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26 Dec 12 Intel to Take on iPhone 5S, Galaxy S IV with New Smartphone Platform


Intel (NASDAQ:

INTC

) is reportedly building an all-new smartphone platform to
compete more effectively in the mobile device market. According
to
DigiTimes

, the company will unveil the platform — along with new Atom
processors designed for lower power consumption — at the 2013
Mobile World Congress in Barcelona, Spain. The event is scheduled
to take place at the end of February.

If this report is accurate, Intel’s announcement will come
around the same time that Samsung is expected to unveil the
Galaxy S IV. The South Korean manufacturer was expected to
introduce the new phone a little sooner, but Samsung quashed that
rumor when it jumped ahead and unveiled the
Galaxy Grand

last week. The Grand runs the latest version of Google (NASDAQ:

GOOG

) Android and includes a five-inch display. Many speculate that
the Galaxy S IV will feature a screen that is even bigger, though
not as big as the Galaxy Note 2, which contains a 5.5-inch
display.

Apple (NASDAQ:

AAPL

) — which uses Intel chips in the iMac, MacBook Air, MacBook
Pro, Mac Mini and other computers — is rumored to be developing
an iPhone upgrade for an early spring 2013 release. The device,
which many suspect will be called the iPhone 5S, could be
unveiled in March.

Intel has had its eye on the smartphone market for some time.
The company is famous for manufacturing the Pentium, Celeron,
Core Duo and Core i7 brands, which have helped Intel to become
the world’s largest chipmaker.

Despite its size and massive revenue (roughly
$50 billion

annually), Intel is losing ground. It has learned that PCs –
desktops, notebooks and other forms — may not be the future. If
Intel is to maintain its spot at the top, it must build a
successful platform for the devices that stand to replace PCs:
smartphones and tablets.

Intel attempted to cash in on the mobile market when it
developed Medfield, a mobile platform used by Motorola, Lenovo
and a handful of other manufacturers. Thus far, none of the
Medfield-powered smartphones have produced a runaway success
story. Instead of hearing more about Motorola’s RAZR I, investors
have been bombarded with reports of
low shipment volumes

and the
surprising revelation

that the Medfield X86 chips did not initially support 4G LTE. The
processor also
prevented multiple Android apps

from running, including Google Chrome.

These results could be very troubling to smartphone makers
that are concerned with 4G LTE and/or Android app
compatibility.

Shares of Intel are down nearly 16 percent year-to-date.

Follow me

@LouisBedigianBZ


(c) 2012 Benzinga.com. Benzinga does not provide investment
advice. All rights reserved.

Article source: http://www.nasdaq.com/article/intel-to-take-on-iphone-5s-galaxy-s-iv-with-new-smartphone-platform-cm202063

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06 Jun 12 Trading Ubuntu for Chromebox Running Google Chrome OS


The VAR Guy is trading in his Ubuntu PC for a new Samsung Chromebox running Google Chrome OS. What motivated the move to a cloud-centric thin client? Here’s the explanation.

First, a little background. Google Chromebooks are web-centric notebooks that run Chrome OS (a super-slim operating system) and leverage cloud software like Google Apps. More recently, Google has partnered with Samsung to launch a Chromebox — a $329 thin desktop (plus mouse, keyboard and monitor costs) that resembles a Mac Mini.

The VAR Guy has run Ubuntu Linux since July 2007 (he also runs Mac OS X and Windows 7 on sister systems). Ubuntu has proven reliable and efficient for productivity apps. But The VAR Guy has been too lazy to upgrade from Ubuntu 7.04 or so. The thought of learning new user interfaces, potentially adjusting drivers and so on isn’t all that appealing to our resident blogger.

What Is A Chromebox?

On the other hand, the thought of Google “maintaining” Chromebox and Chrome OS with automated updates sounds appealing. Admittedly, CNet’s ChromeBox review raises some concerns. But The VAR Guy is willing to give Samsung’s Chromebox a try. The thin desktop features:

  • An Intel Core processor
  • 4 GB RAM
  • Built-in dual-band WiFi 802.11 a/b/g/n
  • Gigabit Ethernet
  • 6 USB 2.0 ports
  • Bluetooth 3.0 compatible
  • Kensington key lock compatible

The horsepower isn’t all that impressive. But the real power of Chromebox should come from the web… er, the cloud. The VAR Guy’s family will leverage Google Apps and other SaaS offerings, while Google essentially keeps the desktop up to date with automated software refreshes.

It sounds simple and compelling. But is it? The VAR Guy will offer continued updates once he boots up his first ChromeBox (in seven seconds) later this week…

And what will become of The VAR Guy’s PC running Ubuntu? Don’t worry. It will continue to hum along in The VAR Guy’s house, though not as a primary system.

Read More About This Topic

  • Related posts are coming soon

Article source: http://www.thevarguy.com/2012/06/05/trading-ubuntu-for-chromebox-running-google-chrome-os/

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06 Jun 12 Trading Ubuntu for Chromebox Running Google Chrome OS


The VAR Guy is trading in his Ubuntu PC for a new Samsung Chromebox running Google Chrome OS. What motivated the move to a cloud-centric thin client? Here’s the explanation.

First, a little background. Google Chromebooks are web-centric notebooks that run Chrome OS (a super-slim operating system) and leverage cloud software like Google Apps. More recently, Google has partnered with Samsung to launch a Chromebox — a $329 thin desktop (plus mouse, keyboard and monitor costs) that resembles a Mac Mini.

The VAR Guy has run Ubuntu Linux since July 2007 (he also runs Mac OS X and Windows 7 on sister systems). Ubuntu has proven reliable and efficient for productivity apps. But The VAR Guy has been too lazy to upgrade from Ubuntu 7.04 or so. The thought of learning new user interfaces, potentially adjusting drivers and so on isn’t all that appealing to our resident blogger.

What Is A Chromebox?

On the other hand, the thought of Google “maintaining” Chromebox and Chrome OS with automated updates sounds appealing. Admittedly, CNet’s ChromeBox review raises some concerns. But The VAR Guy is willing to give Samsung’s Chromebox a try. The thin desktop features:

  • An Intel Core processor
  • 4 GB RAM
  • Built-in dual-band WiFi 802.11 a/b/g/n
  • Gigabit Ethernet
  • 6 USB 2.0 ports
  • Bluetooth 3.0 compatible
  • Kensington key lock compatible

The horsepower isn’t all that impressive. But the real power of Chromebox should come from the web… er, the cloud. The VAR Guy’s family will leverage Google Apps and other SaaS offerings, while Google essentially keeps the desktop up to date with automated software refreshes.

It sounds simple and compelling. But is it? The VAR Guy will offer continued updates once he boots up his first ChromeBox (in seven seconds) later this week…

And what will become of The VAR Guy’s PC running Ubuntu? Don’t worry. It will continue to hum along in The VAR Guy’s house, though not as a primary system.

Read More About This Topic

  • Related posts are coming soon

Article source: http://www.thevarguy.com/2012/06/05/trading-ubuntu-for-chromebox-running-google-chrome-os/

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30 May 12 Chrome OS Update Adds Traditional Desktop Feel


Chrome OS Update Adds Traditional Desktop FeelGoogle’s Chrome OS may be all about the Web, but the latest version of the search giant’s operating system adds a traditional desktop look to Chromebooks including features familiar to any PC user. Instead of having one monolithic browser window with an endless number of tabs, Chrome OS has a new window manager that lets you open multiple windows at once. You can also snap a window to each side of the screen to view two separate windows at once similar to the Aero Snap feature in Windows 7.

At the bottom of the screen, the new Chrome OS features a Windows-style taskbar for pinning favorite apps, accessing a list of all your apps, and a system status area off to the right. You can also change the background image and customize the app launcher with the new Chrome OS look.

Chrome OS Update Adds Traditional Desktop FeelUsers and developers got their first taste of Chrome OS’ new desktop feel, codenamed Aura, in April through Google’s developer update channel. Aura is now rolling out on new Chromebooks such as the recently launched Chromebook Series 5 550 (starting at $450) and Mac Mini-like Chromebox ($330), both from Samsung.

Chromebooks are apparently finding at least a small user base with schools looking to distribute cheap PCs to students, but Google’s Web-centric laptops have not caught on with regular users in any significant way.

At first glance, Chrome OS makes a lot of sense for almost anyone looking for a secondary PC. The average person uses their computer largely to get online and check e-mail, update Facebook, watch videos, and create the odd document. Chrome OS can handle all of these tasks and Google is promising more enhancements such as offline Google Docs editing in the coming weeks.

Chrome OS Update Adds Traditional Desktop FeelBut dig a little deeper and you’ll find that you can’t access full-powered photo and video editing tools, or store more than 16GB worth of data on the device’s puny SSD. Yes, there are online alternatives, but many are still not good enough to match up with their desktop equivalents.

As PCWorld’s Jason Cross pointed out in his first Chromebook Series 5 review, finding Chrome OS alternatives to powerful desktop apps can often feel like a hunt for workarounds. Until Chrome OS can solve that fundamental problem, Google may have a hard time winning over users. Even with its new desktop feel.

Connect with Ian Paul (@ianpaul) on Twitter and Google+, and with Today@PCWorld on Twitter for the latest tech news and analysis.

Article source: http://www.pcworld.com/article/256514/chrome_os_update_adds_traditional_desktop_feel.html

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30 May 12 Chrome OS Update Adds Traditional Desktop Feel


Chrome OS Update Adds Traditional Desktop FeelGoogle’s Chrome OS may be all about the Web, but the latest version of the search giant’s operating system adds a traditional desktop look to Chromebooks including features familiar to any PC user. Instead of having one monolithic browser window with an endless number of tabs, Chrome OS has a new window manager that lets you open multiple windows at once. You can also snap a window to each side of the screen to view two separate windows at once similar to the Aero Snap feature in Windows 7.

At the bottom of the screen, the new Chrome OS features a Windows-style taskbar for pinning favorite apps, accessing a list of all your apps, and a system status area off to the right. You can also change the background image and customize the app launcher with the new Chrome OS look.

Chrome OS Update Adds Traditional Desktop FeelUsers and developers got their first taste of Chrome OS’ new desktop feel, codenamed Aura, in April through Google’s developer update channel. Aura is now rolling out on new Chromebooks such as the recently launched Chromebook Series 5 550 (starting at $450) and Mac Mini-like Chromebox ($330), both from Samsung.

Chromebooks are apparently finding at least a small user base with schools looking to distribute cheap PCs to students, but Google’s Web-centric laptops have not caught on with regular users in any significant way.

At first glance, Chrome OS makes a lot of sense for almost anyone looking for a secondary PC. The average person uses their computer largely to get online and check e-mail, update Facebook, watch videos, and create the odd document. Chrome OS can handle all of these tasks and Google is promising more enhancements such as offline Google Docs editing in the coming weeks.

Chrome OS Update Adds Traditional Desktop FeelBut dig a little deeper and you’ll find that you can’t access full-powered photo and video editing tools, or store more than 16GB worth of data on the device’s puny SSD. Yes, there are online alternatives, but many are still not good enough to match up with their desktop equivalents.

As PCWorld’s Jason Cross pointed out in his first Chromebook Series 5 review, finding Chrome OS alternatives to powerful desktop apps can often feel like a hunt for workarounds. Until Chrome OS can solve that fundamental problem, Google may have a hard time winning over users. Even with its new desktop feel.

Connect with Ian Paul (@ianpaul) on Twitter and Google+, and with Today@PCWorld on Twitter for the latest tech news and analysis.

Article source: http://www.pcworld.com/article/256514/chrome_os_update_adds_traditional_desktop_feel.html

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17 Nov 11 How to control a Mac from your PC using Chrome Remote Desktop


Chrome Remote Desktop is a handy way to control a Mac from your PC.

Chrome Remote Desktop is a handy way to control a Mac from your PC.

(Credit:
Screenshot by Lance Whitney/CNET)

Need to connect to and control a
Mac from your PC? One quick and easy solution can be found in Google’s Chrome Remote Desktop feature.

Released as a beta early last month, the Chrome Remote Desktop extension lets you connect to one computer from another directly through the browser. From there, you can control the other computer using your mouse and keyboard.

Of course, remote desktop software is nothing new. Microsoft includes its Remote Desktop Connection in Windows. It also offers a Mac version of the software, but that one only lets you connect to a PC from your Mac, not the other way around. There are certain options for going from PC to Mac, such as setting up a VNC (virtual network computing) connection in your Mac and then running a VNC client on your PC.

But Chrome Remote Desktop can connect you no matter which computers reside on both ends. And as such, it’s an effective way to control a Mac from your PC without having to configure a variety of settings and download other software.

You can set up such a connection by going through the following steps:

  1. First install Google Chrome on both your PC and Mac if it’s not already installed.
  2. Next download the Chrome Remote Desktop extension from its page at the Chrome Web store and install it on both computers.
  3. After installation, launch Chrome on your Mac and click on the + button at the top to open a new tab. You should see a page displaying any software and extensions that have been installed in Chrome. Click on the one for Chrome Remote Desktop. The first time you do this, you’ll receive a message asking for authorization. Click on the Continue button.
  4. The next screen will ask for the necessary permissions for the extension to run. Click on the Allow Access button.
  5. The next screen will prompt you to share the computer. Click on the Share this Computer button.
  6. You’ll then receive an access code that must be entered on your PC in order to control your Mac. Write down that code.
  7. Next launch Chrome on your PC. Click on the new Tab button and click on the icon for the Chrome Remote Desktop. Again, the first time you run the extension, you’ll need to grant permission for the extension to run.
  8. At the Chrome Remote Desktop BETA Connect screen, click on the link to access a shared computer.
  9. Type in the access code generated on the Mac and then click the Connect button.
  10. You should now see your Mac displayed in the Chrome browser on your PC. As with any remote desktop application, you can use your mouse and keyboard to move around, open applications, access features, create documents, and do virtually anything else you want. You can also minimize Chrome on the Mac but don’t close it otherwise the connection will be lost.
  11. Once you’re finished, you simply click on the button that says Disconnect.

The initial process seems lengthy because you have to grant permission on both sides. But the process runs quicker once you get past that first hurdle.

Chrome Remote Desktop can connect any two computers over the Internet, not just on the same network. So, for example, you can use this to remotely connect to the computer of a friend or family member to help troubleshoot a problem. Of course, since it does run over the public Internet, there are always security concerns. People who may not want this accessible all the time can uninstall the extension and reinstall it when needed, but of course then you have to repeat the initial process each time.

Overall, Chrome Remote Desktop works smoothly. It doesn’t offer some of the bells and whistles and advanced options found in other remote control programs. But it’s a quick and simple solution for PC and Mac users and one I often rely on when I want to control my Mac Mini without leaving my PC.

Article source: http://news.cnet.com/8301-1023_3-57326848-93/how-to-control-a-mac-from-your-pc-using-chrome-remote-desktop/?part=rss&subj=software&tag=title

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