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30 Dec 12 Galaxy Nexus I9250 Gets Android 4.2.1 Jelly Bean with JPO40D Xylon Custom …


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How to Install Android 4.2.1 Jelly Bean on Galaxy Nexus I9250 with JPO40D Xylon Custom ROM

Galaxy Nexus I9250 Gets Android 4.2.1 Jelly Bean with JPO40D Xylon Custom ROM

Step 1 - Download Android 4.2.1JPO40D Xylon ROM and Google Apps for Galaxy Nexus on your computer.

Step 2 - Connect and mount your Galaxy Nexus USB mass storage on your computer with original USB cable.

Step 3 - Copy and paste the Xylon ROM and Google Apps zip files to the root folder on your phone’s SD card.

Step 4 - Then power off your phone and boot into Bootloader mode.

Step 5 - Switch on the phone while pressing and holding Volume Up, Volume Down and Power buttons together until the device enters Bootloader mode

Step 6 - Follow the navigational instructions on screen. Now, select Bootloader and progress into Recovery.

Step 7 - In ClockworkMod recovery (CWM), wipe data first. Then navigate to Flash zip from SD card option and hit Power button to select it.

Step 8 - Tap the Power button again and click Choose zip from sdcard.

Step 9 - Use volume keys to navigate to Xylon ROM zip file and select it by tapping Power button. Confirm the ROM installation on next screen and the installation procedure will begin.

              NOTE: Repeat this step for installing Google Apps as well.

Step 10 - Once Google Apps is installed, hit Go Back and reboot the phone by tapping Reboot System Now in the Recovery Menu. The phone will reboot and the first boot might take about 5 minutes to complete. So, leave it alone.

Android 4.2.1 JPO40D Xylon custom Jelly Bean ROM is now installed on your Galaxy Nexus I9250. Go to Settings  About Phone to verify the firmware version installed.

[Source: Team Android]

To report problems or to leave feedback about this article, e-mail:
To contact the editor, e-mail:

Article source: http://www.ibtimes.co.uk/articles/419243/20121230/galaxy-nexus-i9250-android421-jellybean-jpo40d-xylon.htm

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17 Dec 12 Android’s Google Now services headed for Chrome, too | Internet & Media …


Google Chrome logo

It looks like Chrome users, not just
Android users, will get access to Google Now, the search giant’s technology for bringing weather reports, trip departure reminders, birthday alerts, nearby restaurant reviews, and more to the attention of Android users.

Google’s Chrome team added a “skeleton for Google Now for Chrome” to the Google browser yesterday, an early step in a larger project to show Google Now notifications in Chrome.

Google Now integration into Chrome gives Google a new way to connect people closely to online services that Google judges to be relevant depending on time and location. Francois Beaufort, who keeps a close eye on the Chrome source code, spotted the move.

Google confirmed that it’s working on the project but stopped short of committing to it. “We’re always experimenting with new features in Chrome, so have nothing to announce at this time,” spokeswoman Jessica Kositz said.

The move reflects the growing maturity of Google’s operating system strategy. In mobile, it steers people to Android, and on personal computers, it steers them to Chrome or Chrome OS. Though Chrome isn’t an operating system, strictly speaking, browsers are absorbing more and more OS abilities, and Chrome OS systems of course can’t run anything but Web apps.

Whatever OS a person is using, Google is designing it as a mechanism to reach Google services: search, Google Maps, YouTube, Google Apps, Gmail, Google+, and more. These services are where Google makes its money.

And Google can show some Google Now-like services sometimes in search results, too. Drawing from Gmail messages, Google shows upcoming flight information and birthday reminders to users who have opted into the system.

Update, 12:58 p.m. PT:
Adds comment from Google.

Article source: http://news.cnet.com/8301-1023_3-57558039-93/androids-google-now-services-headed-for-chrome-too/

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16 Dec 12 Nexus 4 Gets Fast and Stable Liquidsmooth Jelly Bean ROM [How to Install]


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Step 1: Download the latest version of Liquidsmooth Jelly Bean ROM

Step 2: Download Google Apps package for CyanogenMod 10.1

Step 3: Copy both the ROM and Google Apps (GApps) zip files to the root folder on your phone’s SD card.

Step 4: Power off your phone and boot into bootloader mode. To do so, press and hold Volume down and Power buttons together until the display comes on. NOTE: Use Volume buttons to navigate and Power button to select an option in Recovery.

Step 5: Browse to the Recovery mode option and select it using the Power button to boot into CWM Recovery.

Step 6: Take a NANDroid Backup of your existing ROM so that you can restore it later if something goes wrong with the new ROM. To take a backup, select Backup and Restore and then hit Backup again. Return to main recovery menu once backup is done.

Step 7: Choose wipe data/factory reset and click Yes to confirm. Wait for the data wipe process to complete (it will wipe only installed apps and settings, but the files on the SD card will be left intact).

Step 8: Choose Install zip from SD card and then click Choose Zip from SD card. Browse to the location of ROM file you copied earlier and select it. Click Yes to confirm ROM installation on next screen.

Step 9: Once ROM is installed, click Choose Zip from SD card again, but select GApps file to install Google Apps as well.

Step 10: After GApps is installed, return to the main recovery menu and hit Reboot System Now to reboot the phone into Liquidsmooth ROM. The first boot may take about 5 to 7 minutes. So, leave it alone.

Updating to Newer Versions of the ROM:

The ROM will receive periodic updates as part of development progress. So, to install newer versions, download the latest ROM, copy it to the device, reboot to recovery, repeat step 8 to install the update and then reboot the phone.

NOTE: It is not necessary to reinstall Google Apps or wipe data once again while updating to a newer version, as it is required only when installing the ROM for first time.

Liquidsmooth Jelly Bean ROM is now successfully installed on your Nexus 4.

[Source: The Android Soul]

To report problems or to leave feedback about this article, e-mail:
To contact the editor, e-mail:

Article source: http://www.ibtimes.co.uk/articles/415457/20121215/nexus4-android421-jellybean-fast-stable-liquidsmooth-install.htm

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14 Jun 12 Chrome OS management console brings improvements for …



For an operating system to be successful in an enterprise environment, it needs to be easily managed. System administrators don’t want to spend a lot of time tweaking each new system on their network by hand, and users want the computers they use every day to work reliably and predictably. This means administrators need to be able to manage applications and updates behind-the-scenes without interrupting users’ work.

All major operating systems, from Windows to OS X to iOS to Android, are all fully customizable and manageable using either first- or third-party tools. Google’s Chrome OS is no exception. As part of our ongoing check-in with the revamped operating system and new, more robust Chrome hardware, today we’ll be spending some time with the Chrome OS management console, looking at whether it makes Chrome OS a viable choice for businesses.

“Zero-touch” Chrome OS management

To get some background on the management console’s development and features, we spoke to Glenn Wilson, a product manager on the Chrome OS team who has also worked on the Chrome browser’s enterprise features.

Wilson explained that while there were relatively few settings to be managed on Chrome OS compared to a more traditional operating system like Windows, the Chrome team wanted to enable “zero-touch” Chromebook deployment in enterprises. The goal was that employees could buy a Chromebook themselves, log in with their Google Apps credentials, and automatically have all of the settings, security certificates, VPN configurations, and extensions required for their workplaces.

In Windows, this normally necessitates some combination of a customized operating system image, Group Policies managed by an Active Directory server, and some post-imaging customization of the computer, whether done automatically or manually. In Chrome OS, the solution to this problem is the Chrome OS management console.


“The management console is actually just an extension to the Google Apps control panel where you can set your settings for your Chrome OS devices,” Wilson told Ars. “Those settings will apply to either devices that are specifically registered with your domain or to your users on any device anywhere. Regardless of how the user got it, regardless of whether it’s the organization’s device or not, there’s still a way for an administrator to get the settings to users that they need to do their jobs.”

These seamless management features are Google’s way of increasing compliance with any security policies in a business while also combating the “bring your own device” phenomenon—when an employee buys a laptop or iPad and wants to use it at work, businesses often have a set of best practices for employees to follow, but generally can’t configure and lock down those devices to the same extent as their company-owned devices. With the Chrome OS management console, administrators and users can both be happy, in theory.

Like Chrome OS itself, Wilson noted that the management console is still a work in progress and under continuous development. For example: while extensions and Chrome Web Apps can be pushed to configured machines currently (and in-house apps can also be side-loaded from a company’s servers without going through Google’s storefront), the ability to manage settings for these extensions is still in development. As new features are rolled out in Chrome OS, you can expect controls for those features to be added to the management console.

Using the Chrome OS management console

The management console itself is accessed from the Google Apps control panel for your account, and it’s only available if you’ve paid the $150-per-device management and support fee (or $30-per-device for education customers), though Google provided us with a seat for testing. Any of your Google Apps accounts with access to the “Settings” tab of your control panel can adjust the settings for Chrome OS (the “Services Admin” role can give out those permissions) and enroll devices on your Google Apps domain.


The management console for Chrome OS is reasonably straightforward, and you can find a detailed description of manageable settings and descriptions of those settings on Google’s support page (though we’ll also dive into many of the most important ones here). Most settings are under the “Org Settings” tab. Here you can set the screen lock policy, configure homepage settings and blacklisted URLs, and control whether systems will save browsing history and passwords. You can also block or allow certain plug-ins, browser extensions, and content types. You can even push out defined browser extensions and apps to users either from the Chrome Web Store or by side-loading them from your own server (Metro apps can be managed much the same way on Windows 8 machines). Settings applied at the top level of your organization apply to all of your users, but you can also augment or replace these with different settings for subgroups of users defined in the “Organization Users” tab of the Apps control panel.

Article source: http://arstechnica.com/information-technology/2012/06/chrome-os-management-console-brings-improvements-for-businesses/

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14 Jun 12 Chrome OS management console brings improvements for businesses



For an operating system to be successful in an enterprise environment, it needs to be easily managed. System administrators don’t want to spend a lot of time tweaking each new system on their network by hand, and users want the computers they use every day to work reliably and predictably. This means administrators need to be able to manage applications and updates behind-the-scenes without interrupting users’ work.

All major operating systems, from Windows to OS X to iOS to Android, are all fully customizable and manageable using either first- or third-party tools. Google’s Chrome OS is no exception. As part of our ongoing check-in with the revamped operating system and new, more robust Chrome hardware, today we’ll be spending some time with the Chrome OS management console, looking at whether it makes Chrome OS a viable choice for businesses.

“Zero-touch” Chrome OS management

To get some background on the management console’s development and features, we spoke to Glenn Wilson, a product manager on the Chrome OS team who has also worked on the Chrome browser’s enterprise features.

Wilson explained that while there were relatively few settings to be managed on Chrome OS compared to a more traditional operating system like Windows, the Chrome team wanted to enable “zero-touch” Chromebook deployment in enterprises. The goal was that employees could buy a Chromebook themselves, log in with their Google Apps credentials, and automatically have all of the settings, security certificates, VPN configurations, and extensions required for their workplaces.

In Windows, this normally necessitates some combination of a customized operating system image, Group Policies managed by an Active Directory server, and some post-imaging customization of the computer, whether done automatically or manually. In Chrome OS, the solution to this problem is the Chrome OS management console.


“The management console is actually just an extension to the Google Apps control panel where you can set your settings for your Chrome OS devices,” Wilson told Ars. “Those settings will apply to either devices that are specifically registered with your domain or to your users on any device anywhere. Regardless of how the user got it, regardless of whether it’s the organization’s device or not, there’s still a way for an administrator to get the settings to users that they need to do their jobs.”

These seamless management features are Google’s way of increasing compliance with any security policies in a business while also combating the “bring your own device” phenomenon—when an employee buys a laptop or iPad and wants to use it at work, businesses often have a set of best practices for employees to follow, but generally can’t configure and lock down those devices to the same extent as their company-owned devices. With the Chrome OS management console, administrators and users can both be happy, in theory.

Like Chrome OS itself, Wilson noted that the management console is still a work in progress and under continuous development. For example: while extensions and Chrome Web Apps can be pushed to configured machines currently (and in-house apps can also be side-loaded from a company’s servers without going through Google’s storefront), the ability to manage settings for these extensions is still in development. As new features are rolled out in Chrome OS, you can expect controls for those features to be added to the management console.

Using the Chrome OS management console

The management console itself is accessed from the Google Apps control panel for your account, and it’s only available if you’ve paid the $150-per-device management and support fee (or $30-per-device for education customers), though Google provided us with a seat for testing. Any of your Google Apps accounts with access to the “Settings” tab of your control panel can adjust the settings for Chrome OS (the “Services Admin” role can give out those permissions) and enroll devices on your Google Apps domain.


The management console for Chrome OS is reasonably straightforward, and you can find a detailed description of manageable settings and descriptions of those settings on Google’s support page (though we’ll also dive into many of the most important ones here). Most settings are under the “Org Settings” tab. Here you can set the screen lock policy, configure homepage settings and blacklisted URLs, and control whether systems will save browsing history and passwords. You can also block or allow certain plug-ins, browser extensions, and content types. You can even push out defined browser extensions and apps to users either from the Chrome Web Store or by side-loading them from your own server (Metro apps can be managed much the same way on Windows 8 machines). Settings applied at the top level of your organization apply to all of your users, but you can also augment or replace these with different settings for subgroups of users defined in the “Organization Users” tab of the Apps control panel.

Article source: http://arstechnica.com/information-technology/2012/06/chrome-os-management-console-brings-improvements-for-businesses/

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06 Jun 12 Trading Ubuntu for Chromebox Running Google Chrome OS


The VAR Guy is trading in his Ubuntu PC for a new Samsung Chromebox running Google Chrome OS. What motivated the move to a cloud-centric thin client? Here’s the explanation.

First, a little background. Google Chromebooks are web-centric notebooks that run Chrome OS (a super-slim operating system) and leverage cloud software like Google Apps. More recently, Google has partnered with Samsung to launch a Chromebox — a $329 thin desktop (plus mouse, keyboard and monitor costs) that resembles a Mac Mini.

The VAR Guy has run Ubuntu Linux since July 2007 (he also runs Mac OS X and Windows 7 on sister systems). Ubuntu has proven reliable and efficient for productivity apps. But The VAR Guy has been too lazy to upgrade from Ubuntu 7.04 or so. The thought of learning new user interfaces, potentially adjusting drivers and so on isn’t all that appealing to our resident blogger.

What Is A Chromebox?

On the other hand, the thought of Google “maintaining” Chromebox and Chrome OS with automated updates sounds appealing. Admittedly, CNet’s ChromeBox review raises some concerns. But The VAR Guy is willing to give Samsung’s Chromebox a try. The thin desktop features:

  • An Intel Core processor
  • 4 GB RAM
  • Built-in dual-band WiFi 802.11 a/b/g/n
  • Gigabit Ethernet
  • 6 USB 2.0 ports
  • Bluetooth 3.0 compatible
  • Kensington key lock compatible

The horsepower isn’t all that impressive. But the real power of Chromebox should come from the web… er, the cloud. The VAR Guy’s family will leverage Google Apps and other SaaS offerings, while Google essentially keeps the desktop up to date with automated software refreshes.

It sounds simple and compelling. But is it? The VAR Guy will offer continued updates once he boots up his first ChromeBox (in seven seconds) later this week…

And what will become of The VAR Guy’s PC running Ubuntu? Don’t worry. It will continue to hum along in The VAR Guy’s house, though not as a primary system.

Read More About This Topic

  • Related posts are coming soon

Article source: http://www.thevarguy.com/2012/06/05/trading-ubuntu-for-chromebox-running-google-chrome-os/

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06 Jun 12 Trading Ubuntu for Chromebox Running Google Chrome OS


The VAR Guy is trading in his Ubuntu PC for a new Samsung Chromebox running Google Chrome OS. What motivated the move to a cloud-centric thin client? Here’s the explanation.

First, a little background. Google Chromebooks are web-centric notebooks that run Chrome OS (a super-slim operating system) and leverage cloud software like Google Apps. More recently, Google has partnered with Samsung to launch a Chromebox — a $329 thin desktop (plus mouse, keyboard and monitor costs) that resembles a Mac Mini.

The VAR Guy has run Ubuntu Linux since July 2007 (he also runs Mac OS X and Windows 7 on sister systems). Ubuntu has proven reliable and efficient for productivity apps. But The VAR Guy has been too lazy to upgrade from Ubuntu 7.04 or so. The thought of learning new user interfaces, potentially adjusting drivers and so on isn’t all that appealing to our resident blogger.

What Is A Chromebox?

On the other hand, the thought of Google “maintaining” Chromebox and Chrome OS with automated updates sounds appealing. Admittedly, CNet’s ChromeBox review raises some concerns. But The VAR Guy is willing to give Samsung’s Chromebox a try. The thin desktop features:

  • An Intel Core processor
  • 4 GB RAM
  • Built-in dual-band WiFi 802.11 a/b/g/n
  • Gigabit Ethernet
  • 6 USB 2.0 ports
  • Bluetooth 3.0 compatible
  • Kensington key lock compatible

The horsepower isn’t all that impressive. But the real power of Chromebox should come from the web… er, the cloud. The VAR Guy’s family will leverage Google Apps and other SaaS offerings, while Google essentially keeps the desktop up to date with automated software refreshes.

It sounds simple and compelling. But is it? The VAR Guy will offer continued updates once he boots up his first ChromeBox (in seven seconds) later this week…

And what will become of The VAR Guy’s PC running Ubuntu? Don’t worry. It will continue to hum along in The VAR Guy’s house, though not as a primary system.

Read More About This Topic

  • Related posts are coming soon

Article source: http://www.thevarguy.com/2012/06/05/trading-ubuntu-for-chromebox-running-google-chrome-os/

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03 Jun 12 Chrome OS update adds traditional desktop feel


Google’s Chrome OS may be all about the Web, but the latest version of the search giant’s operating system adds a traditional desktop look to Chromebooks including features familiar to any PC user. Instead of having one monolithic browser window with an endless number of tabs, Chrome OS has a new window manager that lets you open multiple windows at once. You can also snap a window to each side of the screen to view two separate windows at once similar to the Aero Snap feature in Windows 7.

At the bottom of the screen, the new Chrome OS features a Windows-style taskbar for pinning favorite apps, accessing a list of all your apps, and a system status area off to the right. You can also change the background image and customize the app launcher with the new Chrome OS look.

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Users and developers got their first taste of Chrome OS’ new desktop feel, codenamed Aura, in April through Google’s developer update channel. Aura is now rolling out on new Chromebooks such as the recently launched Chromebook Series 5 550 (starting at $450) and Mac Mini-like Chromebox ($330), both from Samsung.

Chromebooks are apparently finding at least a small user base with schools looking to distribute cheap PCs to students, but Google’s Web-centric laptops have not caught on with regular users in any significant way.

At first glance, Chrome OS makes a lot of sense for almost anyone looking for a secondary PC. The average person uses their computer largely to get online and check e-mail, update Facebook, watch videos, and create the odd document. Chrome OS can handle all of these tasks and Google is promising more enhancements such as offline Google Docs editing in the coming weeks.

But dig a little deeper and you’ll find that you can’t access full-powered photo and video editing tools, or store more than 16GB worth of data on the device’s puny SSD. Yes, there are online alternatives, but many are still not good enough to match up with their desktop equivalents.

As PCWorld’s Jason Cross pointed out in his first Chromebook Series 5 review, finding Chrome OS alternatives to powerful desktop apps can often feel like a hunt for workarounds. Until Chrome OS can solve that fundamental problem, Google may have a hard time winning over users. Even with its new desktop feel.

Connect with Ian Paul (@ianpaul) on Twitter and Google+, and with Today@PCWorld on Twitter for the latest tech news and analysis.

Article source: http://www.itworld.com/operating-systems/279219/chrome-os-update-adds-traditional-desktop-feel

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03 Jun 12 'Father of Google Apps': Chrome OS Is Still the Future


Rajen Sheth, the father of Google Apps – and more. Photo: Jim Merithew/Wired

It was the most Googley of propositions. The most successful company in the history of the internet said it would reinvent corporate computing by selling subscriptions to streamlined machines that moved all data and applications inside a web browser.

A year later, Google has adjusted this audacious pitch, bowing to the reality that the rest of the world hasn’t quite caught up to its vision of a future where desktop and notebook computers are merely ways of getting you onto the internet. With its latest Chrome OS machines, the company has introduced a new user interface that mimics a traditional operating system, taking the user outside the confines of the browser. And it’s no longer selling software-like subscriptions to these machines, moving to flat fees for hardware and technical support.

In some ways, this seems like a comedown. But it also shows that Google is intent on building a business around these machines — something that many pundits have questioned over the last year. When you also consider that Google has introduced a Chrome OS desktop machine, the Chromebox, alongside its Chromebook laptops, the proposition makes far more sense than it did 12 months ago.

Rajen Sheth, the man who oversees Google’s effort to push Chrome OS into schools and businesses, agrees that the second generation of machines show the company’s intent. But he also says that the overall vision for the operating system hasn’t changed.

“We very deeply believe in this vision,” he says, “and we’re doing a tremendous amount to make it happen.” The idea is to create a world where you can pick up any machine — old or new, yours or someone else’s — and instantly tap into all your existing data and applications. But Google also wants to simplify these machines — for the people who use them and for the companies that manage and support them.

In many ways, the new devices live up to the pitch. Equipped with solid-state drives, Chrome OS machines boot in seconds, and since you needn’t install local software, schools and businesses can certainly get them out to users quickly, and then update them with relative ease. But there are still ways that the device can make things more complicated.

After all, you can’t install software on a Chrome machine. And if you lose your internet connection, you still lose the ability to use most applications. Gmail now works offline. And Google Docs, the company’s document and spreadsheet app, lets you view files offline. But you can’t edit files offline. What’s more, even when you have a connection on a Chrome OS, your ability to move files from application to application is still quite limited.

That said, with the Chromebox, a machine designed to plug permanently into a network, the need for applications that operate offline is less of an issue. And according to Sheth, Google will soon introduce a version of Google Docs that lets you not only view documents when offline, but edit them as well.

The offline Google Docs will fill a big hole in the platform, and it’s a long time coming. It hasn’t arrived sooner, Sheth says, because, well, it’s not an easy problem to solve.

“It’s a complex problem because you tend to have multiple people collaborating on the same files,” he says. “What if I make a bunch of edits on an airplane [while offline] and then connect to the internet when I get to my hotel — especially if others have edited the document in the meantime? How do you merge in those changes?”

What’s more, Google must move some of the processing code from the web to the client machine. “We use the cloud for a lot of the processing, particularly on spreadsheets. We not only have to move this to the client side, but do this in a way that the application is still lightweight.”

Sheth says the company is already using its offline editor within the company, and intends to roll it out to the world at large over the next “several weeks.”

As Google’s Sundar Pichai told us last month, the company is also working to integrate Google Drive — its online file storage service — with Chrome OS. And according to Sheth, this will make it easier to move files between the device and web applications.

Google still isn’t saying how many businesses are using Chrome OS. But it does say that “hundreds” of schools across the U.S. and Europe are using the devices. Rajen Sheth is also the man who turned Gmail into a corporate services — he’s known as “the father of Google Apps” — and he says that Chrome OS is taking much the same path as his first baby.

“As with Google Apps, we’ve seen the best initial traction in education, especially with elementary schools,” Sheth says. “So many schools want to give computers to all of their students, but traditionally, the IT costs of doing that are high. Chromebooks let them buy devices for students without increasing their IT costs.”

How else will the platform evolve? Sheth does acknowledge that Google is reshaping the OS for use on devices with touch screens, but he says the company has no intention of putting it on tablets. Chrome OS may show up on touch-screen notebooks, but Google believes that touch-screen tablets — as well as smartphones — are best served by the company’s Android operating system.

In other words, there are still cases where local applications make more sense. The world may be moving to the web. But it’s not quite there yet.

Sheth acknowledges that it’s difficult for some people to wrap their head around a machine when all applications reside on the web. That’s why the company has added a traditional desktop interface to Chrome OS. “Web applications are actually more powerful than client applications that are typically on a desktop, but the mental lap has been a challenge for a lot of people,” he says. “[The new interface] helps them make that leap.”

Google’s aim hasn’t changed. But it’s still looking for the best way to get there.

Article source: http://feeds.wired.com/~r/wired/techbiz/~3/N-5NgMGlB64/

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19 May 12 Condense icons on your Google Chrome Bookmarks Bar


I’m a big fan of Chrome’s Bookmarks Bar, which puts my most frequently visited sites across the top of the browser, just one click away.

The problem is that I have so many favorites, they don’t all fit. Instead, they get squeezed out of view, requiring me to click the little double-arrow on the right end of the Bookmarks Bar. Then I’m stuck perusing a drop-down menu, which takes, like, all day.

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The solution I’ve found is to condense those favorites icons, or favicons, by eliminating the text that accompanies them. It takes a bit of time, but I think it’s worth the effort. Here’s how:

1. Right-click any icon in your Bookmarks Bar, then click Edit.

2. Remove the text from the Name field, then click Save.

3. Presto! Now you’ve got just the favicon for that favorite.

4. Repeat the process for all the other icons in your Bookmarks Bar.

Keep in mind that because not every Web site has an easily identifiable favicon, you might not want to take this approach for each and every favorite.

For example, sites like Facebook, Ebay, and PC World have instantly recognizable favicons. But others are more vague, and if you have any bookmarklets, those are usually represented by nothing more than a gray globe — and therefore shouldn’t be shortened.

Thus, you’ll want to fiddle with this to find the best arrangement for your particular setup. You could always reduce a favicon’s name to an abbreviation, like “LMI” for LogMeIn (which has a fairly generic-looking favicon). That would allow you to condense your Bookmarks Bar while keeping your icons easy to identify.

Contributing Editor Rick Broida writes about business and consumer technology. Ask for help with your PC hassles at Rick Broida writes about business and consumer technology. Ask for help with your Phasslefree@pcworld.com, or try the treasure trove of helpful folks in the Rick Broida writes about business and consumer technology. Ask for help with your PPC World Community Forums. Sign up to have the Rick Broida writes about business and consumer technology. Ask for help with your PHassle-Free PC newsletter e-mailed to you each week.

Article source: http://www.itworld.com/software/277119/condense-icons-your-google-chrome-bookmarks-bar

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