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30 May 12 Google Chrome OS, Take Two: New Software And Chromebooks


New Chromebook
(click image for larger view)

In conjunction with a Chrome OS update that incorporates a more traditional desktop user interface, Google and its hardware partner Samsung on Tuesday plan to introduce two Chrome OS devices, the Samsung Chromebook Series 5 550 and the Samsung Chromebox 3.

The Series 5 550 is an improved Chrome OS notebook. The Chromebox, first mentioned at CES in January and revealed through a TigerDirect online store listing on Friday, is a small desktop Chrome OS computer that requires a separate keyboard, mouse, and display.

“We’re focused a lot on speed because that was one of the things we were not very happy with last year,” said Caesar Sengupta, director of Chrome OS at Google, in a phone interview.

The Series 5 550 ($449/$549 w/3G) features an Intel Core processor, a step up in terms of processing power from the Intel Atom chips in last year’s models. It’s 2.5 times faster on the v8 benchmark than the old Series 5, according to Sengupta.

With a 12.1-inch, 1280 x 800 display, the Series 5 550 weighs 3.3 lbs. and boasts 6 hours of battery life, or 6.5 days in standby mode. It includes 4 GB of RAM, built-in dual band Wi-Fi 802.11 a/b/g/n, Gigabit Ethernet, and a 3G modem option. There’s an HD camera, two USB 2.0 ports, a 4-in-1 memory card slot, and a DisplayPort++ connector that can accommodate HDMI, DVI, or VGA monitors.

[ How big are the stakes for Google? Read Google's Chromebook Gamble. ]

The Series 3 Chromebox ($329) is a small computer akin to the Mac Mini. It scores 3.5x faster than last year’s Chromebook on the v8 benchmark and sports six USB 2.0 ports, 2 DisplayPort++ connectors, DVI single link output, and support for Bluetooth 3.0. Both the Chromebox and Series 5 550 Chromebook now support hardware accelerated graphics, which makes Web page scrolling much quicker and makes the Chrome OS devices more suitable for Web-based games.

The new hardware will be running the latest version of Chrome OS, R19, which offers a much more traditional desktop user interface. Previously, the Chrome browser was locked in place and could not be moved to reveal a desktop below it. Version R19 restores the desktop metaphor by allowing browser windows to be moved and by adding a new app launch and the ability to customize desktop images. It also includes the ability to view Office files, stored locally or on Google Drive. So much for talk that computer users no longer need files.

This shift to a more familiar interface will soon be accompanied by Google Drive integration. Now available through the Chrome OS beta channel, Sengupta says this feature will reach general release in June, around the time of Google IO, the company’s annual developer conference. Google Drive will effectively be the file system for Google’s hardware. It will run offline and online and sync files across other computers, like Macs and PCs, so that the user’s files can be accessed across multiple devices.

In addition, Google plans to release a beta version of Chrome Remote Desktop, which will allow users of Google’s Chrome browser to access remote OS X or Windows computers from any device with Chrome installed.

Sengupta also said that offline editing will be coming to Google Docs in a matter of weeks. He said the feature is presently being tested internally at Google and will be rolled out as soon as it’s ready.

A year ago, Google, Samsung, and Acer launched the first hardware running Chrome OS in an effort to improve the computing experience. While these Chromebooks were available through online retailers, they didn’t sell very much to consumers.

Sengupta didn’t offer specifics about Chromebook usage metrics but made it clear that Google didn’t expect cloud-based computing to become the norm immediately. “Our goal is a fairly long-term one,” he said. “We’re trying to change the world of computing.”

Google plans to expand its Chromebook marketing outreach: In June, expect to start seeing Chrome Zones in select Best Buy stores, where potential customers can test Chrome OS hardware.

But the Chromebook value proposition–easier, more affordable computer management and administration–wasn’t really tailored to appeal to consumers; it was designed to ease the suffering of IT managers by automating chores like system patching.

“We think there’s a lot of promise for Chrome OS in businesses,” said Rajen Sheth, group product manager for Chrome for Business. “We’ve seen a lot of interest in retail for systems in stores, or call centers.”

How much interest? Not enough to disclose sales figures, but enough to have a few noteworthy business customers lined up to test a new way of working. Retailer Dillard’s intends to deploy hundreds of Chromeboxes in about half of its 304 U.S. stores. Education company Kaplan, in conjunction with call center company Genesys, intends to move its New York City call center to online real-time communication protocol WebRTC and Chromeboxes. Mollen Clinics expects to use 4,500 Chromebooks in its mobile immunization clinics in Wal-Mart and Sam’s Clubs locations. And the California State Library intends to distribute 1,000 Chromebooks to libraries around the state for patrons to borrow.

Sheth says that the updated version of Chrome OS and the new Chrome hardware solve a lot of issues that businesses had with the first release. He cites the ability to view Office files and Google Drive integration as examples of changes that will make Chrome OS more palatable to businesses.

The updated hardware also comes with improved features for administrators, such as auto-update controls, auto-enrollment, open-network configuration and additional reporting features.

“When the user get the Chromebooks and logs in, that device knows it’s part of the organization and will automatically configure itself,” said Sheth, adding that this should make Chrome OS devices even more compelling to organizations concerned about total cost of ownership.

“Our biggest goal with the new management functionality is to make it so you can grab a Chromebook of a delivery truck and hand it to a user without the involvement of IT,” said Sheth. “With a PC, that’s not possible. It has to be imaged.”

Perhaps the most compelling feature for businesses is a new pricing model. Google initially offered Chromebooks to businesses under a subscription model. That’s no longer being offered.

“The major feedback we heard from businesses is that they want to be able to purchase once and be done with it,” said Sheth.

The new plan works as follows: After purchasing the hardware, businesses and schools can buy lifetime management and support for $150 and $30, respectively.

The second coming of Chrome OS might just be enough to turn Google’s experiment into a real market. But if not, there’s always next year. “We’re deeply committed to this,” said Sengupta. “It’s a step in the journey.”

At this year’s InformationWeek 500 Conference C-level execs will gather to discuss how they’re rewriting the old IT rulebook and accelerating business execution. At the St. Regis Monarch Beach, Dana Point, Calif., Sept. 9-11.

05/29/2012: Corrected education pricing.

Article source: http://www.informationweek.com/news/hardware/desktop/240000980

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26 May 12 Google’s Motorola buy seen boosting Android in workplace


Computerworld - With the closing of Google’s $12.5 billion acquisition of Motorola Mobility this week, talk of the possibilities for Android in the enterprise has spiked.

While Android has taken the consumer market by storm — the OS runs 59% of smartphones shipped in the first quarter of 2012 — IT managers remain wary that maintaining security and control of consumer Android devices devices used by workers may be difficult if not impossible, according to various surveys.

IT managers say they can’t get the Mobile Device Management (MDM) tools they need to control Android devices brought into the workplace by employees, analysts have said.

Gartner recently reported that it has found adoption of Android tablets and smartphones in large business has so far been “severely limited” because of the complexities of managing devices from multiple vendors running different versions of Android.

A Gartner survey in April found that only 9% of enterprises have made or plan to make Android their primary mobile platform in the next year. That compares to 58% of enterprises that use or plan to use Apple’s iOS and 20% who favor Research in Motion’s BlackBerry OS.

Some analysts say they are hopeful that Motorola’s 2011 purchase of MDM software maker 3LM will improve IT’s ability to manage and secure Android, perhaps in time for the release of the coming Jelly Bean and/or Android 5.0 versions.

Analysts say 3LM is not true MDM, but that its software includes a layer of Application Programming Interfaces (APIs) that could make Android work better with third-party MDM software, analysts said.

Though Google is expected to use 3LM to improve Android manageability, the company wouldn’t comment on its plans for the software. Many analysts expect to gain insight into Google’s plans at its Google I/O conference in late June.

Today, IT shops rely mostly on Exchange ActiveSync to manage Android devices used by workers for job tasks. However, analysts have said that ActiveSync lacks the sophistication required by IT shops.

“ActiveSync is a really low-end solution for MDM,” said Jack Gold, an analyst at J. Gold Associates.

“Now that Google owns Moto (Motorola Mobility), I expect the Moto folks to start feeding back into base Android some of the technology they have developed. This is the primary reason that Google bought Moto, in my opinion,” Gold added.

Gold predicted that the addition of Motorola Mobility will provide Android with “much more capable management interfaces and APIs.” While that won’t help current and past Android versions, it will mean enhanced security at enterprise standards for future Android versions, he added.

“None of this helps the Android enterprise users in the short term, unless they decide to work with MDM from Enterproid and others like Good that have a ‘two-persona’ capability on a device,” Gold said. He explained that “two-persona” refers to the ability to partition data on a smartphone or tablets so that a user’s personal photos and music won’t be destroyed if an IT shops wipes off sensitive corporate data from a mobile device.

Full coverage: Google

Article source: http://www.computerworld.com/s/article/9227491/Google_s_Motorola_buy_seen_boosting_Android_in_workplace_

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19 May 12 Android in enterprises ‘severely limited’ by weak management support from Google


Computerworld -

Adoption of Android tablets and smartphones in large businesses has been “severely limited” because of the complexities of managing the wide variety of Android-based devices and versions of the operating system, research firm Gartner said in an evaluation of 20 mobile device management (MDM) software vendors released Friday.

In a survey conducted in April, Gartner found that 58% of enterprises have made or plan to make Apple’s iOS their primary mobile platform in the next year. In comparison, 20% of enterprises will standardize on RIM’s BlackBerry platform and 9% will choose Google’s Android.

Google offers “weaker management support” for Android than Apple does for iOS or Research In Motion does for BlackBerry, Gartner added in its new 34-page study.

The broad-ranging study said the explosion in consumer smartphones and tablets used in workplaces is making MDM the “fastest-growing enterprise mobile software ever in terms of number of suppliers, revenue growth and interest from Gartner clients.”

MDM license revenues were about $200 million in 2010 and $350 million in 2011, and are expected to reach $500 million in 2012, Gartner said. Research firm IDC recently pegged 2010 MDM revenues at a higher level, $300 million, and it expects the market will reach $1.2 billion in 2015.

A big part of the reason why it’s difficult to manage Android systems, Gartner said, is that Google hasn’t opened many application programming interfaces (API) to the dozens of MDM vendors, which means they can’t connect their management tools to Android. In Android 4.0, Google only provided 16 APIs, compared to more than 500 APIs for the latest version of BlackBerry.

Some MDM vendors have built their own APIs for Android devices, but that process “is time-consuming and expensive to do for each device and version of Android,” Gartner said. “This [problem] has severely limited Android adoption in the enterprise, and even today, very few enterprises provide [Android] support.”

Google didn’t respond to a request for comment about Gartner’s report. However, Android vendors such as Motorola Mobility — which Google is acquiring — have defended the security and management features in Android for enterprise use. Those capabilities are mainly available through software from 3LM, a software vendor that Motorola acquired in 2011.

In January, Christy Wyatt, general manager of Motorola Mobility’s enterprise business unit, said: “We have to get Android as a whole at a stable and secure place, and once Android is behind the firewall [with 3LM], that helps. There’s a lot of mythology around Android and whether it’s secure or not.”

Other Android device makers, such as HTC and Sony, have struck agreements to license 3LM software, she said at the time.

Gartner’s report noted that Google hasn’t disclosed what it plans to do with 3LM as part of Motorola, adding that enterprises Gartner works with are hoping Google will use 3LM as part of an enterprise version of Android for device makers.

Earlier in May, 3LM announced Version 3.0 of its Mobile Device and Application Management platform for handling smartphones and tablets that run Android 4.0, as well as managing iPhones and iPads. Other new features include an easier interface for IT managers and tools to prevent users from copying data from corporate systems to noncorporate systems.

Gartner didn’t rank 3LM in its latest review of 20 MDM vendors because it doesn’t consider 3LM a true MDM vendor. Gartner analyst Phillip Redman, one of three authors of the report, said in an email interview that 3LM builds APIs and doesn’t provide actual MDM capabilities, and he added that those APIs serve as a “layer between MDM and a mobile device.”

Claims that Android is broadly secure are “not true,” Redman added. “All Android is not created equally.” He didn’t elaborate.

Enterprise use of BlackBerry smartphones, which have been widely regarded as secure and manageable through RIM’s BlackBerry Enterprise Server, is on the decline. In April, RIM released an MDM platform called Mobile Fusion that provides management for iOS and Android as well as BlackBerry. Gartner didn’t evaluate Mobile Fusion for its report because it’s too new. But the research firm did say that the software “could be a force if [RIM] decides to invest more in this area.”

Of the 20 MDM vendors that Gartner studied, it ranked these five as leaders: MobileIron, AirWatch, Fiberlink, Zenprise and Good Technologies. SAP and Symantec were listed as “challengers,” while BoxTone and IBM were described as “visionaries.”

Gartner described the other 11 MDM vendors it studied as “niche players.” They are McAfee, Sophos, Soti, Trend Micro, Tangoe, OpenPeak, Silverback MDM, Amtel, Landesk, Smith Micro Software and MyMobile Security.

In all, there are probably more than 100 vendors globally that offer some form of MDM capability, Gartner said. To qualify for the group of 20, the MDM vendors had to have a well-rounded set of mobile management tools. For security management, each of the 20 had to have IT tools that were capable of the following: enforcing passwords; wiping data off of a device; remotely locking a device; creating an audit trail for logging in of a device and verifying a device’s configuration from a central console; and detecting jailbreaks and rooting. They also had to support at least three mobile operating systems. Other required security components included support for antivirus software, encryption, firewalls and mobile VPNs.

Other requirements included tools to block use of flash cards or other external storage media, and tools to audit changes made on the hardware. For software, the 20 MDM vendors had to support the ability to push or pull apps on a device and to verify the origin of mobile apps. The software also had to support app updates, patches and an enterprise and third-party app store.

All 20 MDM vendors in the Gartner group had to have MDM-specific revenue of at least $1.5 million. The average price for MDM software is about $60 per user per year, Gartner said, and that price should drop to $40 per user per year by 2015 as more cloud-based MDM systems emerge.

covers mobile and wireless, smartphones and other handhelds, and wireless networking for Computerworld. Follow Matt on Twitter at Twitter @matthamblen, or subscribe to Hamblen RSSMatt’s RSS feed. His email address is mhamblen@computerworld.com.

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Article source: http://www.computerworld.com/s/article/9227282/Android_in_enterprises_severely_limited_by_weak_management_support_from_Google

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19 May 12 Android in enterprises ‘severely limited’ by weak management support from Google


Adoption of Android tablets and smartphones in large businesses has been “severely limited” because of the complexities of
managing the various Android models and versions, market research firm Gartner said in an evaluation of 20 mobile device management
(MDM) software vendors released Friday.

iOS vs. Android in the enterprise

A survey that Gartner conducted in April showed 58% of enterprises have or will make iOS, used in iPhones and iPads, their
primary mobile platform in the next year, compared with 20% for BlackBerry and 9% for Android.

Google offers “weaker management support” for Android than Apple for iOS or Research in Motion for BlackBerry, Gartner added
in its new 34-page study.

The broad-ranging study said the explosion in consumer smartphones and tablets used in workplaces is making MDM the “fastest-growing
enterprise mobile software ever in terms of number of suppliers, revenue growth and interest from Gartner clients.”

MDM license revenues were about $200 million in 2010 and $350 million in 2011, and are expected to reach $500 million in 2012,
Gartner said. Research firm IDC recently said the revenues were higher in 2010, at $300 million, and expects the market will reach $1.2 billion in 2015. A principal problem with Android management capabilities, Gartner said, is that Google hasn’t opened many application programming interfaces (APIs) for the dozens of MDM vendors to connect their various management
tools to Android, Gartner said. In Android 4.0, Google only provided 16 APIs, compared to more than 500 APIs for the latest
version of BlackBerry.

Some MDM vendors have built their own APIs for Android devices, but the process “is time-consuming and expensive to do for
each device and version of Android,” Gartner said. “This [problem] has severely limited Android adoption in the enterprise,
and even today, very few enterprises provide [Android] support.”

Google didn’t respond to a request to comment. However, Android vendors such as Motorola Mobility — which Google is acquiring
— have defended the security and management available in Android for enterprise uses, mainly through software from 3LM, a software vendor that Motorola acquired in 2011.

Christy Wyatt, general manager of Motorola Mobility’s enterprise business unit, commented in January: “We have to get Android
as a whole at a stable and secure place, and once Android is behind the firewall [with 3LM], that helps. There’s a lot of mythology around Android and whether it’s secure or not.” Other Android device makers, such as HTC and Sony, have struck agreements to license 3LM
software, she said at the time.

Gartner’s report noted that Google hasn’t disclosed what it plans to do with 3LM as part of Motorola, adding that enterprises
Gartner works with are hoping Google will use 3LM as part of an enterprise version of Android for device makers.

Earlier in May, 3LM announced version 3.0 of its Mobile Device and Application Management platform to handle smartphones and tablets running Android 4.0, as well as manage iPhones and iPads. Other new features including an easier interface for IT managers and tools to prevent users from copying data from corporate
apps to non-corporate apps.

Article source: http://www.networkworld.com/news/2012/051812-android-in-enterprises-39severely-limited39-259434.html

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14 May 12 Android Trojan Mimics PC Drive-by Malware Attack


Researchers have noticed one of the first examples of Android “drive-by” malware from an ordinary website, a dangerous type of automatic attack more commonly used to infect Windows PCs.

Discovered by security company Lookout Mobile Security on a number of webistes, the decidedly odd “NotCompatible” Trojan is distributed using a web page containing a hidden iFrame.

Any Android browser visiting an affected page (the attack ignores PC browsers) will automatically start downloading the malware without the user being aware that this has happened. (See also “5 Free Android Security Apps: Keep Your Smartphone Safe.”)

This isn’t quite a PC drive-by attack because the user still needs to install the app, at which point it relies on the user having ticked the “Unknown Sources” box (in most cases this box would be unticked) that allows non-market apps to be installed.

The rough equivalent of this layer on a Vista or Windows 7 PC would be the User Access Control (UAC) which is usually circumvented using social engineering or by misrepresenting the nature of the application.

NotCompatible eschews such tricks beyond simply claiming to be a security update. It’s not sophisticated but it might fool some users, some of the time.

Malware’s Mission Unclear

The purpose of the infection is a bit of a mystery.

“This specific sample, while relatively well constructed, does not appear to go to great lengths to hide its intended purpose: it can be used to access private networks,” said Lookout’s blog.

“This feature in itself could be significant for system IT administrators: a device infected with NotCompatible could potentially be used to gain access to normally protected information or systems, such as those maintained by enterprise or government.”

The affected sites appeared to have low volumes of traffic but the company believed the exploit iFrame was being served on other sites it had yet to identify, it said.

The warning is stark; mobile malware creators are experimenting with what is possible for this class of malware and have found a way to get mobile malware on to devices without them having to visit third-party app sites as has been the case up to now.

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Article source: http://www.pcworld.com/article/255538/android_trojan_mimics_pc_driveby_malware_attack.html

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11 May 12 Ultimate Android betrayal: I just bought a third gen iPad


I feel almost ashamed to be writing this post, but we’re all friends here, right? I’ve been carrying the Android torch for a while now, but earlier this week I broke down and bought a third generation iPad.

This isn’t my first iPad; I bought the original model when it first came out and it proved to me that in general I was a fan of the tablet format. I wasn’t as much a fan of Apple’s “walled garden” or having to run iTunes on my system in order to back things up, but at the time there weren’t any good Android options available.

When Acer brought its Tegra 2-based Iconia A500 to market — one of the earlier dual-core, Honeycomb-running Android tablets — I switched camps and the iPad has been collecting dust since. I also have a Kindle Fire, and my current Galaxy Nexus smartphone replaced a Motorola Droid. So I’ve been an Android guy for a while now.

So why switch back?

Two main reasons. First is the Retina display. It really is a thing of beauty and I grew impatient waiting for Android tablet makers to catch up (I know the 3rd gen iPad hasn’t been on the market very long but I’m not a very patient person). I do a lot of reading on my tablets and anything that makes that a better experience is worth spending money on, in my opinion. My 50th birthday is a few years behind me and my eyes can use all the TLC I can offer them.

I’m comfortable with that reason, but it’s reason two that I feel a bit uneasy about. I bought an iPad because all my friends have iPads. That just makes me part of the problem, I know. Regular readers of this blog know I’m a gamer, and I’ve got a group of friends doing asynchronous multiplayer games via their iPads. I wanted to get in on the fun and too many newer games expect you to have at least an iPad 2 at this point.

So not only am I setting aside Android, but I’m bolstering the theory (a theory I’ve often disputed) that handheld gaming systems like the Nintendo 3DS and Sony Vita are being killed off by tablets and smartphones. These friends don’t have handheld gaming systems; they have iPads instead.

Anyway, it’s way too late for me to do any kind of a ‘review’ of the third generation iPad but I thought I’d throw out a few random thoughts.

On the negative side, I wish it was a little lighter. (The original iPad was 1.5 lbs, the iPad 2 slimmed down to 1.33 lbs, but the 3rd generation is back up to 1.44 lbs.) The battery life doesn’t seem to be as good as on the iPad 1 or my Acer. That’s not to say it’s bad; last night I ran it down from 100% to 80% in about 2 hours, which means the 10 hour estimated battery life should be accurate. But the old iPad and the Acer seem to run forever on a charge. The change might be due to my using this new model differently though (I’ll get to that in a minute). Finally, the Apple cover is junk. I hate it. It’s always flapping around on me and getting in the way and of course it does nothing to protect the back of the unit.

On the positive side, since I’ve been away from the iPad world, the Internet has really moved forward with support for the device. I’m finding it pretty unusual to encounter a site that doesn’t render nicely on the new iPad, and video is virtually never a problem. Because of this I find myself watching a lot of streaming video on the new iPad, which may be why the battery life seems shorter to me. More time watching, less time futzing around looking for sites that support HTML5 video (the old iPad) or waiting for Flash to load (the Acer).

Generally speaking it’s nice to read about some cool new app and be able to assume it’s available for your hardware. Android seems to be catching up to iOS as far as support goes, but as an Android user I was very, very familiar with the phrase “Coming soon.”

Reading on this thing is a dream. My initial intent was to use the new iPad “for fun” and to keep doing work on the Android tablet. Work, in this context, means keeping up on many news feeds, filtering/sharing interesting articles into various ‘buckets’ I maintain for post fodder. I’m still not ready to do any serious text entry on a tablet.

Anyway that plan lasted about an evening. Text is just so crisp that it doesn’t make sense to go back to my beloved A500 for any kind of reading. I installed an RSS reader as well as InstaPaper and Pocket and off to work I went.

And last, this thing is really snappy. Now I can’t compare it to a Tegra 3 Android tablet running Ice Cream Sandwich and I like to believe the newer Android tablets will equal the performance of the 3rd gen iPad, but coming from a Tegra 2 device this thing works like a dream. I feel like I need to barely brush the screen to swipe, move and select items.

The one thing I’m still unsure of is iCloud. Apple gives you 5 GB of free storage that should allow me to back up the iPad over WiFi. Of course once I get more than 5 GB of stuff on it I’ll have a decision to make: install iTunes, pay for more iCloud storage, or live dangerously without a backup. Since I’m not generating much content on the iPad and I can re-download purchased apps, I might just live dangerously since the other two options aren’t at all appealing to me.

All in all, aside from this vague guilty feeling that I’ve abandoned Android, and of course the gaping hole in my wallet where $600 used to be, I’m really pleased with the new addition to my tablet collection.

Read more of Peter Smith’s TechnoFile blog and follow the latest IT news at ITworld. Follow Peter on Twitter at @pasmith. For the latest IT news, analysis and how-tos, follow ITworld on Twitter and Facebook.

Article source: http://www.itworld.com/mobile-wireless/276146/ultimate-android-betrayal-i-just-bought-third-gen-ipad

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08 May 12 Chrome beats IE for a weekend


Chrome beats IE for a weekend

Google creeps up on leisure time browsing crown

WIN – A free one year, 25 user licence of Microsoft Office 365!

Fresh from knocking off Microsoft’s Internet Explorer as the web’s most-used browser for a single day in March, Google’s Chrome browser has now claimed more users than Redmond’s HTML-cruncher for a whole weekend.

Data gathered by StatCounter shows Chrome has enjoyed a day of dominance on most weekends since its March ascendancy. On May 5th and 6th, however, it opened a gap over IE. Sunday the 6th even saw Chrome take a lead of nearly three percent.

Chrome beats IE for a whole weekend

IE still rules on weekdays, when use of the browser surges, presumably thanks to corporate drones diligent workers returning to the locked-down world of enterprise IT. But IE’s days as the market leader may even be numbered in those environments, as Microsoft has recently announced SharePoint and Microsoft CRM will support other browsers. That move will mean workplaces have fewer reasons to insist on IE as the corporate standard. ®

WIN – A free one year, 25 user licence of Microsoft Office 365!

Article source: http://go.theregister.com/feed/www.theregister.co.uk/2012/05/08/chrome_beats_ie_again/

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08 May 12 Flash Player sandbox available for Firefox


Ryan Naraine is a journalist and social media enthusiast specializing in Internet and computer security issues. He is currently security evangelist at Kaspersky Lab, an anti-malware company with operations around the globe. He is taking a leadership role in developing the company’s online community initiative around secure content management technologies.

Prior to joining Kaspersky Lab, Ryan was Editor-at-Large/Security at eWEEK, leading the magazine’s and Web site’s coverage of Internet and computer security issues and managing the popular SecurityWatch blog, covering the daily threats, vulnerabilities and IT security technologies. He also covered IT security, hacker attacks and secure content management topics for Jupiter Media’s internetnetnews.com.

Ryan can be reached at naraine SHIFT 2 gmail.com. For daily updates on Ryan’s activities, follow him on Twitter.

Article source: http://www.zdnet.com/blog/security/flash-player-sandbox-available-for-firefox/11995

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08 May 12 Chrome beats IE for a weekend


Chrome beats IE for a weekend

Google creeps up on leisure time browsing crown

WIN – A free one year, 25 user licence of Microsoft Office 365!

Fresh from knocking off Microsoft’s Internet Explorer as the web’s most-used browser for a single day in March, Google’s Chrome browser has now claimed more users than Redmond’s HTML-cruncher for a whole weekend.

Data gathered by StatCounter shows Chrome has enjoyed a day of dominance on most weekends since its March ascendancy. On May 5th and 6th, however, it opened a gap over IE. Sunday the 6th even saw Chrome take a lead of nearly three percent.

Chrome beats IE for a whole weekend

IE still rules on weekdays, when use of the browser surges, presumably thanks to corporate drones diligent workers returning to the locked-down world of enterprise IT. But IE’s days as the market leader may even be numbered in those environments, as Microsoft has recently announced SharePoint and Microsoft CRM will support other browsers. That move will mean workplaces have fewer reasons to insist on IE as the corporate standard. ®

WIN – A free one year, 25 user licence of Microsoft Office 365!

Article source: http://www.theregister.co.uk/2012/05/08/chrome_beats_ie_again/

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04 May 12 Google Drive For Chrome OS: Mobility and the Cloud


Google Drive is now being integrated with Google’s lighweight, essentially mobile-oriented Chrome operating system. This could be crucial to the future of both products. But more important, it underlines the symbiotic relationship between mobility and the cloud.

Talk about “thin clients” and remote storage has been around for years. But it is no coincidence that it finally began to catch on at the same time as mobile use takes off. And while the mobile trend has been largely consumer-driven, it has broad implications for IT at midsize firms. Most business computer use is by “consumers” of IT services. Mobility has impacted them in much the same way that it has impacted the general consumer public.

Overcast DayA Local Disk in the Cloud

As reported by Stephen Shankland at CNET, Google Drive is being incorporated into the lastest release of the Chrome operating system (version 20.0.1116.0). The integration was announced in a Chrome blog post.

For the Chrome OS, it is a critical step. The browser-based operating system achieves compactness at the price of a limited file-management system. And until now, the only way to make files saved on Chrome available elsewhere was by taking a fairly clunky user action, such as emailing a document to yourself.

Now, anything done through the Chrome OS will be integrated automatically and seamlessly into Drive’s cloud. Said Chrome OS product manager Scott Johnston, “It’s as if you have a local disk, but it happens to be stored in the cloud.”

Multiple Devices and the Cloud

The Chrome OS is not “mobile” in the same sense that Android is, designed specifically for smartphones and other very small mobile devices. But it is tailored for compact “Chromebooks,” which are certainly mobile in the sense of being carried along by their owners and used in various places.

More broadly, mobility goes along with having and using multiple devices. And therein lies a tale about data storage. So long as computer users typically worked on just one machine, storing data locally was simple, practical, and convenient. Having a work computer and a home computer didn’t really change this, since little data was shared between them.

But once the typical user has several devices, and wants to share data, whether personal music or work contacts, freely among them, the local-storage paradigm goes out the window. A local drive on one device is effectively “in the cloud” for all the other devices. So storage may as well really be in the cloud.

This mobile cloud paradigm does not just apply to consumers. For better or worse, it applies to IT as well. Mobile devices have come to work, and workplace computing access has gone on the road. Both trends mean that a midsize firm’s data can no longer be assumed to reside on local disks or even a local network.

For IT managers at these firms, it means some additional data management and data security headaches. But for the firms, it means greater flexibility. In any case, the symbiosis of mobility and the cloud is a fact of contemporary IT life.

This post was written as part of the IBM for Midsize Business program, which provides midsize businesses with the tools, expertise and solutions they need to become engines of a smarter planet. Become a fan of the program on Facebook. Follow us on Twitter.

Article source: http://midsizeinsider.com/en-us/article/google-drive-for-chrome-os-mobility-and

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