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16 Jun 12 Google Chrome Gets Early Metro-Style App for Windows 8


Google Chrome Gets Early Metro-Style App for Windows 8Windows 8 users may now try out an early version of Metro-style Google Chrome by installing the browser’s developer build.

To access the Metro-style browser, users must installChromethroughthedevchannel, then set Chrome as the default browser. Once they do, the Chrome icon in the Windows 8 Start menu will change to show that it’s a Metro-style app.

The Metro-style version of Chrome is similar to its desktop counterpart, but it has larger tabs that are more conducive to touchscreens. Unlike Internet Explorer 10, Chrome shows all open tabs at all times — IE hides them until the user right-clicks or swipes upward on a touchscreen — so it’s a good option for users who need to quickly switch between tabs. The browser also supports Incognito mode and all Adobe Flash content, whereas Internet Explorer uses a whitelist of approved Flash content.

Google Chrome Gets Early Metro-Style App for Windows 8Chrome also supports some of Windows 8’s Metro features. Through the charms bar, users can share links with other apps, but the universal search function in Windows 8 doesn’t seem to work. The browser supports side-by-side snapping of other apps, so you can keep an eye on Twitter or e-mail as you surf the Web.

But as EdBottpointsout, Chrome violates Metro design principles with the browser’s right-click functionality. In Windows 8, right-clicking is supposed to do the same thing as swiping upward on a touchscreen, but that’s not the case in Metro-style Chrome. Swiping upward toggles full-screen browsing in Chrome, while right-clicking shows a pop-up context menu, as it does in the desktop browser.

I don’t have a tablet for testing Windows 8, but when using Splashtop’s Win8 MetroTestbedapp on the iPad, scrolling didn’t work in Chrome. If this is a problem with all tablets, I’m sure it will be fixed with future versions. But I also hope Google goes back and follows Metro design principles for right-clicks and upward swipes.

Google Chrome Gets Early Metro-Style App for Windows 8A few other nitpicks: There’s currently no way to send a Web page from Metro-style Chrome to the desktop, and the “New window” command opens a new tab instead. (Some sort of windowing function for Metro-style Chrome would be great for tab junkies.) Metro-style Chrome also has a “Pin to Start Screen” button that, at the moment, only crashes the browser.

If you’re running a preview version of Windows 8 and want to give Chrome a try, keep in mind that only the default browser may run as a Metro-style app, so Internet Explorer will only run on the desktop once you switch. To switch back to Metro-style IE, you must open the desktop version, go to “Internet Options,” click the “Programs” tab and click the link to “Make Internet Explorer the default browser.”

Article source: http://www.pcworld.com/article/257427/google_chrome_gets_early_metrostyle_app_for_windows_8.html

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15 Jun 12 Google To Release Chrome Beta for Windows 8 Testing


News

Google To Release Chrome Beta for Windows 8 Testing

The test browser is just for the x86/x64 Windows 8 Release Preview, where it can run in both the desktop and Metro user interfaces of the operating system.

Google has announced that its Chrome browser will be available for testing on the Windows 8 Release Preview. The company plans to smooth out the user interface of the browser over the next couple of months, and will be seeking user feedback.

The test browser is just for the x86/x64 Windows 8 Release Preview, where it can run in both the desktop and Metro user interfaces of the operating system. While Windows 8 will be available on ARM-based tablets, the ability to run any other browser besides Internet Explorer on that OS, known as Windows Runtime, appears to be restricted by Microsoft.

The Chrome test browser will be released at the Google Chrome dev channel for Windows, according to Google’s blog post, which didn’t specify when.


WinRT ‘Won’t Run’ Other Browsers
Google and Mozilla, which is also devising its Firefox browser for Windows 8, have both complained publicly that their browsers will not have access to the WinRT APIs necessary for their browsers to work as users would expect. Google went farther in its blog announcing the Chrome beta for Windows 8, by stating that its browser won’t run at all on WinRT.

“Chrome won’t run in WinRT, i.e. Windows 8 on ARM processors, as Microsoft is not allowing browsers other than Internet Explorer on the platform,” Google’s blog states.

An attorney with Mozilla suggested last month that Microsoft could be veering into possible antitrust litigation turf with the restrictions of WinRT. He cited Microsoft’s past antitrust supervision by the U.S. Department of Justice and the European Commission. Those bodies have faulted Microsoft for restricting API access and dominating the browser market via a Windows monopoly.

Microsoft hasn’t clarified the WinRT browser restriction matter publicly. While it has published a guide for a “Metro style enabled desktop browser” (Word doc) that software companies can use to build browsers for Windows 8, it appears that this guide only applies to x86/x64 systems, and not to WinRT systems.

The latest test version of Microsoft’s Internet Explorer 10 browser is called “platform preview 6.” It was distributed with the Windows 8 release preview that Microsoft announced at the end of last month. This new IE 10 version comes with Adobe Flash Player 11.3 built into the browser for use on both the desktop and Metro user interfaces. (Microsoft made no mention about whether its own Silverlight would similarly be supported in IE 10.). Another new aspect of IE 10 is that Microsoft’s “do not track” privacy option, first introduced in IE 9, is turned on by default.

Disagreement on Do Not Track
The do-not-track issue has been kicked around by all of the browser makers, with little effect. Microsoft’s method depends on Web advertisers voluntarily honoring a request to not track user clickstream information. It’s just a technical solution, as there’s nothing legally binding on advertisers to behave in the proper way. Microsoft’s do-not-track approach sends an HTTP string to indicate preference, a method that’s currently under consideration at the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C).

Microsoft’s embrace of having a do-not-track mechanism turned on by default in the latest IE 10 has caused some controversy. It apparently conflicts with the current W3C working draft, according to a Wired report. The W3C appears to be leaning toward the idea of not enabling do-not-track functionality by default, which could put IE 10 out of compliance once the spec becomes a W3C recommendation.

In response, Brendon Lynch, Microsoft’s chief privacy officer, noted in a Friday blog post that the draft hasn’t been finalized yet and that Microsoft plans to work on it with various stakeholders “in the months ahead.” He didn’t acknowledge that Microsoft may be going against the evolving spec with IE 10 on the do-not-track issue, but he suggested that Microsoft would stay engaged in “good faith” efforts.

“As discussions continue, Microsoft remains firmly committed to defining bona fide technical specifications and policies to govern DNT [do not track],” Lynch wrote in the blog post.

Mozilla’s also has a do-not-track approach for its Firefox browser that apparently uses a similar method as Microsoft’s approach. The Mozilla do-not-track system has been used by 8.6 percent of desktop users and 19 percent of mobile users, according to a May 17 Mozilla blog post.

Google has its own antitracking approach for Chrome called “Keep My Opt-Outs.” The Keep My Opt Outs method apparently works through a cookie opt-out procedure, but just for U.S. advertisers. The approach is vaguely described by Google here.

About the Author


Kurt Mackie is online news editor, Enterprise Group, at 1105 Media Inc.

Article source: http://reddevnews.com/articles/2012/06/14/google-to-release-chrome-beta-for-windows-8-testing.aspx

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12 Jun 12 Google Chrome Gets Early Metro-Style App for Windows 8


Windows 8 users may now try out an early version of Metro-style Google Chrome by installing the browser’s developer build.

To access the Metro-style browser, users must installChromethroughthedevchannel, then set Chrome as the default browser. Once they do, the Chrome icon in the Windows 8 Start menu will change to show that it’s a Metro-style app.

The Metro-style version of Chrome is similar to its desktop counterpart, but it has larger tabs that are more conducive to touchscreens. Unlike Internet Explorer 10, Chrome shows all open tabs at all times — IE hides them until the user right-clicks or swipes upward on a touchscreen — so it’s a good option for users who need to quickly switch between tabs. The browser also supports Incognito mode and all Adobe Flash content, whereas Internet Explorer uses a whitelist of approved Flash content.

Google Chrome Gets Early Metro-Style App for Windows 8Chrome also supports some of Windows 8’s Metro features. Through the charms bar, users can share links with other apps, but the universal search function in Windows 8 doesn’t seem to work. The browser supports side-by-side snapping of other apps, so you can keep an eye on Twitter or e-mail as you surf the Web.

But as EdBottpointsout, Chrome violates Metro design principles with the browser’s right-click functionality. In Windows 8, right-clicking is supposed to do the same thing as swiping upward on a touchscreen, but that’s not the case in Metro-style Chrome. Swiping upward toggles full-screen browsing in Chrome, while right-clicking shows a pop-up context menu, as it does in the desktop browser.

I don’t have a tablet for testing Windows 8, but when using Splashtop’s Win8 MetroTestbedapp on the iPad, scrolling didn’t work in Chrome. If this is a problem with all tablets, I’m sure it will be fixed with future versions. But I also hope Google goes back and follows Metro design principles for right-clicks and upward swipes.

Google Chrome Gets Early Metro-Style App for Windows 8A few other nitpicks: There’s currently no way to send a Web page from Metro-style Chrome to the desktop, and the “New window” command opens a new tab instead. (Some sort of windowing function for Metro-style Chrome would be great for tab junkies.) Metro-style Chrome also has a “Pin to Start Screen” button that, at the moment, only crashes the browser.

If you’re running a preview version of Windows 8 and want to give Chrome a try, keep in mind that only the default browser may run as a Metro-style app, so Internet Explorer will only run on the desktop once you switch. To switch back to Metro-style IE, you must open the desktop version, go to “Internet Options,” click the “Programs” tab and click the link to “Make Internet Explorer the default browser.”

Article source: http://www.pcworld.com/article/257427/google_chrome_gets_early_metrostyle_app_for_windows_8.html

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12 Jun 12 Google Chrome Gets Early Metro-Style App for Windows 8


Google Chrome Gets Early Metro-Style App for Windows 8Windows 8 users may now try out an early version of Metro-style Google Chrome by installing the browser’s developer build.

To access the Metro-style browser, users must installChromethroughthedevchannel, then set Chrome as the default browser. Once they do, the Chrome icon in the Windows 8 Start menu will change to show that it’s a Metro-style app.

The Metro-style version of Chrome is similar to its desktop counterpart, but it has larger tabs that are more conducive to touchscreens. Unlike Internet Explorer 10, Chrome shows all open tabs at all times — IE hides them until the user right-clicks or swipes upward on a touchscreen — so it’s a good option for users who need to quickly switch between tabs. The browser also supports Incognito mode and all Adobe Flash content, whereas Internet Explorer uses a whitelist of approved Flash content.

Google Chrome Gets Early Metro-Style App for Windows 8Chrome also supports some of Windows 8’s Metro features. Through the charms bar, users can share links with other apps, but the universal search function in Windows 8 doesn’t seem to work. The browser supports side-by-side snapping of other apps, so you can keep an eye on Twitter or e-mail as you surf the Web.

But as EdBottpointsout, Chrome violates Metro design principles with the browser’s right-click functionality. In Windows 8, right-clicking is supposed to do the same thing as swiping upward on a touchscreen, but that’s not the case in Metro-style Chrome. Swiping upward toggles full-screen browsing in Chrome, while right-clicking shows a pop-up context menu, as it does in the desktop browser.

I don’t have a tablet for testing Windows 8, but when using Splashtop’s Win8 MetroTestbedapp on the iPad, scrolling didn’t work in Chrome. If this is a problem with all tablets, I’m sure it will be fixed with future versions. But I also hope Google goes back and follows Metro design principles for right-clicks and upward swipes.

Google Chrome Gets Early Metro-Style App for Windows 8A few other nitpicks: There’s currently no way to send a Web page from Metro-style Chrome to the desktop, and the “New window” command opens a new tab instead. (Some sort of windowing function for Metro-style Chrome would be great for tab junkies.) Metro-style Chrome also has a “Pin to Start Screen” button that, at the moment, only crashes the browser.

If you’re running a preview version of Windows 8 and want to give Chrome a try, keep in mind that only the default browser may run as a Metro-style app, so Internet Explorer will only run on the desktop once you switch. To switch back to Metro-style IE, you must open the desktop version, go to “Internet Options,” click the “Programs” tab and click the link to “Make Internet Explorer the default browser.”

Article source: http://www.pcworld.com/article/257427/google_chrome_gets_early_metrostyle_app_for_windows_8.html

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09 Jun 12 Google Chrome Coming to Windows 8 Metro


Google’s Web browser, Chrome, is headed to rival Microsoft’s latest operating system, Windows 8 Metro—sort of. Google began work on a Metro-style enabled desktop browser, a version of Chrome that will run in both the Metro and desktop environments of Windows 8 on x86, back in March. The company didn’t offer a specific release date for Chrome, only noting users will be able to test it out in the next Chrome Dev channel release by setting it as the default browser.

The company also pointed out Chrome won’t run in WinRT (Windows 8 on ARM processors), as Microsoft is not allowing browsers other than Internet Explorer (IE) on the platform. “The initial releases of Chrome in Metro mode will include integration with the basic Windows 8 system functionality, such as charms and snap view,” Google software engineer Carlos Pizano wrote in a blog post. “Over the next few months, we’ll be smoothing out the UI on Metro and improving touch support, so please feel free to file bugs. We’re committed to bringing the speed, simplicity, and security of Chrome into Windows 8, and we look forward to working with you on it.”

Microsoft has a lot riding on the latest version of its Windows 8 Metro operating system, which is expected to launch sometime this fall. The design aesthetic, user interface, currently found on Windows Phone and the latest Xbox dashboard, has profound influence on Windows 8: In place of the “traditional” desktop that defined previous editions of Windows, the newest operating system will open with a Metro start screen of colorful, touchable tiles linked to applications. In theory, this will help port Windows 8 onto tablets and other touch-happy form factors; users will have the ability to download Metro apps to their machine via an online storefront.

Google and Microsoft are locked in an escalating battle for browser market share. Google unseated Microsoft as global usage of the Chrome browser passed that of IE for the first time, according to a May report from StatCounter, an independent Website analytics company. Data from more than 15 billion page views (4 billion from the United States; 850 million from the United Kingdom) for the full month of May shows Chrome took 32.43 percent of the worldwide market, compared with 32.12 percent for IE. Microsoft still holds a comfortable lead in the United States with the IE browser, however, capturing 38.35 percent of the market in May, while Chrome trailed with 23.66 percent.



Article source: http://www.eweek.com/c/a/Search-Engines/Google-Chrome-Coming-to-Windows-8-Metro-535034/

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06 Jun 12 Favorites lists also can be shared with Firefox, Chrome, other browsers


Some weeks ago, a reader asked how he could share his Favorites list between three computers, so that changes made to the list in the browser on one system would be conveyed to the other two automatically.In that column, I suggested he implement the “Windows Live Favorites” feature, an add-on to newer versions of Internet Explorer that has been designed for this very scenario.

To set this up, I suggested he visit this URL: http://bit.ly/J5FGaq

Since that column, several people have written in, asking for similar solutions to other browsers, such as Firefox and Chrome. Thankfully, as with IE, this also is easily accomplished.

In Firefox, you can share your Bookmarks (i.e. Favorites) between browsers, as well as browser tabs, add-ons and more, by enabling Firefox Sync. For more information, including instructions for setup, please visit this URL: http://bit.ly/M6Sj72

For Chrome, this can be accomplished by launching the Chrome browser on your computer of choice and then logging into your Google account. More information on how to set this up can be found at this URL: http://bit.ly/RShIB

As you can imagine, these are not the only browsers offering such capabilities. Richard Speroni of Palm City, for example, wrote in, touting similar offerings for the option-filled Opera browser.

“This browser has a feature called Opera Link that allows you to access your bookmarks, passwords and other items on any computer anywhere,” wrote Speroni. “You can even access these using a different browser.”

For more information on the Opera Browser, or to download it (it’s free), visit www.opera.com.

Article source: http://www.tcpalm.com/news/2012/jun/06/favorites-lists-also-can-be-shared-with-firefox/

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06 Jun 12 Favorites lists also can be shared with Firefox, Chrome, other browsers


Some weeks ago, a reader asked how he could share his Favorites list between three computers, so that changes made to the list in the browser on one system would be conveyed to the other two automatically.In that column, I suggested he implement the “Windows Live Favorites” feature, an add-on to newer versions of Internet Explorer that has been designed for this very scenario.

To set this up, I suggested he visit this URL: http://bit.ly/J5FGaq

Since that column, several people have written in, asking for similar solutions to other browsers, such as Firefox and Chrome. Thankfully, as with IE, this also is easily accomplished.

In Firefox, you can share your Bookmarks (i.e. Favorites) between browsers, as well as browser tabs, add-ons and more, by enabling Firefox Sync. For more information, including instructions for setup, please visit this URL: http://bit.ly/M6Sj72

For Chrome, this can be accomplished by launching the Chrome browser on your computer of choice and then logging into your Google account. More information on how to set this up can be found at this URL: http://bit.ly/RShIB

As you can imagine, these are not the only browsers offering such capabilities. Richard Speroni of Palm City, for example, wrote in, touting similar offerings for the option-filled Opera browser.

“This browser has a feature called Opera Link that allows you to access your bookmarks, passwords and other items on any computer anywhere,” wrote Speroni. “You can even access these using a different browser.”

For more information on the Opera Browser, or to download it (it’s free), visit www.opera.com.

Article source: http://www.tcpalm.com/news/2012/jun/06/favorites-lists-also-can-be-shared-with-firefox/

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03 Jun 12 Chrome breaks glass ceiling


AP

The logo for the Google Chrome Web browser.

London – Ten years ago, Internet Explorer mercilessly vanquished the opposition in the browser wars when it achieved a staggering 95 percent share of the market.

Almost all our internet activity was seen through a Microsoft-branded window, and this unhealthy state of affairs eventually led to the United States vs Microsoft court case, in which Internet Explorer’s (IE) dominance was rigorously examined.

As it turned out, IE won the browser battle. Today in Europe it’s a three-horse race, with Firefox, IE and Google’s Chrome browser all on vaguely equal pegging. But worldwide – according to the website Statcounter – Chrome is pulling ahead. It reached pole position in March, and now it’s consistently ahead of Internet Explorer – a huge achievement for a piece of software that’s barely three years old. But with Google already having an effective monopoly over our search queries, do we really want it to preside over our browsing activity, too?

Geeks will argue fiercely about how good Chrome actually is. I’m a Chrome user myself; I love the Omnibox – which deduces whether you’re typing a URL or a search query – and it seems fast, secure and devoid of the glitches that have, over the years, caused me to drift away from Internet Explorer, Safari and Firefox in turn.

But when Google scores a success, hand-wringing discussions about its information gathering habits inevitably follow. When Chrome offers us helpful suggestions based on what we’re typing into the Omnibox, what does it actually know about us? What information does it hold about the files we’ve downloaded? The answer to both questions, in the vast majority of cases, is “nothing worth worrying about”. We can even tweak Chrome’s settings to turn most data collection off. But it remains a concern for some.

Chrome’s market share is destined to grow as creaking old PC systems used across the US and Europe – including many in UK government departments – eventually get upgraded, and browsers such as the ancient and tottering IE6 are eventually abandoned. Chrome has seduced former IE users for two good reasons: it’s a great piece of software, and Google is promoting it heavily. But with Chrome reaching the top of the heap, Google’s awesome size and power increases further. And that will always prompt furrowed brows among the internet community. – The Independent

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Article source: http://www.iol.co.za/scitech/technology/software/chrome-breaks-glass-ceiling-1.1310361

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03 Jun 12 Chrome overtakes Explorer as most preferred user browser





Dubai: Google’s Chrome has dethroned Microsoft’s Internet Explorer (IE) to become the world’s top browser for the first time in May.

According to independent website analytics company StatCounter, Chrome took 32.43 per cent of the worldwide market compared to 32.12 per cent for IE and 25.55 per cent for Firefox.

Although Chrome had edged out IE earlier for shorter periods, the former has been trending up for some time.

Internet Explorer is still the top browser in many regions, including North America, US, China, Australia, Iran and Gulf countries but Chrome is extremely popular in India, Russia, Brazil and South America.

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In the UAE, IE occupies 40.58 per cent market share while Chrome has 34.32 per cent.

The desktop browser space is becoming increasingly competitive as Google’s Chrome and Mozilla’s Firefox continue to eat away market share from Microsoft’s Internet Explorer. Yahoo has also entered the fray with its own browser, Axis.

“IE is still king in most other regions as it’s the default web browser for Windows machines, which still constitute about 90 per cent of the world’s computers,” Rob Enderle, principal analyst at the US-based Enderle Group, said.

The browser trends are expected to continue at least until the general release of Internet Explorer 10 later this year. IE10 is tied to the launch of Windows 8, and it may introduce a wild card into the browser game.

“While attention has recently been focused on the battle between Chrome and IE, Mozilla’s Firefox with its loyal membership base should not be underestimated,” Aodhan Cullen, CEO of  StatCounter, said.

He said Chrome has gone from zero to market leader globally in less than four years but Microsoft’s new version (IE9) is performing well.

Enderle said both Google and Microsoft have been marketing their browsers very heavily and this has been a two browser market going back to Netscape.

“It is going to be a daunting task for Firefox to get back in the game. Firefox was the up-and-comer but the user base is moving to Google Chrome. So, Firefox has been swimming upstream.”

Article source: http://gulfnews.com/business/technology/chrome-overtakes-explorer-as-most-preferred-user-browser-1.1030994

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