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17 Dec 12 Android flaw leaves Samsung vulnerable, users charge


A suspected fault in how Samsung Electronics has implemented the Android’s kernel in several of its devices could allow a malicious application to gain total control over the device.

The vulnerability was described on Saturday by the user “alephzain” on XDA Developers, a forum for mobile developers. It affects devices using the Exynos processor models 4210 and 4412. Alephzain wrote that the issue was a “huge mistake.” (See also “Mobile Malware: It’s bad now, but will be worse in 2012.”)


By Sunday, another developer on the forum, Chainfire, had posted an Android application package (.apk) file that will successfully exploit the vulnerability.

“You should be very afraid of this exploit,” Chainfire wrote. “Any app can use it to gain root without asking and without any permissions on a vulnerable device.”

Affected devices include versions of Samsung’s S2 and S3 mobile phones, the Galaxy Note and Note II, Galaxy Note Plus and Galaxy Note 10.1, according to the post by Chainfire.

Hackers have increasingly targeted the Android operating system, building applications that appear benign but can contain code that can steal data from a device or perform other malicious actions. Google has responded to the rise of malicious Android applications by implementing an automated scanner in its Play marketplace to detect malicious ones.

But unvetted Android applications abound around the internet, posing a risk to users. Security vendors have found malicious applications that send SMS messages to premium rate numbers and ones that intercept one-time passcodes for banking applications.

Samsung officials did not have an immediate comment.

Send news tips and comments to jeremy_kirk@idg.com. Follow me on Twitter: @jeremy_kirk

Article source: http://www.pcworld.com/article/2020711/android-flaw-leaves-samsung-vulnerable-users-charge.html

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17 Dec 12 Samsung devices vulnerable to dangerous Android exploit


A suspected fault in how Samsung Electronics has implemented the Android’s kernel in several of its devices could allow a malicious application to gain total control over the device.

The vulnerability was described on Saturday by the user “alephzain” on XDA Developers, a forum for mobile developers. It affects devices using the Exynos processor models 4210 and 4412. Alephzain wrote that the issue was a “huge mistake.”

By Sunday, another developer on the forum, Chainfire, had posted an Android application package (.apk) file that will successfully exploit the vulnerability.

“You should be very afraid of this exploit,” Chainfire wrote. “Any app can use it to gain root without asking and without any permissions on a vulnerable device.”

Affected devices include versions of Samsung’s S2 and S3 mobile phones, the Galaxy Note and Note II, Galaxy Note Plus and Galaxy Note 10.1, according to the post by Chainfire.

Hackers have increasingly targeted the Android operating system, building applications that appear benign but can contain code that can steal data from a device or perform other malicious actions. Google has responded to the rise of malicious Android applications by implementing an automated scanner in its Play marketplace to detect malicious ones.

But unvetted Android applications abound around the internet, posing a risk to users. Security vendors have found malicious applications that send SMS messages to premium rate numbers and ones that intercept one-time passcodes for banking applications.

Samsung officials did not have an immediate comment.

Send news tips and comments to jeremy_kirk@idg.com. Follow me on Twitter: @jeremy_kirk

Article source: http://www.itworld.com/security/328303/samsung-devices-vulnerable-dangerous-android-exploit

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16 Dec 12 Samsung Galaxy S3 Android 4.1.2 Jelly Bean reaching more users


Certain owners of the Samsung Galaxy S3 are still using the Ice Cream Sandwich operating system on their handset, while some others such as Verizon Wireless users have only just received the Android 4.1.1 Jelly Bean update. Almost two weeks ago though Samsung begun pushing out the Android 4.1.2 Jelly Bean operating system to owners, and now the software update has begun reaching some more users.

The company first began the staggered rollout of the new firmware earlier this month but there are still many users that have yet to receive the new software, but as SamMobile are reporting the update has now reached owners of the smartphone in Korea.

Owners that have the SHW-M440S, SHV-E210S, SHV-E210K and SHV-E210L models of the Korean Galaxy S3 can get the new software via the Samsung KIES desktop application or via the settings on the actual handset.

This latest version of the Android Jelly Bean software will again put US owners of the Galaxy S3 behind users in Europe and Korea, which brings with it a number of new features including some that are found on the Galaxy Note 2.

One of these is the Multi View feature that allows users to run two applications at once and split the display into two sections with each one running a separate application. Other new features will include such things as Page Buddy, customizable Notification panel, and a new keyboard that is similar to the Gesture controlled keyboard that is found in Android 4.2.

Hopefully more countries in Europe will also receive the update in the coming days but there is no telling how long it will take individual carriers to give the firmware update the ok and push it out to customers, as for the time being it seems only unlocked versions of the Galaxy S3 are receiving it.

At the time of writing I have again checked my own Galaxy S3 for the availability of the update without any success. Previously it has been suggested that the handset along with the Galaxy Note 2 will get Android 4.2 early next year, but how long it will take to reach users in the US is anybody’s guess. You would have thought though that the likes of Verizon will get the next update pushed out quicker than it did for the upgrade from Android ICS.

Has your Samsung Galaxy S3 received Android 4.1.2 Jelly Bean yet?

Article source: http://www.phonesreview.co.uk/2012/12/16/samsung-galaxy-s3-android-4-1-2-jelly-bean-reaching-more-users/

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14 Dec 12 Galaxy Note 10.1 LTE Becomes the First Android LTE Tablet in U.K.


U.K. mobile provider EE has announced the availability of two new tablets: Samsung Galaxy Note 10.1 LTE and Google Nexus 7.

The Galaxy Note 10.1 LTE starts at £99 with a two-year plan, which costs £36 per month and includes 8GB of monthly data. Options of 5GB and 3GB are also available for £30.99 and £26 per month, but they increase the initial investment: £200 and £250, respectively.

The Nexus 7 is bundled with a Huawei MiFi dongle, the price starting at £30 monthly if you choose an 8GB or 5GB data plan, or £50 for the 3GB one.

Samsung’s big Galaxy Note has the honor of being the first LTE Android tablet to hit the U.K. As far as availability of EE’s 4G service goes, the company promises it will be available in 18 towns by the end of 2012, as well as in a further 17 towns and cities by March 2013.

Check out our reviews of the Galaxy Note 10.1 and the Nexus 7, and head on over to EE for the details about this offer.

Image credit: Samsung

Article source: http://mashable.com/2012/12/14/samsung-galaxy-note-10-1-lte/

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14 Dec 12 Google Nexus 10 Reviews From Critics And Users: Great Tablet, Just Needs …


(Photo : Google) The new Google Nexus 10 tablet.

If you’re thinking of purchasing a 10-inch tablet, two contenders should be at the top of your list: the Apple iPad and the Google-Samsung Nexus 10. While Apple’s iPad is a given smart choice, it would be wise to see what the Nexus 10 has to offer. Here’s what reviewers and users are saying about the Nexus 10. 

Reviewers

For the most part, reviewers gave the Nexus 10 solid praise, with few complaints. 

“The Google Nexus 10 is a tablet that’s near impossible not to like. It has the best screen on the market and is first to bring the new generation chipsets,” said GSMArena in its review. “If you are looking for an Android tablet and you don’t have a special use of a stylus-enabled Galaxy Note 10.1, the Nexus 10 would be the straightforward recommendation. It’s easily among the best and most complete tablets on the market at a price point that’s just hard to beat.”

“Working this time with Samsung, the Nexus 10 is a good alternative to the iPad. I’ve been using it for the past week, and I love the gorgeous display and design. The latest Android software also brings some nice extras, such as enhanced voice search and support for multiple users. Plus, it’s $100 less than the latest iPad, at $399 for the 16 gigabyte Wi-Fi model and $499 for the 32GB Wi-Fi version,” says Bonnie Cha from AllThingsD

The only real complaint reviewers generally had was about the lack of tablet-tailored Android apps. It seems that there simply isn’t enough apps out there taking advantage of the Nexus 10.

Website TheVerge gave the Nexus 10 a score of 8.3 out of 10 and stated that, “Yes, the Nexus 10 wins on price – $399 for this incredible display is a nice deal. But consider the extra $100 you’ll spend to get the iPad an entry fee to the App Store, and its many apps and accessories that just aren’t available to the Nexus 10. Google’s now proven conclusively that it can design great Android hardware, but until developers prove they can design great Android software it’s still hard to recommend the Nexus 10 over an iPad.”

Users

Nexus 10 owners seem to be ecstatic about their device, and are content with having the 10-inch Android tablet over the much more popular iPad. 

“What can I say? This is my 4th tablet I have owned since the craze began. Without a doubt this Nexus 10 is the best, even better than my iPad 3. Just everything about this tablet is superb! The build quality is simply fantastic and feel sooo good to hold (something my iPad completely fails in),” writes Inquisitor78 on CNET.

Econ_Andy shares a similar opinion of the Nexus 10. 

“‘I’ve been very happy with my purchase. It’s great value for me reading, browsing, using netflix and facebook etc., basic text editing and spreadsheets. This tablet is such an improvement to any other 10″ Android tablet I’ve seen. I tried my friends iPad 3 and I’d say it definitely raises on that one.

The only real complaint on the user side seems to be the slow battery and lack of expandable storage. While Google does offer cloud-based storage services, most users would prefer to upgrade their storage capacities past 32GB.

Let us know which one you prefer – the Apple iPad or the Google Nexus 10.  

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Article source: http://www.latinospost.com/articles/8178/20121213/google-nexus-10-reviews-critics-users-great.htm

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13 Dec 12 Cheaper Samsung Galaxy Note 2 with latest Jelly Bean Update to Appear in …


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The original Samsung Galaxy Note 2 also sported a 1.6GHz quad-core CPU accompanied by 2GB of RAM, which we may not see or will be replaced if these rumors of a cheaper variant proved to be accurate.

Samsung Galaxy Note 2′s 8-megapixel rear camera has been around for some time now. There is a chance it could remain intact for any new budget device. A 5-megapixel replacement is another possibility.

This is not the first time that Samsung will make a cheaper version of its popular device. The tech giant released the Samsung Galaxy S3 Mini, which is the downgraded version of the best-selling Samsung Galaxy S3. The Samsung Galaxy S3 Mini also comes with the latest Jelly Bean.

Samsung’s phablet made quite a buzz as it boasts some amazing features such as incredibly fast processor, massive screen display, S-Pen and 4G/LTE connectivity. Below are the comparison of the specs and features of the two devices.

The unlocked version of the Galaxy Note 2 costs $899. However, Australian carriers offer affordable plans for the device. At the launch event, Samsung demonstrated some special perks of the device for Aussies. The smartphone will offer a split-screen mode on the smartphone-tablet hybrid, which allows users to open two apps at a time.

Early this week, Samsung Galaxy Note 2 received the official OTA update of the 4.1.2 version of the Jelly Bean OS has started to roll out for the international or unlocked version of the device.

According to SamMobile, the Android 4.1.2 Jelly Bean update for the Galaxy Note 2 is now rolling out in Poland and the Galaxy Note 2 LTE Android 4.1.2 update is rolling out in Sweden. The international Galaxy Note 2 possesses a model number of GT-N7100 while the Galaxy Note 2 LTE features GT-N7105. Both updates are currently limited to these areas though we suspect that more regions will see the update in the near future.

The update brings slight changes and additions to the device as the Notifications in that the panel is now customizable allowing owners to tailor it to their liking.

It also now offers a way to toggle some features on and off through the menu including the device’s powerful Multi Window View feature. Users can also disable the brightness slider from within the Notification Menu as well.

The status bar is now black as opposed to gray, the browser is now improved over the last version of the app and Samsung has added Swype-like functionality to the keyboard on the Galaxy Note 2. There also is a new ink effect that is on the lock screen.

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Article source: http://au.ibtimes.com/articles/414522/20121213/samsung-galaxy-note-2-jelly-bean-update.htm

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03 Jun 12 Samsung Galaxy S III: Possibly the Most Anticipated Android Phone Yet


A new Samsung Galaxy S Android smartphone

Samsung’s highly anticipated flagship Android smartphone, the Galaxy S III, debuts in 28 European countries this week. As such, reviews began pouring in across the Internet from those lucky enough to get their hands on the top Android smartphone. Meanwhile, technophiles and Fandroids in the United States only hope the saying “Good things come to those who wait” applies.

To refresh your memory, the Samsung Galaxy S III runs a 1.4 GHz quad-core processor, 8-megapixel camera, 2100 mAh battery, and a Near-Field Communications (NFC) chip for mobile payments. Running Android 4.0.4 “Ice Cream Sandwich,” the Galaxy S III has a 4.8-inch Super AMOLED display and records 1080p video.

Market Reaction and Thoughts

Reviewers note the Galaxy S III is balanced, at least more so than the awkwardly large 5.3-inch Galaxy Note. While the 4.8-inch screen isn’t petite, the overall consensus is it doesn’t feel small, but isn’t outlandishly hefty.

Overall, reviewers claim the S III is an improvement over other Superphones, but rather cumbersome to hold in one hand. The screen is definitively “supersized” if you’re coming from an iPhone, which maintains the “tiny” 3.5-inch Retina display.

Interestingly, Vlad Savov of The Verge notes the Galaxy S III has one of the best cameras he has ever used on an Android device. Interesting, because iFixIt recently revealed the Galaxy S III uses the same rear-camera sensor as the iPhone 4S.

In terms of the user interface, for better or worse, Samsung adds their TouchWiz UI on top of Android. Sharif Sakr of Engadget notes the competitive HTC One X has “a much better user interface that sticks more closely to the guiding ethos of Android 4.0.”

Sakr wasn’t the only one to criticize Samsung’s TouchWiz UI. Chris Hall of Pocket-Lint notes certain facets of the interface feel “cartoony.” That is, if you can see the display. Hall noted the screen could have been brighter, which was due to Samsung’s battery-saving feature. Overall, though, Hall praises the smartphone for its incredible power and expandability via the removable battery and microSD card slot.

Unfortunately, reviewers overwhelmingly dislike the plastic shell on the Samsung Galaxy S III. Unlike the HTC One X, which has a metallic finish, the S III doesn’t posses the same design standards. Critics went as far as to jokingly claim, Samsung’s lawyers designed the phone.

U.S. Differences and Availability

There are several key differences in the final U.S. Galaxy S III, which is expected to release later this summer. Mainly, the phone will run a dual-core processor with an integrated LTE chip. Luckily, most analysts say a quad-core chip in a cell phone is borderline overkill, so most users won’t notice the difference. Especially given Android isn’t engineered to leverage multiple cores.

The Galaxy S III is expected to cost $199 with a new two-year contract, but carrier information or pricing hasn’t been released. Like it’s predecessor, the Galaxy S II, it will be released on the major carriers, including Verizon and ATT.

Article source: http://www.allvoices.com/contributed-news/12302066-samsung-galaxy-s-iii-possibly-the-most-anticipated-android-phone-yet

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22 May 12 What Phones Have Android 4.0 ‘Ice Cream Sandwich’ Now?


Let’s say you want to buy a phone. And let’s say that, since Android 4.0 (Ice Cream Sandwich) has been “available” for six months now, you want to buy a phone that has it pre-loaded.

ICS generally feels faster and more responsive, it offers sync with desktop Google Chrome, it has better contact and data management, and it’s just more well-rounded and useful. It also ensures whatever apps you download will work as well as possible down the road, as developers patch their apps and target ICS for compatibility purposes.

So Ice Cream Sandwich is a fairly reasonable thing to want. And since it’s been out for six months, having it pre-loaded on your brand-new Android phone is a reasonable expectation.

With that, here is your list of possible phones.

Phones With ICS Now:

HTC One S (T-Mobile)
HTC One X (ATT)
HTC EVO 4G LTE (Sprint)
HTC Vivid (ATT)
HTC Amaze 4G (T-Mobile)
HTC Sensation 4G (T-Mobile)
Samsung Galaxy Nexus (Verizon, Sprint)
Samsung Nexus S 4G (ATT)

That’s it—eight. Of these phones, two of them—the HTC One X and the HTC EVO 4G LTE—are currently “contraband,” as veteran technology reporter Rob Pegoraro wonderfully put it, thanks to a ridiculous patent dispute between Apple and HTC involving U.S. Customs. Of the remaining six, a few of them (namely, the Vivid, the Sensation 4G, and the Amaze 4G) may or may not have it loaded in the box, although the OTA update should be ready to go when you first power up the phone. One of them, the Nexus S, is no longer available at retail.

So including the above qualifiers, and assuming HTC works out the patent situation, there are seven new phones you can buy with ICS. That’s terrible.

Over at Google’s developer.android.com site, the latest share numbers show ICS is running on just 4.9 percent of devices out there at the time of this writing. That even includes tablets, which I didn’t include here, mainly because tablets are usually Wi-Fi-only, and therefore something you can easily buy or sell without contract restrictions or massive cancellation fees.

But a lot more phones, including plenty of already existing models, will be getting Ice Cream Sandwich sometime soon! Or rather, at least we were told they are. Here’s that list as promised by U.S. wireless carriers, at least as best I could tell with a few hours of research this morning. Most still don’t have firm dates, although a few are rumored to be within the next few weeks. Feel free to add a phone in the comments if you see one I missed.

Phones Slated to Get ICS, Someday:

HTC Droid Incredible 2 (Verizon)
HTC EVO Design 4G (Sprint)
HTC EVO 3D (Sprint)
HTC Rezound (Verizon)
HTC Rhyme (Verizon)
HTC Sensation 4G (T-Mobile)
HTC Thunderbolt (Verizon)
LG Lucid (Verizon)
LG Spectrum (Verizon)
Motorola Droid Razr (Verizon)
Motorola Droid Razr Maxx (Verizon)
Motorola Droid 4 (Verizon)
Motorola Droid Bionic (Verizon)
Samsung Captivate Glide (ATT)
Samsung Galaxy Note (ATT)
Samsung Galaxy S II Skyrocket (ATT)
Samsung Galaxy S II (ATT, T-Mobile)
Samsung Galaxy S II Epic 4G Touch (Sprint)
Samsung Galaxy S Blaze 4G (T-Mobile)
Sony Xperia Play 4G (ATT, Verizon)

That’s a sizable “slated to get ICS” list, right? The thing about it is that, until each phone actually has ICS, it doesn’t have it. In other words, while some updates may roll in within the next few weeks or months, there’s nothing preventing these manufacturers from changing their mind and never releasing it entirely.

View Slideshow
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Ice Cream Sandwich Home


ICS Customization


ICS Folder


ICS Multitasking

In a few cases, carriers have made explicit promises at the time of purchase. We’ve seen the stickers on the boxes. So those updates will largely have to go through, or else that carrier has broken an agreement with the customer.

But for the rest, despite them all going on stage last year to promise updates for the first 18 months of any Android phone as part of the then-new Google Android Update Alliance—owners of these phones are still left wondering.

What does this mean? It’s not that manufacturers are busy working on brand-new phones with ICS, because brand-new phones are hitting the market even now with Gingerbread. And it’s not that they’re busy working on upgrades for existing ICS phones, because we still don’t have those yet, either. What gives?

It’s Not Just About Having the Newest Version
One reasonable tack here is to decide that whatever phone you’re buying has to satisfy you now. In other words, and this has always been great advice with tech purchases, buy a phone that makes you happy today, and never buy one based on promised features that may or may not appear. But in a world of 4G LTE connected devices and hundreds of thousands of smartphone apps, that’s an annoying restriction, given that these phones are computers, and that their key task for many people is to run apps.

Developers are already focusing on ICS compatibility now. There’s going to be a point fairly soon in the future where apps won’t work correctly unless you’re running ICS, as per the stated minimum requirements. And as long as such fragmentation exists, it will be that much harder for developers to QA apps, widgets, and UI skins, and that much more likely you’ll run into bugs and other unexplained behaviors.

In the end, this isn’t about Android not being any good because of the lack of OS updates. It’s really more of a question of what’s important to you, and whether you think the manufacturer owes you updates, the way Apple provides automatically for all iPhones (hardware permitting—the earliest few are excluded from some features now).

We’re of the opinion that Android users deserve free OS updates, at least while the phone is reasonably current. And a stable, consistent version of the OS across as many phones possible—even despite hardware differences, the diversity of which being one of the things that make Android so great—would help consumers and developers alike. And that’s on top of all the new features ICS brings to the table. Google is also of this opinion, by the way, as it has demonstrated quite clearly. It’s a shame the wireless carriers and phone vendors aren’t being honest with us.

For more, see Hey Google: Here’s What Fragmentation Means.

Update: I added the Sensation 4G and pulled the Galaxy Note off of the current ICS list, since the latter seems to have begun rolling out overseas a few weeks ago, but isn’t here in the U.S. on ATT yet. I also added the Sony Xperia Play 4G to the “slated to get ICS” list.

For more from Jamie, follow him on Twitter @jlendino.

Article source: http://www.pcmag.com/article2/0,2817,2404669,00.asp

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18 May 12 Magid: Android offers lots of options and annoyances


I was an Android user for years and still have several Android devices. But last October I bought an iPhone 4S and I’m glad I did. I remember the exact date I bought it, because it was the last time Apple (AAPL) updated the iPhone. Unlike Android devices, there is only one new iPhone and one new iPad a year. That doesn’t offer a lot of choice but it does make things simpler.

There are things I really like about Android, including how easy it is to configure a new phone. Type in your Google (GOOG) credentials and, within minutes, the phone downloads all your email, contact information and even some personalization features via the cloud. Some models I’ve tested even automatically imported the “wall paper” photo that I had on my previous phone.

Google offers Android to multiple vendors, so there are plenty of phone choices that all — in theory — can run the same operating system and the same apps. Partly because of the competition, there are plenty of Android phones that are less expensive than iPhones, not only for end-users but also for the carriers that typically subsidize the end-user price in exchange for signing a two-year

contract. Android is doing quite well; the latest figures from ComScore give it 51 percent of the U.S. smartphone market, while Apple has 31 percent and Blackberry 12 percent.

Like Apple, Google has amassed an enormous developer base, and there are now more than 443,000 Android apps, according to AppBrain.

There are also a lot of different devices. OpenSignalMaps, a service that helps users find the best cell phone signals in their area, has been logging devices that download its app and has found “599 distinct brands” of Android devices and nearly 4,000 distinct models.

Apple, on the other hand, so far has just one screen size for its iPhone and a single tablet screen size, regardless of which generation device you have. And, even though Apple refreshes its iPhone and iPad annually, the number of Apple tablet and phone models out there can still be counted with two hands.

Having so many Android players with so many distinct devices definitely has its advantages. Amazon, for example, was able to create its very popular $199 Kindle Fire tablet, which runs a heavily customized version of Android that not only has a distinct user interface but doesn’t necessarily run off-the-shelf Android software. Amazon created its own eco-system around the Kindle Fire with its own app store and its own rules for developers.

The open Android system also allowed Samsung to create a diversity of its own devices with a range of screen sizes. I like the new Samsung Galaxy Tab 2 because, like the Kindle Fire, it’s a full featured tablet yet small enough to fit in a coat pocket. And because it’s smaller and lighter, I find myself using my Kindle Fire more often than my iPad. I hope the rumors that Apple is developing a 7-inch iPad turn out to be true.

Size also matters with phones, and sometimes bigger is indeed better. If you’re using your phone to watch video or read eBooks than having a 5.3 inch Galaxy Note might be perfect.

But despite all the positives, the diversity of the Android ecosystem has it downsides. The world of Android is extremely fragmented, not only with a wide variety of hardware devices but with multiple versions of the Android operating system and — my pet peeve — customized interfaces that make it harder to switch between devices.

The fragmentation of hardware makes it harder to get everyone using the latest operating system. Unlike PCs, users can’t just upgrade an operating system at will. Users have to wait for their carrier to release an upgrade, and that can take forever. Even new phones are coming out with older Android versions with no clear update path. It’s also harder to app developers, not only because of the diversity of operating system versions but also hardware differences, including so many screen sizes.

And to make matters worse, handset makers love to customize the user interface with “skins” like Samsung’s “TouchWhiz,” LG’s Optimus and HTC Sense. Each of these skins has its pluses and minuses but I’d be happier with a single user interface from Google, which in my opinion does a better job than the hardware makers when it comes to interface design.

But despite my complaints, I remain optimistic about Android. Problems aside, diversity and openness breed innovation and, over time, I expect there to emerge a more harmonious Android ecosystem. But I got tired of waiting, which is why I bought that iPhone 4S.

Contact Larry Magid at larry@larrymagid.com. Listen for his technology chats on KCBS-AM (740) weekdays at 3:50 p.m.

Article source: http://www.mercurynews.com/larry-magid/ci_20639865/magid-android-offers-lots-options-and-annoyances

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11 May 12 Android 4.0, Ice Cream Sandwich Upgrade Now for ASUS Eee Pad Slider in US


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ASUS recently took to its Twitter account to announce that it would be rolling out the Android 4.0, Ice Cream Sandwich upgrade to the ASUS Eee Pad Slider in the U.S. soon.

The company confirmed that the OTA update to Android 4.0 should be available for the device in the very near future, so all who own the Slider should be checking their update button on a regular basis.

ASUS’s complete line of tablets are already running Android 4.0, Ice Cream Sandwich. All four of them, that is.

The Ice Cream Sandwich upgrade should be coming to the Samsung Galaxy Note in the U.S. quite soon.

At a recent media event, ATT displayed the device running the new software.

“ATT is currently holding a little shindig at CTIA in New Orleans,” said 9to5 Google. “During the event, the company put a Galaxy Note on display running Ice Cream Sandwich.”

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Android Central was in attendance and filmed a short video of the Galaxy Note running the new software.

“The only real difference seems to be in the menus,” added 9to5 Google. “At any rate, if you have held off for ICS on your Galaxy Note, it looks like the update is in the pipeline.”

Rumors of the Android software coming to the tablet-smartphone hybrid have been surfacing on the internet since December of last year, and now it seems like it is finally time for the major U.S. carriers to begin rolling it out.

Ice Cream Sandwich upgrades have begun to roll out for many of Samsung’s devices overseas, including the Galaxy S2. However, the U.S. seems to be last on the company’s priority list.

The Samsung Galaxy S3 will launch at the end of this month in Europe and will come with Android 4.0 pre-installed.

Article source: http://global.christianpost.com/news/android-4-0-ice-cream-sandwich-upgrade-now-for-asus-eee-pad-slider-in-us-74774/

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