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06 Jun 12 Trading Ubuntu for Chromebox Running Google Chrome OS


The VAR Guy is trading in his Ubuntu PC for a new Samsung Chromebox running Google Chrome OS. What motivated the move to a cloud-centric thin client? Here’s the explanation.

First, a little background. Google Chromebooks are web-centric notebooks that run Chrome OS (a super-slim operating system) and leverage cloud software like Google Apps. More recently, Google has partnered with Samsung to launch a Chromebox — a $329 thin desktop (plus mouse, keyboard and monitor costs) that resembles a Mac Mini.

The VAR Guy has run Ubuntu Linux since July 2007 (he also runs Mac OS X and Windows 7 on sister systems). Ubuntu has proven reliable and efficient for productivity apps. But The VAR Guy has been too lazy to upgrade from Ubuntu 7.04 or so. The thought of learning new user interfaces, potentially adjusting drivers and so on isn’t all that appealing to our resident blogger.

What Is A Chromebox?

On the other hand, the thought of Google “maintaining” Chromebox and Chrome OS with automated updates sounds appealing. Admittedly, CNet’s ChromeBox review raises some concerns. But The VAR Guy is willing to give Samsung’s Chromebox a try. The thin desktop features:

  • An Intel Core processor
  • 4 GB RAM
  • Built-in dual-band WiFi 802.11 a/b/g/n
  • Gigabit Ethernet
  • 6 USB 2.0 ports
  • Bluetooth 3.0 compatible
  • Kensington key lock compatible

The horsepower isn’t all that impressive. But the real power of Chromebox should come from the web… er, the cloud. The VAR Guy’s family will leverage Google Apps and other SaaS offerings, while Google essentially keeps the desktop up to date with automated software refreshes.

It sounds simple and compelling. But is it? The VAR Guy will offer continued updates once he boots up his first ChromeBox (in seven seconds) later this week…

And what will become of The VAR Guy’s PC running Ubuntu? Don’t worry. It will continue to hum along in The VAR Guy’s house, though not as a primary system.

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Article source: http://www.thevarguy.com/2012/06/05/trading-ubuntu-for-chromebox-running-google-chrome-os/

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06 Jun 12 Trading Ubuntu for Chromebox Running Google Chrome OS


The VAR Guy is trading in his Ubuntu PC for a new Samsung Chromebox running Google Chrome OS. What motivated the move to a cloud-centric thin client? Here’s the explanation.

First, a little background. Google Chromebooks are web-centric notebooks that run Chrome OS (a super-slim operating system) and leverage cloud software like Google Apps. More recently, Google has partnered with Samsung to launch a Chromebox — a $329 thin desktop (plus mouse, keyboard and monitor costs) that resembles a Mac Mini.

The VAR Guy has run Ubuntu Linux since July 2007 (he also runs Mac OS X and Windows 7 on sister systems). Ubuntu has proven reliable and efficient for productivity apps. But The VAR Guy has been too lazy to upgrade from Ubuntu 7.04 or so. The thought of learning new user interfaces, potentially adjusting drivers and so on isn’t all that appealing to our resident blogger.

What Is A Chromebox?

On the other hand, the thought of Google “maintaining” Chromebox and Chrome OS with automated updates sounds appealing. Admittedly, CNet’s ChromeBox review raises some concerns. But The VAR Guy is willing to give Samsung’s Chromebox a try. The thin desktop features:

  • An Intel Core processor
  • 4 GB RAM
  • Built-in dual-band WiFi 802.11 a/b/g/n
  • Gigabit Ethernet
  • 6 USB 2.0 ports
  • Bluetooth 3.0 compatible
  • Kensington key lock compatible

The horsepower isn’t all that impressive. But the real power of Chromebox should come from the web… er, the cloud. The VAR Guy’s family will leverage Google Apps and other SaaS offerings, while Google essentially keeps the desktop up to date with automated software refreshes.

It sounds simple and compelling. But is it? The VAR Guy will offer continued updates once he boots up his first ChromeBox (in seven seconds) later this week…

And what will become of The VAR Guy’s PC running Ubuntu? Don’t worry. It will continue to hum along in The VAR Guy’s house, though not as a primary system.

Read More About This Topic

  • Related posts are coming soon

Article source: http://www.thevarguy.com/2012/06/05/trading-ubuntu-for-chromebox-running-google-chrome-os/

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01 Jun 12 The Chrome OS experiment: 2 weeks with Google’s new Chrome computers


By (@jr_raphael) G+

Google Chrome OS

Google’s Chrome OS is an interesting concept: You abandon the notion of a computer containing your world and instead embrace the idea of living on the Web — storing your data online and running your apps from the cloud, all via a simple and easily replaceable machine.

I’ve been intrigued by Chrome OS since its introduction in 2010. I used Google’s Cr-48 test notebook for months and then turned my attention to the first commercial Chromebooks upon their launch last May. After reviewing the Samsung Series 5 Chromebook, I was impressed enough to buy one of my own; I still use it extensively today.

For me, the Chromebook is a tool for travel — I rely on it heavily when heading out on the road, particularly for business-related trips — and also a device for quick computing around the house, away from my desk. Sure, I use an Android tablet, too, but some things are just quicker and simpler in Chrome OS’s stripped down PC-like-environment.

For all their assets, though, Google’s Chromebooks aren’t without their share of problems. Software limitations aside, my biggest beef has been speed: Last year’s models are pretty low-end machines, and it’s all too easy to bog them down by opening too many tabs and windows. While Chrome OS itself is light and speedy, the hardware has thus far held it back.

Google Chrome OS Chromebook, Chromebox

That’s why I was eager to try Google’s newly launched second generation of Chrome devices. Announced this week, the Samsung Chromebook Series 5 550 and Samsung Chromebox Series 3 promise to breathe new possibilities into the Chrome OS concept (even if their prices aren’t exactly a breath of fresh air). Of course, Google itself is constantly breathing new possibilities into Chrome OS via its frequent over-the-air software updates — but we’ll get to that more later.

Rather than rushing through a traditional review of the new Chrome OS computers, I thought it’d be interesting to immerse myself in them for a full two weeks and truly get to know what it’s like to live with the devices. I’ll rely on the new Samsung Chromebook and Chromebox for the majority of my computing needs these next several days, and I’ll take you along for the ride — sharing my impressions on everything from the updated hardware to the evolved software and the overall experience of embracing Google’s cloud-centric vision.

Android Power TwitterI’ll check in every couple days with new thoughts and insights (and will continue to cover the Android world in the meantime as well, of course). If there’s anything you want to know about the next-gen Chromebook/Chromebox/Chrome OS experience, just give me a shout: You can leave any questions in the comments on this page, or ping me via social media. My contact info is below.

Welcome to the cloud, my friends. Our journey starts now.     

JR Raphael writes about smartphones and other tasty technology. You can find him on , Twitter, or Facebook.

Article copyright 2012 JR Raphael. All rights reserved.

Article source: http://blogs.computerworld.com/20248/chrome_os_google_chrome_computers

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26 Apr 12 Knoodle’s Deep Integration With Google Apps, YouTube And Chrome Extends Social …


/PRNewswire/ – Knoodle, the enterprise social learning company, today announces a newly expanded set of capabilities that give companies more ways than ever to deploy collaborative learning and continuous knowledge sharing programs leveraging the GoogleApps ecosystem.

To view the multimedia assets associated with this release, please click: http://www.multivu.com/mnr/55732-knoodle-fully-integrated-cloud-based-social-learning-platform

(Photo: http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20120425/MM92055 )

Along with basic integrated user management and single sign-on through Google Apps, Knoodle provides additional built-in functionality for:

  1. Importing presentations, images, audio and video from Google Docs and YouTube into Knoodle, providing direct access to content stored on Google and more seamless ways to build learning modules and courses on Knoodle.
  2. Direct, one-click publishing of Knoodle presentations to Google Docs and YouTube, extending the reach to share Knoodle presentations privately throughout the organization or publicly across the world.
  3. Access via the Chrome Web Store, providing additional reach and availability, as well as full native Chrome and Google Cloud Print support.
  4. True end-to-end mobile learning capabilities with full functionality on Google Chromebooks and Android enabled devices.

These new capabilities solidify Knoodle’s position as the only social learning platform that gives businesses a full range of integrated social learning capabilities that leverage not only the application and user management power of Google Apps, but also seamless access to content, connections and reach for both rapid content authoring, as well as publishing and sharing within both private and public audiences.

“We believe strongly that learning technology for the social enterprise must do much more than just facilitate internal collaboration,” said Michael Rose, General Manager of Knoodle. “These new capabilities are a reflection of our commitment to enable continuous learning and the seamless exchange of ideas between internal teams, as well as with remote field organizations and the external ecosystems of customers and partners leveraging leading social enterprise platforms like Google Apps.  We have seen strong initial demand for Knoodle from Google Apps companies, and we’re looking forward to continued growth within the Google ecosystem.”

The expanded reach, authoring, and sharing capabilities now available through the Google ecosystem go hand in hand with the rapid authoring, testing, and analytics capabilities that have made Knoodle a leader in the enterprise learning space.  By leveraging already familiar tools such as PowerPoint presentations and standard image and video formats, Knoodle makes it easy to rapidly build and deploy anything from product how-to demos, to online certification courses, to new employee onboarding programs, to fully collaborative subject matter expert communities. 

To try Knoodle for free, install Knoodle on your Google Apps domain from our listing in the GoogleAppsMarketplace, or visit www.knoodle.com

About Knoodle Knoodle is the social learning platform for your company. We help your people learn faster and do their jobs better by combining the depth of traditional enterprise learning technology with the immediacy and interactivity of social tools to make learning and knowledge sharing a natural part of the work day. 

Companies big and small trust Knoodle to achieve a broad range of critical business objectives, ranging from product training and demos, to employee onboarding, training and certification programs, to broad social learning communities that bring together employees, customers and the ecosystem of partners. Knoodle delivers its solutions through the cloud, so there is no software to install and manage, deployment occurs in minutes not months, and is accessible anywhere and on any device.

For more information, visit www.knoodle.com.

SOURCE Knoodle

Article source: http://www.sacbee.com/2012/04/25/4441407/knoodles-deep-integration-with.html

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14 Dec 11 Google Chrome 16 Stable With Multiple Account Sync


Google (NASDAQ:GOOG) moved Chrome version 16 out of beta
and into the stable channel, Dec. 13, offering 15 bug fixes and adding the
ability to sync the browser for multiple user accounts on the same Chrome
installation.

As far as paid flaw discoveries goes, Chrome 16 was a
lightweight. Google only paid out $6,500 for security bug discoveries, compared to $26,511 for 18 security flaw finds paid out for Chrome 15.

For the latest round of flaw discoveries, Google paid $1,000 apiece for: high-risk URL bar
spoofing;  use-after-free bugs in SVG
filters and range handling; a buffer overflow in PDF font handling; an out of
bounds write in the V8 JavaScript engine; and an out-of-bounds read in PDF
cross references.

The biggest advancement for Chrome 16 is the extension of the browser’s sync tool to allow more than one user to sign into
Chrome on the same computer, port all of their bookmarks, extensions and
applications to any computer, and make changes to those tools as they see fit.

This will accomplish two things. One, it will save users
of a shared computer from having to download and install software and type in
passwords repeatedly.

Two, it will prevent bookmarks, apps, and extensions from
getting mixed up with everyone else’s and ensure the right Chrome content syncs
to the right devices.

Finally, Google also upgraded its Chrome Web Store again. Chrome app shoppers can now
filter app title by the most popular and highest-rated apps. Users may also
find new programs via the related tab, and check out winter holidays and new
year app genres.

Chrome is on a roll, having jumped to 18 percent market share through November,
according to Net Applications.

Google Chromebooks, on the other hand, appear to be suffering from some
sluggish sales as consumers appear to be more interested in tablet computers.
Samsung and Acer have each discounted their Chromebook models to pull in more
holiday sales this year.

 

 


Article source: http://www.eweek.com/c/a/Application-Development/Google-Chrome-16-Stable-With-Multiple-Account-Sync-392080/

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23 Nov 11 Google Chromebooks get goodies, lower prices for Christmas


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Article source: http://www.gmanews.tv/story/239366/technology/google-chromebooks-get-goodies-lower-prices-for-christmas

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14 Nov 11 Acer warns Google’s Schmidt: Android must share value through the ecosystem


Acer’s founder has given a sharp warning to Google’s chairman Eric Schmidt that the benefits from Android‘s success need to be shared throughout the “value chain” of its suppliers, after complaining that Microsoft and Intel have gathered too much of the profit from the success of Windows.

There are also question marks over the future of Google’s “Chromebooks” – laptops which run its limited ChromeOS operating system, essentially providing access to Google Apps through the Chrome browser – due to limited sales.

But Schmidt, who is on a tour of the Far East, insisted that “resources will be shared” among the members of the Android ecosystem – though he declined to say whether Google would launch own-branded handsets using its acquisition of Motorola, which is due to complete early in the year.

The remarks from Shih and Schmidt appeared in Digitimes, the Taiwanese online business paper which follows the workings of the Far Eastern system builders.

Shih’s remarks indicate that companies making Android systems are wary of being cornered in the way that businesses making Windows hardware have been, where operating margins on commodity PC hardware can be less than 5% while Microsoft and Intel enjoy monopoly profits on the software and processor.

Digitimes says that

Shih noted that an enterprise’s operating strategy should focus on allowing all its partners to enjoy profits and reach a balance, but some US enterprises value too much their own interests, ignoring the profitability of their upstream suppliers, channel retail partners and consumers, causing their operations to be unable to last long.

The warning to Schmidt – that Acer might opt out of the Google’s ecosystems if it feels that the rewards are not sufficient or if Google favours one company over another – may seem trivial, given that Acer is not a major player in the Android smartphone market, and has made little impact in the Android tablet market.

But Shih is almost certainly reflecting the sentiments of a number of Android systems builders who have so far failed to benefit from Google’s efforts outside the smartphone business, where Google faces an uphill struggle to persuade system builders to back it.

Digitimes reports that Schmidt’s attempts to persuade them to build “Chromebooks’ using Google’s Chrome OS have fallen flat:

due to demand for Chrome OS-based devices (Chromebooks) being lower than expected, PC players are taking a passive attitude toward opening projects. In June 2011, Acer and Samsung launched their Chromebooks ahead of other PC brand vendors, but by the end of July, Acer had reportedly only sold 5,000 units and Samsung was said to have had even lower sales than Acer, according to sources from the PC industry. However, Acer has declined to comment.

Google has not provided any figures for sales of “Chromebooks”; Larry Page, the chief executive, made only a passing mention to them in his rundown of Google’s third quarter results discussion:

Finally, Chromebooks have been available for purchase since mid-June, and we’re beginning to see lots of interest and good uptake, both from the businesses and educational institutions.

It is not clear whether the slow sales of computers generally in the US and western Europe have put large organisations off acquiring Chromebooks, or whether the fact that the machines require connection to the internet to function effectively – because they use a minimal OS and do everything else through the browser – has put organisations off deploying them in favour of full-function laptops as well as tablets such as Apple’s iPad, which has sold tens of millions of devices.

But the tensions between Google, Motorola and the Far Eastern system builders on whom Google relies have been made clear by Shih’s words.

Article source: http://www.guardian.co.uk/technology/2011/nov/11/acer-warns-google-android-ecosystem?newsfeed=true

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