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14 Dec 12 New Chrome Extension Lets You Save Web Content to Google Drive


Google has launched a new extension for Chrome called “Save to Drive,” enabling users to save web content to their Google Drive.

After installing the extension, users will get an additional icon in Chrome, letting them save an image, an entire page or an image of the visible page to your Drive.

Users can also save the HTML source code of a webpage or a complete webpage in web archive (.mht) format. Finally, they can simply right click on web content to save it directly to Drive.

save to drive

The extension offers several options to manage saved web content: Users can immediately open the file in Drive, rename it or view it in their Drive list, which provides additional options, such as sharing the file or placing it in a folder.

Google has also added new options for managing the images users store in Drive, including zoom by scrolling, new “fit to page” and “100%” buttons, as well as the ability to comment on a specific part of an image.

Have you tried the new Save to Drive Chrome extension? What do you think of it? Share your thoughts in the comments.

Article source: http://mashable.com/2012/12/12/chrome-extension-google-drive/

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07 Jun 12 Android’s Growth To Peak This Year, Says IDC


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Article source: http://www.informationweek.com/news/mobility/smart_phones/240001585

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27 May 12 Opera is Facebook’s best browser play


Computerworld -

Facebook may acquire Norwegian browser maker Opera Software, developer of the Opera and Opera Mini browsers for desktops and mobile phones, according to a report.

The purchase of Opera would give Facebook a way to quickly create a dedicated browser customized for the social networking giant and its estimated 900 million active monthly users.

It would also put Facebook in the middle of a browser battle with Microsoft (Internet Explorer), Mozilla (Firefox), Google (Chrome) and Apple (Safari). Some of those companies — like Microsoft — have partnered with Facebook, while others — such as Google — compete in the social networking space.

U.K.-based technology website Pocket-lint first reported Friday that Facebook “is looking to buy Opera Software,” citing an unnamed source it described only as “trusted.” Other sites, including The Next Web, claimed that while their sources could not verify Facebook’s interest, they did say Opera’s management has been talking to potential suitors.

Both Opera and Facebook declined to comment on Pocket-lint’s report.

Opera is really the only top-five browser that Facebook, or anyone for that matter, could conceivably acquire.

Three of the five are locked into operating systems: Internet Explorer, with Windows; Chrome, with ChromeOS; and Safari, with OS X and iOS.

And Firefox, while not associated with an OS maker, is backed by the non-profit Mozilla Foundation, which has used the “open Web” mantra since its inception. It’s hard to believe that Mozilla would sell Firefox to Facebook, a company that has reaped billions from a self-contained ecosystem.

That leaves only Opera.

But while Opera is the one viable deal Facebook could make, the Norwegian browser comes with its own baggage: It’s the fifth browser, and a distant fifth at that, in a five-browser market.

Last month, Opera accounted for just 1.6% of the world’s in-use browsers, according to data from metrics company Net Applications. Opera has never cracked the 3% mark, never been in anything but fifth place on the desktop. Even No. 4 Safari has three times Opera’s usage share.

And on mobile, the numbers are little better.

Even though Opera claims about 210 million Opera Mini users worldwide, Net Applications pegged the browser’s share of mobile at 12% for April, just half what it was a year earlier. Most of Opera Mini’s losses have gone to Apple’s Safari, the default browser on the iPhone and iPad, whose owners have a voracious appetite for the Web.

(Net Applications’ Irish rival, StatCounter, showed Opera with a 21.5% share in April, with Safari at 23.7%.)

That’s not to say that a Facebook-owned Opera and Opera Mini wouldn’t change those numbers: In the U.S., Facebook collects about one-in-every-five page views. If Facebook branded Opera and Opera Mini with its own nameplate and pitched them to its members, it could quickly boost the browsers’ shares.

Opera Mini also has an edge that could play to Facebook’s advantage: Apple refuses to allow third-party browsers not built atop Safari into the App Store.

But Opera Mini is already in the iOS App Store, managing that feat because it really isn’t a browser, at least as Apple defines one. Rather than render HTML locally on the device, Opera Mini is essentially a proxy that shuttles page requests to Opera’s own servers, which render the page, then aggressively compress it before sending it back to the device.

More: Browser Topic Center

Article source: http://www.computerworld.com/s/article/9227516/Opera_is_Facebook_s_best_browser_play

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26 May 12 Four short links: 23 May 2012


  1. Tale of Two Pwnies (Chromium Blog) — So, how does one get full remote code execution in Chrome? In the case of Pinkie Pie’s exploit, it took a chain of six different bugs in order to successfully break out of the Chrome sandbox. Lest you think all attacks come from mouth-breathing script kiddies, this is how the pros do it. (via Bryan O’Sullivan)
  2. The Future is Specific (Chris Granger) — In traditional web-MVC, the code necessary to serve a single route is spread across many files in many different folders. In a normal editor this means you need to do a lot of context switching to get a sense for everything going on. Instead, this mode replaces the file picker with a route picker, as routes seem like the best logical unit for a website. There’s a revolution coming in web dev tools: we’ve had the programmer adapting to the frameworks with little but textual assistance from the IDE. I am loving this flood of creativity because it has the promise to reduce bugs and increase the speed by which we generate good code.
  3. Best Online Editors For Teaching HTML/CSS/JS (Pamela Fox) — Over the past few months, I’ve been teaching in-person classes on HTML, CSS, and JavaScript, as part of GirlDevelopIt San Francisco. Along the way, I’ve experimented with various online consoles and editors, and I thought I’d share my experience with using them for teaching.
  4. Makie — design a doll online, they’ll 3d-print and ship it to you. Hello, future of manufacturing, fancy seeing you in a dollhouse!

Article source: http://radar.oreilly.com/2012/05/four-short-links-23-may-2012.html

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25 May 12 Android, iOS Crush BlackBerry Market Share


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Article source: http://www.informationweek.com/news/mobility/smart_phones/240001008

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24 May 12 Google Chrome Now the No. 1 Browser in the World


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Article source: http://www.informationweek.com/aroundtheweb/globalcio/google-chrome-now-the-no-1-browser-in-th/586b4c77635258586967444a2f704131584a4c4c5a513d3d?itc=SBX_iwk_fture_sociative_Business_and_Careers_global-cio

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20 May 12 How to make Android faster, more productive and more secure than iPhone


IPhone users love to brag about their phones. They line up around the block and stand in line for hours when a new one is released. Yet, for many users, Android is clearly the superior platform. Yes, its Achilles’ heel is a big one: security. Android’s openness and large market share mean that it’s a juicy target for attackers.

iOS vs. Android in the enterprise

[ Free download: The mobile security survival guide ]

Yet, Android’s openness also provides serious benefits. It allows for more customization; its apps are usually cheaper and various handset manufacturers are able to offer significantly different form factors, such as the smartphone-tablet hybrid, the Samsung Galaxy Note.

With a little tweaking, you can speed up and optimize Android in ways that will make iPhone users’ heads spin. Here are 10 ways to make Android faster, more productive and more secure than iPhone:

Make your Android faster

1. Get a better browser.

One of the major benefits of using the popular browser Opera Mini is that its cloud engine compresses data by as much as 90%. It features tabbed browsing, support for widgets and the ability to set advanced privacy features, such as the ability to automatically clear passwords, cookies and browsing history.

The advantage for Android users: the ability to use Opera Mobile instead of Opera Mini. Opera Mobile supports Flash and 3D graphics, has an HTML 5 engine and has a device-side web rendering engine for higher fidelity browsing. You can set up the rendering engine to work locally when on a Wi-Fi network and default to the cloud-based rendering engine when on a 3G or 4G network to minimize expensive data usage (if you’re not on an all-you-can-eat data plan). It also allows you to access your camera from your browser. Expect cool new widgets to start using this feature soon.

2. Install an Android optimizer.

Apps like Android Booster and Android Assistant give you the power to automatically kill apps that run in the background, gobbling up battery life and draining CPU. You can set a monthly data limit and monitor exactly how much data you’ve downloaded over 3G and 4G networks, and you can purge your cache, history, etc.

3. Conserve your battery.

Nothing slows you down more than a dead battery. One advantage Android phones have over iPhones is that you can swap out your battery. But proper power management can save you from that trouble. Apps like JuiceDefender and Battery Stretch help you regulate your power use.

With more than 7 million downloads, JuiceDefender is the most popular of these apps. It offers three different profiles: “Balanced,” “Aggressive” or “Extreme.”

The Balanced setting is the default and requires no configuration on your part. If you bump it up to “Aggressive,” the app will automatically disable data connections when the battery is low. If you’re really worried about a dead battery, the “Extreme” setting disables data connections by default. You can turn them back on manually, and you are able to whitelist apps that you want to have connectivity.

Make your Android more productive

4. Dig deeper into which apps hog data.

If you constantly go over your data limits, an app like Android Assistant may not be enough. Sure, you will be alerted when you are nearing your limit, but what exactly is causing the problem?

Is it Facebook, podcasting software, the MLB Gameday app? Who knows?

Article source: http://www.itworld.com/software/276921/how-make-android-faster-more-productive-and-more-secure-iphone

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17 May 12 Windows 8 Schools Google Chrome In Building A Great User Experience


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Article source: http://www.informationweek.com/aroundtheweb/windows/windows-8-schools-google-chrome-in-build/637a412f4b47644c4d35543754456476434f365668773d3d?itc=SBX_iwk_fture_sociative_Windows/Microsoft_windows

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12 May 12 Drag and Drop Search 34


Drag and Drop Search is a free Chrome extension that offers an elegant solution to a common problem: Searching on the website that will give you the answers you need. Google is a great engine, but there is no reason to go through it for everything. If you’re after quick facts and figures, you might be better off searching Wikipedia directly; if it’s videos you’re after, then a direct YouTube search might let you find them faster. If you’d like to get a sense for a place, searching for it on Flickr will show you what it’s like. With Drag and Drop Search installed, you only need to select a term, then drag and drop it on the name of the search engine you’d like to use.

Drag and Drop Search screenshotThe Drag and Drop Search configuration interface looks like it was lifted out of a 1997-era webpage, and requires prior knowledge to work.Drag and Drop Search works by overlaying your window with a four-by-four grid. By default, the center of the grid is clear, and the cells for the outer perimeter are each assigned to a different website or search engine. This makes for twelve sites and engines the add-on ships with, including Delicious, Twitter, Wikipedia, and other popular websites. It’s easy to get started: Select any word or term on the current page, start dragging, and the grid will appear. Each of the cells is clearly labeled; drop the term on the cell for the site you want to search and it will open up in a background tab.

If you are looking for visual polish, you won’t find much of it in Drag and Drop Search. The extension does have a configuration pane for customizing your engines, but it is very bare-bones. It’s just a basic HTML table with one table cell for each grid cell. There are no instructions for customizing the search engines used. Each engine has a name, and a URL. Search engine URLs often contain many arguments, one of which is your search term. Drag and Drop Search does not provide a wildcard character for substituting your search term (like %s on Chrome). Instead, you are supposed to format the URL so that the search term is the last parameter, and leave it blank. In other words, you need to be fairly familiar with URLs to customize the search engines Drag and Drop Search uses.

Drag and Drop Search screenshotIn action, Drag and Drop Search offers a beautiful and effective way to search specific websites for a string of text.The basic mechanism Drag and Drop Search uses is brilliant. It is easy and fast to grab a term and drag it to the right search engine, and it’s even a gesture that translates well into a touch interface (unlike right-clicking). I see Drag and Drop Search as a proof of concept, and a sign of things to come. But even in its current state, it is a simple and useful Chrome extension.

Note: The Download button takes you to the Chrome Web Store, where you can download it directly into your Chrome browser.

–Erez Zukerman

Article source: http://www.pcworld.com/article/255351/speed_up_searchesand_reduce_typingwith_drag_and_drop_search.html

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11 May 12 Speed Up Searches–And Reduce Typing–With Drag and Drop Search


Drag and Drop Search is a free Chrome extension that offers an elegant solution to a common problem: Searching on the website that will give you the answers you need. Google is a great engine, but there is no reason to go through it for everything. If you’re after quick facts and figures, you might be better off searching Wikipedia directly; if it’s videos you’re after, then a direct YouTube search might let you find them faster. If you’d like to get a sense for a place, searching for it on Flickr will show you what it’s like. With Drag and Drop Search installed, you only need to select a term, then drag and drop it on the name of the search engine you’d like to use.

Drag and Drop Search screenshotThe Drag and Drop Search configuration interface looks like it was lifted out of a 1997-era webpage, and requires prior knowledge to work.Drag and Drop Search works by overlaying your window with a four-by-four grid. By default, the center of the grid is clear, and the cells for the outer perimeter are each assigned to a different website or search engine. This makes for twelve sites and engines the add-on ships with, including Delicious, Twitter, Wikipedia, and other popular websites. It’s easy to get started: Select any word or term on the current page, start dragging, and the grid will appear. Each of the cells is clearly labeled; drop the term on the cell for the site you want to search and it will open up in a background tab.

If you are looking for visual polish, you won’t find much of it in Drag and Drop Search. The extension does have a configuration pane for customizing your engines, but it is very bare-bones. It’s just a basic HTML table with one table cell for each grid cell. There are no instructions for customizing the search engines used. Each engine has a name, and a URL. Search engine URLs often contain many arguments, one of which is your search term. Drag and Drop Search does not provide a wildcard character for substituting your search term (like %s on Chrome). Instead, you are supposed to format the URL so that the search term is the last parameter, and leave it blank. In other words, you need to be fairly familiar with URLs to customize the search engines Drag and Drop Search uses.

Drag and Drop Search screenshotIn action, Drag and Drop Search offers a beautiful and effective way to search specific websites for a string of text.The basic mechanism Drag and Drop Search uses is brilliant. It is easy and fast to grab a term and drag it to the right search engine, and it’s even a gesture that translates well into a touch interface (unlike right-clicking). I see Drag and Drop Search as a proof of concept, and a sign of things to come. But even in its current state, it is a simple and useful Chrome extension.

Note: The Download button takes you to the Chrome Web Store, where you can download it directly into your Chrome browser.

–Erez Zukerman

Article source: http://www.pcworld.com/product/1199296/drag_and_drop_search.html

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