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12 May 12 Chrome tool helps you learn a language while you browse the web


NEW YORK, May 12 – A new experimental Language Immersion browser extension for Chrome wants to help you learn a second language by simulating the experience of being immersed within the language.

The tool uses Google Translate to automatically translate words and phrases on the websites you browse from English into a foreign language.

“Depending on the language you select and your existing comfort level, the extension will automatically switch certain words and phrases on web pages you browse to the new language, providing a painless way to immerse yourself in a language without interrupting what you were doing online,” explained Google in a May 9 post on Google+.

Back in 2011 a website called Duolingo launched under the premise of using crowd-sourced translations to translate the web. The startup, which is still in private beta, helps students learn a language for free while simultaneously translating content into foreign languages.

You can add the Language Immersion for Chrome extension to your web browser at http://goo.gl/yKvIt. – AFP

Article source: http://www.themalaysianinsider.com/tech/article/chrome-tool-helps-you-learn-a-language-while-you-browse-the-web

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05 May 12 Learn a new language while Web surfing in Chrome


Language Immersion for Chrome.

(Credit:
Screenshot by Nicole Cozma/CNET)

You’ve probably heard that immersion is the fastest and most comprehensive way to learn a new language. However, immersion is not an easy task when you don’t live in a country where your target language is natively spoken. To help with this issue there’s an awesome extension called Language Immersion for Chrome.

With this extension you can add as much or as little of a new language to your everyday Web surfing habits as you like. The extension supports most of the languages offered by Google Translate (roughly 64 of them), and can help you learn the target language by translating random words, sentences and even paragraphs. So as you read a Web page on the novice setting you’ll see a word or phrase in your chosen language every 30 to 40 words of your native language. And in case you’re a little more advanced than that, you can turn the difficulty level up to Intermediate or even Fluent so larger chunks of the text will be translated.

Settings for Language Immersion for Chrome.

(Credit:
www.useallfive.com)

First you’ll need to grab a copy of the Language Immersion for Chrome extension. Just click on the blue Add to Chrome button. After that, you’ll want to adjust the difficulty setting and make sure the extension is switched on. This can be done by clicking on the extension’s button in your Chrome toolbar. You may also want to enable “Speak translations” by clicking on the wrench icon and then the check box.

(Credit:
Screenshot by Nicole Cozma/CNET)

Now you’re ready to start surfing the Web. If you want an easy start, read something that you’ve read before. This will make piecing together the words or phrases that you are not familiar with much easier. Each time you come across a word translated to the target language, you can click on it to hear it spoken (provided you have this enabled) and to show the translation in your native language. While some slang will get lost in translation, you can still use this extension to build a vocabulary base and learn how to say the words or phrases without too much of a hassle. Plus, turning the extension off can be done with just a few clicks if you need a break from learning.

An example of Language Immersion for Chrome.

(Credit:
Screenshot by Nicole Cozma/CNET)

You may also want to check out Babbel Mobile for Android if you’re looking for something to complement the Chrome extension when you’re away from your computer.

What tools do you use on the Web or your mobile device to start learning new languages? 


(Via Lifehacker)

Article source: http://howto.cnet.com/8301-11310_39-57428023-285/learn-a-new-language-while-web-surfing-in-chrome/?part=rss&subj=software&tag=title

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02 May 12 Chrome marketing is exceptional


Love makes the world go round, and, c`mon, who doesn’t love a good relationship story? But love stories aren’t easily told — one reason there are so few classics. But Google has done just that in 90 seconds. Take a moment to watch the embedded video over your morning coffee and bagel, donut or scone and tell me if you agree.

I don’t even recall where I saw the commercial — it was during some program I had recorded then watched on Monday evening. But as I fast-forwarded through the adverts, something about this one caused me to stop. Perhaps it’s subliminally related to the long length, seeing as most TV spots are no longer than 60 seconds. I actually rewound and watched a second time. Now that’s marketing.

Effective advertising is familiar, aspirational and, when about products, shows the benefits. Who can’t relate to unrequited love or desire to make a relationship work. Familiar and aspirational.

Google effectively does something else: Shows the benefits of multiple Google services, not just Chrome. There’s Gmail, in the message Mark sends Jen, and Google Docs in the plaintive request he makes to her. The commercial also shows YouTube, Picasa Web, Google Translate, Google Maps, Google Spreadsheets and Google Plus, which all tidily fit longstanding Chrome marketing tagline: “The web is what you make of it”.

The same can be said about relationships. Love is what you make of it.

This story has no ending. We don’t know if Jen and Mark meet for coffee, or get back together. That’s how it should be. In this case, closure would take a way from the story.

Article source: http://betanews.com/2012/05/02/chrome-marketing-is-exceptional/

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28 Feb 12 Google Chrome: Still a Strong All-Around Browser


PC World

Chrome’s minimalist design isn’t eye-catching, but its lean toolbar leaves more room for viewing Web pages. And what Chrome lacks in flashiness, it more than makes up for in performance. Google’s browser really shone in our JavaScript test, leaving its competitors in the dust. JavaScript is used in many popular websites–Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, Reddit, etc.–because it makes those sites more immediately responsive and those JavaScript heavy pages will perform better in Chrome. The browser also performed admirably in our speed test, fully loading an image-heavy page in just over five seconds.

Slideshow: 5 Alternative Browsers Built with Chrome

Along with impressive performance, Google’s browser has some other useful tricks up its sleeve. For starters, tabs are run as separate processes so that if one crashes, it doesn’t take the entire browser down with it. If your wanderings take you to a foreign language Web site, Chrome will recognize the language and offer to translate it for you in a matter of seconds. The translations, which are powered by Google Translate, are not always completely accurate–but they can be helpful in giving you a basic idea on what the page is about. Chrome is one of the most secure browsers on this list because it is sandboxed: The plug-ins Chrome uses are limited to accessing information only within the browser itself and cannot read information from other areas on your computer. Sandboxing allows Chrome to prevent malware that uses plug-in exploits from spreading through your PC.

Mobile users will be glad to know that if you own an Android phone or tablet running Android 4.0 (Ice Cream Sandwich), you can sync your Chrome bookmarks and web history to your mobile devices.

You can customize Chrome with web apps, themes, and extensions to fit your preferences. Chrome has a built-in web store that makes it easy to search for and install add-ons to the browser. Add-ons range from simple things, like an Evernote plug-in, all the way up to full games like Angry Birds or Bastion. And, unlike in Firefox, you don’t need to restart your browser every time you install a new extension or app.

Still, Chrome lacks an integrated RSS reader, so you’ll need to come up with your own solution if you subscribe to multiple RSS feeds.

Note: The Downloads button takes you to the vendor’s site, where you can download the latest version of the software.

Article source: http://www.cio.com/article/700923/Google_Chrome_Still_a_Strong_All_Around_Browser

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28 Feb 12 Google Chrome: Still a Strong All-Around Browser


Chrome’s minimalist design isn’t eye-catching, but its lean toolbar leaves more room for viewing Web pages. And what Chrome lacks in flashiness, it more than makes up for in performance. Google’s browser really shone in our JavaScript test, leaving its competitors in the dust. JavaScript is used in many popular websites–Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, Reddit, etc.–because it makes those sites more immediately responsive and those JavaScript heavy pages will perform better in Chrome. The browser also performed admirably in our speed test, fully loading an image-heavy page in just over five seconds.

Along with impressive performance, Google’s browser has some other useful tricks up its sleeve. For starters, tabs are run as separate processes so that if one crashes, it doesn’t take the entire browser down with it. If your wanderings take you to a foreign language Web site, Chrome will recognize the language and offer to translate it for you in a matter of seconds. The translations, which are powered by Google Translate, are not always completely accurate–but they can be helpful in giving you a basic idea on what the page is about. Chrome is one of the most secure browsers on this list because it is sandboxed: The plug-ins Chrome uses are limited to accessing information only within the browser itself and cannot read information from other areas on your computer. Sandboxing allows Chrome to prevent malware that uses plug-in exploits from spreading through your PC.

Mobile users will be glad to know that if you own an Android phone or tablet running Android 4.0 (Ice Cream Sandwich), you can sync your Chrome bookmarks and web history to your mobile devices.

You can customize Chrome with web apps, themes, and extensions to fit your preferences. Chrome has a built-in web store that makes it easy to search for and install add-ons to the browser. Add-ons range from simple things, like an Evernote plug-in, all the way up to full games like Angry Birds or Bastion. And, unlike in Firefox, you don’t need to restart your browser every time you install a new extension or app.

Still, Chrome lacks an integrated RSS reader, so you’ll need to come up with your own solution if you subscribe to multiple RSS feeds.

Note: The Downloads button takes you to the vendor’s site, where you can download the latest version of the software.

Article source: http://rss.feedsportal.com/c/559/f/7174/s/1cfa1a09/l/0L0Spcadvisor0O0Cnews0Cinternet0C3340A4240Cgoogle0Echrome0Estill0Estrong0Eall0Earound0Ebrowser0C0Dolo0Frss/story01.htm

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17 Nov 11 Microsoft Translator can translate any Web page on the fly


The Korea Times home page translated into English courtesy of Microsoft Translator.

The Korea Times home page translated into English courtesy of Microsoft Translator.

(Credit:
Screenshot by CNET)

Microsoft is trying to give Google a run for its money by offering a translation tool that can display any Web page in your native language.

Available as a bookmarklet for your browser, Microsoft Translator identifies the language used on a Web page and then re-displays the page with all text translated into your own language. You can select from a variety of languages, including English, French, German, Italian, Chinese, Japanese, Arabic, and Russian, among others.

To install Microsoft Translator from its Web page, first select your native language from the dropdown list. Then make sure your Favorites or Bookmarks toolbar is visible. Drag and drop the Translate link onto your toolbar, and you’ll see an icon called Translate appear.

From there, you can surf to any Web page not in your native language and simply click on the Translate button to convert it. As one example, I opened the Korea Times home page, clicked on the Translate button, and the page reopened with all the text in English.

Google Chrome includes its own built-in feature for translating Web pages. So the Microsoft Translator bookmarklet, which is simply composed of Javascript code, is designed to work in other browsers. I was able to run it successfully in the latest versions of Internet Explorer,
Firefox, and
Safari.

Though I’ve always relied on Google Translate in the past, Microsoft Translator is a handy alternative that can translate any page with just the click of a button.

Article source: http://news.cnet.com/8301-10805_3-57325984-75/microsoft-translator-can-translate-any-web-page-on-the-fly/

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