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04 Apr 12 Google Chrome 18 Fixes Flaws, Acclerates HTML5 Canvas


Google is now taking Canvas2D a step further by enabling the new Chrome 18 web browser to leverage hardware-based GPU acceleration.

“We’ve enabled GPU-accelerated Canvas2D on capable Windows and Mac computers, which should make web applications like games perform even better than a pure software implementation,” Google explained on the Chromium blog.

Hardware acceleration for Canvas is something that other HTML5-compliant vendors could benefit from as well. As a web standard Canvas is also being leveraged by Mozilla for their BrowserQuest online game, which was released earlier this week. BrowserQuest is a full in-browser massively multi-player online game.

Security Fixes

Chrome 18 also provides at least 9 security fixes, and three of the issues are rated as high impact. There are no critical fixes for the Chrome 18 updates.

One of the high impact flaws is a Use-After-Free memory issue with the SVG graphics library. The other high impact flaws include a memory corruption and a type sanitizer vulnerability.

All told Google is paying security researchers $4,000 for flaws fixed in the stable release of Chrome 18. That said, Google noted in its release notes that it had paid out an additional $8,000 in awards for bugs that were reported and fixed before Chrome 18 hit the stable release channel.

Read the full story at Datamation:
Google Chrome 18 Accelerates Canvas

Sean Michael Kerner is a senior editor at InternetNews.com, the news service of the IT Business Edge Network, the network for technology professionals Follow him on Twitter @TechJournalist.

Article source: http://www.internetnews.com/security/google-chrome-18-fixes-flaws-acclerates-html5-canvas.html

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03 Apr 12 Google Chrome 18 Fixes Flaws, Acclerates HTML5 Canvas


Google is now taking Canvas2D a step further by enabling the new Chrome 18 web browser to leverage hardware-based GPU acceleration.

“We’ve enabled GPU-accelerated Canvas2D on capable Windows and Mac computers, which should make web applications like games perform even better than a pure software implementation,” Google explained on the Chromium blog.

Hardware acceleration for Canvas is something that other HTML5-compliant vendors could benefit from as well. As a web standard Canvas is also being leveraged by Mozilla for their BrowserQuest online game, which was released earlier this week. BrowserQuest is a full in-browser massively multi-player online game.

Security Fixes

Chrome 18 also provides at least 9 security fixes, and three of the issues are rated as high impact. There are no critical fixes for the Chrome 18 updates.

One of the high impact flaws is a Use-After-Free memory issue with the SVG graphics library. The other high impact flaws include a memory corruption and a type sanitizer vulnerability.

All told Google is paying security researchers $4,000 for flaws fixed in the stable release of Chrome 18. That said, Google noted in its release notes that it had paid out an additional $8,000 in awards for bugs that were reported and fixed before Chrome 18 hit the stable release channel.

Read the full story at Datamation:
Google Chrome 18 Accelerates Canvas

Sean Michael Kerner is a senior editor at InternetNews.com, the news service of the IT Business Edge Network, the network for technology professionals Follow him on Twitter @TechJournalist.

Article source: http://www.internetnews.com/security/google-chrome-18-fixes-flaws-acclerates-html5-canvas.html

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31 Mar 12 Google Promises "Moar Better Graphics" With GPU-Driven Chrome 18




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17 comment(s) – last by Reclaimer77.. on Mar 30 at 7:51 PM


Chrome is emerging as third major player in the browser market

At its peak in 2003, Microsoft Corp. (MSFT) controlled over 94 percent of the browser market.  Inspired to “free” the world’s internet access from the control of one single company, the Mozilla Foundation launched the open source browser Firefox in 2004, a browser which would offer Microsoft its first serious challenge since Netscape Navigator.  And in 2008, Google Inc. (GOOG), makers of the world’s most popular search engine, released a second serious open source – “Chrome”.

Today Chrome has an estimated 18.9 percent of the market [source] and is the world’s fastest growing browser (Firefox has 20.9 percent, Microsoft’s Internet Explorer owns 52.8 percent).

Google this week announced the release of the 18th edition of its popular browser.  Available on every major personal computer platform — Windows, Linux, and even Macs – the new version brings fancier graphics and a number of bug fixes.

Google continues to pay top dollar to security researchers for finding flaws in its browser.  It awarded miaubiz, Chamal de Silva, Atte Kettunen of OUSPG, Aki Helin of OUSPG and Arthur Gerkis personal thanks and a bounty of $8,000 USD for helping it fix its flaws.

Serious flaws in OpenType and Skia handling were fixed.  Five “medium” priority handling errors were also patched.

Bugfixes aside, the new release brings GPU acceleration to Canvas2D, a key emerging web standard, which allows for beautiful 2D animations without proprietary standards.  The new releases also adds TransGaming’s SwiftShader engine, which allows 3D web graphics based on the WebGL standard.

SwiftShader
SwiftShader is is seen here running 3D Mark ’03.  The engine allows for 3D graphics on the web, and has been added exclusively to Google’s popular Chrome browser.
[Image Source: TransGaming]


For those looking to get their 3D web gaming on, Google does caution, “Keep in mind that a software-backed WebGL implementation is never going to perform as well as one running on a real GPU, but now more users will have access to basic 3D content on the web.”

Sounds like GPU acceleration of WebGL is still a work in progress.

The upgrade also includes a new version of Adobe Systems Inc.’s (ADBE) Flash multimedia platform, which contains bug fixes and performance upgrades of its own.

Sources: Google [1], [2], TransGaming

Article source: http://www.dailytech.com/Google+Promises+Moar+Better+Graphics+With+GPUDriven+Chrome+18/article24335.htm

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30 Mar 12 Chrome 18 Gets Graphics Boost, Fixes Pwn2Own Glitches


Google this week released the latest stable version of its browser, Chrome 18, which adds a graphics boost and fixes some security issues identified by Pwn2Own contest hackers.

In a blog post, Google promised improvements to Canvas2D’s speed and WebGL’s reach.

“We’ve enabled GPU-accelerated Canvas2D on capable Windows and Mac computers, which should make Web applications like games perform even better than a pure software implementation,” wrote Google’s John Bauman and Brian Salomon.

GPU-accelerated Canvas2D was previously only available in the beta channel so developers had a chance to check it out, they said. “We’re continuing to make improvements and tweaks to our Canvas2D implementation, so please file a bug in our public issue tracker if you encounter problems.”

WebGL, meanwhile, brings hardware-accelerated 3D graphics to the browser and was first added to the stable version of Chrome in February 2011. With Chrome 18, Google has enabled SwiftShader, a software rasterizer from TransGaming that kicks in for users who cannot run content on the GPU.

“Keep in mind that a software-backed WebGL implementation is never going to perform as well as one running on a real GPU, but now more users will have access to basic 3D content on the web,” Bauman and Salomon wrote.

This week’s release also fixes nine security issues, three of which were designated as high priority. Google handed out $4,000 in bug bounties this time around, as well as an additional $8,000 for “awesomeness” to those who worked with Google to prevent certain glitches from reaching the stable channel.

In early March, Chrome was the first to fall in the Pwn2Own hacking competition. Google said this week that some of the security updates in Chrome 18 “represent the start of hardening measures based on study of the exploits submitted to the Pwnium competition.”

Chrome 17 was released in early February and added faster page loading and more download security.

For more, see PCMag’s full review of Google Chrome and the slideshow below.

For more from Chloe, follow her on Twitter @ChloeAlbanesius.


View Slideshow
See all (24) slides


Google Chrome 17


Malware Download Protection


Add New User


Syncing Choices


 

For the top stories in tech, follow us on Twitter at @PCMag.

Article source: http://www.pcmag.com/article2/0,2817,2402402,00.asp

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30 Mar 12 Chrome 18 adds GPU-acceleration and SwiftShader for better gaming performance


Those of you running an older computer or one with less-than-stellar integrated graphics (read: Intel) take heed: Chrome 18 has gone stable, bringing SwiftShader’s awesome software rendering muscle to Google’s web browser. The gains are impressive, too, with the Transgaming tech capable of yielding 3Dmark scores that are on par with an AMD Radeon 5550.

That’s not to say your Atom-powered, first-generation Chromebook is going to run Bastion as smoothly as your desktop computer, but it’s probably going to run a whole lot better following this update.

Chrome 18 has also introduced GPU-accelerated Canvas 2D rendering (on Windows and Mac for now — an ETA for Linux wasn’t mentioned), which is another reason that the integration of SwiftShader is important. Google wants to ensure that all Chrome users get to experience every aspect of its speed, from URL completion and pre-rendering to all the GPU-acceleration features it now offers.

It’s all down to Google’s desire to push Chrome as a platform. Yes, Google is a supporter of the web as a platform and web apps as the wave of the future, but they’re also doing everything they can to entice developers into building Chrome-centric apps and games.

By dangling extras like Native Client and thereby offering performance that plain vanilla web apps — and other browsers — just can’t match right now, Google hopes developers will favor Chrome. That’s becoming increasingly likely as Chrome’s user base swells. Just recently it surpassed Internet Explorer as the most-used browser worldwide…even if it was only for a single Sunday.

More at the Chromium Blog


Article source: http://www.geek.com/articles/news/chrome-18-adds-gpu-acceleration-and-swiftshader-for-better-gaming-performance-20120329/

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30 Mar 12 Chrome 18 arrives with hardware-accelerated Canvas


Version 18 of the Chrome Web browser has rolled out to the stable channel. The new version includes hardware-accelerated rendering for the HTML5 Canvas element on Windows and Mac OS X.

As we have recently reported, standards-based Web technologies provide an increasingly capable platform for game development. The major browser vendors are working to further increase the viability of open standards for browser-based gaming. Offloading Canvas rendering to the GPU helps reduce the CPU load of 2D games and improves performance. The feature has been available in Chrome for quite some time, but it’s now finally enabled by default.

Hardware-accelerated Canvas rendering is only available on systems with compatible graphics hardware. You can get some information about what features in Chrome have hardware acceleration enabled on your system by navigating to the “chrome://gpu” URL.

Another key open standard that is relevant for gaming is WebGL, which provides JavaScript APIs for rendering 3D content in the Canvas element. In Chrome 18, Google has introduced a software-based backend for WebGL based on TransGaming’s SwiftShader. This will make it possible for users to view WebGL content on computers that don’t have compatible graphics hardware. Although it will open up WebGL content to more users, the software-based renderer doesn’t offer comparable performance to native hardware-accelerated WebGL.

In addition to these improvements, the Chrome developers have also been working to make various security improvements based on vulnerabilities that were exposed during the Pwnium competition. For more details about the Chrome 18 release, you can refer to the official release announcement. The software is available for download from Google’s website.

Article source: http://arstechnica.com/business/news/2012/03/chrome-18-arrives-with-hardware-accelerated-canvas.ars?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=rss

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30 Mar 12 Chrome 18 Arrives with Nine Security Fixes


Google on Wednesday released Chrome 18 to its Stable channel complete with several new features and fixes for nine security vulnerabilities.

Officially named version18.0.1025.142, the new version of Google’s open source browser offers improved graphics performance on both new and older hardware as well as closing numerous security holes, including three high-severity ones.

“Today’s web brings beautiful, rich experiences right into your browser,” wrote Vangelis Kokkevis, Google’s “Chrome Graphics Olympian,” in a blog post on Wednesday announcing the new release. “With Chrome’s most recent Stable channel release, we’ve sped up graphics and drawing performance for users on capable hardware, and enabled fancier 3D content for other users on older computers.”

An Extra $8,000 Awarded

Included among the security fixes incorporated into the stable version of Chrome 18 are measures being taken to address the exploits submitted in the recent Pwnium competition, Google blogger Karen Grunberg noted in a separate post.

Teenage researcher “PinkiePie” is among those credited for uncovering the vulnerabilities, which included five medium-severity and one low-severity bug along with the three high-severity problems.

Specifics about the individual vulnerabilities are being withheld until the majority of users are updated, but in the meantime Google has awarded an extra $8,000 to researchers involved during the development cycle to help make sure the bugs didn’t make it through to the stable version, Grunberg said.

Also included in the stable Chrome 18 is the new Adobe Flash Player 11.2, she added.

A New Software Rasterizer

As for the graphics improvements included in Chrome 18, two key changes have been added to enable them, as we already saw back in February, when the software’s beta version was released.

First, there’s the fact that the browser has enabled GPU-accelerated Canvas2D on capable Windows and Mac computers, “which should make Web applications like games perform even better than a pure software implementation,” wrote developers John Bauman and Brian Salomon, in another blog post.

Then, too, there’s TransGaming’s SwiftShader, a software rasterizer that gives users with older hardware configurations access to basic 3D content on the Web.

Chrome 18 is now available as a free download for Windows, Linux, and Mac OS X, but users already running Chrome can upgrade using the browser’s automatic update function.

Article source: http://www.pcworld.com/businesscenter/article/252841/chrome_18_arrives_with_nine_security_fixes.html

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29 Mar 12 Chrome 18 Arrives with Nine Security Fixes


Google on Wednesday released Chrome 18 to its Stable channel complete with several new features and fixes for nine security vulnerabilities.

Officially named version18.0.1025.142, the new version of Google’s open source browser offers improved graphics performance on both new and older hardware as well as closing numerous security holes, including three high-severity ones.

“Today’s web brings beautiful, rich experiences right into your browser,” wrote Vangelis Kokkevis, Google’s “Chrome Graphics Olympian,” in a blog post on Wednesday announcing the new release. “With Chrome’s most recent Stable channel release, we’ve sped up graphics and drawing performance for users on capable hardware, and enabled fancier 3D content for other users on older computers.”

An Extra $8,000 Awarded

Included among the security fixes incorporated into the stable version of Chrome 18 are measures being taken to address the exploits submitted in the recent Pwnium competition, Google blogger Karen Grunberg noted in a separate post.

Teenage researcher “PinkiePie” is among those credited for uncovering the vulnerabilities, which included five medium-severity and one low-severity bug along with the three high-severity problems.

Specifics about the individual vulnerabilities are being withheld until the majority of users are updated, but in the meantime Google has awarded an extra $8,000 to researchers involved during the development cycle to help make sure the bugs didn’t make it through to the stable version, Grunberg said.

Also included in the stable Chrome 18 is the new Adobe Flash Player 11.2, she added.

A New Software Rasterizer

As for the graphics improvements included in Chrome 18, two key changes have been added to enable them, as we already saw back in February, when the software’s beta version was released.

First, there’s the fact that the browser has enabled GPU-accelerated Canvas2D on capable Windows and Mac computers, “which should make Web applications like games perform even better than a pure software implementation,” wrote developers John Bauman and Brian Salomon, in another blog post.

Then, too, there’s TransGaming’s SwiftShader, a software rasterizer that gives users with older hardware configurations access to basic 3D content on the Web.

Chrome 18 is now available as a free download for Windows, Linux, and Mac OS X, but users already running Chrome can upgrade using the browser’s automatic update function.

Article source: http://www.pcworld.com/businesscenter/article/252841/chrome_18_arrives_with_nine_security_fixes.html

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29 Mar 12 How to Benchmark Your Browser for HTML 5


How to Benchmark Your Browser for HTML 5Contemporary browsers are much more than just a window into the World Wide Web: Browser developers have turned the software into sophisticated application platforms in their own right. But browsers are not the same as hardware platforms–rather, they function as virtual environments accessible from a variety of platforms. For example, you can have Google’s Chrome browser on Windows, Mac OS, Linux, and Android devices.

The current set of Web browsers–Chrome, Firefox, Opera, Internet Explorer, and Safari–support assorted standards, including HTML 5, the latest version of HyperText Markup Language. HTML 5 is an ambitious extension of HTML, incorporating an array of features. The standard is still in flux, however, and the World Wide Web Consortium hasn’t finalized it yet. Some of the important new features in HTML 5 include canvas rendering, tighter integration of SVG (scalable vector graphics), and video and audio tags. These new elements are specifically designed to make it easier for Web developers to present and manage multimedia content. What HTML 5 currently doesn’t have is a built-in standard way to handle 3D graphics.

Whenever new, competing platforms emerge, it’s natural to try to compare their performance. After all, users want the most robust and most responsive environment for running their applications, whether those apps are for productivity, entertainment, or education. The problem is that Web applications themselves are in a state of flux, as is the state of benchmarking Web browsers.

What I’m going to cover in this article won’t tell you what the fastest browser is, nor what the best hardware might be for those browsers–that will come later. Today, I’ll dive into the complexities of benchmarking browsers, look at a few examples of benchmarks, and help you understand where performance testing currently stands when it comes to these new virtual platforms. By the end of this article, you will know how to benchmark and optimize your browser for HTML 5 applications.

What Are We Benchmarking?

Performance testing can sometimes be a bit of a black art, and with Web browsers the situation is even worse. Part of the problem is the relative immaturity of the platform–HTML 5 is still an emerging standard, after all. As a result, applications use only some pieces of the standard, if any. The other main problem is how existing benchmarks work: For the most part, they test somewhat different things, so you need to run several to get a clear idea of how well your browser will perform. For example, Futuremark’s Peacekeeper browser benchmark bills itself as mainly a JavaScript benchmark, but it makes use of HTML 5 canvas and video in its test.

In addition, the same browser may behave differently on different operating systems. The Mac OS incarnation of Apple’s Safari, for instance, runs better than its Windows kin does (not a big surprise).

As you begin to consider benchmarking, you need to ask yourself a few key questions. Which platform? Is your intent to benchmark browser performance, or hardware? Are you running on a desktop system, a laptop, a tablet, or a phone? All of these questions will help to determine the type of benchmarks you’ll want to run. I’ll be focusing on desktop browser performance here, but bear in mind that performance in, say, Chrome running on an Android tablet with a power-efficient GPU and ARM processor will be different than on a desktop system with a discrete GPU.

What is cool is that we now have a way of benchmarking across multiple hardware platforms, albeit with some caution. Since Chrome and Firefox run across many different operating systems, you can use them to test performance across those platforms. Of course, the way code is compiled and built will differ, and some custom code is necessary for a browser to run on a particular OS or hardware platform, which can affect performance. But it’s a good first step.

I’ll be taking a look at several scenarios, all using desktop browsers. First, I’ll examine performance across three browsers running under the Windows 8 Consumer Preview. I chose Windows 8 mostly because I was curious about the claimed performance increases of Internet Explorer 10 over IE 9.

How to Benchmark Your Browser for HTML 5Access HTML 5 test pages such as Asteroids to benchmark how well your browser can handle HTML 5.

In addition to checking out browsers, I also swapped graphics cards. For the first run, I used an AMD Radeon HD 6970; for the second, an Nvidia GTX 570. Both were reference boards, so they ran at default clock speeds.

Finally, just for comparison, I tried the same benchmarks on a fairly typical Windows 7 laptop.

Next Page: A Look at the Benchmarks

Article source: http://www.pcworld.com/article/252729/how_to_benchmark_your_browser_for_html_5.html

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29 Mar 12 Chrome 18 arrives, with GPU acceleration — get it now!


Google Chrome 18 has just landed as a stable release, and while it has the usual mix of minor tweaks and security fixes, the real news is its graphics improvements.

Part of this comes from the browser enabling GPU-accelerated rendering for 2D Canvas content, which could bring a real performance boost to canvas-based animations and games. (Or that’s the plan, anyway. If you have any issues, or just want to find out what’s happening on your system, then entering chrome://gpu will give you more information on the browser’s current GPU acceleration usage.)

And if you’re running Chrome on an older system then you’ve probably already noticed that it can’t display rich 3D content via technologies such as WebGL. But that all changes with Chrome 18, thanks to the inclusion of SwiftShader, a software rasterizer which automatically activates for users who can’t run content on the GPU.

While this kind of software solution is never going to compete with a real GPU, SwiftShader is fast enough to be genuinely useful. As the authors point out, the system can be 100 times faster than basic implementations, like Microsoft’s Direct3D Reference Rasterizer, and is even quicker than some integrated graphics hardware. So although you’re not going to want to play Call of Duty with it, for 3D web content the technology makes a great deal of sense.

Other changes are less newsworthy, though still important, as they include a lengthy list of bug fixes and resolutions for some notable security issues. A post on the Google Chrome Releases blog tells you more, if you’re interested, or you can simply download Google Chrome 18 now.

Article source: http://betanews.com/2012/03/28/chrome-18-arrives-with-gpu-acceleration-get-it-now/

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