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12 Jun 12 Google Chrome Gets Early Metro-Style App for Windows 8


Windows 8 users may now try out an early version of Metro-style Google Chrome by installing the browser’s developer build.

To access the Metro-style browser, users must installChromethroughthedevchannel, then set Chrome as the default browser. Once they do, the Chrome icon in the Windows 8 Start menu will change to show that it’s a Metro-style app.

The Metro-style version of Chrome is similar to its desktop counterpart, but it has larger tabs that are more conducive to touchscreens. Unlike Internet Explorer 10, Chrome shows all open tabs at all times — IE hides them until the user right-clicks or swipes upward on a touchscreen — so it’s a good option for users who need to quickly switch between tabs. The browser also supports Incognito mode and all Adobe Flash content, whereas Internet Explorer uses a whitelist of approved Flash content.

Google Chrome Gets Early Metro-Style App for Windows 8Chrome also supports some of Windows 8’s Metro features. Through the charms bar, users can share links with other apps, but the universal search function in Windows 8 doesn’t seem to work. The browser supports side-by-side snapping of other apps, so you can keep an eye on Twitter or e-mail as you surf the Web.

But as EdBottpointsout, Chrome violates Metro design principles with the browser’s right-click functionality. In Windows 8, right-clicking is supposed to do the same thing as swiping upward on a touchscreen, but that’s not the case in Metro-style Chrome. Swiping upward toggles full-screen browsing in Chrome, while right-clicking shows a pop-up context menu, as it does in the desktop browser.

I don’t have a tablet for testing Windows 8, but when using Splashtop’s Win8 MetroTestbedapp on the iPad, scrolling didn’t work in Chrome. If this is a problem with all tablets, I’m sure it will be fixed with future versions. But I also hope Google goes back and follows Metro design principles for right-clicks and upward swipes.

Google Chrome Gets Early Metro-Style App for Windows 8A few other nitpicks: There’s currently no way to send a Web page from Metro-style Chrome to the desktop, and the “New window” command opens a new tab instead. (Some sort of windowing function for Metro-style Chrome would be great for tab junkies.) Metro-style Chrome also has a “Pin to Start Screen” button that, at the moment, only crashes the browser.

If you’re running a preview version of Windows 8 and want to give Chrome a try, keep in mind that only the default browser may run as a Metro-style app, so Internet Explorer will only run on the desktop once you switch. To switch back to Metro-style IE, you must open the desktop version, go to “Internet Options,” click the “Programs” tab and click the link to “Make Internet Explorer the default browser.”

Article source: http://www.pcworld.com/article/257427/google_chrome_gets_early_metrostyle_app_for_windows_8.html

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12 Jun 12 Google Chrome Gets Early Metro-Style App for Windows 8


Google Chrome Gets Early Metro-Style App for Windows 8Windows 8 users may now try out an early version of Metro-style Google Chrome by installing the browser’s developer build.

To access the Metro-style browser, users must installChromethroughthedevchannel, then set Chrome as the default browser. Once they do, the Chrome icon in the Windows 8 Start menu will change to show that it’s a Metro-style app.

The Metro-style version of Chrome is similar to its desktop counterpart, but it has larger tabs that are more conducive to touchscreens. Unlike Internet Explorer 10, Chrome shows all open tabs at all times — IE hides them until the user right-clicks or swipes upward on a touchscreen — so it’s a good option for users who need to quickly switch between tabs. The browser also supports Incognito mode and all Adobe Flash content, whereas Internet Explorer uses a whitelist of approved Flash content.

Google Chrome Gets Early Metro-Style App for Windows 8Chrome also supports some of Windows 8’s Metro features. Through the charms bar, users can share links with other apps, but the universal search function in Windows 8 doesn’t seem to work. The browser supports side-by-side snapping of other apps, so you can keep an eye on Twitter or e-mail as you surf the Web.

But as EdBottpointsout, Chrome violates Metro design principles with the browser’s right-click functionality. In Windows 8, right-clicking is supposed to do the same thing as swiping upward on a touchscreen, but that’s not the case in Metro-style Chrome. Swiping upward toggles full-screen browsing in Chrome, while right-clicking shows a pop-up context menu, as it does in the desktop browser.

I don’t have a tablet for testing Windows 8, but when using Splashtop’s Win8 MetroTestbedapp on the iPad, scrolling didn’t work in Chrome. If this is a problem with all tablets, I’m sure it will be fixed with future versions. But I also hope Google goes back and follows Metro design principles for right-clicks and upward swipes.

Google Chrome Gets Early Metro-Style App for Windows 8A few other nitpicks: There’s currently no way to send a Web page from Metro-style Chrome to the desktop, and the “New window” command opens a new tab instead. (Some sort of windowing function for Metro-style Chrome would be great for tab junkies.) Metro-style Chrome also has a “Pin to Start Screen” button that, at the moment, only crashes the browser.

If you’re running a preview version of Windows 8 and want to give Chrome a try, keep in mind that only the default browser may run as a Metro-style app, so Internet Explorer will only run on the desktop once you switch. To switch back to Metro-style IE, you must open the desktop version, go to “Internet Options,” click the “Programs” tab and click the link to “Make Internet Explorer the default browser.”

Article source: http://www.pcworld.com/article/257427/google_chrome_gets_early_metrostyle_app_for_windows_8.html

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12 Jun 12 Google launches Metro-style Chrome browser for Windows 8 — and it rocks


Google has released its first attempt at making its popular Chrome browser work with Windows 8′s Metro-style design aesthetic, and because the app ignores some of Microsoft’s Metro mandates, it’s actually quite good.

A few months back, we heard that both Google and Mozilla would release a version of their popular Chrome and Firefox browsers targeting Windows 8. Both companies rightly should, considering that if they don’t get on the ball, they could potentially not have their browser tested and ready to go on Windows 8′s release day (whenever that is).

To get access to Metro-style Chrome on Windows 8, you have to subscribe to the Chrome Dev channel for Windows and download the latest version (21.0.1171.0). Once you have Chrome as your default browser and pinned to the Win 8 Start screen, you’re good to go.

I downloaded Metro-style Chrome, and I love that it’s a far cry from Internet Explorer 10, the default browser in Windows 8. Whereas IE10 feels way different from IE9, this version of Chrome ignores some of the Metro design ideas that Microsoft has been pushing. When you right-click or press “Windows key + Z,” there should be an App bar that pops up at the bottom of the screen. Google, being Google, has instead opted to put a more traditional menu bar in the top right corner that you can click for settings and app changes. There’s also standard tabbed browsing that works smoothly.

However, like IE10, Chrome includes Flash Player built into the browser for viewing all kinds of Flash content. But here it differs slightly too, because IE10 uses an approved list of sites and Flash content, where Chrome displays everything.

One of my biggest problems with Windows 8 and Metro apps is how much it’s forcing me to change from my established habits for work and play. But Chrome works great here because it falls between old and new instead of just being NEW.

You can check out more screens of Metro-style Chrome in Windows 8 below:

Google has released a great new version of its Chrome browser that works with Windows 8′s Metro-style interface.

chrome-win-8chrome-win-8-1Screenshot (21)Screenshot (19)Screenshot (16)Screenshot (17)

Article source: http://venturebeat.com/2012/06/11/hands-on-google-chrome-windows-8/

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11 Jun 12 Flash player 11.3 will support sandboxing in Firefox on Windows



Several changes that Adobe made in Flash 11.3 aim to boost the browser plugin’s security and reduce its susceptibility to attacks. The most significant of those changes is the introduction of sandboxing on the Windows platform.

Due to the frequent discovery of Flash vulnerabilities and the relative ubiquity of the plugin, Flash is one of the most heavily-exploited pieces of software. Adobe and browser vendors have been working to make it harder to exploit by isolating the plugin and working to ensure that users have easier access to the latest version.

Most browsers already implement process isolation for plugins in order to prevent Flash crashes from taking down the whole application. In some browsers, such as Chrome, the plugin is sandboxed on Windows to prevent it from accessing sensitive platform functionality. Adobe has worked with Mozilla to bring that feature to Firefox on Windows.

The sandboxing takes advantage of native security features that Microsoft built into Windows Vista and Windows 7. The Flash plugin will operate in three separate processes, one that interacts with the browser, one that does the bulk of the Flash execution, and one that mediates control of underlying operating system features.

The main Flash process will be run at a “low integrity” level, which will prevent it from writing to the user’s profile, manipulating the registry, or sending messages to higher integrity processes. It will also be encumbered with a number of job restrictions that will further limit its access. In order to reach the filesystem or hardware devices, the sandboxed process will have to go through the OS broker process, which is designed to strictly limit access.

The sandboxing mechanism that will be used for Flash in Firefox is similar to the one that Adobe has already implemented in its Acrobat Reader software. Because the implementation relies on features that are built into Windows Vista and Windows 7, however, the Flash sandboxing will not be supported on Windows XP.

Flash has had sandboxing support in Chrome on Windows Vista and Windows 7 since 2011. Internet Explorer doesn’t quite have full Flash sandboxing yet, but already runs the plugin at a low integrity level. Bringing the sandboxing feature to Firefox is another positive step forward.

In addition to introducing sandboxing, Adobe has also been working on a background update system that will allow the plugin to be updated automatically–without requiring user intervention. Simplifying Flash updates will make it easier for Adobe to protect users from zero-day vulnerabilities.

Adobe first introduced the automatic updater on Windows earlier this year. Now Adobe is bringing it to Apple’s Mac OS X. The updater will use a launch daemon to check for updates every day. When an update is detected, it can automatically install it in the background without disrupting the user’s activities.

Alongside the addition of the background updater, Adobe has also taken the opportunity to add application signing, which allows the Flash plugin to run on systems where Gatekeeper is configured to block unsigned software.

The Flash plugin is supported in a restricted capacity in Windows 8, not available on iOS, being discontinued on Android, and soon to be phased out on the Linux desktop. It’s no longer a viable solution for developers who want to reach every screen. Although Flash is gradually heading towards obsolescence, Flash content will continue to be supported in some capacity while standards-based alternatives are maturing and gaining acceptance. As such, enhancements that help to reduce the security risks posed by the plugin are welcome developments.

Article source: http://arstechnica.com/information-technology/2012/06/flash-player-11-3-will-support-sandboxing-in-firefox-on-windows/

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11 Jun 12 Chrome for Windows 8 Metro Coming Soon, Says Google


Google is getting ready to release a version of Chrome that works in Metro mode in Windows 8 Release Preview.

On Thursday Carlos Pizano, Software Engineer and “Metro Gnome” at Google, said that Chrome for Windows 8 Release Preview will arrive soon.

According to Pizano’s blog entry, Chrome will run in both Metro and desktop environments of Windows 8 on x86. However Chrome will not be released for Windows RT — the version of Windows 8 running on ARM-based chips — because Microsoft is reportedly not allowing browsers other than Internet Explorer on the platform.

“The initial releases of Chrome in Metro mode will include integration with the basic Windows 8 system functionality, such as charms and snap view,” he said. “Over the next few months, we’ll be smoothing out the UI on Metro and improving touch support, so please feel free to file bugs. We’re committed to bringing the speed, simplicity, and security of Chrome into Windows 8, and we look forward to working with you on it.”

Consumers running Windows 8 Release Preview will be able to try the Chrome browser in Metro mode in the next Chrome Dev channel release by setting it as the default browser. Based on a screenshot provided by Pizano, the browser won’t look any different than it does on Windows 7 or other desktop operating systems, keeping with the standard Google design.

Microsoft is following Apple’s lead by denying 3rd-party browsers besides its own stock Internet Explorer on Windows RT tablets with ARM-based processors. The desktop version of Windows 8 won’t have the same restriction although users won’t be able to run more than one browser in Metro mode at any given time.

In addition to Google, Mozilla is also working on a Metro version of Firefox. The company recently published a blog stating that users of Windows RT also deserve a choice of browsers, and called on Microsoft to remain firm on its user choice principles.

“Windows on ARM -as currently designed- restricts user choice, reduces competition and chills innovation,” wrote Mozilla General Council Harvey Anderson. “By allowing only IE to perform the advanced functions of a modern Web browser, third-party browsers are effectively excluded from the platform. This matters for users of today’s tablets and tomorrow’s PCs.”

“Because Windows on ARM relies upon so many traditional Windows assets, including brand, code, footprint, and experience, the decision to exclude other browsers may also have antitrust implications,” Anderson added.

Sounds like a threat, doesn’t it?

Article source: http://www.tomshardware.com/news/Chrome-Metro-Windows-8-Windows-RT-Carlos-Pizano,15962.html

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11 Jun 12 Chrome for Windows 8 Metro Coming Soon, Says Google


Google is getting ready to release a version of Chrome that works in Metro mode in Windows 8 Release Preview.

On Thursday Carlos Pizano, Software Engineer and “Metro Gnome” at Google, said that Chrome for Windows 8 Release Preview will arrive soon.

According to Pizano’s blog entry, Chrome will run in both Metro and desktop environments of Windows 8 on x86. However Chrome will not be released for Windows RT — the version of Windows 8 running on ARM-based chips — because Microsoft is reportedly not allowing browsers other than Internet Explorer on the platform.

“The initial releases of Chrome in Metro mode will include integration with the basic Windows 8 system functionality, such as charms and snap view,” he said. “Over the next few months, we’ll be smoothing out the UI on Metro and improving touch support, so please feel free to file bugs. We’re committed to bringing the speed, simplicity, and security of Chrome into Windows 8, and we look forward to working with you on it.”

Consumers running Windows 8 Release Preview will be able to try the Chrome browser in Metro mode in the next Chrome Dev channel release by setting it as the default browser. Based on a screenshot provided by Pizano, the browser won’t look any different than it does on Windows 7 or other desktop operating systems, keeping with the standard Google design.

Microsoft is following Apple’s lead by denying 3rd-party browsers besides its own stock Internet Explorer on Windows RT tablets with ARM-based processors. The desktop version of Windows 8 won’t have the same restriction although users won’t be able to run more than one browser in Metro mode at any given time.

In addition to Google, Mozilla is also working on a Metro version of Firefox. The company recently published a blog stating that users of Windows RT also deserve a choice of browsers, and called on Microsoft to remain firm on its user choice principles.

“Windows on ARM -as currently designed- restricts user choice, reduces competition and chills innovation,” wrote Mozilla General Council Harvey Anderson. “By allowing only IE to perform the advanced functions of a modern Web browser, third-party browsers are effectively excluded from the platform. This matters for users of today’s tablets and tomorrow’s PCs.”

“Because Windows on ARM relies upon so many traditional Windows assets, including brand, code, footprint, and experience, the decision to exclude other browsers may also have antitrust implications,” Anderson added.

Sounds like a threat, doesn’t it?

Article source: http://www.tomshardware.com/news/Chrome-Metro-Windows-8-Windows-RT-Carlos-Pizano,15962.html

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09 Jun 12 Google Readies Chrome for Windows 8 Metro


Coming soon to Windows 8 Preview: Google Chrome. Illustration: Webmonkey

Google is hard at work on a version of its Chrome browser that will work with Windows 8′s Metro environment. The Chromium blog recently announced that the next build of Chrome’s dev channel will run in both the Metro and desktop environments of Windows 8.

If you’d like to try it out a version of Chrome on Windows 8 once it’s available — most likely later today or perhaps over the weekend — you’ll need to switch over to the Chrome dev channel.

While Chrome will run in Windows 8′s Metro interface on desktop PCs, Google faces the same Microsoft platform restrictions Mozilla has spoken out against and as of now there will be no version of Chrome for WinRT, the version of Windows 8 designed to run on ARM processors.

Since WinRT is the most likely candidate for tablets that means any Windows 8 tablets will be Chrome-free.

Google has stopped short of being as vocal as Mozilla — which has called WinRT “a return to the digital dark ages. The Chromium blog merely notes that “Microsoft is not allowing browsers other than Internet Explorer on the platform,” though there is a link in that sentence to Mozilla’s original post decrying Microsoft’s restrictions.

The crux of Mozilla’s gripe — which Google seems to be tacitly endorsing as well — is that in Windows RT Microsoft gives its own Internet Explorer access to special APIs other web browsers can’t use.

Mozilla’s Asa Dotzler has previously pointed out that at least part of what makes this different than Apple’s iOS — which imposes similar restrictions on software — is that Microsoft still has binding agreements with the EU about browser choice on Windows, and Windows RT is still Windows.

It’s possible that Microsoft will change its mind about third-party web browsers on WinRT (or be legally compelled to change its mind) before any Windows 8 tablets arrive, but in the mean time at least you’ll soon be able to use Chrome with Windows 8 on desktop machines.

Article source: http://www.webmonkey.com/2012/06/google-readies-chrome-for-windows-8-metro/

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08 Jun 12 Chrome for Windows 8 Metro Coming Soon


Google announced this week that it will soon release a version of its Chrome browser for Windows 8 Metro mode.

Chrome for Metro will be available in the next Chrome Dev channel release by setting it as your default browser, Carlos Pizano, a Google software engineer and “Metro Gnome,” wrote in a blog post. It will work with the Release Preview of Windows 8, which Microsoft released last week.

Google first announced plans for a Metro-style Chrome browser in March. “Our goal is to be able to offer our users a speedy, simple, secure Chrome experience across all platforms, which includes both the desktop and Metro versions of Windows 8,” Google said at the time.

Pizano said today that the “initial releases of Chrome in Metro mode will include integration with the basic Windows 8 system functionality, such as charms and snap view.” But in the lead-up to the expected late-2012 release of Windows 8, Google will be “smoothing out the UI on Metro and improving touch support, so please feel free to file bugs,” Pizano wrote.

“We’re committed to bringing the speed, simplicity, and security of Chrome into Windows 8, and we look forward to working with you on it,” he concluded.

Google was sure to bring up the fact that the Windows on ARM version of the upcoming Windows 8 OS will not support browsers other than Internet Explorer. “Chrome won’t run in WinRT,” Pizano said simply.

Like the other versions of Windows 8, Windows RT will include two environments: the classic Windows interface and the more Windows Phone-esque Metro style option. Last month, however, Mozilla complained publicly that “Windows on ARM prohibits any browser except for Internet Explorer from running in the privileged ‘Windows Classic’ environment.” Google soon chimed in that it shared Mozilla’s concerns.

Microsoft has not commented on the controversy, but the Senate Judiciary Committee said it is examining whether Windows RT runs afoul of any antitrust regulations.

For more, see Who’s Ready for Microsoft’s Windows RT? Also check out PCMag’s Hands On With Windows 8 Release Preview and the slideshow below.

For more from Chloe, follow her on Twitter @ChloeAlbanesius.


View Slideshow
See all (24) slides


Windows 8 Multi-Monitor


Windows 8 Lock Screen


Charms and Status


Sports App


For the top stories in tech, follow us on Twitter at @PCMag.

Article source: http://www.pcmag.com/article2/0,2817,2405532,00.asp

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08 Jun 12 Google Readies Chrome for Windows 8 Metro


Coming soon to Windows 8 Preview: Google Chrome. Illustration: Webmonkey

Google is hard at work on a version of its Chrome browser that will work with Windows 8′s Metro environment. The Chromium blog recently announced that the next build of Chrome’s dev channel will run in both the Metro and desktop environments of Windows 8.

If you’d like to try it out a version of Chrome on Windows 8 once it’s available — most likely later today or perhaps over the weekend — you’ll need to switch over to the Chrome dev channel.

While Chrome will run in Windows 8′s Metro interface on desktop PCs, Google faces the same Microsoft platform restrictions Mozilla has spoken out against and as of now there will be no version of Chrome for WinRT, the version of Windows 8 designed to run on ARM processors.

Since WinRT is the most likely candidate for tablets that means any Windows 8 tablets will be Chrome-free.

Google has stopped short of being as vocal as Mozilla — which has called WinRT “a return to the digital dark ages. The Chromium blog merely notes that “Microsoft is not allowing browsers other than Internet Explorer on the platform,” though there is a link in that sentence to Mozilla’s original post decrying Microsoft’s restrictions.

The crux of Mozilla’s gripe — which Google seems to be tacitly endorsing as well — is that in Windows RT Microsoft gives its own Internet Explorer access to special APIs other web browsers can’t use.

Mozilla’s Asa Dotzler has previously pointed out that at least part of what makes this different than Apple’s iOS — which imposes similar restrictions on software — is that Microsoft still has binding agreements with the EU about browser choice on Windows, and Windows RT is still Windows.

It’s possible that Microsoft will change its mind about third-party web browsers on WinRT (or be legally compelled to change its mind) before any Windows 8 tablets arrive, but in the mean time at least you’ll soon be able to use Chrome with Windows 8 on desktop machines.

Article source: http://www.webmonkey.com/2012/06/google-readies-chrome-for-windows-8-metro/

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08 Jun 12 Chrome for Windows 8 Metro Coming Soon


Google announced this week that it will soon release a version of its Chrome browser for Windows 8 Metro mode.

Chrome for Metro will be available in the next Chrome Dev channel release by setting it as your default browser, Carlos Pizano, a Google software engineer and “Metro Gnome,” wrote in a blog post. It will work with the Release Preview of Windows 8, which Microsoft released last week.

Google first announced plans for a Metro-style Chrome browser in March. “Our goal is to be able to offer our users a speedy, simple, secure Chrome experience across all platforms, which includes both the desktop and Metro versions of Windows 8,” Google said at the time.

Pizano said today that the “initial releases of Chrome in Metro mode will include integration with the basic Windows 8 system functionality, such as charms and snap view.” But in the lead-up to the expected late-2012 release of Windows 8, Google will be “smoothing out the UI on Metro and improving touch support, so please feel free to file bugs,” Pizano wrote.

“We’re committed to bringing the speed, simplicity, and security of Chrome into Windows 8, and we look forward to working with you on it,” he concluded.

Google was sure to bring up the fact that the Windows on ARM version of the upcoming Windows 8 OS will not support browsers other than Internet Explorer. “Chrome won’t run in WinRT,” Pizano said simply.

Like the other versions of Windows 8, Windows RT will include two environments: the classic Windows interface and the more Windows Phone-esque Metro style option. Last month, however, Mozilla complained publicly that “Windows on ARM prohibits any browser except for Internet Explorer from running in the privileged ‘Windows Classic’ environment.” Google soon chimed in that it shared Mozilla’s concerns.

Microsoft has not commented on the controversy, but the Senate Judiciary Committee said it is examining whether Windows RT runs afoul of any antitrust regulations.

For more, see Who’s Ready for Microsoft’s Windows RT? Also check out PCMag’s Hands On With Windows 8 Release Preview and the slideshow below.

For more from Chloe, follow her on Twitter @ChloeAlbanesius.


View Slideshow
See all (24) slides


Windows 8 Multi-Monitor


Windows 8 Lock Screen


Charms and Status


Sports App


For the top stories in tech, follow us on Twitter at @PCMag.

Article source: http://www.pcmag.com/article2/0,2817,2405532,00.asp?kc=PCRSS03069TX1K0001121

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