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16 Dec 12 Tablet features war: Google Nexus 10 vs Apple iPad 4 vs Nexus 7 vs iPad mini


The best way to compare different devices is to subject them to a series of tests. These tests are known as benchmarks which are used for determining the processing speed of the CPU, along with the navigation, and the performance of the graphics unit, GPU, for each of them. On Dec. 15, Itproportal released there comparison between the Nexus 10 and iPad 4, but now there is a recent video in which you will see interesting results in addressing the Nexus 7, Nexus 10, the iPad 4 and iPad Mini.

The first thing that should be noted is that these devices are facing very different price ranges. The Nexus 10 and iPad 4 prices can’t be compared with those of Nexus 7 and the iPad Mini, but still it’s interesting to see the speed of each because this can help you decide which one to buy.

The first test that appears in the video compares the processing speed of the CPU, the central processing unit. For this test there is a a clear winner: the Nexus 10 with a score of 2,761 points. The best thing about this issue is to compare it with its main rival, the iPad 4 that scores 1767 points. However, the most curious thing about this test is that the Nexus 7 reaches a score 1659 points with its Nvidia Tegra 3 processor, which is very close to the A6X iPad 4. The smallest of the Apple tablets, iPad Mini, falls far short with 758 points.

The second test determines how the CPU performs when browsing. For this test, the lower the score the better, and the iPad 4 wins with 839 points, followed by Nexus 10 with 1396, iPad Mini comes in at 1440 and Nexus 7 at 1690.

The third test, which has already been mentioned, is to see what the performance of the graphics processing unit, the GPU. This test is very important due to the popularity of graphics software applications such as games. This time, the iPad 4 again surpasses the rest, and by far, achieving a rate of 42 fps. It is followed by the Nexus 10 with 26 fps, iPad Mini with 24 fps and 14 fps for the Nexus 7. What happens in this test is that you have the screen-size as a factor, because the larger screens are supposedly penalized by size.

Although all the aforementioned tablets make a good choice for the holiday shopping season, the winner is the iPad 4. However, some may choose to go with cheaper options such as the Nexus 10, iPad mini or Nexus 7, which still offer a lot of power.

Article source: http://www.examiner.com/article/tablet-features-war-google-nexus-10-vs-apple-ipad-4-vs-nexus-7-vs-ipad-mini

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16 Jun 12 ARM Preps Mali GPU for Low-cost Android Tablets


ARM has developed a new, entry-level version of its Mali graphics processor that could help expand the market for low-cost Android tablets.

The GPU, called the Mali-450, is designed to help manufacturers build tablets that cost less than market-leading products like Apple’s iPad, which starts at $399, but provide good enough graphics performance to keep most users satisfied.

With touchscreens and high-definition video now fairly mainstream, the GPUs in tablets and smartphones account for a bigger share of the cost, and take up more space on the CPU on which they’re integrated.

Some manufacturers want cheaper parts, however, that offer reasonable graphics performance and occupy less die space. That’s where the 450 is targeted, said Ian Smythe, director of marketing in ARM’s Media Processing Division.

The new GPU is offered with up to eight cores and offers double the performance of its predecessor, the Mali-400, which has up to four cores, Smythe said. The Mali-450 is expected to appear in tablets in the first half of next year, he said.

Tablet makers are demanding a wide range of price and performance characteristics, so ARM is essentially bifurcating its GPU road map. It will offer the Mali-T600 family for higher-end devices, and the Mali-400 family, including the 450, for the low end.

Both can do gaming and video playback, but only the higher-end parts do “computational graphics,” Smythe said. That includes tasks like matching points on two images to do facial recognition, or stitching photographs together into a panorama.

ARM supplies the CPU designs used in most tablets and smartphones but it’s a relative newcomer to graphics. ARM entered the GPU market in 2006 when it bought Norwegian chip maker Falanx. It’s since built the team in Norway from 20 to about 80 people, Smythe said.

The GPUs in Apple’s iOS devices are based on a design by ARM’s U.K. rival Imagination Technologies. ARM does better in Android-based devices, supplying GPUs for about 20 percent of the smartphones and more than half of Android tablets, Smythe said.

ARM expects its licensees to sell about 100 million Mali GPUs this year, up from 48 million in 2011. “We’ve not quite caught up to our CPU colleagues who are shipping several billion units per year, but we’re making progress,” he said.

The best-known smartphone with an ARM GPU is the Samsung Galaxy SII, which uses the Mali-400. The Galaxy SIII, expected later this year, will use the higher-end T604. The Mali-T658, announced in November, should start appearing in phones and tablets in the first half of next year.

Further out, ARM is developing a high-end part code-named Skrymir, named after a giant in Norse mythology, which is due in 2014.

James Niccolai covers data centers and general technology news for IDG News Service. Follow James on Twitter at @jniccolai. James’s e-mail address is james_niccolai@idg.com

Article source: http://www.pcworld.com/article/257744/arm_preps_mali_gpu_for_lowcost_android_tablets.html

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07 Jun 12 Google Chrome Speeds Up Fancy CSS Filter Effects


Meet Fuzzy Brown Monkey, WT Monkey’s CSS Filter-laden cousin. Image: Screenshot/Webmonkey

CSS filters offer web developers some very powerful tools, powerful enough that it wouldn’t be too hard to create a web app capable of producing the kind of effect-laden photos popularized by Instagram. There’s just one problem: CSS Filters can be hard on the CPU.

Few things on the web get your PC’s fan spinning quite like CSS Filters — just give Google’s abstract painting demo page a try to see for yourself. Filters alone can send your fan spinning, but combine them with some CSS transitions or animations and you’ve got a recipe for battery draining excess.

That, combined with the fact that so far they only work in WebKit browsers, means right now you should use CSS Filters with caution.

Fortunately the roaring sound of your fan may soon be a thing of the past, at least for Google Chrome users. The Chromium blog reports that CSS Filters with GPU acceleration have landed in Chromium. It will be some time before the acceleration makes its way into the stable version of Google Chrome, but it is coming and that’s good news for the future of CSS Filters. Stephen White, a Software Engineer at the Chromium project, writes, “GPU acceleration of these filters brings their performance to the point where they can be used for animating elements in conjunction with CSS animations powered by -webkit-transition or even HTML5 video tags.”

It might be a while yet before Adobe launches a web-based version of its Premiere video editor, but expect other browsers to follow Chrome’s lead in supporting and speeding up CSS Filters.

It’s worth noting that, while the Instagram use case tends to get all the press, CSS Filters can do a lot more than just sepia toning images. In fact potential uses go far beyond just images or video. For example, CSS Filters could be used to blur backgrounds (or make them black and white) thus highlighting foreground content in online diagrams, charts or educational apps. CSS Filters could replace image sprites in navigation elements (less to download means faster page load times) and could also be used in conjunction with some animation to let users know that something on a page has changed.

For more info on CSS Filters, check out our earlier coverage and have a look at the HTML5Rocks site, which offers a nice overview of CSS Filters along with some example code.

Article source: http://www.webmonkey.com/2012/06/google-chrome-speeds-up-fancy-css-filter-effects/

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07 Jun 12 Google Chrome Speeds Up Fancy CSS Filter Effects


Meet Fuzzy Brown Monkey, WT Monkey’s CSS Filter-laden cousin. Image: Screenshot/Webmonkey

CSS filters offer web developers some very powerful tools, powerful enough that it wouldn’t be too hard to create a web app capable of producing the kind of effect-laden photos popularized by Instagram. There’s just one problem: CSS Filters can be hard on the CPU.

Few things on the web get your PC’s fan spinning quite like CSS Filters — just give Google’s abstract painting demo page a try to see for yourself. Filters alone can send your fan spinning, but combine them with some CSS transitions or animations and you’ve got a recipe for battery draining excess.

That, combined with the fact that so far they only work in WebKit browsers, means right now you should use CSS Filters with caution.

Fortunately the roaring sound of your fan may soon be a thing of the past, at least for Google Chrome users. The Chromium blog reports that CSS Filters with GPU acceleration have landed in Chromium. It will be some time before the acceleration makes its way into the stable version of Google Chrome, but it is coming and that’s good news for the future of CSS Filters. Stephen White, a Software Engineer at the Chromium project, writes, “GPU acceleration of these filters brings their performance to the point where they can be used for animating elements in conjunction with CSS animations powered by -webkit-transition or even HTML5 video tags.”

It might be a while yet before Adobe launches a web-based version of its Premiere video editor, but expect other browsers to follow Chrome’s lead in supporting and speeding up CSS Filters.

It’s worth noting that, while the Instagram use case tends to get all the press, CSS Filters can do a lot more than just sepia toning images. In fact potential uses go far beyond just images or video. For example, CSS Filters could be used to blur backgrounds (or make them black and white) thus highlighting foreground content in online diagrams, charts or educational apps. CSS Filters could replace image sprites in navigation elements (less to download means faster page load times) and could also be used in conjunction with some animation to let users know that something on a page has changed.

For more info on CSS Filters, check out our earlier coverage and have a look at the HTML5Rocks site, which offers a nice overview of CSS Filters along with some example code.

Article source: http://www.webmonkey.com/2012/06/google-chrome-speeds-up-fancy-css-filter-effects/

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29 May 12 How to Benchmark Your Android Device


How To Benchmark Your Android DeviceHow powerful is your phone? The question would have been nonsensical a decade ago, but as we increasingly depend on smartphones and tablets for some of our everyday computing needs, paying more attention to their performance makes sense. Until recently, choosing a smartphone was mainly a matter of aesthetic taste and mobile OS preference. Today, however, most of the devices available prioritize their display and use similar slate or candy-bar designs. As a result, performance has become a much more prominent differentiator.

Unfortunately, many mobile device owners are falling into the same trap that desktop PC consumers did years ago: They look at a list of specifications, see that a smartphone’s processor is clocked higher or has more cores, and assume that the device is faster than one that has what appear to be lower specs. It’s as though the MHz myth of the 1990s is back to confuse buyers in a totally new market segment.

The standard SoC (system on a chip) powering one of today’s mobile devices, however, is advancing at a rapid pace. A device produced just a few months ago may have the same numbers of processor cores and be clocked at the same frequency as a brand new device, but its underlying architecture may be far less efficient. In addition, the two devices’ SoCs may be outfitted with different GPUs, different amounts of memory, and different versions of the mobile OS. Because of these hidden variables, a vendor’s list of specs doesn’t reveal the whole story. As is true with desktop and laptop PCs, establishing the relative performance of mobile devices requires testing.

Getting Started

Since Android’s ecosystem is far more diverse than its mobile OS rivals’, we’ll focus on testing an Android-based device here. A handful of the tests that we’ll be covering here are cross-platform or run within a Web browser, meaning that they’ll work on iOS or Windows Phones-based devices–or even on desktops and notebooks–as well.

In evaluating the performance of an Android-based smartphone or tablet (or any other modern smartphone or tablet), it’s best to think of the device as a tiny PC. When benchmarking a full-fledged desktop PC, we don’t declare that system faster or slower than another after running a single test that stresses a particular component. Instead, we run a host of different tests to gauge how well various individual components work, then we weigh the results, and finally we reach a judgment about overall performance. The same approach is appropriate for Android-based devices.

A number of benchmark tools are available online and in the Google Play market for testing device performance. We’ll discuss a handful of free tools here, but many other benchmarking tools are available, too. Some (like Vellamo from Qualcomm) are offered by hardware manufacturers; others are created by students. We recommend using established tools whose makers have demonstrated a capacity and willingness to issue updates; ultimately, however, you should tailor your benchmark suite to your unique usage habits. If Web browsing is your highest priority, use apps that test browser and JavaScript performance. If you spend most of your time on mobile devices playing games, be sure to run graphics/GPU-centric tests.

Benchmarking Procedures

As with PC performance testing, there are some standard procedures to follow when running benchmark tests on Android-based devices. Apps or utilities running in the background on an Android-based device can sap system resources and interfere with the benchmarks, resulting in inconsistent or misleading scores that don’t accurately reflect real-world performance. To eliminate this variable, your best course is to shut the background apps down. Many Android-based devices include built-in Task Managers that will turn off unnecessary background apps, thereby freeing up memory and processor resources. Restart your device, wait a few minutes to ensure that everything has loaded completely and then use the task manager to kill unneeded apps and maximize available memory. Wait a few moments longer, and then begin a fresh test.

Processor, Memory, Storage, and Overall Performance Tests

Linpack for Android (available at Google Play store, free)

Linpack for Android; click for full-size image.Linpack for Android measures the CPU’s computation speed.Linpack for Android is a quick and easy-to-run benchmark that measures how fast an Android device can solve a dense N by N system of linear equations. Linpack is purely a CPU benchmark, and it can run in either single-thread mode (to assess the performance of a single CPU core) or multithread mode (to tax all of the available processing cores in a device). To start running the tests, you simply launch the app, choose the single-thread or multithread test, and then click the appropriate button in the main menu.

AnTuTu System Benchmark (available at Google Play store, free)

AnTuTu System Benchmark; click for full-size image.AnTuTu System Benchmark tests an Android device’s CPU, GPU, memory and storage performance.AnTuTu System Benchmark is an all-in-one benchmark designed to run tests on your device’s CPU, GPU, memory, and storage. The CPU benchmark evaluates both integer and floating-point performance. The GPU tests assess 2D and 3D performance. The memory test measures available memory bandwidth and latency. And the storage tests gauge the read and write speeds of a device’s flash memory. To run AnTuTu, swipe to the Test tab, select the tests that you’d like to run, and then click the Start button. When the tests are complete, the results will appear on the Scores tab.

CF-Bench (available at Google Play store, free)

CF-Bench; click for full-size image.CF-Bench tests both native and managed Java code performance.CF-Bench is another all-in-one benchmark, created by respected Android developer Chainfire (hence the CF). Chainfire originally built the tool for his own use, but a couple of years ago he released it to the public. CF-Bench is a CPU, memory, and storage benchmark tool that can exploit the additional computing resources of multicore SoCs; and it produces consistent, repeatable scores, while testing both native and managed Java code performance. To run CF-Bench, launch the app and click the Full benchmark button. Results will appear at the bottom of the screen, along with a handy comparison to other popular devices.

Next: GPU/graphics, network, and browser performance

Article source: http://www.pcworld.com/article/255977/how_to_benchmark_your_android_device.html

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24 May 12 Pwnium Chrome hackers exploited 16 zero-day vulnerabilities


Google Chrome hackers used a total of 16 zero-day vulnerabilities to crack the browser at the inaugural “Pwnium” hacking contest and win $120,000.

The number of bugs the two researchers used – six in one case, “roughly” 10 in the other – was dramatically more than the average attack. The Stuxnet worm of 2010, called “groundbreaking” by some analysts, used just four bugs, only three of them previously-unknown “zero-day” vulnerabilities.

Google detailed only the half-dozen deployed by the researcher known as “Pinkie Pie” in a post to the Chromium blog yesterday. Details of the 10 used by Sergey Glazunov will not be disclosed until they are patched in other programs they afflict, said Jorge Lucangeli Obes and Justin Schuh, two Chrome security engineers.

Pinkie Pie and Glazunov were the only prize winners at Pwnium, the March contest Google created after it withdrew from the long-running “Pwn2Own” hacking challenge. Google had pledged to pay up to $1 million, but ended up handing out just $120,000 – $60,000 to each of the men.

In previous P2n2Own contests, Chrome had escaped not only unscathed, but also untested by top-flight security researchers.

Pinkie Pie strung together six vulnerabilities on March 9 to successfully break out of the Chrome “sandbox,” an anti-exploit technology that isolates the browser from the rest of the system.

The vulnerabilities let him exploit Chrome’s pre-rendering – where the browser loads potential pages before a user views them – access the GPU (graphics processor unit) command buffers, write eight bytes of code to a predictable memory address, execute additional code in the GPU and escape the browser’s sandbox.

At the time of Pwnium, one Google program manager called Pinkie Pie’s exploits “works of art.”

Google patched Pinkie Pie’s bugs within 24 hours of his demonstration. Since then, the company has revealed technical details in its Chromium bug database of five of the six vulnerabilities.

Glazunov’s exploits relied on approximately 10 vulnerabilities – they, too, were patched within 24 hours – but Google is keeping information on those secret for now.

“While these issues are already fixed in Chrome, some of them impact a much broader array of products from a range of companies,” said Obes and Schuh. “We won’t be posting that part until we’re comfortable that all affected products have had an adequate time to push fixes to their users.”

Chrome, currently at version 19, had an estimated 18.9% of the browser usage market in April, according to metrics firm Net Applications. Rival StatCounter, however, pegged Chrome’s share for the month at 31.2%.

Article source: http://rss.feedsportal.com/c/270/f/470440/s/1fa9a773/l/0Lnews0Btechworld0N0Csecurity0C33597220Cpwnium0Echrome0Ehackers0Eexploited0E160Ezero0Eday0Evulnerabilities0C0Dolo0Frss/story01.htm

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23 May 12 Pwnium hacking contest winners exploited 16 Chrome zero-days


Computerworld -

Google yesterday revealed that the two researchers who cracked Chrome in March at the company’s inaugural “Pwnium” hacking contest used a total of 16 zero-day vulnerabilities to win $60,000 each.

The number of bugs each researcher used — six in one case, “roughly” 10 in the other — was dramatically more than the average attack. The Stuxnet worm of 2010, called “groundbreaking” by some analysts, used just four bugs, only three of them previously-unknown “zero-day” vulnerabilities.

Google detailed only the half-dozen deployed by the researcher known as “Pinkie Pie” in a post to the Chromium blog yesterday. Details of the 10 used by Sergey Glazunov will not be disclosed until they are patched in other programs they afflict, said Jorge Lucangeli Obes and Justin Schuh, two Chrome security engineers, in the blog.

Pinkie Pie and Glazunov were the only prize winners at Pwnium, the March contest Google created after it withdrew from the long-running “Pwn2Own” hacking challenge. Google had pledged to pay up to $1 million, but ended up handing out just $120,000 — $60,000 to each of the men.

In previous P2n2Own contests, Chrome had escaped not only unscathed, but also untested by top-flight security researchers.

Pinkie Pie strung together six vulnerabilities on March 9 to successfully break out of the Chrome “sandbox,” an anti-exploit technology that isolates the browser from the rest of the system.

The vulnerabilities let him exploit Chrome’s pre-rendering — where the browser loads potential pages before a user views them — access the GPU (graphics processor unit) command buffers, write eight bytes of code to a predictable memory address, execute additional code in the GPU and escape the browser’s sandbox.

At the time of Pwnium, one Google program manager called Pinkie Pie’s exploits “works of art.”

Google patched Pinkie Pie’s bugs within 24 hours of his demonstration. Since then, the company has revealed technical details in its Chromium bug database of five of the six vulnerabilities.

Glazunov’s exploits relied on approximately 10 vulnerabilities — they, too, were patched within 24 hours — but Google is keeping information on those secret for now.

“While these issues are already fixed in Chrome, some of them impact a much broader array of products from a range of companies,” said Obes and Schuh. “We won’t be posting that part until we’re comfortable that all affected products have had an adequate time to push fixes to their users.”

Chrome, currently at version 19, had an estimated 18.9% of the browser usage market in April, according to metrics firm Net Applications. Rival StatCounter, however, pegged Chrome’s share for the month at 31.2%.

covers Microsoft, security issues, Apple, Web browsers and general technology breaking news for Computerworld. Follow Gregg on Twitter at Twitter @gkeizer, on Google+ or subscribe to Gregg’s RSS feed Keizer RSS. His email address is gkeizer@computerworld.com.

See more by Gregg Keizer on Computerworld.com.

Read more about Malware and Vulnerabilities in Computerworld’s Malware and Vulnerabilities Topic Center.

Article source: http://www.computerworld.com/s/article/9227404/Pwnium_hacking_contest_winners_exploited_16_Chrome_zero_days?source=rss_keyword_edpicks

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10 Apr 12 Google upgrades Android emulator with better performance and hardware support


Google has upgraded its Android emulator for developers with hardware acceleration and support for a broader range of inputs, the company announced today on the Android Developers Blog.

“The Android emulator is a key tool for Android developers in building and testing their apps,” Android team members Xavier Ducrohet and Reto Meier wrote on the blog. “As the power and diversity of Android devices has grown quickly, it’s been hard for the emulator keep pace. Today we’re thrilled to announce several significant improvements to the emulator, including a dramatic performance upgrade and support for a broader range of hardware features, notably sensors and multi-finger input.”

One of the biggest improvements is built-in GPU support. Android devices are increasingly relying on the graphics chip to boost performance, so now the emulator will be able to take advantage of hardware acceleration to create a more realistic simulation. As an added bonus, OpenGL apps can now run inside the emulator.

Another improvement is new hardware support to better test apps. Developers can tether an Android device and a test an app in the emulator using inputs on the tethered device.

There’s also added CPU performance in the emulator. Ducrohet and Reto Meier write:

We’ve also improved the CPU performance of the Android emulator. Hardware floating point operation has been available for system images since Ice Cream Sandwich (Android 4.0), allowing CPU operations to be emulated roughly twice as quickly. Last week’s r17 developer tools release included x86 system images and host drivers (available through the SDK Manager), allowing the emulator to access the host CPU natively and offer significantly faster execution. We’re working on providing emulator support for more hardware features including Bluetooth and NFC.

Check out the videos below to see the new emulator in action:

Article source: http://venturebeat.com/2012/04/09/google-android-emulator/

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10 Apr 12 Google Chrome 18 Fixes Flash and Canvas2D


Among the “big fix” items in the new Chrome 18.0.1025.151 release is a Flash player security update, that only Google Chrome is receiving. Google Chrome is the only browser that directly integrates Adobe Flash.

“The Chrome update includes fixes to two memory corruption vulnerabilities that were specific to Adobe Flash Player integrated with Google Chrome,” Wiebke Lips, Senior Manager of Corporate Communications at Adobe, told eSecurityPlanet. “In other words, these vulnerabilities do not impact Flash Player for any other browser or platform.”

The Flash player flaws were additional vulnerabilities that were initially fixed in an Adobe Flash Player 11.2.202.228 update issued at the end of March. That update ushered in silent updates for Windows users of Flash Player on Firefox and Internet Explorer. Google’s Chrome browser has provided silent updates for the integrated browser and flash solution since its initial release.

While security is always a top concern in Google Chrome updates, so too are bug fixes. In Chrome 18.0.1025.151, Google is fixing a Canvas 2D drawing bug related to GPU acceleration. Canvas 2D is an HTML5 element that enables interactive content to run in a browser. As part of the initial Chrome 18 release, Google debuted GPU hardware based acceleration for Canvas 2D in an effort to enable more complex and detailed HTML5 games on Chrome.

Read the full story at eSecurityPlanet:
Google Patches Chrome 18 for Flash Flaws

Sean Michael Kerner is a senior editor at InternetNews.com, the news service of the IT Business Edge Network, the network for technology professionals Follow him on Twitter @TechJournalist.

Article source: http://www.internetnews.com/security/google-chrome-18-fixes-flash-and-canvas2d.html

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05 Apr 12 Google Chrome Updates Stable And Beta Channels


Google Chrome Updates Stable And Beta Channels

Google is constantly busy hammering away at new updates to Chrome. The hope is to obviously make it the safest and fastest browser on the Web. While Chrome has multiple channels it updates through, the stable and beta channels receive the permanent updates that define the platform. Both channels received a small update today that provides a number of fixes.

Detailing the updates on the Google Chrome Releases page, the team has notified users that an update has been rolled out to the stable and betat channels in Chrome for Windows, Mac, Linux and Chrome Frame. The updates made today fix a variety of small bugs related to HTML5 Canvas, CSS, etc. The fixes are:

Black screen on Hybrid Graphics system with GPU accelerated compositing enabled
CSS not applied to element
Regression rendering a div with background gradient and borders
Canvas 2D line drawing bug with GPU acceleration
Multiple crashes
Pop-up dialog is at wrong position
HTML Canvas patterns are broken if you change the transformation matrix
SSL interstitial error “proceed anyway” / “back to safety” buttons don’t work

Google also found an issue with the Mac version of Chrome. It seems that HTML5 audio doesn’t work on some Mac computers. A fix for that will probably be coming sooner than later.

The new release also includes a new version of Flash Player. Adobe issued a major security fix last week for Flash Player, but this release seems to be unrelated. The Adobe Web site says that the update “addresses memory corruption vulnerabilities in the Chrome Interface.”

As per tradition, Google hands out cash rewards for security loopholes pointed out by members of the community. In all, Google handed out $6,000 in cash to three developers. One person in particular going by the screen name miaubiz took home $4,500 for pointing out five security flaws.

It’s these kind of incentives that keeps Chrome on top of its game as being one of the most secure browsers on the Web. For full details on this release and more, check out the revision log.

Article source: http://www.webpronews.com/google-chrome-updates-stable-and-beta-channels-2012-04

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