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16 Dec 12 Colbert visits Google, is clueless about Google Play | Technically Incorrect …


No, he’s not corpsing.


(Credit:
Google screenshot by Chris Matyszczyk/CNET)

Google’s Eric Schmidt is a very busy man.

But he still found the time to interview fellow political philosopher Stephen Colbert, when the latter appeared at Google this week.

Indeed, Schmidt even found the time to post a chunk of the escapade onto his Google+ account. (The full hour has been posted to YouTube and I have embedded it at the bottom of this post.)

You might imagine that Colbert would be au fait with all of Google’s services before presenting himself before an audience of Googlies.

But, no.

Colbert was there to push his masterwork “America Again: Re-Becoming the Greatness We Never Weren’t.” He wanted people to go to their local bookstore or to the “one that’s named after the rain forest.”

Schmidt, ever the subtle salesman, explained to him that his book was for sale not merely on Amazon, but on Google Play.

“What does that mean?” asked a bemused Colbert.

Patiently, Schmidt explained that the Google hydra had a book-selling arm too.

Colbert still worried that — Google being Google — it would only sell e-books. He was stunned to discover that there might even be the possibility to buy a physical book too.

Yet he still had brand recognition problems. Shortly afterward, he appeared to forget the name again altogether.

When he learned his book would be for sale on Google Play at list price, Colbert said: “So go to Google Plus for no deal!”

How extraordinary that despite Google becoming one of the bigger tech spenders in advertising, there is still work to be done.

The whole interview embraced vast numbers of topics. Many will enjoy Colbert telling Schmidt that Google Maps are phenomenal. Schmidt agreed. “Ask an Apple user,” he said.

Should you be keen to hear someone say “bulls***” to Eric Schmidt, then I recommend the 19th minute.

Article source: http://news.cnet.com/8301-17852_3-57559405-71/colbert-visits-google-is-clueless-about-google-play/

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06 Jun 12 New Google Chrome Aims at Windows 8


The Chrome operating system is designed for lightweight computers known as Chromebooks.The Chrome operating system is designed for lightweight computers known as Chromebooks.

Google just released a new version of its Chrome operating system with fancy tweaks to online computing services like word processing and video — all designed to make it faster, more functional and easier to use.

It’s an open question whether the changes are enough to make Chrome, which is also the name of Google’s browser, more than a marginal player, but the system is impressive, and designed to work seamlessly with Google products like Android phones and the (still-underwhelming) Google Plus social network. It is also clearly pointed at Microsoft, just as Microsoft is preparing to introduce Windows 8, one of the biggest changes to its operating system ever.

The Chrome operating system is designed for lightweight computers known as Chromebooks that require an Internet connection to obtain access to most applications.

“People participate in ecosystems,” said Sundar Pichai, who is in charge of the Chrome project at Google. “If you are a Chrome browser user, an Android user and a Gmail user, a Chromebook is a more natural experience than a Windows 8.”

Most of Google’s changes will be available to people already using computers running Chrome, since Google can change things online. Some, like hardware-accelerated graphics for faster scrolling, or a better trackpad on the Chrome laptop, require a new machine. The first of these, from Samsung, has also just been announced. It is about the size and weight of a MacBook Air, and starts at $449.

The Air starts at $999, but is a well-regarded and powerful machine that does not require you to be online to use it. Google is making more strides in that direction. In about two more weeks, Mr. Pichai said, you will be able to write offline in Google Docs, or Drive, as it is now called.

“We really wanted to show how productive you could be with this device,” Mr. Pichai said. “By default you will be able to get the last 100 documents you were working on. When you go back online, it will resynch with your files and update everything.” You can also “pin” certain documents, no matter how old, so they are always available.

It is also possible to open and work on anything from Microsoft Office, including Word, Excel and PowerPoint, without converting it to the Google version of those products.

In order to inspire software developers with what the graphics can do, there is a special hidden feature: press the control, alt and shift buttons together, then the refresh button, and the screen spins, even while playing a video.

There is also a new Samsung desktop, the Chromebox, starting at $329, that could be attractive to schools and businesses looking to provide a lot of people the same kind of machine.

The prices of both new Samsung devices undercut even most low-end tablet and desktop machines.

Previously the desktops and laptops were only sold online, but next month they will also be offered at some Best Buy stores. That could be a big shot in the arm for a machine that has probably sold in the tens of thousands.

Acer also makes Chromebooks, but does yet have machines with the new hardware. Mr. Pichai said other manufacturers, which he did not mention, would be selling their versions of the machine in time for the Christmas season.

Another new Chrome feature, still in beta, enables customers to get access to their PCs and Mac computers remotely. The screen of the remote computer appears on the Chrome machine, and the distant computer can be manipulated from Chrome. The other computer has to be on, though it can be in screensaver mode.

“Companies are excited about Chromebooks, but have legacy applications they want to keep,” Mr. Pichai said. “Now, if you have a legacy Oracle expense app, you can put it somewhere and have it accessible on Chrome.”

Article source: http://bits.blogs.nytimes.com/2012/05/29/new-google-chrome-aims-at-windows-8/

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29 May 12 Bits Blog: New Google Chrome Aims at Windows 8


The Chrome operating system is designed for lightweight computers known as Chromebooks.The Chrome operating system is designed for lightweight computers known as Chromebooks.

Google just released a new version of its Chrome operating system with fancy tweaks to online computing services like word processing and video — all designed to make it faster, more functional and easier to use.

It’s an open question whether the changes are enough to make Chrome, which is also the name of Google’s browser, more than a marginal player, but the system is impressive, and designed to work seamlessly with Google products like Android phones and the (still-underwhelming) Google Plus social network. It is also clearly pointed at Microsoft, just as Microsoft is preparing to introduce Windows 8, one of the biggest changes to its operating system ever.

The Chrome operating system is designed for lightweight computers known as Chromebooks that require an Internet connection to obtain access to most applications.

“People participate in ecosystems,” said Sundar Pichai, who is in charge of the Chrome project at Google. “If you are a Chrome browser user, an Android user and a Gmail user, a Chromebook is a more natural experience than a Windows 8.”

Most of Google’s changes will be available to people already using computers running Chrome, since Google can change things online. Some, like hardware-accelerated graphics for faster scrolling, or a better trackpad on the Chrome laptop, require a new machine. The first of these, from Samsung, has also just been announced. It is about the size and weight of a MacBook Air, and starts at $449.

The Air starts at $999, but is a well-regarded and powerful machine that does not require you to be online to use it. Google is making more strides in that direction. In about two more weeks, Mr. Pichai said, you will be able to write offline in Google Docs, or Drive, as it is now called.

“We really wanted to show how productive you could be with this device,” Mr. Pichai said. “By default you will be able to get the last 100 documents you were working on. When you go back online, it will resynch with your files and update everything.” You can also “pin” certain documents, no matter how old, so they are always available.

It is also possible to open and work on anything from Microsoft Office, including Word, Excel and PowerPoint, without converting it to the Google version of those products.

In order to inspire software developers with what the graphics can do, there is a special hidden feature: press the control, alt and shift buttons together, then the refresh button, and the screen spins, even while playing a video.

There is also a new Samsung desktop, the Chromebox, starting at $329, that could be attractive to schools and businesses looking to provide a lot of people the same kind of machine.

The prices of both new Samsung devices undercut even most low-end tablet and desktop machines.

Previously the desktops and laptops were only sold online, but next month they will also be offered at some Best Buy stores. That could be a big shot in the arm for a machine that has probably sold in the tens of thousands.

Acer also makes Chromebooks, but does yet have machines with the new hardware. Mr. Pichai said other manufacturers, which he did not mention, would be selling their versions of the machine in time for the Christmas season.

Another new Chrome feature, still in beta, enables customers to get access to their PCs and Mac computers remotely. The screen of the remote computer appears on the Chrome machine, and the distant computer can be manipulated from Chrome. The other computer has to be on, though it can be in screensaver mode.

“Companies are excited about Chromebooks, but have legacy applications they want to keep,” Mr. Pichai said. “Now, if you have a legacy Oracle expense app, you can put it somewhere and have it accessible on Chrome.”

Article source: http://bits.blogs.nytimes.com/2012/05/29/new-google-chrome-aims-at-windows-8/?partner=rss&emc=rss

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29 May 12 New Google Chrome Aims At Windows 8


The Chrome operating system is designed for lightweight computers known as Chromebooks.The Chrome operating system is designed for lightweight computers known as Chromebooks.

Google just released a new version of its Chrome operating system with fancy tweaks to online computing services like word processing and video — all designed to make it faster, more functional and easier to use.

It’s an open question whether the changes are enough to make Chrome, which is also the name of Google’s browser, more than a marginal player, but the system is impressive, and designed to work seamlessly with Google products like Android phones and the (still-underwhelming) Google Plus social network. It is also clearly pointed at Microsoft, just as Microsoft is preparing to introduce Windows 8, one of the biggest changes to its operating system ever.

The Chrome operating system is designed for lightweight computers known as Chromebooks that require an Internet connection to obtain access to most applications.

“People participate in ecosystems,” said Sundar Pichai, who is in charge of the Chrome project at Google. “If you are a Chrome browser user, an Android user and a Gmail user, a Chromebook is a more natural experience than a Windows 8.”

Most of Google’s changes will be available to people already using computers running Chrome, since Google can change things online. Some, like hardware-accelerated graphics for faster scrolling, or a better trackpad on the Chrome laptop, require a new machine. The first of these, from Samsung, has also just been announced. It is about the size and weight of a MacBook Air, and starts at $449.

The Air starts at $999, but is a well-regarded and powerful machine that does not require you to be online to use it. Google is making more strides in that direction. In about two more weeks, Mr. Pichai said, you will be able to write offline in Google Docs, or Drive, as it is now called.

“We really wanted to show how productive you could be with this device,” Mr. Pichai said. “By default you will be able to get the last 100 documents you were working on. When you go back online, it will resynch with your files and update everything.” You can also “pin” certain documents, no matter how old, so they are always available.

It is also possible to open and work on anything from Microsoft Office, including Word, Excel and PowerPoint, without converting it to the Google version of those products.

In order to inspire software developers with what the graphics can do, there is a special hidden feature: press the control, alt and shift buttons together, then the refresh button, and the screen spins, even while playing a video.

There is also a new Samsung desktop, the Chromebox, starting at $329, that could be attractive to schools and businesses looking to provide a lot of people the same kind of machine.

The prices of both new Samsung devices undercut even most low-end tablet and desktop machines.

Previously the desktops and laptops were only sold online, but next month they will also be offered at some Best Buy stores. That could be a big shot in the arm for a machine that has probably sold in the tens of thousands.

Acer also makes Chromebooks, but does yet have machines with the new hardware. Mr. Pichai said other manufacturers, which he did not mention, would be selling their versions of the machine in time for the Christmas season.

Another new Chrome feature, still in beta, enables customers to get access to their PCs and Mac computers remotely. The screen of the remote computer appears on the Chrome machine, and the distant computer can be manipulated from Chrome. The other computer has to be on, though it can be in screensaver mode.

“Companies are excited about Chromebooks, but have legacy applications they want to keep,” Mr. Pichai said. “Now, if you have a legacy Oracle expense app, you can put it somewhere and have it accessible on Chrome.”

Article source: http://bits.blogs.nytimes.com/2012/05/29/new-google-chrome-aims-at-windows-8/

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02 May 12 Chrome marketing is exceptional


Love makes the world go round, and, c`mon, who doesn’t love a good relationship story? But love stories aren’t easily told — one reason there are so few classics. But Google has done just that in 90 seconds. Take a moment to watch the embedded video over your morning coffee and bagel, donut or scone and tell me if you agree.

I don’t even recall where I saw the commercial — it was during some program I had recorded then watched on Monday evening. But as I fast-forwarded through the adverts, something about this one caused me to stop. Perhaps it’s subliminally related to the long length, seeing as most TV spots are no longer than 60 seconds. I actually rewound and watched a second time. Now that’s marketing.

Effective advertising is familiar, aspirational and, when about products, shows the benefits. Who can’t relate to unrequited love or desire to make a relationship work. Familiar and aspirational.

Google effectively does something else: Shows the benefits of multiple Google services, not just Chrome. There’s Gmail, in the message Mark sends Jen, and Google Docs in the plaintive request he makes to her. The commercial also shows YouTube, Picasa Web, Google Translate, Google Maps, Google Spreadsheets and Google Plus, which all tidily fit longstanding Chrome marketing tagline: “The web is what you make of it”.

The same can be said about relationships. Love is what you make of it.

This story has no ending. We don’t know if Jen and Mark meet for coffee, or get back together. That’s how it should be. In this case, closure would take a way from the story.

Article source: http://betanews.com/2012/05/02/chrome-marketing-is-exceptional/

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15 Apr 12 Chrome OS introduces Aura window manager


Don’t look now, but Google has officially revealed their intentions to go after Windows and OS X. Chrome OS 19 has arrived for Samsung Series 5 and Acer AC700 Chromebooks running the developer channel, and the changes it brings may shock you.

Why? Because Chrome OS suddenly looks like it’s much more than “just a bootable web browser.”

The new Aura window manager has landed, bringing with it a number of features that you’d expect from a traditional OS. For starters, there’s the Shelf along the bottom of the screen. It’s set to hide when you’ve got a browser window maximized by default, but you can choose to have it always on top or auto-hide, too, just like the Windows taskbar or OS X dock.

On the left-hand side of the Shelf are a handful of Google-pinned shortcuts: the Chrome icon opens a new tab, and Gmail, Google search, Docs, and YouTube round out the list. Your open browser windows appear next, and the favicon for the currently active tab is displayed to remind you which session is which.

There’s also a small, white grid icon. Clicking it displays your Chrome apps floating above your current wallpaper (yes, you can have wallpaper now, too). As a result, apps are no longer displayed on the new tab page. Instead, it’s flashback time: a selection of eight frequently-visited sites appear once again, and you can rearrange and replace to your heart’s content.

In the top right corner of your windows, you’ll notice two controls: one to close and another to reposition. Clicking and pulling down minimizes the current window, while clicking and pulling left or right splits the screen and snaps to the edge. A plain old click will re-maximize your window.

Although glitchy right now, window borders also sport transparency effects. Artifacts frequently appear when moving windows about, but it’s the kind of growing pain you expect with a developer channel release.

The Chrome OS Scratchpad app has also been re-tooled, and it’s now a bit more like Wordpad. A full array of formatting tools is available, from bulleted or numbered lists to highlighting. As before, documents you create in Scratchpad are quickly synced to your Google Docs storage.

Another cloud feature has been added, this one to the updated photo editor. Photos can finally be uploaded individually or in bulk to Picasa. Curiously, it’s the only option currently available when you click the share icon in the photo editor — Google Plus hasn’t been added yet, though that seems inevitable.

In addition to an updated photo editor, the offline media player has been tweaked, too. Unfortunately while the audio player still worked nicely, the video player crashed every time I tried to load a clip.

Hardware acceleration features have been improved, and overall Chrome OS 19 feels substantially faster than version 18. One thing that really seems to help is that the Chat for Google app is less greedy with system resources than it used to be. Since it wants to run all the time when you’re signed in, a more efficient chat app provides a real boost to the whole OS.

The downside for now is that the update is incredibly unstable. Tabs have been crashing frequently when I switch back and forth, and background tabs often reload when I bring one to the foreground.

Still, with all these new features and tweaks in tow and improved handling of multiple monitor setups, it’s clear that Google feels that Chrome OS is nearly ready to go toe-to-toe with Windows and OS X. The only thing holding them up right now is a lack apps and games that can truly rival the performance offered by their native desktop counterparts.

With NaCl under the hood, however, and access to loads of offline storage via Chrome’s APIs, Chrome apps are going to catch up. When they do, it’s game on.

More at Chrome Releases


Article source: http://www.geek.com/articles/news/chrome-os-introduces-aura-window-manager-20120410/

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06 Feb 12 Chrome’s Market Share Drops In January; Was It Due To Google’s Penalty?


google-chrome-logoAfter 17 straight months of gains in market share, Google’s Chrome web browser dropped 0.17 percent in January, and the company that tracks browser market share suggests that it’s because Google penalized Chrome after a botched sponsored blog post campaign.

The figures come from Net Applications, which says it tracks about 160 million unique visits per month to a worldwide network of more than 40,000 sites.

According to Net Applications, Firefox and Safari also saw market share losses in January. While they were declining, Microsoft’s Internet Explorer gained 1.09%, its biggest monthly gain in at least two years.

One possible explanation is that a lot of people bought new PC computers over the holidays, and Internet Explorer’s market share grew in January because it’s the default browser there. But that didn’t happen a year ago; in January 2011, Explorer’s market share declined nearly a full percent. (IE did gain in February, 2011, as shown above.)

Net Applications ties Explorer’s gain and Chrome’s decline to the Google penalty which removed Chrome from search results for a number of browser-related search terms. Google penalized Chrome in early January after the company’s own botched sponsored blog post campaign ran afoul of Google’s search/webmaster guidelines.

In my searches this morning, the main Chrome page doesn’t appear on page one for “browser,” “web browser,” “download web browser,” “chrome,” “google chrome” nor “chrome browser.” I’m not sure that’s why Chrome’s market share dropped in January, but it’s an interesting theory to consider at minimum.

(tip via Computerworld)

Related Topics: Featured | Google: Chrome | Google: SEO | SEO: Spamming | Stats: Popularity | Top News


About The Author: is Search Engine Land’s Executive News Editor, responsible for overseeing our daily news coverage. His news career includes time spent in TV, radio, and print journalism. His web career continues to include a small number of SEO and social media consulting clients, as well as regular speaking engagements at marketing events around the U.S. He blogs at Small Business Search Marketing and can be found on Twitter at @MattMcGee and/or on Google Plus.


SMX - Search Marketing Expo

Article source: http://searchengineland.com/chromes-market-share-drops-in-january-was-it-due-to-googles-penalty-110097

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04 Feb 12 Chrome’s Market Share Drops In January; Was It Due To Google’s Penalty?


google-chrome-logoAfter 17 straight months of gains in market share, Google’s Chrome web browser dropped 0.17 percent in January, and the company that tracks browser market share suggests that it’s because Google penalized Chrome after a botched sponsored blog post campaign.

The figures come from Net Applications, which says it tracks about 160 million unique visits per month to a worldwide network of more than 40,000 sites.

According to Net Applications, Firefox and Safari also saw market share losses in January. While they were declining, Microsoft’s Internet Explorer gained 1.09%, its biggest monthly gain in at least two years.

One possible explanation is that a lot of people bought new PC computers over the holidays, and Internet Explorer’s market share grew in January because it’s the default browser there. But that didn’t happen a year ago; in January 2011, Explorer’s market share declined nearly a full percent. (IE did gain in February, 2011, as shown above.)

Net Applications ties Explorer’s gain and Chrome’s decline to the Google penalty which removed Chrome from search results for a number of browser-related search terms. Google penalized Chrome in early January after the company’s own botched sponsored blog post campaign ran afoul of Google’s search/webmaster guidelines.

In my searches this morning, the main Chrome page doesn’t appear on page one for “browser,” “web browser,” “download web browser,” “chrome,” “google chrome” nor “chrome browser.” I’m not sure that’s why Chrome’s market share dropped in January, but it’s an interesting theory to consider at minimum.

(tip via Computerworld)

Related Topics: Featured | Google: Chrome | Google: SEO | SEO: Spamming | Stats: Popularity | Top News


About The Author: is Search Engine Land’s Executive News Editor, responsible for overseeing our daily news coverage. His news career includes time spent in TV, radio, and print journalism. His web career continues to include a small number of SEO and social media consulting clients, as well as regular speaking engagements at marketing events around the U.S. He blogs at Small Business Search Marketing and can be found on Twitter at @MattMcGee and/or on Google Plus.


SMX - Search Marketing Expo

Article source: http://searchengineland.com/chromes-market-share-drops-in-january-was-it-due-to-googles-penalty-110097

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07 Dec 11 Chrome Users Don’t Send Referrer Data from Google Plus


Google Plus traffic reported to be down by 60% – Really?

We all have heard the news that Google Plus is not developing as some people think it should. The Daily Mail even reported “Traffic plunges for Google+ as 60% of users log off“. The newspaper based it’s piece on a report by analytics firm Chitika, who thinks that the launch of Google Plus into public beta has been a failure.

Google+ Traffic Index

First of all, I wouldn’t really see it as a failure if traffic first surges to 1200% of the value before the launch of the public beta and then drops by 60% resulting in a 480% increase all in all. Not really that bad, I think.

Influence of Google Chrome

Ok, now to something completely different though not unrelated: version 14 of Google’s Chrome browser has been released on September 16th, which happens to be one day before Chitika’s graph starts. Unfortunately I don’t know how quickly the automatic updates of Google Chrome spread, but if it takes several days as I could imagine then this puts Chitika’s stats into some doubt.

I believe there might be a correlation between the rise in usage share of Chrome 14 and the decline of Chitika’s Google+ traffic index. As SEOMoz readers you all know that correlation is not causation so I had a deeper look into it. At first I recognized that if I visit my blog from my Google+ About page, Piwik logs a “Direct Entry”. A look into the access log files confirms that – the referrer field just contains “-”.

So I decided to take a deeper look and fired up OWASP’s Zed Attack Proxy to analyse the traffic between my browsers and the Internet.

Session with Mozilla Firefox

First I recorded a session with Firefox 7. For the test, I simply clicked on the link to my blog which is on the About me page on Google+. Here’s the result in ZAP:

Google Plus Referrer Firefox

The sequence of requests here is:

  1. https://plus.google.com/_/diagnostics

  2. http://plus.google.com/url

  3. http://www.frankoli.de/ueber/franks-seite

That first request seems to be an AJAX request to send some statistical data back to Google+. The second is opened in a new tab and responds with a very simplistic piece of HTML code and a bit of Javascript to redirect the browser to the target URL.

The resulting request to the target server looks like this:

Google+ Request Firefox

A pretty normal request including a ‘Referer’ which indicates to the target server and its analytics software that the visitor has been referred by Google+.

Same Request with Google Chrome

This same session using Google Chrome 15 looks a bit different in ZAP:

Google+ Referrer using Chrome Browser

This time there are only two relevant requests:

  1. https://plus.google.com/url

  2. http://www.frankoli.de/ueber/franks-seite

The request to /url on Google Plus is basically the same as with Firefox, but with a notable difference: This one uses the https protocol. It’s an encrypted request and therefore the browser rightly does not transfer a Referer header. Just as requested by RFC2616:

Google+Request in Chrome

Why does Google do that? And what are the implications?

Frankly, I have no idea why Google would do that. Why should they treat users differently depending on the browser simply for linking to another web site. Originally I thought I had found a bug in Chromium until I noticed that in one case the redirect page is transferred encrypted while in the other it is not.

Concerning Chitika’s statistics which I cited at the beginning of this article, this means that the start of the public beta of Google Plus might have overlapped with the spreading of Google Chrome 14 and thus decreasing referral data during that launch. So in reality the traffic index of Google+ after the rollout of Chrome 14 should be about 25% better as Chitika uses referral data to determine the traffic index.

Furthermore it means that you should not rely on your referrer data if you want to really measure the visitor numbers coming from Google+. And especially it means you can’t compare Referrer data from Google Plus and other Social Media sites as you would compare apples with pears. If you really want to know how many visits you get from Google+ you have to seed links which you can later identify. But be aware! Don’t create duplicate content along the way and bear in mind that others will just distribute any link they like, so you’ll never get the full picture anyway.

Article source: http://www.seomoz.org/ugc/chrome-users-dont-send-referrer-data-from-google-plus

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05 Dec 11 Three Google Chrome extensions for those obsessed with Klout scores


klout twitter Three Google Chrome extensions for those obsessed with Klout scores

For the Klout obsessed

Although social media scoring site Klout.com has been taken to task for taking on the impossible task of measuring someone’s clout, some still obsess over what some consider to be an arbitrary score (given that Warren Buffet who clearly has more influence than any of us only has a Klout score of 36). Critics point out that influence isn’t measured inside a single industry, rather a wide net is cast over all industries, matching supermodels against doctors – neither influence the same people. Additionally, some have shown how the system can be gamed and how quantity trumps quality, violating the very nature of social media.

That said, many are still obsessed with Klout and watch their score constantly, in fact, we were recently told that a conference was recruiting speakers (unpaid, mind you) based on their Klout score, not considering anyone with a score under 60. We have also heard of CEOs becoming obsessed with the scores, insisting on their staff raising their Klout scores to better the company (flawed thinking at best). If that boss had the following chart, he would know that scores 50 or above are not common:

Critical author klout scores 1 Three Google Chrome extensions for those obsessed with Klout scores

For the curious, obsessed or (like the boss above) overly-obsessed, we have found three extensions for Google Chrome to feed your bad habit!

1. Klout for Twitter

The Klout for Twitter Google Chrome extension adds a tiny Klout icon next to every status update when using Twitter.com as seen in the image at the top of this article. It’s quick and easy and lets you see the scores of people you’re talking to, but we advise that no one take it too seriously, we assert it is mostly entertainment.
scores Three Google Chrome extensions for those obsessed with Klout scores

2. KloutPlus for Google Plus

To further feed your obsession and measure yourself against everyone online, you can also see people’s Klout scores when using Google+ with the KloutPlus for Google Plus Google Chrome extension. We have installed this extension and it has not populated yet, we don’t know how long the delay is, but scores don’t appear inline next to updates, rather on a user’s profile:
gplus Three Google Chrome extensions for those obsessed with Klout scores

3. Klouter

Klouter is an extension that simply adds a small icon at the top of the Chrome browser that updates you of your own Klout score as often as you like from one minute to 99 minutes. This is for the truly obsessed:
kloutscore Three Google Chrome extensions for those obsessed with Klout scores

Do you plan on using any of these three extensions? Tell us in comments what you think!

Thanks for spreading the word

This article published on
Sunday, December 4th, 2011 at 1:05 pm | Contact the editor

Keywords: , ,

Topics: Social Media

Article source: http://agbeat.com/real-estate-technology-new-media/three-google-chrome-extensions-for-those-obsessed-with-klout/

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