msgbartop
All about Google Chrome & Google Chrome OS
msgbarbottom

13 Jun 12 Even With a Little Polish, Chrome OS Is Still a Bit Hazy


This year, Microsoft and Apple are both introducing new versions of their operating systems with important changes to their user interfaces, and with a flurry of publicity. A third major company is also overhauling its PC operating system, but you probably won’t hear much about it.

Google redesigned its PC operating system, Chrome OS. While Google is a major rival to Apple and Microsoft in things like search, smartphones and browsers, Chrome OS hasn’t dented the competition in the year since it emerged. It was meant to be radically different than Windows and the Macintosh operating system, a refreshing change for a new era. But it had serious limitations, principally that it ran only apps inside a browser on a handful of special, low-powered laptops called Chromebooks and could do almost nothing when it wasn’t online.

The new version, which I’ve been testing, aims to address some of those issues and it makes some progress. But I still can’t recommend it over a PC or Mac for average consumers who are looking for the greatest versatility in a laptop. I still find it more of an evolving project than a finished product.

Its fundamental limitations remain. Most importantly, you still can’t install your favorite programs, be they Microsoft Office or iTunes or Firefox—only a few thousand “Web apps” that run inside the Chrome browser. And it still only works on specific hardware: that laptop called the Chromebook or—new this year—a small desktop called a Chromebox. The only hardware maker producing the 2012 versions of these machines so far is Samsung, though Google says more are coming.

PTECHjp1

New Chrome OS allows for multiple windows and has a taskbar at the bottom like Windows.

Chrome OS does have some admirable qualities—especially its philosophy of simplicity and of being wedded to the cloud. For instance, because it’s designed to fetch your apps and documents from the Internet, you can replicate your entire computer by just logging in on any other Chrome OS PC. And, if you mainly use the Web and live in the cloud, it may be the ticket for you, especially as a second machine.

Last year’s inaugural version of Chrome OS was little more than a giant browser in which you ran only Web-based apps. The new redesign of Chrome OS, released late last month, represents something of a retreat from that dramatic strategy.

Now, Google is touting the new release for features that make it look and work more like a Windows PC or Mac—for instance, multiple, movable windows; a strip along the bottom that holds the icons of apps you use; a slightly greater emphasis on doing things offline; and greater focus on finding and launching apps. None of this is revolutionary for people used to traditional computers.

What Chrome OS is exactly can be confusing. While it looks and works a lot like the browser of the same name, Chrome OS is a full-blown operating system that, unlike the Chrome browser, can’t be installed on PCs and Macs. Also, Chrome OS is unrelated to Google’s best-known operating system, Android. The latter is meant to power smartphones, tablets and some other miscellaneous devices.

PTECHjp2

Chrome OS still only works on specific hardware: a laptop called the Chromebook or—new this year—a small desktop called a Chromebox.

I tested the redesigned Chrome OS on the new Samsung Chromebook, a model which Google claims has up to three times the performance of the original Chromebook. This laptop has a 12-inch screen, weighs 3.3 pounds and is about 0.8 of an inch thick. I didn’t run a formal battery test on it, but Samsung claims it gets up to six hours on a charge, less than the claims for the MacBook Air or the new Windows ultrabooks. In my tests, the battery easily lasted a full day in light to moderate use. The Chromebook is sold online and costs $450. A model that includes a slow, 3G cellular modem is $100 more. The Chromebox desktop is a small box that comes without a screen, mouse, or keyboard, and sells for $330.

Because it’s primarily meant as a portal to the Internet, the Chromebook has only about as much storage as a smartphone: 16 gigabytes, rather than the hundreds of gigabytes common in other laptops. And it has a wimpy processor, one of Intel’s entry-level Celeron models.

In my tests, the new Chromebook performed well and did everything it promised. Unlike in the first iteration, I was able to use multiple independent windows and to minimize them or resize them easily. I could store frequently used apps, which still run in browser pages, in the bottom strip, similar to the Windows taskbar or Mac dock—again, nothing new there, but a welcome addition.

I was also able to play music and videos, to view and edit photos, and to view (but not edit) Microsoft Office documents. These abilities are a good thing, but also have been long available on other operating systems.

In the next month or two, Google plans to automatically update Chrome with two important features: the integration of Google’s online file-storage locker, Google Drive, right into the Chromebook’s file system; and the ability to edit documents when offline. I was able to test pre-release versions of these features and they worked fine. Google Drive can already be installed and integrated into the Windows and Mac file systems.

In fact, all of the important features of the Chrome OS—which is still at heart just a big browser—are available in the Windows and Mac versions of the Chrome browser, including the ability to run Web apps, programs like Google’s office suite, or Web-based games. Google concedes this, but says that, by making the whole computer a browser, it has simplified the overall experience.

Google has big plans for the Chrome OS. It has built-in features it claims will work great with future touch-screen hardware.

But, overall, I’d say, if you only have the budget for one main computer, you’re better off with a Mac or a PC.

Write to Walt at walt.mossberg@wsj.com.

Article source: http://ca.finance.yahoo.com/news/even-little-polish-chrome-os-010910922.html

Tags: , , , ,

07 Jun 12 Windows-Android hybrids: Beauties or beasts?


18-inch Asus AiO Android/Windows hybrid tablet

Since Microsoft first introduced the versatile Tablet PC over a decade ago, the idea of having a device that was effective as both a hand-holdable tablet and a full-on PC has been a siren’s song in tech. In the case of the Tablet PC, it was always a little too clunky, a little too expensive, and a generation behind in power — so it never sold well. Asus started nibbling at the space with its Transformer products, but until now they have been Android-only — so while they can look like a laptop, they can’t run PC software. Until this week. Asus claims its new AiO (All-in-One) will support both full-up Windows as a desktop and Android as a (huge 18-inch) tablet. Does the AiO mark the coming of age for hybrid devices, or is it another Frankenstein doomed to be relegated to the back pages of Wikipedia like the Tablet PC?

Why Android and Windows make sense together

Windows 8 tablets are attracting a lot of attention for their potential to run all the desktop applications we’ve come to rely on over the years in the trendy form of a tablet. Whether it’s needing Photoshop, Quicken, your favorite games, or just plain Microsoft Office, it isn’t easy to simply dump the PC and move to a tablet right now — even one with a keyboard like the Asus Transformer. A Windows 8 tablet — especially one using an x86 chip — could solve that problem nicely. Unfortunately, Windows 8 tablets won’t run many of the nifty tablet applications developed for Android and iOS. Sure, some top ones will be ported, and as Windows 8 becomes popular more will be moved over. But it will be years before Windows 8 catches up on tablet applications — if it ever does.

By running both Windows and Android, a hybrid device has the potential to support the best of both worlds. It would operate as a full-on desktop or laptop when assembled, or as an Android tablet when used as a hand-held device.

Android emulator or ARM chip?

HP Tablet PCHybrids are likely to be built in two very different ways. The first will simply be a version of the Asus Transformer with an x86 chip running an emulator like BlueStacks. Asus already has a deal for BlueStacks on its other PCs, so it makes sense to try something similar with its tablets. The big advantage of this design is simplicity: Only one processor to worry about, and a proven form factor for the product.

The other, more radical, way to build a hybrid is epitomized by the newly announced AiO. Specs are scant, but while it definitely will feature an x86 chip in the dock, it is likely that the “tablet-only” mode running Android will be accomplished using an ARM chip in the tablet portion. That allows for better battery life and for leaving the x86, along with all the other “PC” hardware, in the dock. It can also guarantee full Android compatibility and performance comparable to that of a dedicated tablet.

The downsides of the dual-processor approach will be cost and complexity. Adding an ARM chip by itself won’t cost much, but it’ll require its own memory and support chips. The device will also need to integrate the two operating systems enough that users can share files and not become too confused when switching back and forth — the prototype crashed during its maiden demo at E3 trying to do just that. So, while the concept is very appealing, the devil will be in the details. I don’t think I’d want to be the first one on my block to buy one.

Next page: An 18-inch tablet – are they serious?

Article source: http://www.extremetech.com/extreme/130385-windows-android-hybrids-beauties-or-beasts

Tags: , , ,

06 Jun 12 New Google Chrome Aims at Windows 8


The Chrome operating system is designed for lightweight computers known as Chromebooks.The Chrome operating system is designed for lightweight computers known as Chromebooks.

Google just released a new version of its Chrome operating system with fancy tweaks to online computing services like word processing and video — all designed to make it faster, more functional and easier to use.

It’s an open question whether the changes are enough to make Chrome, which is also the name of Google’s browser, more than a marginal player, but the system is impressive, and designed to work seamlessly with Google products like Android phones and the (still-underwhelming) Google Plus social network. It is also clearly pointed at Microsoft, just as Microsoft is preparing to introduce Windows 8, one of the biggest changes to its operating system ever.

The Chrome operating system is designed for lightweight computers known as Chromebooks that require an Internet connection to obtain access to most applications.

“People participate in ecosystems,” said Sundar Pichai, who is in charge of the Chrome project at Google. “If you are a Chrome browser user, an Android user and a Gmail user, a Chromebook is a more natural experience than a Windows 8.”

Most of Google’s changes will be available to people already using computers running Chrome, since Google can change things online. Some, like hardware-accelerated graphics for faster scrolling, or a better trackpad on the Chrome laptop, require a new machine. The first of these, from Samsung, has also just been announced. It is about the size and weight of a MacBook Air, and starts at $449.

The Air starts at $999, but is a well-regarded and powerful machine that does not require you to be online to use it. Google is making more strides in that direction. In about two more weeks, Mr. Pichai said, you will be able to write offline in Google Docs, or Drive, as it is now called.

“We really wanted to show how productive you could be with this device,” Mr. Pichai said. “By default you will be able to get the last 100 documents you were working on. When you go back online, it will resynch with your files and update everything.” You can also “pin” certain documents, no matter how old, so they are always available.

It is also possible to open and work on anything from Microsoft Office, including Word, Excel and PowerPoint, without converting it to the Google version of those products.

In order to inspire software developers with what the graphics can do, there is a special hidden feature: press the control, alt and shift buttons together, then the refresh button, and the screen spins, even while playing a video.

There is also a new Samsung desktop, the Chromebox, starting at $329, that could be attractive to schools and businesses looking to provide a lot of people the same kind of machine.

The prices of both new Samsung devices undercut even most low-end tablet and desktop machines.

Previously the desktops and laptops were only sold online, but next month they will also be offered at some Best Buy stores. That could be a big shot in the arm for a machine that has probably sold in the tens of thousands.

Acer also makes Chromebooks, but does yet have machines with the new hardware. Mr. Pichai said other manufacturers, which he did not mention, would be selling their versions of the machine in time for the Christmas season.

Another new Chrome feature, still in beta, enables customers to get access to their PCs and Mac computers remotely. The screen of the remote computer appears on the Chrome machine, and the distant computer can be manipulated from Chrome. The other computer has to be on, though it can be in screensaver mode.

“Companies are excited about Chromebooks, but have legacy applications they want to keep,” Mr. Pichai said. “Now, if you have a legacy Oracle expense app, you can put it somewhere and have it accessible on Chrome.”

Article source: http://bits.blogs.nytimes.com/2012/05/29/new-google-chrome-aims-at-windows-8/

Tags: , , , ,

05 Jun 12 Why you won’t see Office for iPad, Android — at least for now


There’s a very good reason why we’ve not seen a version of Microsoft’s Office suite for iPads and Android devices, and it has everything to do with Microsoft wanting to give enterprise a reason to choose Windows 8 or Windows RT tablets over tablets powered by Android and iOS.

Microsoft has vigorously denied claims that that an Office for iPad exists and will be rolled out in time for an upcoming SharePoint conference in November, and ZDNet’s Jason Perlow speculates that Office for the Android and iOS platforms exists as long as you redefine what an “app” is.

While I think that Perlow comes up with some solid reasoning as to why Office might not work as a traditional ‘app’, the real reason why Microsoft hasn’t yet bought Office to the iPad and the myriad of Android tablets out there is that it needs to keep this ace up its sleeve for itself.

With Windows 8, Microsoft is one again getting ready to try to convince us that tablets — specifically, Windows-powered tablets — are the future. Problem is, Microsoft is entering this game at a very late stage.

Apple has flooded the market with millions of iPads, and Android is doing a very good job of mopping up the budget end of the market with devices such as the Kindle Fire. This leaves Microsoft having to play catch-up in a market already well saturated with tablets.

Microsoft has a lot riding on Windows 8. In a radical departure from previous version of Windows, this platform sweeps aside the traditional keyboard and mouse input system that people know and love, and instead replaces it with a user interface designed to be controlled by touch as the primary mechanism.

It’s a massive gamble, and even Microsoft chief executive Steve Ballmer has admitted that it’s the “riskiest product bet yet for Microsoft“.

Given that Windows 8 is so different and a risky product, and that Microsoft can ill-afford to end up with ‘another Vista’ on its hands, the Redmond-based giant needs all the help it can muster.

Which is why it’s turning to Microsoft Office.

Love it or loathe it, Microsoft Office is one of those killer Windows applications that enterprise users continue to have a love affair with. Wherever Microsoft makes Office available, enterprise will follow.

And this is Microsoft’s gamble with Office. If it makes Office available on all tablets, irrespective of operating system, then enterprise users are free to choose whatever platform suits them. But if Microsoft keeps Office exclusive for Windows powered tablets — both Windows 8 and Windows RT, which we know will come with Office apps installed — then that gives both the company and the platform a massive advantage, especially with enterprise customers — which, as Microsoft knows — is where a lot of the money is.

This is precisely the same reason why Nintendo doesn’t make the hugely popular Mario franchise available on platforms such as iOS. While it would be a massive money-spinner, it would put Nintendo’s future in jeopardy if gamers no longer had to buy Nintendo hardware in order to play the classic game.

The way I see it is that Microsoft isn’t going to consider releasing Office for iOS and Android until it sees how Windows 8, specifically Windows 8 on tablets, does in the marketplace. If Windows 8 and Windows RT-powered tablets do well, then it’s possible that Microsoft will keep Office as a Windows exclusive as far as tablets are concerned. However, if Windows tablets falter then Microsoft might as well cut its losses, admit defeat once again in the tablet market, and develop a version of Office for iOS and Android.

If you want Microsoft Office for Android or iOS, then you’d better hope that Windows-powered tablets fall flat on their face.

Image source: Microsoft.

Related:

Article source: http://www.zdnet.com/blog/hardware/why-you-wont-see-office-for-ipad-android-at-least-for-now/20673

Tags: , , , , ,

29 May 12 Bits Blog: New Google Chrome Aims at Windows 8


The Chrome operating system is designed for lightweight computers known as Chromebooks.The Chrome operating system is designed for lightweight computers known as Chromebooks.

Google just released a new version of its Chrome operating system with fancy tweaks to online computing services like word processing and video — all designed to make it faster, more functional and easier to use.

It’s an open question whether the changes are enough to make Chrome, which is also the name of Google’s browser, more than a marginal player, but the system is impressive, and designed to work seamlessly with Google products like Android phones and the (still-underwhelming) Google Plus social network. It is also clearly pointed at Microsoft, just as Microsoft is preparing to introduce Windows 8, one of the biggest changes to its operating system ever.

The Chrome operating system is designed for lightweight computers known as Chromebooks that require an Internet connection to obtain access to most applications.

“People participate in ecosystems,” said Sundar Pichai, who is in charge of the Chrome project at Google. “If you are a Chrome browser user, an Android user and a Gmail user, a Chromebook is a more natural experience than a Windows 8.”

Most of Google’s changes will be available to people already using computers running Chrome, since Google can change things online. Some, like hardware-accelerated graphics for faster scrolling, or a better trackpad on the Chrome laptop, require a new machine. The first of these, from Samsung, has also just been announced. It is about the size and weight of a MacBook Air, and starts at $449.

The Air starts at $999, but is a well-regarded and powerful machine that does not require you to be online to use it. Google is making more strides in that direction. In about two more weeks, Mr. Pichai said, you will be able to write offline in Google Docs, or Drive, as it is now called.

“We really wanted to show how productive you could be with this device,” Mr. Pichai said. “By default you will be able to get the last 100 documents you were working on. When you go back online, it will resynch with your files and update everything.” You can also “pin” certain documents, no matter how old, so they are always available.

It is also possible to open and work on anything from Microsoft Office, including Word, Excel and PowerPoint, without converting it to the Google version of those products.

In order to inspire software developers with what the graphics can do, there is a special hidden feature: press the control, alt and shift buttons together, then the refresh button, and the screen spins, even while playing a video.

There is also a new Samsung desktop, the Chromebox, starting at $329, that could be attractive to schools and businesses looking to provide a lot of people the same kind of machine.

The prices of both new Samsung devices undercut even most low-end tablet and desktop machines.

Previously the desktops and laptops were only sold online, but next month they will also be offered at some Best Buy stores. That could be a big shot in the arm for a machine that has probably sold in the tens of thousands.

Acer also makes Chromebooks, but does yet have machines with the new hardware. Mr. Pichai said other manufacturers, which he did not mention, would be selling their versions of the machine in time for the Christmas season.

Another new Chrome feature, still in beta, enables customers to get access to their PCs and Mac computers remotely. The screen of the remote computer appears on the Chrome machine, and the distant computer can be manipulated from Chrome. The other computer has to be on, though it can be in screensaver mode.

“Companies are excited about Chromebooks, but have legacy applications they want to keep,” Mr. Pichai said. “Now, if you have a legacy Oracle expense app, you can put it somewhere and have it accessible on Chrome.”

Article source: http://bits.blogs.nytimes.com/2012/05/29/new-google-chrome-aims-at-windows-8/?partner=rss&emc=rss

Tags: , , , ,

29 May 12 New Google Chrome Aims At Windows 8


The Chrome operating system is designed for lightweight computers known as Chromebooks.The Chrome operating system is designed for lightweight computers known as Chromebooks.

Google just released a new version of its Chrome operating system with fancy tweaks to online computing services like word processing and video — all designed to make it faster, more functional and easier to use.

It’s an open question whether the changes are enough to make Chrome, which is also the name of Google’s browser, more than a marginal player, but the system is impressive, and designed to work seamlessly with Google products like Android phones and the (still-underwhelming) Google Plus social network. It is also clearly pointed at Microsoft, just as Microsoft is preparing to introduce Windows 8, one of the biggest changes to its operating system ever.

The Chrome operating system is designed for lightweight computers known as Chromebooks that require an Internet connection to obtain access to most applications.

“People participate in ecosystems,” said Sundar Pichai, who is in charge of the Chrome project at Google. “If you are a Chrome browser user, an Android user and a Gmail user, a Chromebook is a more natural experience than a Windows 8.”

Most of Google’s changes will be available to people already using computers running Chrome, since Google can change things online. Some, like hardware-accelerated graphics for faster scrolling, or a better trackpad on the Chrome laptop, require a new machine. The first of these, from Samsung, has also just been announced. It is about the size and weight of a MacBook Air, and starts at $449.

The Air starts at $999, but is a well-regarded and powerful machine that does not require you to be online to use it. Google is making more strides in that direction. In about two more weeks, Mr. Pichai said, you will be able to write offline in Google Docs, or Drive, as it is now called.

“We really wanted to show how productive you could be with this device,” Mr. Pichai said. “By default you will be able to get the last 100 documents you were working on. When you go back online, it will resynch with your files and update everything.” You can also “pin” certain documents, no matter how old, so they are always available.

It is also possible to open and work on anything from Microsoft Office, including Word, Excel and PowerPoint, without converting it to the Google version of those products.

In order to inspire software developers with what the graphics can do, there is a special hidden feature: press the control, alt and shift buttons together, then the refresh button, and the screen spins, even while playing a video.

There is also a new Samsung desktop, the Chromebox, starting at $329, that could be attractive to schools and businesses looking to provide a lot of people the same kind of machine.

The prices of both new Samsung devices undercut even most low-end tablet and desktop machines.

Previously the desktops and laptops were only sold online, but next month they will also be offered at some Best Buy stores. That could be a big shot in the arm for a machine that has probably sold in the tens of thousands.

Acer also makes Chromebooks, but does yet have machines with the new hardware. Mr. Pichai said other manufacturers, which he did not mention, would be selling their versions of the machine in time for the Christmas season.

Another new Chrome feature, still in beta, enables customers to get access to their PCs and Mac computers remotely. The screen of the remote computer appears on the Chrome machine, and the distant computer can be manipulated from Chrome. The other computer has to be on, though it can be in screensaver mode.

“Companies are excited about Chromebooks, but have legacy applications they want to keep,” Mr. Pichai said. “Now, if you have a legacy Oracle expense app, you can put it somewhere and have it accessible on Chrome.”

Article source: http://bits.blogs.nytimes.com/2012/05/29/new-google-chrome-aims-at-windows-8/

Tags: , , , ,

24 May 12 Microsoft Office for iOS and Android May Arrive This Fall


Microsoft Office for iOS and Android May Arrive This FallMicrosoft appears to be closing in on a release of Microsoft Office for both iOS and Android this fall, despite previous denials.

The software is expected to be ready for a release in November, sources tell Boy Genius Report. This would match up with a previous report from The Daily, which claimed to have seen a working prototype of Office on an iPad.

Microsoft was quick to deny, calling the report “inaccurate rumors and speculation.” So much for that: BGR’s source claims that the Office they saw looked “almost identical” to a picture shown by The Daily, so maybe the folks in Redmond weren’t entirely truthful.

In any case, releasing a mobile version of Office for both Android and iOS makes a lot of sense. Windows Phone is behind its larger competitors in terms of market share and, although Windows 8 is supposed to be tablet-friendly, there’s no guarantee that those tablets will be able to compete with the market-leading iPad.

Users Want Productivity Apps

If you need more evidence of the public’s desire for mobile Office, look at the top paid apps in the iTunes App Store. In the Productivity category, Apple’s Pages, Keynote, and Numbers apps are consistently in the list of top ten bestsellers, and have been since iWork for iPad’s launch in January 2010. As of Wednesday evening, Pages was third, Keynote ninth, and Numbers is 11th in that category.

These apps serve their purpose, but are far from perfect. iWork does not natively save documents to Office formats, and its export function trips up sometimes when it comes to formatting. Microsoft can obviously build better support for Office in its own productivity suite than Apple could.

Microsoft is silent this time when asked about the rumors. While it was quick in February to deny, this time it declined to comment. That silence speaks volumes about Redmond’s future plans.

For more tech news and commentary, follow Ed on Twitter at @edoswald, on Facebook, or on Google+.

Article source: http://www.pcworld.com/businesscenter/article/256127/microsoft_office_for_ios_and_android_may_arrive_this_fall.html

Tags: , , , ,

15 May 12 Kingsoft Office for Android Brings Free Document Editing to Your Mobile Devices


A few months back I called Kingsoft Office the best Microsoft Office alternative you’ve never heard of. Now Kingsoft is making waves again with a mobile version of that impressive suite.

Kingsoft Office for Android lets you open, edit, and create documents, spreadsheets, and presentations right on your smartphone or tablet. And it’s noteworthy not just for its Microsoft Office compatibility, but also its price: the app is free.

How good could a free office suite be? In this case, pretty darn good. The app supports Word, Excel, and PowerPoint file formats, meaning you should be able to open and edit any existing documents you want to bring along.

It also lets you create these kinds of documents from scratch, saving them either to your device or any cloud-storage service that supports WebDAV. Alas, Dropbox isn’t one of them, but Box.net does — and support for that service is built directly into the app.

I’m particularly impressed by Kingsoft Office’s interface. Like the desktop version, it employs tabs for easy switching between multiple open documents. And it just plain looks nice (see below), especially on a tablet, which is where an app like this makes the most sense.

Indeed, if you’ve been wondering whether a tablet can really take the place of a laptop, Kingsoft Office adds a big checkmark to the “yes!” column. For any serious document work, I think you’ll want to pair it with a Bluetooth keyboard — but then you’re good to go (both literally and figuratively).

One note for Kindle Fire users: You can find Kingsoft Office in the Amazon Appstore, but it shows up there as a trial version. To get the full-featured free version that’s available from Google Play, you’ll need to venture into the settings, enable Allow Installation of Application From Unknown Sources, and then sideload the app. If you’re not sure how, a little Web searching will reveal the necessary steps. (It’s easy.)

If you’ve tried any of the other office-suite apps for Android, hit the comments and let me know if you think they’re any better — and why. For my money (in this case no money), the best option by far is Kingsoft’s.

Article source: http://www.pcworld.com/businesscenter/article/255577/kingsoft_office_for_android_brings_free_document_editing_to_your_mobile_devices.html

Tags: , , , ,

08 May 12 Chrome beats IE for a weekend


Chrome beats IE for a weekend

Google creeps up on leisure time browsing crown

WIN – A free one year, 25 user licence of Microsoft Office 365!

Fresh from knocking off Microsoft’s Internet Explorer as the web’s most-used browser for a single day in March, Google’s Chrome browser has now claimed more users than Redmond’s HTML-cruncher for a whole weekend.

Data gathered by StatCounter shows Chrome has enjoyed a day of dominance on most weekends since its March ascendancy. On May 5th and 6th, however, it opened a gap over IE. Sunday the 6th even saw Chrome take a lead of nearly three percent.

Chrome beats IE for a whole weekend

IE still rules on weekdays, when use of the browser surges, presumably thanks to corporate drones diligent workers returning to the locked-down world of enterprise IT. But IE’s days as the market leader may even be numbered in those environments, as Microsoft has recently announced SharePoint and Microsoft CRM will support other browsers. That move will mean workplaces have fewer reasons to insist on IE as the corporate standard. ®

WIN – A free one year, 25 user licence of Microsoft Office 365!

Article source: http://go.theregister.com/feed/www.theregister.co.uk/2012/05/08/chrome_beats_ie_again/

Tags: , , , ,

08 May 12 Chrome beats IE for a weekend


Chrome beats IE for a weekend

Google creeps up on leisure time browsing crown

WIN – A free one year, 25 user licence of Microsoft Office 365!

Fresh from knocking off Microsoft’s Internet Explorer as the web’s most-used browser for a single day in March, Google’s Chrome browser has now claimed more users than Redmond’s HTML-cruncher for a whole weekend.

Data gathered by StatCounter shows Chrome has enjoyed a day of dominance on most weekends since its March ascendancy. On May 5th and 6th, however, it opened a gap over IE. Sunday the 6th even saw Chrome take a lead of nearly three percent.

Chrome beats IE for a whole weekend

IE still rules on weekdays, when use of the browser surges, presumably thanks to corporate drones diligent workers returning to the locked-down world of enterprise IT. But IE’s days as the market leader may even be numbered in those environments, as Microsoft has recently announced SharePoint and Microsoft CRM will support other browsers. That move will mean workplaces have fewer reasons to insist on IE as the corporate standard. ®

WIN – A free one year, 25 user licence of Microsoft Office 365!

Article source: http://www.theregister.co.uk/2012/05/08/chrome_beats_ie_again/

Tags: , , , ,