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25 Dec 12 Samsung Galaxy Camera Review: Android Meets Point-and-Shoot Camera


PHOTO: Samsung's Galaxy Camera brings the connectivity and sharing features of Android to a point-and-shoot camera.

A couple of years ago, if you went digging through a purse or a backpack, you’d likely find a point-and-shoot camera. Now you’ll find that most people instead use the cameras built into their smartphones. Not only have camera phones improved, they let you instantly share photos with family and friends.

Samsung has a new idea — to bring together the best of the standalone camera and the smartphone. Its new Galaxy Camera is what you’d get if a point-and-shoot camera were crossed with an Android phone — it promises to take better photos than most phones but has built in sharing capabilities. But can it do it all? Is it the best of both worlds?

WATCH: Samsung Galaxy Camera Video Review

A Camera with a Big Touch Screen
The Galaxy Camera looks like a regular camera from the front, but flip it around and it looks like a big-screen Android phone. It has a 4.8-inch HD Super Clear Touch display, which looks and acts very much like Samsung’s Galaxy S 3 phone. It is powered by Android 4.1 or Jelly Bean. You can navigate through the operating system just as you would on a phone. Yes, you can surf the Web, even check your email and download and use apps from the Google Play Store thanks to the built-in Wi-Fi radio and the built-in LTE. (There are Verizon and ATT versions of the camera — more on the pricing soon.)


PHOTO: Samsung's Galaxy Camera brings the connectivity and sharing features of Android to a point-and-shoot camera.

PHOTO: Samsung's Galaxy Camera brings the connectivity and sharing features of Android to a point-and-shoot camera.













You can’t text message or make calls on the camera (that’s not a complaint — holding a camera up to your ear doesn’t look all that cool) but you can easily snap photos and upload them to Instagram, Facebook, Flickr, Picasa or other sites. And snapping pics and sharing them is really a cinch. While Wi-Fi-enabled cameras are a dime a dozen, the Android operating system is easy to navigate, especially when it comes to adjusting settings and selecting photos to share. If you’re an Instagram fan, this is the ultimate Instagram camera. And your shots will look better than most of the others in your feed.

A Good Camera with Great Features
That’s because 16.3-megapixel camera has a 21x optical zoom and takes very good still shots. Shots in natural lighting were well balanced, and while low-light performance wasn’t spectacular, it was acceptable for the specs. However, the photos I took were not as good as shots I take with a $600 Canon DSLR (I’ve got the Canon T2i) or a micro-four-thirds camera. They were better than photos taken with the iPhone 5 or Galaxy S 3, but about the same as what you get from an average point-and-shoot.

However, where the camera does stand out as a camera is in its “smart” shooting features. Samsung has matched the hardware with some interesting software features, including a “best photo” mode that will select the best of eight shots for you. There is also a “continuous shot” mode, which captures a series of moving photos. While some of the images I took of my cousins playing football suffered from motion blur, others were clear.

You can also shoot 1080p video and take still shots while you are shooting. Oh, and you can apply Samsung’s own filters and effects, in case you don’t want to use a third-party app. Samsung has brought most of its great Android photo features to the camera. On top of that, there’s an “Expert” mode for those photographers who want more manual controls for adjusting aperture, ISO, shutter speed and more.

A Camera With Battery and Size Sacrifices
With all those features come some major sacrifices. First, the camera is bulky for what it is. Yes, it has a 21x zoom lens, but the camera is almost an inch thick, 5 inches wide and weighs 11 ounces. That doesn’t make it large, but it’s much larger than the average point-and-shoot. It’s closer in size to micro-four-thirds or mirrorless cameras like the Olympus E-PL5 or Panasonic GX1, which take noticeably better photos.

Article source: http://abcnews.go.com/Technology/samsung-galaxy-camera-review-android-meets-point-shoot/story?id=18055760

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25 Dec 12 Galaxy Camera Review: Android Meets Camera


PHOTO: Samsung's Galaxy Camera brings the connectivity and sharing features of Android to a point-and-shoot camera.

A couple of years ago, if you went digging through a purse or a backpack, you’d likely find a point-and-shoot camera. Now you’ll find that most people instead use the cameras built into their smartphones. Not only have camera phones improved, they let you instantly share photos with family and friends.

Samsung has a new idea — to bring together the best of the standalone camera and the smartphone. Its new Galaxy Camera is what you’d get if a point-and-shoot camera were crossed with an Android phone — it promises to take better photos than most phones but has built in sharing capabilities. But can it do it all? Is it the best of both worlds?

WATCH: Samsung Galaxy Camera Video Review

A Camera with a Big Touch Screen
The Galaxy Camera looks like a regular camera from the front, but flip it around and it looks like a big-screen Android phone. It has a 4.8-inch HD Super Clear Touch display, which looks and acts very much like Samsung’s Galaxy S 3 phone. It is powered by Android 4.1 or Jelly Bean. You can navigate through the operating system just as you would on a phone. Yes, you can surf the Web, even check your email and download and use apps from the Google Play Store thanks to the built-in Wi-Fi radio and the built-in LTE. (There are Verizon and ATT versions of the camera — more on the pricing soon.)


PHOTO: Samsung's Galaxy Camera brings the connectivity and sharing features of Android to a point-and-shoot camera.

PHOTO: Samsung's Galaxy Camera brings the connectivity and sharing features of Android to a point-and-shoot camera.













You can’t text message or make calls on the camera (that’s not a complaint — holding a camera up to your ear doesn’t look all that cool) but you can easily snap photos and upload them to Instagram, Facebook, Flickr, Picasa or other sites. And snapping pics and sharing them is really a cinch. While Wi-Fi-enabled cameras are a dime a dozen, the Android operating system is easy to navigate, especially when it comes to adjusting settings and selecting photos to share. If you’re an Instagram fan, this is the ultimate Instagram camera. And your shots will look better than most of the others in your feed.

A Good Camera with Great Features
That’s because 16.3-megapixel camera has a 21x optical zoom and takes very good still shots. Shots in natural lighting were well balanced, and while low-light performance wasn’t spectacular, it was acceptable for the specs. However, the photos I took were not as good as shots I take with a $600 Canon DSLR (I’ve got the Canon T2i) or a micro-four-thirds camera. They were better than photos taken with the iPhone 5 or Galaxy S 3, but about the same as what you get from an average point-and-shoot.

However, where the camera does stand out as a camera is in its “smart” shooting features. Samsung has matched the hardware with some interesting software features, including a “best photo” mode that will select the best of eight shots for you. There is also a “continuous shot” mode, which captures a series of moving photos. While some of the images I took of my cousins playing football suffered from motion blur, others were clear.

You can also shoot 1080p video and take still shots while you are shooting. Oh, and you can apply Samsung’s own filters and effects, in case you don’t want to use a third-party app. Samsung has brought most of its great Android photo features to the camera. On top of that, there’s an “Expert” mode for those photographers who want more manual controls for adjusting aperture, ISO, shutter speed and more.

A Camera With Battery and Size Sacrifices
With all those features come some major sacrifices. First, the camera is bulky for what it is. Yes, it has a 21x zoom lens, but the camera is almost an inch thick, 5 inches wide and weighs 11 ounces. That doesn’t make it large, but it’s much larger than the average point-and-shoot. It’s closer in size to micro-four-thirds or mirrorless cameras like the Olympus E-PL5 or Panasonic GX1, which take noticeably better photos.

Article source: http://abcnews.go.com/Technology/samsung-galaxy-camera-review-android-meets-point-shoot/story?id=18055760

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12 Apr 12 Nickel, Cobalt and Chrome Supplier Invests in Continuous Improvement – Virtual


Quality manager joins Hunter Chemical, ISO9001:2008 certified supplier of nickel, cobalt and chrome-based chemicals, oxides and powders.

Fort Washington, PA (PRWEB) April 12, 2012

Hunter Chemical LLC strengthens its ongoing drive to provide great products and great service to its customers by hiring Michael Aragon as Quality Manager. At Hunter, Michael’s responsibility will be to assure that all manufacturing and service related processes are properly followed and documented. Hunter is an ISO 9001:2008 certified company, receiving this level of ISO designation in 2005.

Michael’s experience in this field began over 20 years ago in the U.S. Navy where he was a Quality Assurance Chief and was awarded multiple honors for meritorious service, outstanding program management and sustained superior performance. More recently, Michael was Quality Control Manager for ten years at a licensed FAA repair station supplying equipment to the aviation and marine customers.

Ben Brock, President of Hunter Chemical said, “Hunter believes in a quality philosophy that continuously improves the products and services that we deliver. We feel that Michael’s dedication to process control and overall experience will help us meet the high expectations that we set for ourselves and that customers expect of us.”

About Hunter Chemical LLC: Hunter Chemical LLC manages processes and resources for the production and distribution of Nickel, Cobalt and Chrome-based chemicals, oxides and raw materials. These products are used in P/M, MIM, metal finishing, thermal spray and other applications. Hunter Chemical maintains direct relationships with the world’s top sources of primary Nickel, Cobalt and Chrome based salts, solutions, oxides and powders to allow for competitive prices of high-purity material. Proprietary products include Chrome Catalysts and Fume Suppressants for hard chrome plating, decorative chrome plating and anodizing in addition to Chrome Oxide and Alumina Titania for thermal spray applications. The company is certified to ISO9001:2008.

If you would like more information about this topic see http://www.hunterchem.com or contact Greg Landry at 215.461.1900 or greg(at)hunterchem(dot)com

For the original version on PRWeb visit: http://www.prweb.com/releases/prweb2012/4/prweb9387690.htm

Article source: http://www.virtual-strategy.com/2012/04/12/nickel-cobalt-and-chrome-supplier-invests-continuous-improvement

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