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21 Dec 12 Anomaly Korea now available from Google Play for $2.99


Anomaly Korea, the sequel to the award-winning Anomaly Warzone Earth, is now available for download via Google Play. The game about an all-out invasion of the earth by a race of giant alien machines comes just in time for (supposed) end of the world.

Anomaly Korea features 12 new missions, new powerups and tactical units, and plenty more all polished off with HD graphics that will look simply stunning on your Android device. We previewed Anomaly Korea and have been excited for the full version of the game ever since.

The tower offense title is available for a special launch price of $2.99 if you act now. Head on over to Google Play and grab it before the machines win and doom the earth and its inhabitants forever.

“Anomaly Korea” Lands on App Store and Google Play

Defend Korea against invading aliens in 12 all-new tower offense missions

11 bit studios announced today that “Anomaly Korea,” the sequel to the critically acclaimed “Anomaly Warzone Earth,” is now available for iOS and Android devices via the iTunes App Store and Google Play. A partnership of 11 bit studios and Chillingo published the iOS version, while 11 bit published the Android version.

In “Anomaly Korea”, players take command of a squad of Earth’s defenders and use the tactical touch gameplay to run them through a gauntlet of deadly alien foes. While new weapons and new gameplay modes provide new ways to combat the alien scum, there are also new enemies and new challenges lying in wait for veteran and new commanders.

“Anomaly Korea” features:

  • A sequel to the award-winning “Anomaly Warzone Earth”
  • Think tactically across 12 new missions
  • Deploy new player powers and units to take on new enemies
  • Put your skills to the test in ‘Art of War’ mode
  • Cutting-edge visuals and a stunning soundtrack with full voice acting
  • Graphics optimized for today’s most powerful Android and iOS devices

Article source: http://phandroid.com/2012/12/21/anomaly-korea-now-available-from-google-play-for-2-99/

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19 Dec 12 Samsung unveils Galaxy Grand smartphone with a 5-inch screen


Samsung has added another 5-inch screen phone to its Galaxy line-up, introducing a new device with a mid-range price.

The South Korean company announced the Galaxy Grand early Tuesday morning. The phone is similar to the Samsung Galaxy Note II, the company’s 5.5-inch-screen phone that is available from most U.S. carriers for $300 on a new contract.

Samsung declined to say how the device would be priced, but mid-range smartphones typically sell for about $100 to $150 with a contract.

Although the Galaxy Grand has a large display, many of its specifications fall short compared with the Galaxy Note II, as one would expect with a mid-range phone.

PHOTOS: Top 10 tech products of 2012

For starters, the phone’s WVGA display isn’t HD, with just an 800-by-480-pixel resolution. The Galaxy Grand’s 1.2 GHz dual-core processor is also less powerful than the Galaxy Note II’s, and the Galaxy Grand doesn’t come with the S Pen stylus.

The phone, however, does run on Android 4.1 Jelly Bean, and it features an 8-megapixel rear camera. Additionally, the Galaxy Grand has 8 GB of storage, which can be expanded with a microSD card. 

Samsung did not provide details regarding when the phone might come to the U.S. or which network will carry it.

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Article source: http://www.latimes.com/business/technology/la-fi-tn-samsung-galaxy-grand-5-inch-20121218,0,6529292.story

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18 Dec 12 What the Galaxy Camera should have been


What would a full HD display on a smartphone look like? When will the wait for affordable 1TB solid state drives come to an end? How about a super zoom camera in a smartphone, or the other way around? Such are the topics that we often discuss while we are sipping on steaming hot chai at the stall right outside our office, so it wasn’t all that surprising to see Samsung come out with the Galaxy Camera. On the day it arrived in our test lab, I couldn’t wait to unpack it and try all the features.

Simply put, it's the Samsung Galaxy S II with a huge lens popped in minus support for making calls

Simply put, it’s the Samsung Galaxy S III with a huge lens popped in, minus support for making calls

 

 

I clearly remember Shayne’s expression when I asked him how he found the Galaxy Camera after he had come back from the launch event. “It’s oversized,” he insisted. At that time, I thought he was exaggerating, but on unpacking it, I felt even that was an understatement. At 129 x 71 cm, it’s a lot broader and taller than most travel zoom digital cameras or even compact mirrorless cameras. And on top of that, the massive 21x zoom lens that sticks out about half an inch from the body reduces portability even further. In no way is it designed to be carried in the pocket! Samsung should have provided eyelets on the sides to attach a neck strap, but that too is missing. A 4-inch display (Super AMOLED would have been nice to have) and a completely retracting lens would have gone a long way in shrinking the design and making it pocketable. But then, it would be challenging to offer a quad-core processor, 1GB of RAM, graphics processor, 8GB of on-board storage, Wi-Fi, Bluetooth, GPS and 3G capabilities along with the guts of a super-zoom camera in a compact package.

Still, I imagined that there would be limitless possibilities with such a lavish feature set. It’s clear that Samsung wants to offer a camera that goes beyond just allowing you to share your photos wirelessly and upload them on social networks—something that doesn’t require the specifications of such a high-end smartphone. To me, the Galaxy Camera comes across as a super-zoom camera jammed into the body of the Galaxy S III. The functionalities of the camera are delivered by the camera app, which when run is supposed to give users the feel of a high-end camera. Instead, it actually feels like a high-end smartphone running a camera app, even if the user interface of the camera is top notch.

Virtual dials in the manual and semi-manual modes

Virtual dials in the manual and semi-manual modes

 

 

Now, at Rs 29,900, for which you could buy a DSLR or an enthusiast-class super-zoom (such as the Canon PowerShot SX50 HS), it’s fair to expect stellar photo quality. But sadly, the Galaxy Camera doesn’t deliver on its core functionality—the quality of photos it takes isn’t impressive at all. It’s incredible as a mobile Internet device and portable media player—I feel the latter should have been the secondary aspect and not the other way around. If you ask me which device comes closest to or is better than the Galaxy Camera, I’d say it’s the Nokia PureView 808. It takes much better photos, and more importantly, it fits in the pocket!

From a technological standpoint, the Galaxy Camera is by far the smartest camera available. It was only possible for Samsung to conjure it up because it knows how to build high-end smartphones and digital cameras—it’s just a matter of converging technologies. It’s an over-enthusiastic concept, and the need to go in for it isn’t justified unless you’re a social networking or a photo sharing buff—it’s certainly not for enthusiasts, or for that matter, even amateurs. Things would have been different had the price been under Rs 20,000 or if the quality of photos was DSLR-like. For me, a better balance would have been a compact mirrorless interchangeable lens camera with some of the features of Galaxy Camera (Wi-Fi, Bluetooth, 3G support, GPS, social networking and at least 8GB of built-in storage), all built around a regular camera interface. Rather than the awkward Galaxy Camera, this fantasy device could make waves in the market.

Article source: http://tech2.in.com/opinions/point-and-shoot/what-the-galaxy-camera-should-have-been/645992

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14 Dec 12 You Can Now Buy a 4G Nexus 7, Sort of


EE’s just announced that you can finally buy yourself some 4G-packing Android tablets, including the Nexus 7, well, kind of. The Samsung Galaxy Note 10.1 LTE is a genuine LTE-equipped tablet you can call your own, but to make the Nexus 7 go 4G, EE’s bundling an LTE portable hotspot with it. Not a bad solution, I guess.

The tablets come with steep price plans, though, so it’s not exactly a cheap option. The Note 10.1 LTE will cost you from £100 up-front, with the 8GB-a-month plan costing £36 a month. Meanwhile, the Nexus 7-4G hotspot combo will set you back from £30, and, again, £36 a month for 8GB of data.

4G speeds on your phone is awesome, there’s no doubt, but on a tablet? HD video streaming really comes alive; it’s just a shame 8GB really won’t get you that far.

Article source: http://www.gizmodo.co.uk/2012/12/you-can-now-buy-a-4g-nexus-7-sort-of/

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16 Jun 12 Android this week: Razr beats iPhone; Acer outs HD tablet; Intel …


This is the first week I can remember where a single Android phone is reportedly outselling Apple’s iPhone at one carrier. According to a research note from William Blair, that’s exactly what’s happening at Verizon stores. A check of inventory and sales indicated Motorola’s Droid Razr is topping the iPhone 4S, which is good news for Motorola and its new owner, Google.

It’s possible that Verizon’s LTE network is part of this surge for the Android-powered Razr: Without an LTE iPhone on any carrier, the Razr — and other Android phones — can deliver mobile broadband speeds topping 20 Mbps or more; as fast as wired broadband at home. The iPhone 4S holds its own against LTE on HSPA+ networks, but falls far shorter on Verizon and Sprint, where speeds generally average 1.5 Mbps with occasional 3 Mbps bursts. Razr sales could see their own burst as CNet noted this week that Android 4.0 was coming soon to the smartphone.

Android 4.0 is already included with Acer’s new slate: The company this week introduced its A700 tablet with the latest Google software. Pre-sales have begin in the U.S. and Canada at $449 for this 10.1-inch tablet boasting a 1900 x 1200 display with 178-degree viewing angles. I haven’t had the opportunity to try the A700 yet, but it looks good on paper.

Nvidia’s quad-core Tegra 3 powers the A700 which also has one gigabyte of memory and 32 GB of storage, which can be expanded with the microSD card slot. The slate is Wi-Fi only — no 3G/4G radio — but includes Bluetooth, an e-compass and GPS. Acer added Dolby Mobile 3 and 5.1-channel surround sound support and a battery life claim of 8 hours for web surfing or 10.5 hours of video watching; not bad if accurate.

This week I enjoyed reading a review of the Orange San Diego handset. Why? This device, available in Europe, is based on Intel’s smartphone reference design for Android. We’ve waited a long time for Intel to truly get in the smartphone game and the San Diego shows promise for Intel’s Medfield solution.

The Verge wrote the detailed review finding that Intel may not have surpassed ARM-based chips, but in many ways, has at least caught up. I’m not too surprised because the Medfield chip demos on Android devices I saw in January impressed me enough to say that Intel’s time may have arrived.

The San Diego shines in most performance scenarios and has good stand-by time, but software is the current downfall here; particularly in the camera application. Still, the San Diego is still worth a look as it provides a glimpse into future Android smartphones carrying the “Intel Inside” sticker.

Related research and analysis from GigaOM Pro:
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Article source: http://gigaom.com/mobile/android-this-week-razr-beats-iphone-acer-outs-hd-tablet-intel-phone-shows-promise/

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15 Jun 12 Google Chrome Updated For MacBook Pro Retina Display


Google Chrome Updated For MacBook Pro Retina Display

Google works fast when it comes to putting out new features in Chrome. The dev channel release of the browser just recently added in rudimentary support for Windows 8 and its Metro interface. Their next target is the new retina display in the MacBook Pro.

Google showed off their first effort in updating Chrome for the new MacBook Pro’s retina display. Here’s a comparison image of what is presumably how Chrome looks on both a regular MacBook Pro and the new retina display-powered MacBook Pro. The difference is pretty striking as you can obviously see.

Google Chrome MacBook Pro Retina Display

The new high resolution version of Google Chrome is only available in the Canary Release for now. While those with new MacBook Pros are more than welcome to download it right now, I would suggest that you wait until it hits the beta channel. For those unaware, Canary is the highly experimental version of Chrome that’s updated every night. It’s extremely buggy and might not be user friendly. If you’re a developer, however, have at it and enjoy the high resolution fun.

Google Chrome is just the latest application among many that are being updated to take advantage of the new high resolution retina display in the MacBook Pro. It was announced during Apple’s WWDC keynote on Monday that retina display support would be hitting many Apple applications like Mail, Safari, Aperture and Final Cut Pro.

Beyond Apple’s own products, third-party software developers are also updating their products to take advantage of the new display. Photoshop and AutoCAD have both been updated by Adobe and AutoDesk respectively to take advantage of the new display.

Games can take advantage of the new retina display as well. Diablo III was mentioned at the keynote as being able to take advantage of the new 2880×1800 resolution and AnandTech confirms it. The author found that Diablo III was able to average at about 20 fps at max resolution. It’s playable, but it’s not exactly great either. The on-board Nvidia GT 650M can only do so much. Portal 2 was also able to display at 2880×1800, but the console text was way too small to even see so Valve probably needs to issue an update for it in the future.

As you can see, Chrome is in good company as more and more developers will start to optimize their apps for the new retina display. While I hate that the new MacBook Pro is blatantly anti-consumer from a hardware perspective, I appreciate that it’s driving more people to implement HD displays in their laptops. I think we’ve had enough laptops that can only display in 1366×768.

Article source: http://www.webpronews.com/google-chrome-updated-for-macbook-pro-retina-display-2012-06

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22 Jan 12 Play Angry Birds in your Chrome browser


Getting too much work done? If so, fire up your Web browser and head over to chrome.angrybirds.com. This is where you can play Chrome Angry Birds, the browser-based version of Angry Birds. It’s just as addictive and as fun as the mobile version. And that’s why your productivity will end here.

Angry Birds is available in the Chrome Web store; simply add it to your browser to begin playing. It automatically installs an offline version, too, so you don’t have to be connected to the Internet in order to play. If you prefer to use a browser other than Chrome, Angry Birds also works in Safari, Firefox, and Internet Explorer (but only IE 9 or higher). You can choose between SD and HD versions, depending on the speed of your Internet connection.

Just like its insanely popular mobile version, the browser-based version of Angry Birds has you slinging birds at those annoying pigs. Instead of using your fingers to do so (unless you’re using a touch-screen tablet or PC), you simply grab your mouse and start slinging. Making the adjustment isn’t difficult at all, but I found that I had just a tad less control over the positioning of my birds–or maybe that’s just what I tell myself when I have trouble knocking over enough little green pigs.

The browser-based version features the same levels found in the mobile version, but adds a Chrome dimension available only to Web users. I’d tell you more about it, but I’m still trying to unlock it. If you get there first, let me know what to expect.

Article source: http://www.itworld.com/software/242449/play-angry-birds-chrome-your-pcs-web-browser

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19 Jan 12 Editorial Review of Angry Birds Chrome


Getting too much work done? If so, fire up your Web browser and head over to chrome.angrybirds.com. This is where you can play Chrome Angry Birds, the browser-based version of Angry Birds. It’s just as addictive and as fun as the mobile version. And that’s why your productivity will end here.

Angry Birds ChromeEverything’s bigger in the browser-based version of Angry Birds, including the ads.Angry Birds is available in the Chrome Web store; simply add it to your browser to begin playing. It automatically installs an offline version, too, so you don’t have to be connected to the Internet in order to play. If you prefer to use a browser other than Chrome, Angry Birds also works in Safari, Firefox, and Internet Explorer (but only IE 9 or higher). You can choose between SD and HD versions, depending on the speed of your Internet connection.

Just like its insanely popular mobile version, the browser-based version of Angry Birds has you slinging birds at those annoying pigs. Instead of using your fingers to do so (unless you’re using a touch-screen tablet or PC), you simply grab your mouse and start slinging. Making the adjustment isn’t difficult at all, but I found that I had just a tad less control over the positioning of my birds–or maybe that’s just what I tell myself when I have trouble knocking over enough little green pigs.

The browser-based version features the same levels found in the mobile version, but adds a Chrome dimension available only to Web users. I’d tell you more about it, but I’m still trying to unlock it. If you get there first, let me know what to expect.

–Liane Cassavoy

Article source: http://www.pcworld.com/product/1177565/rovio_angry_birds_chrome.html?p=review

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17 Nov 11 Flip a Coin or Roll a Die With RandomMagic


Having trouble making a tough decision? Looking to settle a score by a roll of the dice? RandomMagic, an extension for Google’s Chrome browser, is up to these tasks, and a few more.

RandomMagic Chrome extension screenshotRandomMagic’s graphics are low-quality, but it’s easy to understand how to use it. RandomMagic is available in the Chrome Web Store. You simply add the extension to your browser, and you’re ready to go. It appears in the upper right hand corner of your Chrome’s menu bar as a small icon in the shape of a magician’s hat and wand. Click on it brings up RandomMagic’s options: roll a die, flip a coin, generate a number between 1 and 100, or generate a random string of letters.

The random string of letters that you generate could be used as a password, but you’ll want to make sure you have a password keeper if you’re going to need to remember it. (Better yet, use LastPass to manage your passwords, and have that utility generate a secure password for you.)

The rest of RandomMagic’s features really are about having fun. You can make a decision by flipping a coin, or you can sit at your desk and roll a virtual die. Or you can use RandomMagic to see if your computer can read your mind when you’re thinking of a number between 1 and 100.

RandomMagic is easy to use, but its graphics are a little rough around the edges: it may make you nostalgic for a time before HD graphics and super-slick logos became the norm. If you’d like to see it improve, you can make a donation to the developer: an option to do so is clearly displayed among the extension’s options.

RandomMagic may not make you more productive or speed up your Web surfing. And it certainly won’t bring about world peace. But if you’re looking for a fun way to waste time or trying to play a game of chance, RandomMagic could be just the thing for you.

Note: This link takes you to this extension’s page at Google, where you can automatically install the file into your Chrome browser. This program is donationware. It is free to use, but the author accepts and encourages donations towards further development.

–Liane Cassavoy

Article source: http://www.pcworld.com/product/1163579/randommagic.html

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