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31 Dec 12 3 LG Nexus 4 Features You May Not Know


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Below are the three features that you may not know your LG Nexus 4 have.

  1. Google+ storage – Photos can take a lot of storage space in your precious LG Nexus 4 with very limited internal storage. However, you can upload the photos you took in your Google+ account. This is also a good feature in the event that you lose your LG Nexus 4.
  2. PhotoSphere – The PhotoSphere is the update that Jelly Bean 4.2 brings with it 360 degree photos. LG Nexus 4 already enabled users to take panoramic photos. However, PhotoSphere takes this a step further and you can take photos of what is above and below you making sure you do not miss anything.
  3. Gesture typing – This is another feature unique to Jelly Bean 4.2 update and it brings a new keyboard in the style of the Swype keyboard. This feature allows you slide over the keyboard when typing the words. If you want to enable it, just go into settings and then choose Enable Gesture Typing on your LG Nexus 4.

On the other hand, some reports said that search engine giant Google is already working on the successor of the popular LG Nexus 4.

Google has been releasing Nexus smartphones and tablets over the years. Since it was launched, the Nexus line has included handsets from HTC, Samsung, and LG. However, it seems Google may be using the recently-acquired Motorola for its next phone.

Wall Street Journal quoted unnamed sources that a new device is on its way from Google-owned Motorola. These people say Motorola engineers are hard at work on a “sophisticated” handset codenamed ‘X phone.’ However, it is still unsure whether the device will be a Nexus-brand phone.

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Article source: http://au.ibtimes.com/articles/419322/20121231/lg-nexus-4-features-specs-2-jelly.htm

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29 Dec 12 Google Nexus review: What are Google ‘Nexus’ Android phone, tablet all about … – ABC15.com (KNXV


PHOENIX – iPhones and iPads are simple.  Apple only makes a handful of models and that’s it, that’s that.  The simplicity of their product line is part of the charm.  Android on the other hand is a totally different story. 

There is a long list of manufacturers all making different sizes, speeds, software versions, etc, etc.  There is some beauty to having more options but there is also a lot of confusion. 

Amid it all, there is one line of Android products that stands alone. The Nexus products from Google . Problem is, most people have no idea what “Nexus” is all about.

Nexus, is a line of products sold by Google. Google doesn’t actually make the smartphones and tablets.  It’s essentially a collaboration between Google engineers and a hardware company.  Think of it as Google’s idea of the perfect Android smartphone or tablet.

Here’s how it works: the people at Google who create the Android software work hand in hand different hardware companies to design the next Nexus product.  Usually in the world of Android devices, Google makes the software and then a hardware company takes that software and finesses it for their specific hardware.  The Nexus line is a marriage of the two processes.

Nexus provides synergy (man I hate that word).  It provides a connection between Android hardware and software that typically doesn’t exist.  It’s not always the best hardware out there and you often times miss out on some of the added features that manufacturers tack on to the Android OS.  None the less, you get the Android experience exactly as the creators of the Android operating envisioned. 

What many consumers don’t know is that most Android smartphones actually run a very modified version of Google Android.  This means each tablet or smartphone manufacturer will add their own software tweaks to give them the competitive edge.  They’re all called “Android” smartphones but the software can look very different on some devices.  In some situations this is a good thing, in other situations it just adds clutter.  Nonetheless, Samsung, HTC, LG, Motorola and others have carved out their Android niche because of their added secret sauce.  With a Nexus device, it’s Android bare naked.  No tweaks, no add-ons and no skins.  It’s Android exactly as the software geniuses at Google dreamed it up. 

The best part about Nexus devices is that you will almost always get the latest updates to the Android software within days of it being released by Google.  Typically, months before normal Android smartphones and tablets get that same update.  If you’re a “bleeding edge” kind of techie, this is a big deal.  Otherwise, most consumers won’t care or notice the difference.

Right now, Google offers 3 Nexus devices including the Nexus 4 smartphone, the Nexus 7 tablet and the Nexus 10 tablet.  The smartphone is not connected to a cell phone carrier and is only compatible with att and T-mobile.  Buy the smartphone, slide in a SIM card from your selected carrier and you’re good to go.  No contracts, no commitments. 

Are Nexus devices the best?  Not always.  They offer a great marriage between the Android software and the exact hardware that Google dreams up.  Typically they have some of the best specs to date but not always. 

What you do get is a streamlined Android experience without the added clutter from the manufacturers and cell phone carriers.  You also get updates as soon as they’re released.  Best of all, you typically get this at a rock bottom price.  The Nexus 7” tablet starts at $199, the 10” tablet at $399 and the Nexus 4 smartphone at $299 (without any contracts).   These prices are hard to beat for the hardware you get and the “pure” Google Android experience. 

I’m currently testing out the both the Nexus 4 smartphone and the Nexus 10 tablet, look for my reviews in the coming weeks.

Have you tried out a Nexus smartphone or tablet?  I’d love to hear your thoughts in the comments below or on Twitter or Facebook .

Copyright 2012 Scripps Media, Inc. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

Article source: http://www.abc15.com/dpp/news/science_tech/google-nexus-review-what-are-google-nexus-android-phone-tablet-all-about-yuhnke-tech-check

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29 Dec 12 How to Know When the Nexus 4 is Back in Stock


As we head into the New Year, Google’s latest Nexus smartphone, the Nexus 4, remains sold out completely through the Google Play Store with no return in sight. Those who still wish to buy it might be waiting a few weeks before it comes back into stock but that doesn’t mean that you’ll need to check the Play Store every day. Instead, there are three much easier methods of checking for Nexus 4 stock on the Google Play Store.

Read: Nexus 4 Launch Remains a Mess into 2013.

Since the November, the Nexus 4 has been extremely scarce. The 8GB sold out almost immediately after the device went on sale for a second time through Google’s Play Store and a few weeks after that, the 16GB Nexus 4 displayed the same bold sold out symbol which prohibits customers from ordering the device. The Nexus 4′s bumper case remains sold out as well.

Google has not yet said when the Nexus 4 might be relieved of its supply issues, leaving prospective buyers wondering when they might be able to get their hands on LG’s first Nexus smartphone.

For those who might be looking to order, checking the Google Play Store for availability might have already become a daily ritual. Personally, I used check it every day in the hopes that Google would finally be offering it again because I have no interest in paying exorbitant amounts of money for the Nexus 4 through site’s like Craigslist or eBay. One of the beautiful parts about the Nexus 4, after all, is its price tag.

Fortunately, I decided to cut that daily routine out and move on to greener pastures. What I mean is that there are easier ways to ensure that you’ll be ready to buy a Nexus 4 once the device comes back into stock.

Here now, we show you how to check for Nexus 4 stock through the Google Play Store not only in the U.S., but in other countries as well.

Article source: http://www.gottabemobile.com/2012/12/28/how-to-know-when-the-nexus-4-is-back-in-stock/

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28 Dec 12 LG Nexus 4 vs Samsung Galaxy Nexus : Camera shootout


We had a run-in with Google’s flagship smartphone today and we put it to work right away. The Nexus 4 is built by LG and follows the Galaxy Nexus very closely in terms of design and aesthetics. We’ll have an in-depth first impressions of the phone for you very soon, but first, how about a little camera showdown against the Galaxy Nexus. The camera in the previous phone was only good if all the conditions were ideal like a bright summer’s day. Anything else and you might as well not bother taking the phone out of your pocket. The Nexus 4 on the other hand has an 8MP BSI sensor from Sony, so we can expect great things from it, especially in low light.

We will be comparing it with other handsets like the iPhone 5, Lumia 920, etc in the future but for now, we just want to see how much of an improvement it is over its predecessor.

On Video

We’ve shot a quick hands-on video of the LG Nexus 4, highlighting its design and build as well as a quick comparison with the Galaxy Nexus itself. We also get to see the new powerful Qualcomm SoC in action through a quick lap of NFS: Most Wanted.

Good detail on both but the Nexus 4 edges out the GNex with better depth of field

Good detail on both but the Nexus 4 edges out the GNex with better depth of field

 

In the first out door test, both cameras appear to capture very good amount of detail. However, the colours are a bit exaggerated in the Galaxy Nexus as compared the Nexus 4. Also, the depth of field is stronger in the Nexus 4 as the blue wall and shrubs in the background are more blurred out.

No real competition here

No real competition here

 

Our second test was indoors, under sufficient ambient lighting. Here, the BSI sensor come into play by offering a much better white balance as well as a lot more detail. The Galaxy Nexus is simply unable to capture enough detail and colours in this sort of lighting.

Good detail and accurate colours from the Nexus 4

Good detail and accurate colours from the Nexus 4

 

We finally come to our macro test. Once again, the Nexus 4 came out on top with better white balance and much better contrast. The detail is also a lot better.

There’s no word when the Nexus 4 will actually launch in India but latest rumours state a possibility of an early Jan launch. You can buy the handset right now from the gray market for approximately Rs 30,000 for the 16GB model. Stay tuned for our first impressions on the Nexus 4 coming up shortly. 


Product sourced from: Cell Point, Shop No.76, Heerapanna. Contact no:+91 9819 031 860

Article source: http://tech2.in.com/features/smartphones/lg-nexus-4-vs-samsung-galaxy-nexus-camera-shootout/664542

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28 Dec 12 LG wants Samsung Galaxy Note 10.1 banned in Korea


LG Display has fired back at Samsung in the ongoing patent skirmish between the two Korean companies.

An injunction filed today by LG seeks to ban Samsung’s
Galaxy Note 10.1 in Korea based on allegations that the
tablet ‘s display panel violates certain LG patents. LG said it filed the suit over Samsung’s use of OLED displays, according to Dow Jones Newswires.

The patents in question are related to the viewing technology used in OLED displays, which helps people better see the screen from any angle. In addition to halting sales of the Galaxy Note, LG is also looking for damages of 1 billion won ($933,000) each day in the event of “continued non-compliance,” Dow Jones added.

This suit marks the latest action in the OLED (organic light-emitting diode) patent wars between the two display manufacturers.

In September, LG filed a patent lawsuit against Samsung, claiming infringement of seven of its OLED patents. Alleging that Samsung violated the design, driver circuitry, and device design of its OLED panels, that suit wanted an an unspecified amount in damages and a permanent ban on five products, including the Galaxy S3 phone, the Galaxy Tab 7.7 tablet, and the smaller Galaxy Note.

In November, Samsung retaliated by filing its own suit against LG seeking to invalidate the patents in question on the grounds that they “lack innovation.”

The bad blood between the two goes back even further.

Earlier this year, 11 current and former Samsung Mobile employees were arrested on charges that they allegedly stole and leaked details to LG about a Samsung AMOLED TV. Six of LG’s own workers were also reportedly involved in the theft.

As Korea’s top two display manufacturers, LG and Samsung have been jockeying for dominant market share, especially in the area of OLED panels, which are used for smartphones, tablets, and TVs.

Shim Jaeboo, a Samsung Display vice president, told Dow Jones that his company did not infringe on LG’s patents and that it will respond to “unjustified claims” made by LG.

CNET contacted both LG and Samsung for comment and will update the story if we receive any information.

Article source: http://news.cnet.com/8301-13578_3-57561093-38/lg-wants-samsung-galaxy-note-10.1-banned-in-korea/

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27 Dec 12 Nexus 4 Phone – A Thing Of Beauty From Google


Nexus 4

Nexus 4 (Photo credit: Sterlic)

The Nexus 4 smartphone, from Google, but built by LG, is elegant. No, it is downright awesome. I’ve had a loaner test unit for well over a month and it just feels right in the hand. The camera is a dream to use, too.

Besides all the tech specs that make it a fast device that is easy to use and intuitive, it comes unlocked and contract-free. Sure, you are buying the device with cash up front, but it saves you in the long term by allowing you the freedom to jump carriers. (Jump to end of post if you are looking for the TechCrunch contest info).

I believe this phone offers business owners a chance to save money and get a terrific mobile computing device at the same time. After all, it is more than just a phone. I hear from many small biz owners who want out of the major carrier locked plan options and Google clearly has heard this refrain, too.

As readers may remember, I’m a big fan of the new Ting mobile phone service (briefly reviewed here in late September with a Samsung Galaxy S III): What Phone Should I Get?. Ting offers a terrific a la carte pricing plan that I really like for small business owners looking to keep phone costs down.

I’m still trying to figure out if I could purchase another Ting phone, swap out the SIM card, and make the Nexus 4 into a Ting phone. This post will be updated if I successfully achieve that goal. The company sent me a loaner phone and I’m on the $16/month for my business cell phone plan test with Ting. I love that I can change options easily without creating a new contract.

Since Google sent me the Nexus 4 to evaluate for my other small business columns (and sadly it goes back at some point in the near future), I have been using it with either Google Talk or Skype on wifi-only. But, figuring out where to go to get the SIM card set up takes a bit of, well, Googling.

The best post I found about setting up this unlocked phone is from J.R. Raphael at ComputerWorld in his post: Google’s Nexus 4: Understanding Your Carrier Options. In a nutshell, he recommends purchasing a simple prepaid cell phone plan from Straight Talk or a regular monthly plan from T-Mobile.  Plus, you can follow some of his other in-depth posts for more ideas on how to save on your cell phone bill.

LG Nexus 4 (Front)

LG Nexus 4 (Front) (Photo credit: drukelly)

Head to this official Google page for all the details about the Google Nexus 4. Just a few of the highlights:

  • Screen size: 4.7″ diagonal
  • 1280 x 768 pixel resolution (320 ppi)
  • Corning® Gorilla® Glass 2 (tough stuff from my experience)
  • Android 4.2 (Jelly Bean)
  • 8GB or 16GB with 2GB of RAM
  • Qualcomm Snapdragon S4 Pro CPU
  • 8 MP Camera
  • Wireless charging (kinda cool to do away with cables)

Chris Velazco at TechCrunch did a super in-depth review in November and it covers just about anything you might wonder about this new phone. Nexus 4 Review: Not Exactly Perfect, But Close Enough For Me.

The last cool thing to know about the Nexus 4, if you are in the market for a personal or a business mobile phone is that TechCrunch is giving one away on New Year’s Eve. It is partly a contest to build Facebook likes, but hey, that’s one of the games these days. Read the contest details here: TechCrunch Giveaway: Nexus 4 And Nexus 10 #TechCrunch.

If you are a business owner looking to save money on a cell phone plan by purchasing an unlocked phone up front, the Google Nexus is one high-end phone to consider. LG has done a fine job of making a phone that competes with Apple’s iPhone, in terms of eye candy and technical chops, though many of my Apple buddies prefer the smaller form factor of the iPhone. The Google Nexus 4 is a powerful phone and handheld computer for those days where you are mobile and without a tablet or laptop.

Article source: http://www.forbes.com/sites/tjmccue/2012/12/26/nexus-4-phone-a-thing-of-beauty-from-google/

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26 Dec 12 LG Nexus 4 Available In Google Play Store On 2/31/2013 – Auto-o


As we reach the end of 2012, the most difficult smartphone to come by is the LG Nexus 4. We had our bets up that it would be the iPhone 5 but it looks like Apple learned its lesson from past iPhone releases and were well prepared this time.

LG Nexus 4: when (if ever) will it be easily available on the Google Play Store?

Unfortunately we can’t say that about Google and their empty Play Store is proof of that. Not only is the LG Nexus 4 sold out but so is the Google Nexus 7 and some of the Nexus 10 models.

Now back to the LG Nexus 4, so when can we expect it to be back in stock? At this time both Google and LG are playing the blame game. Google is criticizing LG for the lack of stock while others are seeing Google’s lack of experience with selling hardware the real issue. At this time, all that has been officially said is that it will be back in a couple of weeks.

If you’ve been keeping an eye on the Play Store though you will see that the shipping date keeps slipping, and now it is deep into February should you order one today. Personally, I would be on the lookout for the few units that happen to pop up in the Google Play Store every now and then. That is if you don’t mind waiting until next year. Check out the link below to see real-time updates of availability of the LG Nexus 4 over at the Google Play Store across 4 countries. It also has a history of previous times when it became available in case you’re good with numbers and can work out the pattern. If you can, do tell me your predictions as I am yet to get my hands on one!

Article source: http://www.autoomobile.com/news/lg-nexus-4-play-store-availability/10010511/

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20 Dec 12 Could Maps and iPhone be Google’s Real Nexus?


Google Maps returned to the iPhone with a bang over the weekend, garnering 10 million downloads in its first 48 hours on the Apple app store. In the three months since Apple released iOS 6, including its own maps, the company has been mocked and vilified for a product that many have found inferior. The controversy, which was probably overblown, might have taking some of the polish off Apple’s reputation, but Google’s rapid and fairly spectacular response is a story unto itself.

A couple of things to get out of the way first. The new Google Maps on the iPhone is terrific, as is Google Maps everywhere else. In fact, Google Maps on iPhone is currently better than it is on Android. I’m not the only person who feels that way. And, just to clarify, the “better part” here is the fit-and-finish of the app. As far as functionality and ease of use, Google Maps and Apple’s app are pretty similar. Google trumps Apple on accuracy and richness of data, which makes sense given Google has more than 7,000 people working on making those maps great.

When you consider just how many people that is — it’s nearly twice as many as all of Facebook — you get a sense of the strategic importance of maps to Google. (Maps remain important to Apple as well, which is rumored to be in talks with Foursquare to improve its local data.) As more and more of search goes mobile, Google has seen average revenue per search decline. The good news, however, is that people on the go are always looking for something and that’s why maps are so important to Google. It should surprise no one that it took less than three months to produce a beautiful, polished Google Maps app for the iPhone.

And while the team behind the maps is pretty far removed from the group that produces the Nexus line of tablets and smartphones, it’s worth comparing the success of Maps for iPhone with Nexus. Last month, Google released a moderately well reviewed phone called the Nexus 4, that oddly lacked state-of-art 4G LTE data. Apparently building few, the phone sold out quickly and has been essentially unavailable ever since. Google let it be known that the supply problems are the fault of LG, made few explicit promises of better supply anytime soon and left it at that.

Given that this is a Google-branded product, sold on its own website, you might expect it would get better treatment from the mothership than “we’re sorry you don’t have it yet, but we can’t do much for you”, but the truth is the Nexus products just don’t matter very much to Google. They are supposed to light the way in the Android market as “best in class” devices, but even when they get it right the effect is often muted. Consider Google’s new tablets, the Nexus 7 and 10. The smaller one, in particular, is almost universally praised, more so even than the aforementioned Nexus 4 phone.

Article source: http://www.forbes.com/sites/markrogowsky/2012/12/18/could-maps-and-iphone-be-googles-real-nexus/

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18 Dec 12 The beauty of the Android fanboy battles


Ladies and gentlemen, a monumental shift is happening in the battlegrounds of mobile technology — and you don’t have to look any further than Android fan fights to see the effects.

We’ll get into the nitty gritty in a moment. First, we need to take a quick trip back in time: Not long ago, the emotion-packed debate among smartphone fans revolved almost exclusively around the “iPhone vs. Android” comparison. Just a couple short years ago, in fact, the main argument I heard from readers was how ridiculous it was that I dared suggest Android was in many ways more advanced than iOS.

Even the fact that I looked at ongoing trends and — way back when Android accounted for a single-digit percentage of the global smartphone market — had the audacity to point out that the platform was on its way to global domination was largely laughed off as blasphemous nonsense. I got called more bad names than I can count back then, and the number of people on the Android side of the fence was tiny compared to what it is today.

My, how things have changed. The latest numbers from ComScore show Android holding about 54 percent of the U.S. smartphone market, with Apple trailing behind at 34 percent. Globally, the disparity is even greater: According to IDC, three-quarters of all smartphones shipped worldwide in the third quarter of 2012 were Android-based, compared to just 15 percent for iOS. And remember, Apple launched its heavily hyped iPhone 5 within that very window.

The shift I’m talking about today isn’t about those numbers, though — not directly, at least. What’s more interesting to me is how the effect of that market change is starting to trickle down to the broader user perspective.

Allow me to illustrate: Over the last couple weeks, I wrote a series of stories sharing my pre-holiday recommendations for the top three Android phones both in general and for the various U.S. carriers. All of a sudden, I noticed a virtual bar-room brawl breaking out about my choices — people passionately arguing about how I could possibly pick Phone X over Phone Z, even insulting me because I didn’t recommend the particular phone or manufacturer they preferred.

Stop and think about that for a second: I’m now getting heckled for recommending one Android device over another Android device. The heated debate — the one that gets people’s blood boiling — is now over a perceived snub to someone’s Android brand of choice.

How cool is that?

That changing level of loyalty is a testament to how much the mobile landscape has evolved. This particular anecdote is just one example, of course; you can see the effect in plenty of places, ranging from similar intraplatform arguments to the iReminiscent levels of hype and rumor surrounding some Android device launches. Heck, we even have Android manufacturers pushing out attack ads against each other these days (seriously — who woulda thought?!).

So what’s it all mean? Simple: The game is no longer merely about working to grab attention away from the iPhone. Sure, that’s still a factor — and the mobile market is in a constant state of flux — but look at the numbers. For the moment, at least, that battle’s been won.

And let’s be honest: At this point, it doesn’t take much to one-up Apple (or at least significantly differentiate from it). The real challenge now is to win over hearts within the ever-expanding and competitive Android ecosystem — to stand out from the other Android manufacturers and stake a claim in this crowded realm of dessert-flavored delights.

That means LG has to keep stepping up its efforts if it wants to steal some of Samsung’s share. HTC has to figure out a way to expand its availability and punch up its marketing if it’s going to stay relevant. Motorola’s gotta fight to rebuild its reputation as a first-class handset-maker. And Samsung — much like Apple two years ago — had better not rest on its laurels if it wants to hang onto its crown.

The best part? No matter how it all plays out, we, the consumers of Android products, invariably win. In terms of technology and innovation, Android is moving at a breakneck pace — and it’s no small wonder.

Android Power TwitterWhen you compare this to the Apple-centric state of the mobile tech ecosystem a few short years ago, it’s really just mind-blowing. And it makes me more excited than ever to see what new competition-driven innovations — and competition-fueled discussions — 2013 will bring.

[Android battle image courtesy Vu Viet Anh (aoisora9x).]

Article source: http://blogs.computerworld.com/android/21518/android-fanboy-battles

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18 Dec 12 Nexus 4 delays blamed on LG’s ‘scarce and erratic’ supply by Google chief


Google UK’s managing director has made a fulsome apology to would-be buyers of the new Nexus 4 smartphone, blaming “scarce and erratic” supplies from manufacturer LG, but admitting that “our communication has been flawed” with both sides.

Dan Cobley, the managing director for the UK, put the apology on his Google+ page following widespread criticism in user forums of erratic and perverse delivery schedules, in which people who ordered the phones online from Google earlier saw shipping dates long after those who made subsequent orders.

The Nexus 4, made by LG to Google’s specifications, runs a “pure Google” version of Android without any handset maker’s alterations. The comparatively low UK price of £239 for the 8GB model of the high-specification handset – which offers a 4.7in, 320ppi screen, 8 megapixel camera, HSPA+ connectivity and NFC – attracted a significant number of buyers seeking to use it for a sim-only contract with a carrier.

But Google hit a series of supply chain problems because demand ran ahead of supply. Google has repeatedly declined to say how many were ordered worldwide, but has been overwhelmed with demand each time it has offered stock through its site, beginning in November.

Cobley said in a comment on one of his own posts told would-be buyers and those who had ordered that “I know what you are going through is unacceptable and we are all working through the nights and weekends to resolve the issue”. He offered an “unreserved apology for our service and communication failures in this process”, adding that he realised that “the people who ordered the Nexus 4 so early are among our most committed and loyal users”.

People who ordered the phones earlier in the month complained that after being told it would be shipped in “3-5 days”, that they then received no further notification from the company, and saw other people who had ordered later receiving shipping notifications. The problems have caused il feeling with a number of buyers.

“I don’t mind (well, I’m a bit miffed) that my phone is late,” wrote one would-be owner, Ben Stewart, on Cobley’s page. “I do mind that first in, first out isn’t being obeyed.” That, together with the lack of communication, “are what’s really annoying”, he said.

The hassles over delivery and shipping have left a number of purchasers dissatisfied over Google’s handling of the provision of phones. The Nexus 4, made by LG, is the fourth “pure Google” Android phone, following the Nexus One made bt HTC, and the Nexus S and Galaxy Nexus made by Samsung.

Google has also struggled with customers complaining that when they have wanted to return Samsung-made Nexus 10 tablets because of problems, but have run into problems getting shipping labels.

Although the Nexus line of phones has been high-profile online, actual sales figures have been comparatively low, with figures released by Samsung during its patent trial with Apple in California over the summer showing that the Nexus S sold around 500,000 units in the year from the second quarter of 2011, when it went on sale there, compared to Samsung’s total phones sales of around 14.5m in the US for the same period.

The Nexus 4 has attracted widespread attention because of the low price at which Google is offering it – equivalent to that for a lower-spec smartphone, rather than the Nokia Lumia, Samsung Galaxy S 3 or iPhone 5 with which it might be compared.

One irked commenter at product-reviews remarked: “Google needs to just buy a company that knows how to manage this process of selling physical items on line and shipping them. What they have now is a joke, If you call their device support, the people are clueless. Their ability to provide tech support for my Nexus 7 [tablet], or order status for my Nexus 4 is nil.”

Google owns the loss-making mobile phone manufacturer Motorola Mobility (MMI). But MMI is in the midst of a retreat from a number of manufacturing and sales positions outside the US, selling off factories in China, India and Brazil and closing offices in South Korea and Taiwan. It is also not set up to deal directly with customer sales, because it is structured as a phone manufacturer which deals with carriers, rather than selling direct.

The text of Cobley’s apology reads:

Dear all

I know that what you are going through is unacceptable and we are all working through the nights and weekends to resolve this issue. Supplies from the manufacturer are scarce and erratic, and our communication has been flawed. I can offer an unreserved apology for our service and communication failures in this process.

For those that originally received a 3-5 days shipping estimate, your orders are now in process for fulfillment. You can expect an email notification early this week which will include tracking information. Although you will be initially charged in full, you will receive a credit for the shipping charge soon after.

For others that received pre-Christmas shipping estimates, we anticipate processing your orders for fulfillment this week.

I realise that the people who ordered the Nexus 4 so early are among our most committed and loyal users and we are doing all we can to put things right.

Sorry again.

Dan

Article source: http://www.guardian.co.uk/technology/2012/dec/17/nexus-4-delays-apology-blame

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