the US, selling off factories in China, India and Brazil and closing offices in South Korea and Taiwan. It is also not set up to deal directly with customer sales, because it is structured as a phone manufacturer which deals with carriers, rather than selling direct.

The text of Cobley’s apology reads:

Dear all

I know that what you are going through is unacceptable and we are all working through the nights and weekends to resolve this issue. Supplies from the manufacturer are scarce and erratic, and our communication has been flawed. I can offer an unreserved apology for our service and communication failures in this process.

For those that originally received a 3-5 days shipping estimate, your orders are now in process for fulfillment. You can expect an email notification early this week which will include tracking information. Although you will be initially charged in full, you will receive a credit for the shipping charge soon after.

For others that received pre-Christmas shipping estimates, we anticipate processing your orders for fulfillment this week.

I realise that the people who ordered the Nexus 4 so early are among our most committed and loyal users and we are doing all we can to put things right.

Sorry again.

Dan

Article source: http://www.guardian.co.uk/technology/2012/dec/17/nexus-4-delays-apology-blame

Tags: , , , , ,

14 Dec 12 Quick Contest: Win 1 of 3 Galaxy Nexus Fantom Tempered Glass Screen …


The Galaxy Nexus on Verizon is still to this day one of the most popular phones among Droid Life readers. It was the first Nexus (maybe the last too) to launch on Big Red, providing this passionate community the only fully open phone on their network of choice in quite some time. But now that the phone has been around for almost a year, it seems to take a backseat at times to all of the new phones that hit the market. So to show the G-Nex that we still love it, we wanted to hand out a couple of tempered glass screen protectors for it. 

The Fantom, made by XGEAR, is practically scratch resistant, keeps off fingerprints, and is thin enough to not add extra bulk to your device. At 8H hardness, you won’t find this kind of protection from any other screen protector. Then normally retail for $29.99.

Contest

Update:  Our three winners have been picked! David, ImmaDroid, and Sean, be sure to check your email!

Prize:  3 (three) Fantom tempered glass screen protectors for the Galaxy Nexus.

How to enter:

1.  In the comments, tell us why you still love your Galaxy Nexus.

Winners:

Today, at 3PM Pacific, we’ll randomly choose three winners from the comments.

*Winners need to have U.S. addresses.


jQuery(‘.nrelate_dhot’).removeClass(‘nrelate_dhot’);

Article source: http://www.droid-life.com/2012/12/13/quick-contest-win-1-of-3-galaxy-nexus-fantom-tempered-glass-screen-protectors/

Tags: , , , ,

13 Jun 12 Android performance boosted 30-100 percent by Linaro toolchain


Linaro’s efforts have boosted Android’s performance, delivering an improvement of 30 to 100 percent in various benchmarks. They achieved these impressive gains by adapting Android 4 so that it could be built with their improved GCC toolchain.

We first wrote about Linaro in 2010 when the non-profit organization was founded by a consortium of hardware and software companies, including ARM, Samsung, TI, and Canonical. Linaro has worked to improve the quality of Linux on the ARM architecture, focusing largely on hardware-enablement and tooling.

The group is closely aligned with Ubuntu, but the improvements that it is driving offer benefits for the broader ecosystem of platforms and distributions that are deployed on ARM hardware. They have done a lot of work upstream in GCC (the GNU Compiler Collection) to open the door for better ARM optimization in Linux and other open source software.

Linaro’s GCC improvements have been producing measurable performance advantages over Google’s stock Android environment and build toolchain since late last year. Google is reportedly accepting some of these improvements in the upstream Android Open Source Project and independent developers are also looking to put them to use.

As a recent blog post at Liliputing pointed out, Linaro improvements are being merged in Cyanogen, a popular third-party ROM that is maintained through a community-driven process. Enthusiasts have already started generating device-specific builds that incorporated the Linaro patches. A Linaro build for the Galaxy Nexus, for example, was published this week on reddit (disclosure: reddit is a cousin site of Ars).

If you are looking for more information about Linaro, or want to get involved, you can find out more by visiting the organization’s website or checking out the Linaro projects that are hosted on the Launchpad collaboration site.

Update: updated to indicate that Google is merging the improvements, based on a Google+ comment made by Google engineer Jean-Baptiste Queru.

Article source: http://arstechnica.com/gadgets/2012/06/android-performance-boosted-30-100-percent-by-linaro-toolchain/

Tags: , , , , ,

12 Jun 12 Android Dilemma: Samsung Galaxy S III or Motorola RAZR HD?


King of Android: New Samsung Galaxy S III has got game, but is the Motorola RAZR HD a better choice?

The real summer blockbuster may very well be the battle royale now underway for Android supremacy. Manufacturers have stayed true to their word (from CES in January) that we’d see fewer Android smartphone models this year; instead we’d get Apple-like major launches. Sure enough, there are two models vying for your attention: the newly announced Samsung Galaxy S III and the upcoming Motorola RAZR HD. For upgraders or iPhone switchers (and I know many… what with the limited display size of the 4S, and inflexibility of iOS) the question remains: Which Android is the best – Samsung S III or Motorola RAZR HD?

As an OG Droid guy (November 2009) I passed on the Galaxy Nexus (bad battery) and waited and waited until finally the right Android came along. That was the Samsung Galaxy S III. Its predecessor was a smash hit. And the sim-less version I have — now rooted and running Ice Cream Sandwich — is testament to Samsung’s design prowess. Here’s hoping Apple gets off their high horse, and drops these fruitless, asinine, innovation stifling patent trolling vacations. Ultimately, competition is good for a free market, and, ultimately, consumers.

Here’s the thing. As soon as Verizon announced the S III last week I pre-ordered el pronto.

However, as I’m wont to do, I continued to research the upcoming Moto RAZR HD. Being an OG Droid owner, I’ve been impressed with Motorola’s build quality. And, there’s something about made … er, I mean designed … in America that feels right.

But I want to make the right choice.

Probably like a lot of you, I’ll be living with this new Android for years to come, so it’s got be as perfect as perfect can be. And the S III, while no doubt the best Android you can possibly order today (and smartly to be available on all major carriers: Verizon, ATT, Sprint, T-Mobile)  has a few shortcomings, that have me second-guessing my decision to go from OG Droid – S III. But there’s at least one major, major reason why waiting for the RAZR HD might not be the best idea. More on that in a sec.

First, here’s a few of the reasons I’m considering cancelling my Galaxy S III pre-order and holding out for the upcoming Motorola Droid RAZR HD:

1. Kevlar 

Purported shot of the upcoming Motorola RAZR HD: Hmmmmm … Kevlar!

Might sound weird to some of you, but I love that Kevlar backing and the overall rigidity and durability it adds to the device. Though I’ve yet to get my hands on the S III, it sounds like it is quite plastick-y. Not the worse thing in the world. The S II feels fine to me, but … Kevlar!

2. Better car dock, multimedia dock

It seems as though Motorola does a better job with accessories, specifically the car, and multimedia docks. These are both essential to me. I use Google Nav daily for our Stark Insider ventures which take us from Napa down to Carmel and up and down Silicon Valley.

3. Softkeys (like the Galaxy Nexus)

I like softkeys. The physical button on bottom-center of the S III has an old-school vibe (in a bad way). On the other hand, those softkeys as seen on the Nexus really give developers and future Android revs room to grow.

4. Battery life!

Okay, maybe this should be number 1 in terms of priority.

The S III will ship with a 2100mAh battery – keep in mind the screen is 4.8-inches (that’s large). Moto reportedly will up that by about 50% with 3300mAh of juice (same as the well performing RAZR Maxx). That’s a significant difference. I simply can’t stand running our of power in the middle of a work day- it can end up costing me money.

5. Anything but TouchWiz

Ultimately I prefer stock ICS/Android, as we see in the Galaxy Nexus. However, between Samsung’s TouchWiz and Motorola’s Blur/? I’d pick anything but TouchWiz.

While it matters less to me, the RAZR HD will also beat the S III when it comes to camera resolution (13 MP vs. 8 MP).

But — and this is a Big But — here’s the rub: I immediately upgraded to the S III before Verizon decided to pull the plug on grandfathered unlimited data plans. Thankfully my unlimited plan ported over with no issue (though it annoys me to no end out of principal, that Verizon charges a $30 “upgrade fee” to a loyal customer).

The risk is if I decide to cancel the S III, and wait for the Moto for the reasons mentioned above I risk not being able to port the unlimited plan when the RAZR HD comes out. Since we have no date yet on the new RAZR this can be cause for concern.

I’m oh-so-close to cancelling the S III and waiting for the RAZR HD, and taking the chance Verizon will give us ample notice before pulling the magical unlimited data carpet from underneath our stream-loving feet.



jQuery(‘.nrelate_default’).removeClass(‘nrelate_default’);

Article source: http://www.starkinsider.com/2012/06/android-dilemma-samsung-galaxy-s-iii-or-motorola-razr-hd.html

Tags: , , , , ,

09 Jun 12 Android updates embarrassing, but do users notice?


It was big news this week that most
Android phones haven’t yet been upgraded to the latest Android operating system. Developers also seem to still prefer writing apps for Apple devices, despite Google’s predictions. That’s sure embarrassing for Google. But does it make that much of a difference to the Android user? I’ll offer myself up as a reality check.

The statistics on the sorry situation come from Google itself. Only 7.1 percent of devices that have recently accessed Google Play are listed as using the latest Android 4 “Ice Cream Sandwich” version of Google’s mobile operating system (anything from Android 4.0 to Android 4.0.4). Most are far behind, using Android 2 “Honeycomb” versions ranging from Android 2.0 through Android 2.3.7.

I prefer Android 2 to Android 4 myself, so I’m kind of pleased that one of my two main Android phones, the Galaxy S II Skyrocket with ATT, is still on the older version. But it is also annoying. When’s that phone going to get upgraded? What about other Android phones that I have?

Update roulette
I’ve amassed quite a collection of Android phones over the years. Some are review units I’ve been allowed to keep, some I picked up while attending the annual Google I/O developer event, and some I’ve purchased (my policy is that any phone I use regularly, I buy). Here’s an inventory of units I have at hand and their status:

HTC Dream / Android 1.6: Actually, this is the Google I/O developer edition phone that was given out by Google itself at Google I/O 2009, with specs the same as the HTC Dream. My understanding from Google is that it will never be updated over-the-air beyond where it’s at now. I believe that’s also the case for those with branded HTC Dream phones.

Nexus One / Android 2.3.6: This is the original in the Google Nexus line, and I received it when attending the
Nexus One launch event in January 2010.

HTC Evo 4G: / Android 2.3.3: I received this Sprint phone when I attended Google I/O 2010. It appears not to be on HTC’s list for upgrading to Android 4.

Droid Charge / Android 2.3.6 : My first Verizon 4G LTE phone, which I purchased last June. It’s not on Samsung’s list of phones to be upgraded.

Droid Bionic / Android 2.3.4: A review unit that I’m about to send back to Motorola. I never did a review of the phone, primarily because it wasn’t running the latest version of Android and I didn’t feel I could do a decent review versus phones like the
Galaxy Nexus or the iPhone 4S that do have the latest versions of their operating systems. The Droid Bionic isn’t due to get Android 4 until the third quarter of this year.

Nexus S / Android 4.0.4: I purchased this phone with Sprint last year, though I no longer use it day-to-day nor have a Sprint account. It got the Android 4 update in April, four months after the software shipped on the Galaxy Nexus.

ATT Galaxy S II Skyrocket / Android 2.3.6: One of the two Android phones that I use on a day-to-day basis, I purchased it only a few months ago. It’s on the list to get upgraded, but there’s no set date.

Galaxy Nexus / Android 4.0.4: The latest in the Nexus line, I purchased mine to use as one of my two main Android phones in January 2012. It’s running the most up-to-date version of Android.

The sorry state of Android updates
After taking a look at that inventory, it’s clear the state of Android updates is pretty pathetic. There’s an excellent chance the Galaxy S III will arrive before my Galaxy S II gets updated to Android 4. The Droid Bionic is not likely to get Android 4 before Apple ships iOS 6 and perhaps an entirely new iPhone. My Nexus S — a Google-branded phone — took four months to get the latest version of Android, which was insane.

If I weren’t so involved in technology writing, and thus constantly upgrading my phones, it’s likely that I’d still have only my Droid Charge midway through a two-year contract and no hope of ever jumping from Android 2 to Android 4.

In contrast, consider that the iPhone 3G that I still have, my original iPhone bought in 2008, is running iOS 4. It’ll never get upgraded past that, but it’s also a four-year-old phone that kept up with the latest iOS releases until last year. That’s much better than Android phones I have that are only a year or two old and seem likely to never jump beyond Android 2. My oldest Android phone, still one year younger than my iPhone 3G, will never leave Android 1.6 unless I try manually “rooting” an upgrade myself.

Meanwhile, the iPhone 4 that I swapped for an iPhone 4S is hanging in there with the current version of iOS 5, despite coming up on two years old. I fully expect it will be able to upgrade to iOS 6, when that comes out.

But does old matter?
Now for the reality check. I used the Nexus One, one of the oldest phones in the bunch listed above, on a trip back to the U.K. last month. Despite the phone’s age, and despite its running only Android 2, it had the following features, which let me do the following things:

My Nexus One, still ticking along

  • E-mail app to send and receive e-mail
  • Browser to browse the Web
  • Twitter app to tweet
  • Facebook app to share on Facebook
  • Google+ app to share on Google+
  • Instagram app to share photos
  • Foursquare app to check in and get local information
  • Camera app to shoot pictures and video
  • Kindle app to read
  • Map app to find locations and GPS navigate to them
  • Clock to set an alarm
  • Calendar to check my schedule
  • SMS to send text messages
  • Wi-Fi hotspot to share my mobile Internet connection with my computer

What exactly was I missing by the operating system being so old? Nothing, really. The phone did just as much as my top-of-the-line Galaxy Nexus. It did just as much as my top-of-the-line iPhone 4S, for that matter. Sure, the pictures and video were lower-resolution, though not that remarkably noticeable. Aside from that, it wasn’t like I was struggling to carry on my mobile life as normal.

That’s the reality check that can go missing when looking at update figures. People are clearly still able to use their phones despite not having the latest version of Android. 

Is the killer app not an app?
The reality check also applies to another embarrassing figure, from Flurry Analytics, that shows  developers still seem to favor iOS to Android.

MG Siegler had an excellent post yesterday about this, rightly taking Google Executive Chairman Eric Schmidt to task over his prediction that by now developers would be favoring Android over iOS. That clearly doesn’t seem to be the case. But while the start-up developers Siegler talks to each week may be saying iOS first, Android later if ever, most of those start-up developers, I’d say, are making applications few will ever use, and few will miss if they don’t show up on Android.

I can’t recall anyone I’ve talked to about phones who said they got one for a specific application. I’m sure there are some who do this, of course. But how common is it?

When I talk with ordinary people, the reasons they upgrade to a particular phone seem to be things like the low cost to upgrade, the size of the phone, the color of the phone, or just the overall ease of using the phone. That’s where the iPhone seems to win; people like it because it’s easy to use. The iPhone also wins as an upgrade because people I know want to have the latest one, period.

But people avoiding Android because they couldn’t get an app? Instagram shows that’s not a barrier to adoption. It took forever for Instagram to come to Android, yet Android grew despite this.

Personally, I find it odd that Android continues to grow when I still find the iPhone’s iOS to be a more pleasant operating system. The only thing that keeps me from using my iPhone 4S even more is the lack of a 4G LTE connection and the built-in Google Maps navigation offered on the iPhone. But that’s me. Others are different, and others clearly do use Android despite all the supposed “wrongs” with it. There are no wrong phones, if you’re happy with what you use.

One of my favorite reality check moments is when I go to some school event and look at what all the other parents are carrying as phones, while we wait for an assembly to begin. Two weeks ago, I counted three iPhones and three Android phones in my row. Developers be damned; Android upgrade delays be damned; pundits be damned. Half that row was using Android.

Controlled fragmentation
That doesn’t excuse Google or its carrier and handset partners for the poor performance in getting Android updates out. When so many relatively new Android phones are behind in being updated, Google looks bad, and it should look bad, especially a year after an initiative that was supposed to make things better. But actual Android users might not care. As long as their phones keep doing what they expect their phones to do, Android 2 or Android 4, they carry on.

As for Apple, the rumors of the new iPhone that’s larger than the current one may allow Apple to have that killer app that’s not an app: more variety in form factor. You want a bigger iPhone? Maybe you can have it. Want a smaller one? Stay with the iPhone 4 or iPhone 4S. Need a lower-cost phone? There’s the iPhone 3GS.

For all the “fragmentation” worries raised about Android, the advantage has been that the fragmentation allowed a thousand Android devices to bloom (and a handful of those to flower into big hits). Think of Apple’s rumored devices as a study in controlled fragmentation. More variety, more choice, yet a consistent experience across them all. That might be the real killer app.

Article source: http://news.cnet.com/8301-33620_3-57449588-278/android-updates-embarrassing-but-do-users-notice/

Tags: , , , , ,

06 Jun 12 Galaxy Nexus drops to a cent on Amazon


Samsung Galaxy Nexus(Credit:
Sarah Tew/CNET)

Right now you can get a screaming deal on one of the top
Android phones around, as long as you’re willing to hand over two years of mobile indentured servitude to Verizon.

Google tapped Samsung to make its latest Nexus phone, which went on sale at the end of last year and was the first device to officially come preloaded with Android 4.0 Ice Cream Sandwich. Half a year later it’s still one of the top phones running the OS, and just a few months ago it was still selling for $299.99 with a new contract, so Amazon Wireless‘ new single-penny price point is a price slash that’s splattering savings all over the place.

The Galaxy Nexus comes with 4G connectivity, 32GB, an impressive 5-megapixel camera, and a 4.65-inch Super AMOLED display. The timing of the price drop likely is no coincidence. With Samsung’s much-anticipated Galaxy S III soon to drop in the United States, it makes sense to move more units of the
Galaxy Nexus before the S III sucks all the air out of the room.

You’ll need a new Verizon account to get the phone for a penny, unless you’re adding a line to a family account, which also gets you the big markdown. If you’re looking to upgrade your phone and extend your contract at the same time, you can still wind up with some savings by paying just $149.99 for a new Galaxy Nexus.

Then again, if you’re already spending more than $100, you might just want to wait for that Galaxy S III.

(Via TechCrunch)

Article source: http://news.cnet.com/8301-17938_105-57447779-1/galaxy-nexus-drops-to-a-cent-on-amazon/

Tags: , , ,

06 Jun 12 Galaxy Nexus drops to a cent on Amazon


Samsung Galaxy Nexus(Credit:
Sarah Tew/CNET)

Right now you can get a screaming deal on one of the top
Android phones around, as long as you’re willing to hand over two years of mobile indentured servitude to Verizon.

Google tapped Samsung to make its latest Nexus phone, which went on sale at the end of last year and was the first device to officially come preloaded with Android 4.0 Ice Cream Sandwich. Half a year later it’s still one of the top phones running the OS, and just a few months ago it was still selling for $299.99 with a new contract, so Amazon Wireless‘ new single-penny price point is a price slash that’s splattering savings all over the place.

The Galaxy Nexus comes with 4G connectivity, 32GB, an impressive 5-megapixel camera, and a 4.65-inch Super AMOLED display. The timing of the price drop likely is no coincidence. With Samsung’s much-anticipated Galaxy S III soon to drop in the United States, it makes sense to move more units of the
Galaxy Nexus before the S III sucks all the air out of the room.

You’ll need a new Verizon account to get the phone for a penny, unless you’re adding a line to a family account, which also gets you the big markdown. If you’re looking to upgrade your phone and extend your contract at the same time, you can still wind up with some savings by paying just $149.99 for a new Galaxy Nexus.

Then again, if you’re already spending more than $100, you might just want to wait for that Galaxy S III.

(Via TechCrunch)

Article source: http://news.cnet.com/8301-17938_105-57447779-1/galaxy-nexus-drops-to-a-cent-on-amazon/

Tags: , , ,