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05 Jun 12 When should you upgrade to Internet Explorer 9?


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Question: Is there really any difference between Internet Explorer 8 and 9? Every time I download 9 something goes wrong; is it okay if I keep 8?

Answer: You’d have plenty of company in opting out of IE9 – according to NetApplications’ research, IE8 remains the most widely-used browser version, with 26.2 percent of the market compared to 15.9 percent for its successor.

But those same statistics also show that Microsoft’s horrifyingly obsolete IE6 somehow retains a 7.1 percent share, so don’t draw too many conclusions from them.

The biggest difference between IE8 and 9 is the interface of each. The 2009-vintage IE8 was the last browser release from Microsoft to stick with separate address and search boxes (a design still used by Mozilla Firefox and Apple’s Safari), while IE9 adopted the unified search-plus-address box of Google’s Chrome when it debuted a year later.

That alone makes IE9 a better choice on smaller screens, where its more efficient layout lets you see more of a Web page. But I also found IE9′s toolbar more cluttered than the equivalent interface in Chrome.

The other differences between these two versions are less obvious but more important. IE9 offers better controls for your privacy and makes it easier to discipline plug-ins that delay the browser’s startup and eat available memory. It includes security fixes to protect against unintentional and deliberate software downloads. And it does a much better job of supporting Web standards than IE8.

That last feature may force your decision: Site developers will eventually tire of supporting IE8, especially if most of any one site’s users have moved on to newer software. Google, for example, declared last year that it would only support the current and previous major releases of browsers- which suggests that when IE10 ships as part of Windows 8 later this year, IE8 users may find parts of Gmail don’t work for them.

To put this in more human terms: If friends of yours work in Web development, your continued use of IE8 keeps them at their desks longer.

But what if you just can’t get IE9 to install properly? Look, it happens: Internet Explorer, unlike third-party options like Chrome, Firefox or Safari, functions as an extension of Windows, with a lot more wiring connecting it to the rest of the operating system.

In that case, it’s easier to switch than fight: Install a competing browser and use that as your default. I’d go with Google’s Chrome – and I say this as a skeptic of giving Google too much of your business online. It’s hard to beat Chrome’s efficient operation, clean interface and automatic updates to itself and to its Flash and PDF viewers, two plug-ins that in competing browsers require separate and all-too-frequent updates.

Tip: Two Google alternatives to try

Even if you do switch to Chrome, that doesn’t mean you have to use Google as its default search engine. Microsoft’s Bing is one obvious alternative, with some appealing innovations in areas like “social search”- i.e., results informed by people in your social networks. But you may also want to try two newer contenders: DuckDuckGo brags of much better privacy protection, while Blekko aims to cut down on the uninformative “spammy” content that has infested too many Google search results, especially before recent upgrades by Google.

To its credit, Google has made switching Chrome to these alternatives a five-step process: Visit the search engine’s home page, click the wrench icon in Chrome’s upper-right corner, click “Settings…” from the menu, click the “Manage search engines…” button, and click the “Make default” button that will appear when you hover over a site in that list.

USA Today

Article source: http://www.news10.net/news/national/195689/5/Should-you-upgrade-to-IE9

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03 Jan 12 Chrome, Firefox Engineers Defend Google, Mozilla Search Deal


Chrome, Firefox Engineers Defend Google, Mozilla Search Deal
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Page 1 of 2 )

Engineers for
Google (NASDAQ:GOOG) and Mozilla’s desktop browser teams lashed out at media
reports that questioned the companies’ renewed deal to put Google search in the
Firefox browser toolbar.

Google and Mozilla renewed their deal to feature
Google as the default search provider for the Firefox toolbar Dec. 20. Google
pays Mozilla a portion of ad revenue generated from those searches.

Google and
Mozilla both declined to provide financial terms of the new arrangement due to
confidentiality agreements the companies inked. AllThingsDigital said the deal was worth $300 million a year for
at least the next three years, valuing the deal at $900 million.

This sum, if
true, is worth more than three times more on an annualized basis than the
previous arrangement Google and Mozilla forged, when Mozilla reported earning
nearly $100 million of its $123 million in 2010 revenue from its deal with
Google.

Google clearly
paid a premium to keep Mozilla from making Microsoft Bing or Yahoo its default
search provider. What makes the deal particularly intriguing is that Google’s
Chrome Web browser has made huge market-share gains in just three and a half
years since it launched, growing to 19 percent while Firefox has fallen under
22 percent, according to the latest Net Applications numbers.

TechCrunch
blogger-turned venture capitalist MG Siegler expressed surprise that Google would
pay that much money to fund a competitor: “One thing is certain: Google is
not paying Mozilla a billion dollars out of the kindness of their hearts. Doing
so would be irresponsible to their shareholders. Again, they’re paying all that
money to a competitor.”

This
sentiment, echoed by other journalists, elicited some commentary from key
Chrome and Firefox browser engineers.

Peter Kasting,
who Google hired to work on Firefox before the company built Chrome, argued
that Google is funding an open-source partner to help advance the Web, both in
introducing a faster browser and spurring browsers, such as Firefox, Microsoft
(NASDAQ:MSFT) Internet Explorer and Apple (NASDAQ:AAPL) Safari, to get better.

“It’s
completely irrelevant to this goal whether Chrome actually gains tons of users
or whether, instead, the Web advances because the other browser vendors step up
their game and produce far better browsers. Either way, the Web gets better.
Job done. The end,” Kasting wrote on Google+ Dec. 24.

“So it’s
very easy to see why Google would be willing to fund Mozilla: Like Google,
Mozilla is clearly committed to the betterment of the Web, and they’re spending
their resources to make a great, open-source Web browser.



Article source: http://www.eweek.com/c/a/Application-Development/Chrome-Firefox-Engineers-Defend-Google-Mozilla-Search-Deal-739999/

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25 Dec 11 Google Paying Mozilla Almost $1B for Firefox Search: Why?


Old news: Google and Mozilla have renewed the partnership that ensures Google’s search engine remains Mozilla Firefox’s default search tool, and none too soon – the companies’ previous deal expired in November of this year and Mozilla greatly relies on Google’s financial support. According to the company’s “State of Mozilla” report, Google contributed 84 percent of Mozilla’s $123 million revenue in 2010.

What’s new, however, is the cost at which Mozilla and Google are now doing business. According to a report by AllThingsD’s Kara Swisher, Google will allegedly pay Mozilla nearly three times its previous yearly payment for the privilege of remaining Firefox’s default search engine. And the new contract guarantees to give Mozilla revenue and Google search prominence for the better part of three years. At nearly $300 million a year, that works out to just under one billion for Mozilla.

So why the boost in payment?

According to Swisher, both Yahoo and Microsoft were allegedly a part of the conversation at varying points in the contract process. And it’s been speculated that Google’s willingness to play ball at a higher price point was something that neither of its competitors were willing to do.

If so, Google strong-armed the competition, and for good reason: The company wants to keep Microsoft’s Bing from gaining any additional traction in the search market beyond its current deal with Yahoo. As for Yahoo – given that its deal with Microsoft has Bing powering Yahoo Search in total –it’s anyone’s guess as to why the company was separately bidding to become Firefox’s primary search engine.

However, there’s also speculation that Google’s interest in Firefox wasn’t primarily competitive. Rather, it’s been suggested that the company’s laying the groundwork for a potential defense against potential antitrust issues going forward.

Consider this: If Google’s Chrome OS takes off, the company will invariably push Google Chrome as the de facto browser for users of the operating system. And when that happens, argues MG Siegler, Google and Chrome starts to look a lot like Microsoft and Internet Explorer. The antitrust vultures then start circling.

“But if Google can point to a billion dollar commitment in (basically fully) supporting Mozilla and Firefox, perhaps it will negate the Chrome problem. We’ll see,” Siegler writes.

“One thing is certain: Google is not paying Mozilla a billion dollars out of the kindness of their hearts. Doing so would be irresponsible to their shareholders. Again, they’re paying all that money to a competitor. And they’re doing it at terms far beyond the previous terms and at a rate that not even their biggest competitor would match.”

And Mozilla’s Firefox, which feels at times like a knight or a rook in a larger game, gets to keep cruising along at third-place in the global browser wars.

For more from David, subscribe to him on Facebook: David Murphy.

For the top stories in tech, follow us on Twitter at @PCMag.

Article source: http://www.pcmag.com/article2/0,2817,2398046,00.asp

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23 Dec 11 Chrome overtakes Internet Explorer 8


chart-chrome-ie8.top.gif

NEW YORK (CNNMoney) — Microsoft’s Internet Explorer 8 is no longer the world’s most-used browser, according to a Web analytics firm. But its replacement isn’t a different version of IE: It’s Chrome, Google’s upstart Web browser.

StatCounter, which tracks Internet data, said that IE8′s share of the browser market fell to 23.5% in the last week of November, trailing behind Chrome’s 23.6%. Since then, Chrome has expanded its lead. It now has nearly 25% of the market, compared to IE8′s 22%.

Chrome had been topping IE8 on weekends since the beginning of October, but Google’s browser finally overtook Microsoft’s for a five-day period a few weeks ago, StatCounter CEO Aodhan Cullen said in a blog post.

“It looks as if people favor Chrome on weekends at home, but office commercial use has now caught up,” he said.

Of course, IE8 is just one version of Internet Explorer. A growing number of people — 10%, by StatCounter’s measurements — are using the more modern IE9. Many are also still using older versions like IE7 and, amazingly, IE6, which debuted in 2001.

Combined, Internet Explorer still leads with a 38.5% share of the global browser market. Google’s Chrome is second and Mozilla’s Firefox is in third place, a percentage point behind Chrome.

Chrome’s lightning-fast rise significantly reshapes the playing field.

The browser battle intensified this year, after a decade-long hiatus, as search competition between Google (GOOG, Fortune 500) and Microsoft (MSFT, Fortune 500) heated up. Searches made in Internet Explorer default to Microsoft’s Bing, while Chrome and Firefox are both tied in with Google’s search engine.

In a constant attempt to one-up one another, the browser makers have been adding a slew of advanced features like extensions, synchronization, privacy, HTML5 support, and hardware acceleration. Google is so serious about staying up to date that it releases a new version of Chrome every six weeks.

Finding itself in the unfamiliar position of trailing its browser competition, Microsoft plans to follow Google’s lead and start implementing automatic updates to IE9 in January, the company recently announced.

Microsoft once commanded more than 90% of the browser market, a position it grabbed by preloading IE on Windows computers. That sent Netscape, the browser king of the 1990s, tumbling into irrelevancy.

It also prompted antitrust suits against Microsoft in both the United States and the European Union, the latter of which forced the company to offer Windows users a list of browsers to choose from when they set up their new PCs.

That, along with the reality that other browsers had outpaced IE’s innovations, has let Firefox, Apple’s (AAPL, Fortune 500) Safari browser, and most recently Chrome eat away at Microsoft’s market share over the years. Internet Explorer’s use has been falling steadily.

A year ago, StatCounter said that Microsoft’s share of the browser market had fallen below 50% for the first time in more than a decade.

But online data tracking is a tricky science, with various methods returning different results. Some trackers record browser information based on clicks to a network of client Web sites, which is the main method StatCounter uses. Others use toolbars, ISP data or even surveys to collect the information.

Though the trend is clear across the board, other data trackers show that Internet Explorer 8 is still firmly on top of the browser world. For instance, Net Applications — the firm whose research is most frequently cited by the browser makers themselves — shows that IE8′s market share sits much more comfortably at 28%, compared to just 18% for Chrome. To top of page

Article source: http://money.cnn.com/2011/12/16/technology/chrome_internet_explorer/?source=cnn_bin

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16 Dec 11 Chrome overtakes Internet Explorer 8


chart-chrome-ie8.top.gif

NEW YORK (CNNMoney) — Microsoft’s Internet Explorer 8 is no longer the world’s most-used browser, according to a Web analytics firm. But its replacement isn’t a different version of IE: It’s Chrome, Google’s upstart Web browser.

StatCounter, which tracks Internet data, said that IE8′s share of the browser market fell to 23.5% in the last week of November, trailing behind Chrome’s 23.6%. Since then, Chrome has expanded its lead. It now has nearly 25% of the market, compared to IE8′s 22%.

Chrome had been topping IE8 on weekends since the beginning of October, but Google’s browser finally overtook Microsoft’s for a five-day period a few weeks ago, StatCounter CEO Aodhan Cullen said in a blog post.

“It looks as if people favor Chrome on weekends at home, but office commercial use has now caught up,” he said.

Of course, IE8 is just one version of Internet Explorer. A growing number of people — 10%, by StatCounter’s measurements — are using the more modern IE9. Many are also still using older versions like IE7 and, amazingly, IE6, which debuted in 2001.

Combined, Internet Explorer still leads with a 38.5% share of the global browser market. Google’s Chrome is second and Mozilla’s Firefox is in third place, a percentage point behind Chrome.

Chrome’s lightning-fast rise significantly reshapes the playing field.

The browser battle intensified this year, after a decade-long hiatus, as search competition between Google (GOOG, Fortune 500) and Microsoft (MSFT, Fortune 500) heated up. Searches made in Internet Explorer default to Microsoft’s Bing, while Chrome and Firefox are both tied in with Google’s search engine.

In a constant attempt to one-up one another, the browser makers have been adding a slew of advanced features like extensions, synchronization, privacy, HTML5 support, and hardware acceleration. Google is so serious about staying up to date that it releases a new version of Chrome every six weeks.

Finding itself in the unfamiliar position of trailing its browser competition, Microsoft plans to follow Google’s lead and start implementing automatic updates to IE9 in January, the company recently announced.

Microsoft once commanded more than 90% of the browser market, a position it grabbed by preloading IE on Windows computers. That sent Netscape, the browser king of the 1990s, tumbling into irrelevancy.

It also prompted antitrust suits against Microsoft in both the United States and the European Union, the latter of which forced the company to offer Windows users a list of browsers to choose from when they set up their new PCs.

That, along with the reality that other browsers had outpaced IE’s innovations, has let Firefox, Apple’s (AAPL, Fortune 500) Safari browser, and most recently Chrome eat away at Microsoft’s market share over the years. Internet Explorer’s use has been falling steadily.

A year ago, StatCounter said that Microsoft’s share of the browser market had fallen below 50% for the first time in more than a decade.

But online data tracking is a tricky science, with various methods returning different results. Some trackers record browser information based on clicks to a network of client Web sites, which is the main method StatCounter uses. Others use toolbars, ISP data or even surveys to collect the information.

Though the trend is clear across the board, other data trackers show that Internet Explorer 8 is still firmly on top of the browser world. For instance, Net Applications — the firm whose research is most frequently cited by the browser makers themselves — shows that IE8′s market share sits much more comfortably at 28%, compared to just 18% for Chrome. To top of page

Article source: http://money.cnn.com/2011/12/16/technology/chrome_internet_explorer/index.htm

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24 Nov 11 Microsoft Bing looks for reindeer magic


SAN FRANCISCO: Like Santa Claus on that one foggy Christmas Eve, Microsoft has summoned Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer to guide some precious cargo — a holiday marketing campaign for its Bing search engine.

The advertisements, debuting online and on TV this week, star Rudolph and other characters from the animated story about the most famous reindeer of all. The campaign is part of Microsoft’s attempt to trip up Google Inc, an internet search rival as imposing as the Abominable Snowman was before Yukon Cornelius tamed the monster.

Google has been countering with its own emotional ads throughout the year. Most of Google’s ads show snippets of its dominant search engine and other products at work before swirling into the logo of the company’s Chrome Web browser.

The dueling ads underscore the lucrative nature of search engines. Although visitors pay nothing to use them, search engines generate billions of dollars a year in revenue from ads posted alongside the search results.

The holiday season is a particularly opportune time for search companies because that’s when people do more searches _ to find gifts online, look for party supplies and plan nights out on the town. That means more people to show ads to. Advertisers also tend to be willing to pay more per ad because they know people are in a buying mode.

To capture that audience, Microsoft and Google are both thinking outside the search box to promote their brands.

Although the text ads running alongside search results do a fine job of reeling in some customers, they still lack the broader, more visceral impact of a well-done television commercial, said Peter Daboll, chief executive of Ace Metrix, a firm that rates the effectiveness of ads.

“It’s instructive that these companies who are all about the internet and doing things in real time are actually doing these emotive ads on TV,” Daboll said.

Search engines are particularly difficult to sell because the sophisticated technology required to make them work isn’t something “you can touch or feel in a store, so you need to bring some emotion to it,” said Sean Carver, Bing’s advertising director. “The storytelling is important.”

Microsoft Corp. licensed the rights to the characters from Rudolph’s 47-year-old holiday special after convincing their owners that the Bing commercials would add an endearing chapter to the reindeer’s story. The rights to Rudolph and the rest of the cast are owned by the children of Robert L. May, who wrote the story in 1939 while working as a copywriter at the Montgomery Ward department store (May’s brother-in-law, Johnny Marks, later wrote the famous song).

Microsoft is far more experienced at marketing than Google.

For one thing, it’s 23 years older than Google, which was founded in 1998.

More important, Google co-founders Larry Page and Sergey Brin were so contemptuous of traditional marketing campaigns that the company never bothered to advertise its search engine on national TV until the 2010 Super Bowl. Spending millions to be a part of TV’s annual advertising extravaganza was so out of character that Eric Schmidt, Google’s CEO at the time, heralded the Super Bowl ad with a post on Twitter that concluded “hell has indeed frozen over.”

Since that breakthrough, Google has caught the advertising bug. Without breaking down its total ad budget, Google disclosed that it has spent $583 million more on television and other advertising during the first nine months of this year than it did at the same time last year.

The investment has won Google some respect in the advertising industry.

Google took five of the 10 top spots for most effective national TV ads that promote websites, based on Ace Metrix’s study of viewer reactions to the commercials. Topping the list is an ad showing how a father used Google services such as Gmail to create an electronic journal of his daughter Sophie’s life.

Three Bing ads also ranked in the 10 most effective, but it also had two ads on the least effective list.

“There doesn’t seem to be a very coherent creative pattern to the Bing ads,” Daboll said. “It’s kind of hit and miss.”

There’s no mistaking the common theme in the four Rudolph ads produced for the Bing promotion. The ads are all done in the same stop-motion puppet animation used in the original 1964 TV special. One features Bumble the Abominable Snowman using Bing to get ideas for a more fearsome roar. Another shows some of the characters turning to Bing for suggestions on a vacation that leads to a getaway on an island of misfit toys.

Microsoft has bought seven slots on national TV to run those four 30-second ads. The company is going for high impact rather than high frequency and is placing those ads during holiday-themed specials, starting with “The Simpsons” on the Fox network on Thanksgiving night and ending on Dec. 21 during “South Park” on the Comedy Channel. Microsoft isn’t buying time during the Rudolph special, though, which CBS is broadcasting next Tuesday and Dec. 10.

The ads also will be shown in more than 200 movie theaters before holiday films and will be available online beginning Wednesday.

Microsoft declined to say how much it’s spending on the Rudolph campaign.

Aaron Lilly, a Microsoft executive who helps conceive Bing’s promotions, came up with the idea to build holiday ads around the Rudolph story two years ago. It didn’t happen then because the Aflac insurance company had already bought licensing rights to the characters for that holiday season.

The ads will be a success for Microsoft if they help the company gain more ground and cut its losses in Internet search, an area that remains weak for Microsoft even after years of investing in better technology.

While the Xbox video game console and familiar software such as Windows and Office provide most of Microsoft’s earnings, Bing remains a financial drain. The online division anchored by Bing has suffered operating losses totaling $7 billion since June 2008, when Microsoft introduced the latest overhaul of its search engine.

Google’s share of the Internet search market has increased since Bing’s debut, according to the research firm comScore. Google now processes about two out of three search requests in the U.S. and rakes in an even larger share of the revenue that rolls when people click on ads next to search results.

Bing’s market share has climbed from about 9 percent in June 2008 to roughly 15 percent in October, but most of those gains have come at the expense of Yahoo Inc., which hired Microsoft to run most of its search technology two years ago.

For Google, the ads are aimed at not only maintaining its dominance in search but also driving adoption of other Google products, including its Chrome browser. Google says Chrome now has 200 million users worldwide, up from about 120 million at the end of last year. Despite those gains, Chrome still trails Microsoft’s Internet Explorer and the Mozilla’s Firefox.

But Chrome has been able to narrow the gap separating it from Internet Explorer more than Bing has been able to do in its pursuit of Google in search. Bing is still hoping to emulate Rudolph, a one-time laughingstock who overcame the skeptics to leap of the front of the pack.

Article source: http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/tech/news/internet/Microsoft-Bing-looks-for-reindeer-magic/articleshow/10858453.cms

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02 Nov 11 Browser Wars Heat Up: IE Ebbs, Chrome Surges



SymbolPriceChangeAAPL396.51-8.27Chart for Apple Inc.BIDU135.05-5.13Chart for Baidu, Inc.GOOG578.65-13.99Chart for Google Inc.MSFT25.99-0.64Chart for Microsoft CorporationYHOO14.93-0.71Chart for Yahoo! Inc.{“s” : “aapl,bidu,goog,msft,yhoo”,”k” : “a00,a50,b00,b60,c10,g00,h00,l10,p20,t10,v00″,”o” : “”,”j” : “”}

In the battle for control of your desktop Internet browser, Microsoft‘s dominance is gradually being nibbled away.

New data from Netmarketshare shows that Microsoft Internet Explorer accounted for 52.63% of desktop Internet browser usage in October, down from 54.39% a month ago. It is the 8th straight month that IE has lost market share. Firefox holds 22.51% of the market, up a hair from 22.48% in September, and down a bit from 23.69% in December 2010. Google Chrome continues to gain share, and now has 17.62% of the market, up from 10.36% in December. Apple Safari has 5.43% share, up from 5.02% in September, and 4.02% last December. Opera‘s share of the  market is down to 1.56%, from 1.67% in September, and 2.27% in December. Other browsers accounted for just 0.24% share in the latest month.

Netmarketshare also offers some other fascinating bits of data on other global Web market share trends:

Mobile browsing is dominated by Apple…

  • Safari: 62.2%
  • Android Browser: 18.7%
  • Opera Mini: 13.1%
  • Symbian Browser: 2.6%

Mobile/tablet OS market share also is ruled by Apple…

  • iOS (iPhone, iPad, iPod Touch): 61.6%
  • Android: 12.8%
  • Java ME: 12.8%
  • Symbian: 3.5%

Mobile/tablet search share is dominated by you-know-who…

  • Google: 91.1%
  • Yahoo: 7%
  • Microsoft Bing: 1.1%
  • Baidu: 0.5%

Desktop OS share is still dominated by Redmond…

  • Windows: 91.9%
  • Mac: 6.9%
  • Linux: 1.2%

Desktop search share is largely a one-horse race…

  • Google: 82.4%
  • Yahoo: 6.8%
  • Baidu: 4%
  • Bing: 4%.

All kinds of interesting takeaways here. For one thing, on a global basis, Google is even more dominant in search than it is in the U.S. For another, while Android may be outselling Apple devices right now, from an installed basis viewpoint, Apple is still dominant. And interesting to see just how dominant Windows remains in the desktop OS business.

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Article source: http://finance.yahoo.com/news/Browser-Wars-Heat-Up-IE-Ebbs-xfoftp-1484806262.html

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28 Oct 11 Google Chrome turns 15, Firefox goes Bing


October 26, 2011 By Mike Flacy

chrome-store

While speed has become less of an issue with each browser revision, Google and Mozilla are turning to expanded features to entice more users while Microsoft remains quiet about any changes to Internet Explorer.

Released late yesterday, Google issued a new update to the popular Chrome browser. Google Chrome 15 rolls out a variety of bug fixes as well as a brand new tab interface. The changes to the tabs interface separates the most-visited list of Web sites and the apps on separate pages. These pages can be accessed by clicking the left and right arrows on either side of the page. However, if the user has an app that overwrites the initial interface like Speed Dial, they won’t be able to access the new design without disabling the application.The new apps page allows the user to rearrange apps on the page and dispose of unwanted apps by dragging and dropping into a nearby trashcan. 

firefox-bingThe Chrome apps store also got a major visual overhaul and now includes reviews of apps that are linked to Google+ profiles. Users that enjoy reading an insightful review can follow a link back to the user’s Google+ profile and follow that person’s updates. However, the vast majority of reviews were created previous to the launch of Google+. Regarding bug fixes, Google eliminated eleven high-risk bugs and paid out just over $12,000 to developers that identified the bugs. In the works for Google Chrome 16, users will be able to take advantage of an auto-syncing feature that will automatically link profile information across computers by only logging into any Google service once. Chrome 16 is expected to launch in early December.

In the Mozilla camp, the company released a version of Firefox that is built with the Bing user in mind. This means Microsoft’s Bing is the default choice for a search engine when users type a keyword into the Awesome bar or the search box. This isn’t an exclusive partnership though. There are 20 other custom versions of Firefox that utilize other options for search.

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Article source: http://www.digitaltrends.com/web/google-chrome-turns-15-firefox-goes-bing/

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