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15 Apr 12 Google starts testing device syncing for Chrome


In order to unify the Chrome experience across all devices that use the Chrome browser, the development team at Google is testing a new way to sync tab information between devices.

Included in the beta test of Google Chrome 19, the next major release of the Web browser will include the ability to sync open tabs between different devices. Assuming that the user has the browser open on both devices and is logged in with the same profile, they can access all open pages by clicking the new “Other Devices” option in the bottom right hand corner of a new tab page. For instance, if a user is reading a particular article or series of articles on a work computer, they can open up the tab on a laptop, desktop or tablet located at home without having to type in the URL or search for each page. 

Chrome_Desktop_Beta_Android_SyncIn addition to pulling up the current URL within the tab, the syncing process also brings over page history as well. Users can navigate backward and forward through the tab’s history and current tabs that are open on the device won’t be closed when the new “Other Devices” tab is launched.

Beyond the new tab sync feature within Chrome 19, the beta version of the software includes a smattering of bug fixes and performance tweaks. Issues with 3D graphics on NVIDIA GPUs has been fixed as well as errors with incognito windows.

Regarding desktop to mobile syncing, Google is working on a solution that will be built into Chrome 20. If a user has pulled up directions to a new restaurant on a desktop computer, but forgotten to print out the details, they could bring up the directions immediately on a synced Android 4.0 mobile phone.

This feature will replace the Google Chrome to Phone extension that’s currently available on the Chrome Web Store. Google is also expected to include updates to Native Client, a solution for high-end gaming through the Web browser, within Chrome 19 and Chrome 20. 

Article source: http://www.digitaltrends.com/computing/google-starts-testing-device-syncing-for-chrome/

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15 Apr 12 Google starts testing device syncing for Chrome


In order to unify the Chrome experience across all devices that use the Chrome browser, the development team at Google is testing a new way to sync tab information between devices.

Included in the beta test of Google Chrome 19, the next major release of the Web browser will include the ability to sync open tabs between different devices. Assuming that the user has the browser open on both devices and is logged in with the same profile, they can access all open pages by clicking the new “Other Devices” option in the bottom right hand corner of a new tab page. For instance, if a user is reading a particular article or series of articles on a work computer, they can open up the tab on a laptop, desktop or tablet located at home without having to type in the URL or search for each page. 

Chrome_Desktop_Beta_Android_SyncIn addition to pulling up the current URL within the tab, the syncing process also brings over page history as well. Users can navigate backward and forward through the tab’s history and current tabs that are open on the device won’t be closed when the new “Other Devices” tab is launched.

Beyond the new tab sync feature within Chrome 19, the beta version of the software includes a smattering of bug fixes and performance tweaks. Issues with 3D graphics on NVIDIA GPUs has been fixed as well as errors with incognito windows.

Regarding desktop to mobile syncing, Google is working on a solution that will be built into Chrome 20. If a user has pulled up directions to a new restaurant on a desktop computer, but forgotten to print out the details, they could bring up the directions immediately on a synced Android 4.0 mobile phone.

This feature will replace the Google Chrome to Phone extension that’s currently available on the Chrome Web Store. Google is also expected to include updates to Native Client, a solution for high-end gaming through the Web browser, within Chrome 19 and Chrome 20. 

Article source: http://www.digitaltrends.com/computing/google-starts-testing-device-syncing-for-chrome/

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12 Apr 12 Device syncing on-deck for Chrome


Chrome now offers Other Devices for tab syncing.

(Credit:
Google)

Google has started to warm up Chrome with features designed to make it interact more smoothly with
Android and other computers, as the summer’s Google I/O conference and a possible final street-ready version of Native Client wait in the wings.

Google Chrome 19 beta for Windows, Mac, Linux, and Chrome Frame landed today, updated with Other Device support. The new feature lets you access your Chrome tabs from other computers, and includes Chrome for Android if you’ve got an Ice Cream Sandwich device. The Other Devices option is available at the bottom of the New Tab page, next to the Recently Closed drop-down menu. Along with syncing open tabs, it also syncs that particular tab’s history, so you can navigate forward and back when you open it on a new device.

Today also saw the arrival of the developer’s build of Chrome 20 (download for Windows, Mac, Linux), which had given people access to Other Device support previously but now comes with a Chrome to Mobile option that lets you send a page directly to Chrome for Android. You still have enable the option in about:flags, but it does give you the ability to send a URL directly to Chrome for Android. It’s basically Google’s in-house version of Chrome to Phone.

Google has made available the full revision logs for Chrome 19 beta and Chrome 20 dev. As of yet, there’s been no official Native Client progress update . That’s likely to change as work progresses on Chrome 19 and Chrome 20.

Article source: http://news.cnet.com/8301-1001_3-57412763-92/device-syncing-on-deck-for-chrome/

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12 Apr 12 Device syncing on-deck for Chrome


Chrome now offers Other Devices for tab syncing.

(Credit:
Google)

Google has started to warm up Chrome with features designed to make it interact more smoothly with
Android and other computers, as the summer’s Google I/O conference and a possible final street-ready version of Native Client wait in the wings.

Google Chrome 19 beta for Windows, Mac, Linux, and Chrome Frame landed today, updated with Other Device support. The new feature lets you access your Chrome tabs from other computers, and includes Chrome for Android if you’ve got an Ice Cream Sandwich device. The Other Devices option is available at the bottom of the New Tab page, next to the Recently Closed drop-down menu. Along with syncing open tabs, it also syncs that particular tab’s history, so you can navigate forward and back when you open it on a new device.

Today also saw the arrival of the developer’s build of Chrome 20 (download for Windows, Mac, Linux), which had given people access to Other Device support previously but now comes with a Chrome to Mobile option that lets you send a page directly to Chrome for Android. You still have enable the option in about:flags, but it does give you the ability to send a URL directly to Chrome for Android. It’s basically Google’s in-house version of Chrome to Phone.

Google has made available the full revision logs for Chrome 19 beta and Chrome 20 dev. As of yet, there’s been no official Native Client progress update . That’s likely to change as work progresses on Chrome 19 and Chrome 20.

Article source: http://download.cnet.com/8301-2007_4-57412763-12/device-syncing-on-deck-for-chrome/?part=rss&subj=software&tag=title

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30 Mar 12 Chrome 18 adds GPU-acceleration and SwiftShader for better gaming performance


Those of you running an older computer or one with less-than-stellar integrated graphics (read: Intel) take heed: Chrome 18 has gone stable, bringing SwiftShader’s awesome software rendering muscle to Google’s web browser. The gains are impressive, too, with the Transgaming tech capable of yielding 3Dmark scores that are on par with an AMD Radeon 5550.

That’s not to say your Atom-powered, first-generation Chromebook is going to run Bastion as smoothly as your desktop computer, but it’s probably going to run a whole lot better following this update.

Chrome 18 has also introduced GPU-accelerated Canvas 2D rendering (on Windows and Mac for now — an ETA for Linux wasn’t mentioned), which is another reason that the integration of SwiftShader is important. Google wants to ensure that all Chrome users get to experience every aspect of its speed, from URL completion and pre-rendering to all the GPU-acceleration features it now offers.

It’s all down to Google’s desire to push Chrome as a platform. Yes, Google is a supporter of the web as a platform and web apps as the wave of the future, but they’re also doing everything they can to entice developers into building Chrome-centric apps and games.

By dangling extras like Native Client and thereby offering performance that plain vanilla web apps — and other browsers — just can’t match right now, Google hopes developers will favor Chrome. That’s becoming increasingly likely as Chrome’s user base swells. Just recently it surpassed Internet Explorer as the most-used browser worldwide…even if it was only for a single Sunday.

More at the Chromium Blog


Article source: http://www.geek.com/articles/news/chrome-18-adds-gpu-acceleration-and-swiftshader-for-better-gaming-performance-20120329/

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06 Mar 12 Why Google is playing games with Chrome's future–literally


Apps may get all the buzz, but Chrome’s Native Client and the games it powers are pushing the limits of what the browser can do.

Chrome’s Native Client powers new games (screenshots)

SAN FRANCISCO–You think porn drives technology? Think again. Games are what’s driving online innovation–just ask Google, which is embracing them as fast as it can.

At the Game Developers Conference (GDC) held in San Francisco’s Moscone Center today, Google showed off advances in its Native Client (NaCl) and Pepper technology for Chrome that it hopes will drive more interest from developers and gamers alike in browser-based gaming. Google is also integrating NaCl games with Google+ to give the nascent social network something to play with.

The company unveiled a handful of NaCl-powered games last December, and now it’s ready to kick off several more big names to showcase Chrome’s latest improvements. Colt McAnlis, Developer Advocate for Native Client at Google, said basically that it’s game on for Chrome. “We saw with Zynga that there was this gaming boom, but it competed with the mobile bubble. We want to see a modern gaming gold rush in the browser,” he said in an interview between his presentations at GDC.

Zombie Track Meet from FuzzyCube promises to be a madcap undead footrace.

Zombie Track Meet from FuzzyCube promises to be a madcap undead footrace.

(Credit:
Google)

Changes already in the roughest version of public version of Chrome, called Canary, herald new abilities for the browser. Starting around Chrome 19, currently on the developer’s channel, or Chrome 20, on the Canary channel, users will be able to play games with full NaCl support and Google+ integration. Some of this groundwork has been laid in Chrome 18 beta’s support for WebSockets.

“We’re now having a really interesting discussion with game developers about how Native Client gives them a really cool pivot point. They just have to compile things differently,” he said.

Along with development progress in Native Client, continued work on HTML5 standards has created some new game-specific APIs. These include Gamepad, for playing games with a standard gaming controller; Fullscreen, for full-screen window support; and Mouse Lock, for 3D, first-person shooter-style mousing.

Google is revealing six new games at GDC on Wednesday: Zombie Track Meet from FuzzyCube, AirMech, Eats to Munchies, Dark Legends, Ubisoft’s From Dust, and Firehose Games’ Go Home Dinosaurs, which McAnlis described as an improbable cross between Tetris and Tower Defense, but with dinosaurs and barbecue.

Google has made improvements to its Chrome Web Store in-app payments option that include support for more currencies and a simpler payment path. This means that developers will be able to monetize their games better, and it’s going to include Google+ games.

AirMech from Carbon Games is a real-time strategy game with transforming mech suits.

AirMech from Carbon Games is a real-time strategy game with transforming mech suits.

(Credit:
Google)

Of course, Google has a long way to go before its nascent social network can rival Facebook, but the company is clearly betting on driving Google+ interest through Chrome’s popularity. “In Native Client, we’ve got the ability to expose what the hardware can do in a safe way, and we’ve got the games to prove it. For this year, we want some amazing success stories, focusing on Native Client and Web first,” he said.

Chrome 20, by the way, isn’t due on the stable channel until sometime in June. NaCl development is currently far from complete. McAnlis said that while some areas are progressing, like support for TrueType, SDL, and OpenAL for NaCl ports, the NaCl team is still working on better IDE, better breakpoint support, and more documentation. “We want to get it so can you port a game to NaCl in one hour, and Google I/O [the company's summer developer's conference] is the target for that.”

McAnlis stressed that his employer is serious about games, beyond its social networking or technological implications. “This isn’t a fad. Google is investing in games. Developers can bring console-quality games to Chrome,” he said.

It’s an interesting gambit, and one that could help staunch the bleeding of user interest as people flock to mobile devices. However, McAnlis added that there’s no plans to bring Native Client to Chrome for
Android since gaming apps are already well-represented there. Native Client’s success and the rethinking of browser-based gaming would get a big boost if another browser vendor such as Microsoft or Mozilla were to take a strong interest in the open-source technology, but that has yet to happen.

Article source: http://download.cnet.com/8301-2007_4-57391119-12/why-google-is-playing-games-with-chromes-future-literally/?part=rss&subj=software&tag=title

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06 Mar 12 Why Google is playing games with Chrome’s future–literally


Apps may get all the buzz, but Chrome’s Native Client and the games it powers are pushing the limits of what the browser can do.

Chrome’s Native Client powers new games (screenshots)

SAN FRANCISCO–You think porn drives technology? Think again. Games are what’s driving online innovation–just ask Google, which is embracing them as fast as it can.

At the Game Developers Conference (GDC) held in San Francisco’s Moscone Center today, Google showed off advances in its Native Client (NaCl) and Pepper technology for Chrome that it hopes will drive more interest from developers and gamers alike in browser-based gaming. Google is also integrating NaCl games with Google+ to give the nascent social network something to play with.

The company unveiled a handful of NaCl-powered games last December, and now it’s ready to kick off several more big names to showcase Chrome’s latest improvements. Colt McAnlis, Developer Advocate for Native Client at Google, said basically that it’s game on for Chrome. “We saw with Zynga that there was this gaming boom, but it competed with the mobile bubble. We want to see a modern gaming gold rush in the browser,” he said in an interview between his presentations at GDC.

Zombie Track Meet from FuzzyCube promises to be a madcap undead footrace.

Zombie Track Meet from FuzzyCube promises to be a madcap undead footrace.

(Credit:
Google)

Changes already in the roughest version of public version of Chrome, called Canary, herald new abilities for the browser. Starting around Chrome 19, currently on the developer’s channel, or Chrome 20, on the Canary channel, users will be able to play games with full NaCl support and Google+ integration. Some of this groundwork has been laid in Chrome 18 beta’s support for WebSockets.

“We’re now having a really interesting discussion with game developers about how Native Client gives them a really cool pivot point. They just have to compile things differently,” he said.

Along with development progress in Native Client, continued work on HTML5 standards has created some new game-specific APIs. These include Gamepad, for playing games with a standard gaming controller; Fullscreen, for full-screen window support; and Mouse Lock, for 3D, first-person shooter-style mousing.

Google is revealing six new games at GDC on Wednesday: Zombie Track Meet from FuzzyCube, AirMech, Eats to Munchies, Dark Legends, Ubisoft’s From Dust, and Firehose Games’ Go Home Dinosaurs, which McAnlis described as an improbable cross between Tetris and Tower Defense, but with dinosaurs and barbecue.

Google has made improvements to its Chrome Web Store in-app payments option that include support for more currencies and a simpler payment path. This means that developers will be able to monetize their games better, and it’s going to include Google+ games.

AirMech from Carbon Games is a real-time strategy game with transforming mech suits.

AirMech from Carbon Games is a real-time strategy game with transforming mech suits.

(Credit:
Google)

Of course, Google has a long way to go before its nascent social network can rival Facebook, but the company is clearly betting on driving Google+ interest through Chrome’s popularity. “In Native Client, we’ve got the ability to expose what the hardware can do in a safe way, and we’ve got the games to prove it. For this year, we want some amazing success stories, focusing on Native Client and Web first,” he said.

Chrome 20, by the way, isn’t due on the stable channel until sometime in June. NaCl development is currently far from complete. McAnlis said that while some areas are progressing, like support for TrueType, SDL, and OpenAL for NaCl ports, the NaCl team is still working on better IDE, better breakpoint support, and more documentation. “We want to get it so can you port a game to NaCl in one hour, and Google I/O [the company's summer developer's conference] is the target for that.”

McAnlis stressed that his employer is serious about games, beyond its social networking or technological implications. “This isn’t a fad. Google is investing in games. Developers can bring console-quality games to Chrome,” he said.

It’s an interesting gambit, and one that could help staunch the bleeding of user interest as people flock to mobile devices. However, McAnlis added that there’s no plans to bring Native Client to Chrome for
Android since gaming apps are already well-represented there. Native Client’s success and the rethinking of browser-based gaming would get a big boost if another browser vendor such as Microsoft or Mozilla were to take a strong interest in the open-source technology, but that has yet to happen.

Article source: http://download.cnet.com/8301-2007_4-57391119-12/why-google-is-playing-games-with-chromes-future-literally/

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07 Feb 12 Three years on, Chrome at last arrives on Android


Chrome for Android overlays multiple tabs if you tap the tab button in the upper right.

Chrome for Android overlays multiple tabs if you tap the tab button in the upper right.

(Credit:
Screenshot by Stephen Shankland/CNET)

Google today released a beta version of its Chrome browser for
Android, a momentous step that marries two of Google’s most important programming projects.

The new browser, unlike the stock Android browser, is available in the Android Market so that people don’t have to wait for handset makers to offer it through an operating system upgrade. But its reliance on newer hardware acceleration interfaces means it only works on Ice Cream Sandwich, which despite emerging last year on Samsung’s Galaxy Nexus smartphone remains a rarity in the real world.

Chrome for Android includes the desktop version’s V8 JavaScript engine, has gesture-based controls for moving among multiple tabs, synchronizes with the desktop version of Chrome, and shuts out plug-ins including Adobe Systems’ Flash Player and Google’s own Native Client. With its performance and features, Google expects Android users to increase their browser activity.

“In general, we have seen usage go up,” said Sundar Pichai, Google’s senior vice president of Chrome and Apps. “I expect to see more people use the mobile Web.”

It’s unfortunate that it’s limited to Ice Cream Sandwich, but Chrome doubtless will take off widely among those with Android 4.0. Even in beta, it’s a compelling browser at least on the Galaxy Nexus I tried it on, and it’s and a much better match for Apple’s
Safari on iOS. And eventually, its success is all but assured when it simply becomes what ships with Android.

Google tried to examine every aspect of browsing and if necessary adapt it for the mobile world. “The intent was to reinvent
mobile browsers,” said Arnaud Weber, engineering manager for Chrome. “We went through every feature of Chrome and brainstormed every feature.”

Peas in a pod
Android and Chrome are made for each other. Each arrived for the public to use in the closing months of 2008. Each started as small, rough projects that exploded in usage and became top priorities for the company.

Each project isn’t actually an end in itself, but rather a means to an end: get more people to use the Internet and Google’s services on it. Android and Chrome are vehicles to carry people to Google search, YouTube, Google Docs, Google Maps, Google+, and doubtless many future online services. Not coincidentally, Chrome and Android are set up to work better if you’re signed into a Google account.

With so much to gain from each other, it’s somewhat surprising that it took more than three years for the Chrome chocolate to get stuck in the Android peanut butter. But Google wanted to make sure Chrome for Android would be good enough, Pichai said.

Chrome for Android runs only on Googles Ice Cream Sandwich version of the mobile operating system.

Chrome for Android runs only on Google’s Ice Cream Sandwich version of the mobile operating system.

(Credit:
screenshot by Stephen Shankland/CNET)

“We really wanted to get the full capabilities of a desktop browser–stuff like V8–in a highly capable browser that’s optimized for the mobile experience,” Pichai said. “It was a challenge.”

And Google didn’t want to brand the stock Android browser with the Chrome name. It wasn’t based on Chromium, the open-source foundation of Chrome, and Google wanted to ensure the “underlying mobile platform could run things you’re used to in desktops,” Pichai said.

Feature frenzy
Among the features in the browser:

• The browser shows multiple tabs like overlapping pages when you tap the tabs button. Swiping one of the pages to one side or the other close it in much the same way that you can sweep away notifications on Ice Cream Sandwich. Once you click a page, it expands to fill the whole screen, at which point you can switch to new pages by sliding your finger from one edge or the other.

• The browser can preload pages in advance when Google has high confidence that you’ll likely tap its link. That means pages don’t have to wait so much for the network.

• Chrome for Android has hardware acceleration for tasks such as scrolling. It also uses it for slick visual feedback effects like browser tabs.

• It supports a wide range of Web standards, including Web Workers for multiple computing processes, Web Sockets for fast server-browser communciations, HTML5 video and audio, and IndexedDB for offline storage.

Chrome for Android synchronizes with Chrome for personal computers.

Chrome for Android synchronizes with Chrome for personal computers.

(Credit:
screenshot by Stephen Shankland/CNET)

• The browser is rejiggered for tablets. “On tablets, we realize consumers expect a similar experience to what they get on a laptop,” Pichai said, so for example the tab strip looks like what you’d see on a personal computer.

• You can synchronize data such as bookmarks and Web address autocomplete suggestions with your desktop browser, with passwords arriving in a later upgrade. As with Firefox for Android, tabs you had open on your laptop or desktop can be opened from a list in Chrome for Android. To use sync, you must be signed into your Google account.

• The browser has incognito mode that doesn’t leave traces such as cached images, cookies, and browsing history on the phone. It’s walled off into a separate stack of tabs; if any incognito tabs are open, you can move between them and the ordinary stack of tabs by tapping the tab button and then tapping the appropriate stack.

• Programmers can use their PCs to remotely debug Web pages that don’t work properly on Chrome for Android. A command on the PC will open the mobile browser’s Web pages for scrutiny.

Web apps or native apps?
Chrome for Android increases a certain tension within Google: should software run natively on a particular computing device or as a Web app within a browser?

For Android, the answer clearly has been largely the former as Google has pushed the Android Market and worked to improve programming tools and interfaces. But part of Chrome’s raison d’etre has been to spur Web-app innovation, a subject near and dear to Google’s heart. Because browsers run on so many devices, Web apps span them and at least theoretically offer programmers the promise of cross-platform development.

Naturally, with Chrome on board, Android becomes a much more powerful foundation for Web applications. That’s especially true since Chrome will be on the Android Market and therefore Android users will be able to upgrade it even when their handset manufacturers can’t be bothered to keep up with newer Android releases.

But Chrome’s arrival doesn’t herald a new age when Web apps rule on Android.

“The mobile ecosystem is evolving at such a rapid pace that native apps will always be there, while the Web works its way there,” Pichai said.

Chrome for Android doesn’t yet overwrite the stock Android browser. The latter is still used, for example, by other Android apps that need a browser engine.

Android 4.0 only
Google stuck required Ice Cream Sandwich because it has necessary interfaces such as those for hardware acceleration. It sure is convenient, though, that it means Google doesn’t have to worry about a lot of problems with compatibility and performance of a lot of older phones.

In fact, Google passing over earlier Android versions is almost exactly what Microsoft chose to do with Internet Explorer 9 when it dropped Windows XP support, in part because it lacks newer graphics interfaces. That cuts off a lot of people but simplifies engineering and support.

“ICS represesnts a big leap forward,” Pichai said of Google’s choice. “It made sense to aim there, to build for the future.”

Likewise, don’t expect Chrome on other mobile operating systems, most notably iOS. Apple permits other browsers on iOS only if they use its WebKit engine to render Web pages; although Chrome stems from the same WebKit lineage, it’s a different bundle of bits with, for example, a different JavaScript engine.

“On iOS, we can’t run V8 or our multiprocess architecture,” Pichai said. “There are a lot of limitations.”

Chrome for Android is based on Chrome 16, the current stable release of the browser for computers. Google plans to update Chrome for Android every six weeks, just like the desktop version, and eventually the browser version numbers will sync up, Pichai said.

Net Applications January 2012 show the gradual rise of the unbranded Android browser to third place after Apple's Safari and Opera Mini in terms of usage. Expect Chrome for Android to steadily supplant the unbranded browser as Android 4.0 spreads.

Net Applications’ January 2012 numbers show the gradual rise of the unbranded Android browser to third place after Apple’s Safari and Opera Mini in terms of usage. Expect Chrome for Android to steadily supplant the unbranded browser as Android 4.0 spreads.

(Credit:
Net Applications)

“Our intent is to have the smallest possible gap” between the desktop and mobile versions of Chrome, Weber said.

Chrome for Android won’t support Flash, Pichai said. Google has been a tight Flash ally with its creator, Adobe Systems, but Google was spared a tough choice when Adobe scuppered its attempt to extend Flash from desktop to mobile last year.

Google’s own Native Client, for running Web apps compiled to run at native speeds, also isn’t an option, said Dave Burke, the Android engineering director. For that sort of software, programmers will simply write native Android apps, he said.

But Google loves the mobile Web–and it’s a big deal financially.

“We believe one in every seven searches on Google comes from a mobile device,” said JP Morgan analyst Doug Anmuth in a research report yesterday.

Advertisers pay only a half to a quarter the amount for each ad when people click on them compared to what they pay on personal computers right now, but more mobile usage likely will mean more advertisers bidding and therefore higher cost-per-click payment rates for Google, he said.

But overall, a lot of Google’s excitement seems to be just about finally giving a top company brand a prominent place in a fast-moving, important market.

“I think mobile browsing is in its infancy. As phones are getting more powerful, as screen sizes are getting larger and higher-resolution, and as connectivity is getting better going from 3G to 4G, I think mobile browsing can be huge,” Pichai said. Now using Chrome on Android, “my browser usage has sky rocketed.”

Article source: http://news.cnet.com/8301-30685_3-57368713-264/three-years-on-chrome-at-last-arrives-on-android/?part=rss&subj=software&tag=title

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02 Jan 12 MAME can now run in Google Chrome


5304995710 69ee8c040a b MAME can now run in Google Chrome

Your princess is in another castle! Not long ago, Google announced a project called Native Client for Google Chrome. Simply put, it is way for web developers to create websites that can execute native code. That allows your browser to become a vector for full-fledged applications without the limitations imposed by traditional web technology. As a case study, the popular arcade game emulator MAME was ported to Native Client.

In this post, Robert Muth explains the process of getting MAME to work within the framework of Native Client. Even if you’re not a developer, the post is worth a read. Much of the technical jargon can be skipped through to see how porting existing technology to Native Client works. It’s interesting if only in an academic context. That said, there is a downside to this.

Not even looking at the viral concerns of executing code closer to the metal, Native Client worries me. Google has shown in the past year that it doesn’t mind fragmenting the web with technology like WebM and Dart. Sure, they create open source technology, but they don’t do much, if any, leg work to get it adopted as a standard. Google has the mindset of “Well, we’ll use it, and obviously everyone else will want to as well.” That’s better than ActiveX-style Microsoft lock-in, but not by much.

The last thing we need is more websites that are dependent on the user running a specific browser. We want an open web, and Google talks a good game about that, but I am still unsure if that is really their goal. It sure seems to me that they are working on a lot of Google technology lock-in.

Source: Google Developers
Image Credit: vvvracer

Article source: http://www.macgasm.net/2012/01/02/mame-run-google-chrome/

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02 Jan 12 MAME ported to Google Chrome


It might not have lasted too long on the iTunes App Store, but MAME (the Multiple Arcade Machine Emulator) has now been ported to Chrome. MAME acts as an emulator for classic arcade games, with a range of hardware options — everything from Pac-Man to Galaga can be run within the software. Google engineer Robert Muth has released a case study detailing the challenges presented by porting the complex emulator, and the limitations of the Native Client the project was forced to overcome. The case study reads like a detailed build log, giving notes on all of the changes Muth was forced to make in order to get the system running — a task which took just four days.

This is the latest in a growing number of gaming apps powered by Native Client, including Mini Ninjas and Bastion. The work done to support MAME has also meant that the engineers have been able to port SDL (Software Directmedia Layer) to Native Client — a step that should make porting a number of other games to the system far simpler. If you want to give MAME a try, head to the Chrome Web Store to install the classic Robby Roto arcade game. The notes say that certain other games are also supported by simply uploading the ROM.

Article source: http://www.theverge.com/2012/1/1/2674518/mame-google-chrome-port

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