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19 Jun 12 Samsung Makes Android SAFE for IT


Samsung’s forthcoming Galaxy S III smartphone will be the company’s first device to be officially branded and sold under its new SAFE program.

SAFE stands for “Samsung Approved for Enterprise.”

The Galaxy S III will be available in the U.S. from Verizon Wireless, ATT (NYSE: T), Sprint (NYSE: S), T-Mobile and U.S. Cellular in July.

Samsung also introduced Safe2Switch, a program that lets smartphone users of other makers’ products trade in their existing devices and purchase a new Samsung smartphone. People who currently own a Samsung smartphone can trade up.

Samsung first introduced the SAFE program in the United States in late 2011, and there are more than 20 Samsung SAFE devices on the market, company spokesperson Martha Thomas told LinuxInsider. However, the Galaxy S III will be the first one to bear the program’s brand. Introducing devices under the SAFE brand will make it easier for customers to see which products are enterprise-ready.

“With SAFE, Samsung is sending a message to IT departments — this phone is easy for you guys to sign off on,” James Robinson, lead Android developer and cofounder of OpenSignalMaps, told LinuxInsider. “The S III is going to be an extremely popular device.”

Playing IT Safe

SAFE was created as a way to defragment the Android operating system (OS) across multiple versions offered on handsets by carriers in the United States, Samsung said. Out of the box, the SAFE-branded Galaxy S III supports a suite of enterprise-ready features and capabilities as well as 338 IT policies. These policies include on-device AES 256-bit encryption, enhanced support for Microsoft (Nasdaq: MSFT) Exchange ActiveSync, and support for virtual private network (VPN) and mobile device management (MDM) solutions.

Galaxy S III features include AllShare Play, which lets users securely share PowerPoint presentations and PDFs with other S III owners; Share Shot, which enables photo compiling and sharing; S Beam One Touch Sharing, which lets Galaxy S III owners exchange information or documents by tapping these devices together; and Samsung TecTiles — programmable tags and mobile applications.

Partnering With Samsung

Samsung is working with mobile device management (MDM) providers, including AirWatch, Sybase (NYSE: SY) and Juniper Networks (Nasdaq: JNPR), to provide management and security on the Galaxy S III. It’s also working with VPN providers, including Cisco (Nasdaq: CSCO) and F5 Networks, to enable IP-based encryption. Samsung’s security vendor partners include Symantec (Nasdaq: SYMC).

One partner, Avaya, “has been enabling Samsung’s Android-based devices with our Avaya one-X Mobile client application,” Avaya spokesperson Deb Kline told LinuxInsider. This “securely connects an end user’s Samsung mobile device to his or her corporate communications system.” Voice streams are encrypted and businesses can continue to apply their typical security measures such as firewalls and session border control.

Samsung “has put in place a formal quality assurance testing and verification process to ensure the SAFE enterprise solutions work as needed and described,” the company’s Thomas said. “The QA process will be in place for all future Samsung SAFE devices.”

Taming the Android Defrag Bomb?

Samsung’s claim of defragmenting Android with SAFE may make some users’ ears perk up — either with anticipation or skepticism. OpenSignalMaps recently found there are close to 4,000 different types of devices running the OS.

“SAFE defragments Android by creating a single standard for IT administrators to test against,” Samsung’s Thomas explained. “This means the IT administers can test one SAFE device such as the Galaxy S III and know that all SAFE phones — from those running on Gingerbread to Ice Cream Sandwich — will work the same on their network. It also allows VPN, MDM and application providers to leverage a single uniform software developer kit when creating solutions for SAFE devices.”

However, “Fragmentation in terms of security capabilities is what Samsung’s focusing on here, for that small sub-genre of fragmentation support for IT policies is what is needed,” OpenSignalMaps’ Robinson pointed out. “By introducing a new feature to its phones, Samsung is not providing a general cure to fragmentation. It’s not even providing a cure across all devices. But it is promising that … it’s going to be easier for IT departments to sign off on particular applications, particularly MDM and VPN apps, running on particular models.”

Article source: http://www.technewsworld.com/story/75412.html

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08 Jun 12 What Enterprises Should Take Away from IDC’s Latest Smartphone OS Forecast


It would seem foolhardy and stupid to try and guess the final league standings for a sports season four years from now (though the continued embrace of Big Data-based predictive analytics by pro sports teams may change that someday).

Yet, here we have good ol’ IDC stepping up this week with their latest predictions for smartphone operating system market share til 2016.

To be fair, IDC’s (and Gartner’s, and Forrester’s, etc.) forecasts do have more than stats-o-tainment value for those of us who check Techmeme five times daily.

For developers, it helps decide where to invest their time and skills in, and could mean the difference between a healthy income and unemployment several years down the road.

For app makers, it can mean the difference between breaking even and breakaway profits.

Ditto for hardware vendors.

And for enterprises, forecasts like this guide CIOs in making their long-range infrastructure and hiring plans.

And just to refresh your memory, here is IDC’s predictions from 15 months ago, for comparison.

Here are my takeaways with the enterprise in mind:

1) Multiple platforms are here to stay. Companies that are supporting 3-4 platforms today – BlackBerry, iOS, Android, and maybe Windows Mobile if they’re heavy into field service – but wish they weren’t will find no relief, according to IDC’s forecasts. Four years from today, they’ll be supporting Android, iOS, Windows Phone and (probably) BlackBerries.

Enterprises must not only seek out MDM tools that strongly manage all platforms, but also Mobile Application Development Platforms (MADPs) that allow you to write once, run anywhere on the OSes you want to use, with minimum rewrite. Even better would be an overarching platform that synchronizes MDM with MADP to give enterprises maximum control over their mobile infrastructure. Bottom line, you need to adapt as the days of the Windows/BlackBerry duopoly are over.

2) Forget IDC’s wording, Android isn’t “peaking.” According to IDC’s own figures, Android shipments this year will be 1.1 billion phones. That will grow to 1.22 billion Android smartphones in 2016. In other words, Android has neither stalled nor flattened out.

3) Even if Windows Phone has caught up to iOS by 2016, iOS will still be ahead. Even as Windows Phone matches iOS in 2016 shipments, its overall installed base of users will still lag for several smartphone refresh cycles (each of which is about two years). Also, IDC expects most of Windows Phone’s gains to come in emerging markets with Nokia’s help. Nothing wrong with that, except that mobile developers and apps still come from and cater to the developed markets – iOS’s core strength.

4) The big loser in IDC’s revised predictions isn’t iOS (or Symbian), it’s RIM. Whereas IDC once saw RIM still holding 13.7% share of the market by 2015, it now sees it only holding 6% this year, and 5.9% in 2016. “The gulf between the BlackBerry OS and its primary competition will widen over the forecast as the mobile phone market becomes increasingly software/app-oriented and the ‘bring your own device’ enterprise trend proliferates,” says IDC.

5) The forecasts, ultimately, don’t matter to CIOs as much as they would’ve 5-10 years ago. I see a trio of reasons: 1) the short tenure of today’s CIO means many won’t be around when 2016 rolls around; 2) the emergence of BYOD lets organizations avoid having to budget tens of millions of dollars in capital expenditures for mobile hardware; 3) long-range forecasts are less reliable due to the dynamicism of the mobile market. Think of tablets, which have only been around 2.5 years old. Not to be nihilistic, but any forecast today need to be taken with a handful, not a pinch of salt.

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If you want to hear more about where enterprise mobility might be in four years, I’d suggest checking out the Breakfast with Gamechangers Internet radio show next Wednesday June 13 at 11 am ET/8 am PT. SAP President and Corporate Officer Sanjay Poonen will be interviewed by host Bonnie D. Graham.

Article source: http://www.zdnet.com/blog/sybase/what-enterprises-should-take-away-from-idcs-latest-smartphone-os-forecast/3302

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26 May 12 Google’s Motorola buy seen boosting Android in workplace


Computerworld - With the closing of Google’s $12.5 billion acquisition of Motorola Mobility this week, talk of the possibilities for Android in the enterprise has spiked.

While Android has taken the consumer market by storm — the OS runs 59% of smartphones shipped in the first quarter of 2012 — IT managers remain wary that maintaining security and control of consumer Android devices devices used by workers may be difficult if not impossible, according to various surveys.

IT managers say they can’t get the Mobile Device Management (MDM) tools they need to control Android devices brought into the workplace by employees, analysts have said.

Gartner recently reported that it has found adoption of Android tablets and smartphones in large business has so far been “severely limited” because of the complexities of managing devices from multiple vendors running different versions of Android.

A Gartner survey in April found that only 9% of enterprises have made or plan to make Android their primary mobile platform in the next year. That compares to 58% of enterprises that use or plan to use Apple’s iOS and 20% who favor Research in Motion’s BlackBerry OS.

Some analysts say they are hopeful that Motorola’s 2011 purchase of MDM software maker 3LM will improve IT’s ability to manage and secure Android, perhaps in time for the release of the coming Jelly Bean and/or Android 5.0 versions.

Analysts say 3LM is not true MDM, but that its software includes a layer of Application Programming Interfaces (APIs) that could make Android work better with third-party MDM software, analysts said.

Though Google is expected to use 3LM to improve Android manageability, the company wouldn’t comment on its plans for the software. Many analysts expect to gain insight into Google’s plans at its Google I/O conference in late June.

Today, IT shops rely mostly on Exchange ActiveSync to manage Android devices used by workers for job tasks. However, analysts have said that ActiveSync lacks the sophistication required by IT shops.

“ActiveSync is a really low-end solution for MDM,” said Jack Gold, an analyst at J. Gold Associates.

“Now that Google owns Moto (Motorola Mobility), I expect the Moto folks to start feeding back into base Android some of the technology they have developed. This is the primary reason that Google bought Moto, in my opinion,” Gold added.

Gold predicted that the addition of Motorola Mobility will provide Android with “much more capable management interfaces and APIs.” While that won’t help current and past Android versions, it will mean enhanced security at enterprise standards for future Android versions, he added.

“None of this helps the Android enterprise users in the short term, unless they decide to work with MDM from Enterproid and others like Good that have a ‘two-persona’ capability on a device,” Gold said. He explained that “two-persona” refers to the ability to partition data on a smartphone or tablets so that a user’s personal photos and music won’t be destroyed if an IT shops wipes off sensitive corporate data from a mobile device.

Full coverage: Google

Article source: http://www.computerworld.com/s/article/9227491/Google_s_Motorola_buy_seen_boosting_Android_in_workplace_

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19 May 12 Android in enterprises ‘severely limited’ by weak management support from Google


Computerworld -

Adoption of Android tablets and smartphones in large businesses has been “severely limited” because of the complexities of managing the wide variety of Android-based devices and versions of the operating system, research firm Gartner said in an evaluation of 20 mobile device management (MDM) software vendors released Friday.

In a survey conducted in April, Gartner found that 58% of enterprises have made or plan to make Apple’s iOS their primary mobile platform in the next year. In comparison, 20% of enterprises will standardize on RIM’s BlackBerry platform and 9% will choose Google’s Android.

Google offers “weaker management support” for Android than Apple does for iOS or Research In Motion does for BlackBerry, Gartner added in its new 34-page study.

The broad-ranging study said the explosion in consumer smartphones and tablets used in workplaces is making MDM the “fastest-growing enterprise mobile software ever in terms of number of suppliers, revenue growth and interest from Gartner clients.”

MDM license revenues were about $200 million in 2010 and $350 million in 2011, and are expected to reach $500 million in 2012, Gartner said. Research firm IDC recently pegged 2010 MDM revenues at a higher level, $300 million, and it expects the market will reach $1.2 billion in 2015.

A big part of the reason why it’s difficult to manage Android systems, Gartner said, is that Google hasn’t opened many application programming interfaces (API) to the dozens of MDM vendors, which means they can’t connect their management tools to Android. In Android 4.0, Google only provided 16 APIs, compared to more than 500 APIs for the latest version of BlackBerry.

Some MDM vendors have built their own APIs for Android devices, but that process “is time-consuming and expensive to do for each device and version of Android,” Gartner said. “This [problem] has severely limited Android adoption in the enterprise, and even today, very few enterprises provide [Android] support.”

Google didn’t respond to a request for comment about Gartner’s report. However, Android vendors such as Motorola Mobility — which Google is acquiring — have defended the security and management features in Android for enterprise use. Those capabilities are mainly available through software from 3LM, a software vendor that Motorola acquired in 2011.

In January, Christy Wyatt, general manager of Motorola Mobility’s enterprise business unit, said: “We have to get Android as a whole at a stable and secure place, and once Android is behind the firewall [with 3LM], that helps. There’s a lot of mythology around Android and whether it’s secure or not.”

Other Android device makers, such as HTC and Sony, have struck agreements to license 3LM software, she said at the time.

Gartner’s report noted that Google hasn’t disclosed what it plans to do with 3LM as part of Motorola, adding that enterprises Gartner works with are hoping Google will use 3LM as part of an enterprise version of Android for device makers.

Earlier in May, 3LM announced Version 3.0 of its Mobile Device and Application Management platform for handling smartphones and tablets that run Android 4.0, as well as managing iPhones and iPads. Other new features include an easier interface for IT managers and tools to prevent users from copying data from corporate systems to noncorporate systems.

Gartner didn’t rank 3LM in its latest review of 20 MDM vendors because it doesn’t consider 3LM a true MDM vendor. Gartner analyst Phillip Redman, one of three authors of the report, said in an email interview that 3LM builds APIs and doesn’t provide actual MDM capabilities, and he added that those APIs serve as a “layer between MDM and a mobile device.”

Claims that Android is broadly secure are “not true,” Redman added. “All Android is not created equally.” He didn’t elaborate.

Enterprise use of BlackBerry smartphones, which have been widely regarded as secure and manageable through RIM’s BlackBerry Enterprise Server, is on the decline. In April, RIM released an MDM platform called Mobile Fusion that provides management for iOS and Android as well as BlackBerry. Gartner didn’t evaluate Mobile Fusion for its report because it’s too new. But the research firm did say that the software “could be a force if [RIM] decides to invest more in this area.”

Of the 20 MDM vendors that Gartner studied, it ranked these five as leaders: MobileIron, AirWatch, Fiberlink, Zenprise and Good Technologies. SAP and Symantec were listed as “challengers,” while BoxTone and IBM were described as “visionaries.”

Gartner described the other 11 MDM vendors it studied as “niche players.” They are McAfee, Sophos, Soti, Trend Micro, Tangoe, OpenPeak, Silverback MDM, Amtel, Landesk, Smith Micro Software and MyMobile Security.

In all, there are probably more than 100 vendors globally that offer some form of MDM capability, Gartner said. To qualify for the group of 20, the MDM vendors had to have a well-rounded set of mobile management tools. For security management, each of the 20 had to have IT tools that were capable of the following: enforcing passwords; wiping data off of a device; remotely locking a device; creating an audit trail for logging in of a device and verifying a device’s configuration from a central console; and detecting jailbreaks and rooting. They also had to support at least three mobile operating systems. Other required security components included support for antivirus software, encryption, firewalls and mobile VPNs.

Other requirements included tools to block use of flash cards or other external storage media, and tools to audit changes made on the hardware. For software, the 20 MDM vendors had to support the ability to push or pull apps on a device and to verify the origin of mobile apps. The software also had to support app updates, patches and an enterprise and third-party app store.

All 20 MDM vendors in the Gartner group had to have MDM-specific revenue of at least $1.5 million. The average price for MDM software is about $60 per user per year, Gartner said, and that price should drop to $40 per user per year by 2015 as more cloud-based MDM systems emerge.

covers mobile and wireless, smartphones and other handhelds, and wireless networking for Computerworld. Follow Matt on Twitter at Twitter @matthamblen, or subscribe to Hamblen RSSMatt’s RSS feed. His email address is mhamblen@computerworld.com.

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Article source: http://www.computerworld.com/s/article/9227282/Android_in_enterprises_severely_limited_by_weak_management_support_from_Google

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19 May 12 Android in enterprises ‘severely limited’ by weak management support from Google


Adoption of Android tablets and smartphones in large businesses has been “severely limited” because of the complexities of
managing the various Android models and versions, market research firm Gartner said in an evaluation of 20 mobile device management
(MDM) software vendors released Friday.

iOS vs. Android in the enterprise

A survey that Gartner conducted in April showed 58% of enterprises have or will make iOS, used in iPhones and iPads, their
primary mobile platform in the next year, compared with 20% for BlackBerry and 9% for Android.

Google offers “weaker management support” for Android than Apple for iOS or Research in Motion for BlackBerry, Gartner added
in its new 34-page study.

The broad-ranging study said the explosion in consumer smartphones and tablets used in workplaces is making MDM the “fastest-growing
enterprise mobile software ever in terms of number of suppliers, revenue growth and interest from Gartner clients.”

MDM license revenues were about $200 million in 2010 and $350 million in 2011, and are expected to reach $500 million in 2012,
Gartner said. Research firm IDC recently said the revenues were higher in 2010, at $300 million, and expects the market will reach $1.2 billion in 2015. A principal problem with Android management capabilities, Gartner said, is that Google hasn’t opened many application programming interfaces (APIs) for the dozens of MDM vendors to connect their various management
tools to Android, Gartner said. In Android 4.0, Google only provided 16 APIs, compared to more than 500 APIs for the latest
version of BlackBerry.

Some MDM vendors have built their own APIs for Android devices, but the process “is time-consuming and expensive to do for
each device and version of Android,” Gartner said. “This [problem] has severely limited Android adoption in the enterprise,
and even today, very few enterprises provide [Android] support.”

Google didn’t respond to a request to comment. However, Android vendors such as Motorola Mobility — which Google is acquiring
— have defended the security and management available in Android for enterprise uses, mainly through software from 3LM, a software vendor that Motorola acquired in 2011.

Christy Wyatt, general manager of Motorola Mobility’s enterprise business unit, commented in January: “We have to get Android
as a whole at a stable and secure place, and once Android is behind the firewall [with 3LM], that helps. There’s a lot of mythology around Android and whether it’s secure or not.” Other Android device makers, such as HTC and Sony, have struck agreements to license 3LM
software, she said at the time.

Gartner’s report noted that Google hasn’t disclosed what it plans to do with 3LM as part of Motorola, adding that enterprises
Gartner works with are hoping Google will use 3LM as part of an enterprise version of Android for device makers.

Earlier in May, 3LM announced version 3.0 of its Mobile Device and Application Management platform to handle smartphones and tablets running Android 4.0, as well as manage iPhones and iPads. Other new features including an easier interface for IT managers and tools to prevent users from copying data from corporate
apps to non-corporate apps.

Article source: http://www.networkworld.com/news/2012/051812-android-in-enterprises-39severely-limited39-259434.html

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