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24 May 12 Pwnium Chrome hackers exploited 16 zero-day vulnerabilities


Google Chrome hackers used a total of 16 zero-day vulnerabilities to crack the browser at the inaugural “Pwnium” hacking contest and win $120,000.

The number of bugs the two researchers used – six in one case, “roughly” 10 in the other – was dramatically more than the average attack. The Stuxnet worm of 2010, called “groundbreaking” by some analysts, used just four bugs, only three of them previously-unknown “zero-day” vulnerabilities.

Google detailed only the half-dozen deployed by the researcher known as “Pinkie Pie” in a post to the Chromium blog yesterday. Details of the 10 used by Sergey Glazunov will not be disclosed until they are patched in other programs they afflict, said Jorge Lucangeli Obes and Justin Schuh, two Chrome security engineers.

Pinkie Pie and Glazunov were the only prize winners at Pwnium, the March contest Google created after it withdrew from the long-running “Pwn2Own” hacking challenge. Google had pledged to pay up to $1 million, but ended up handing out just $120,000 – $60,000 to each of the men.

In previous P2n2Own contests, Chrome had escaped not only unscathed, but also untested by top-flight security researchers.

Pinkie Pie strung together six vulnerabilities on March 9 to successfully break out of the Chrome “sandbox,” an anti-exploit technology that isolates the browser from the rest of the system.

The vulnerabilities let him exploit Chrome’s pre-rendering – where the browser loads potential pages before a user views them – access the GPU (graphics processor unit) command buffers, write eight bytes of code to a predictable memory address, execute additional code in the GPU and escape the browser’s sandbox.

At the time of Pwnium, one Google program manager called Pinkie Pie’s exploits “works of art.”

Google patched Pinkie Pie’s bugs within 24 hours of his demonstration. Since then, the company has revealed technical details in its Chromium bug database of five of the six vulnerabilities.

Glazunov’s exploits relied on approximately 10 vulnerabilities – they, too, were patched within 24 hours – but Google is keeping information on those secret for now.

“While these issues are already fixed in Chrome, some of them impact a much broader array of products from a range of companies,” said Obes and Schuh. “We won’t be posting that part until we’re comfortable that all affected products have had an adequate time to push fixes to their users.”

Chrome, currently at version 19, had an estimated 18.9% of the browser usage market in April, according to metrics firm Net Applications. Rival StatCounter, however, pegged Chrome’s share for the month at 31.2%.

Article source: http://rss.feedsportal.com/c/270/f/470440/s/1fa9a773/l/0Lnews0Btechworld0N0Csecurity0C33597220Cpwnium0Echrome0Ehackers0Eexploited0E160Ezero0Eday0Evulnerabilities0C0Dolo0Frss/story01.htm

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23 May 12 Pwnium hacking contest winners exploited 16 Chrome zero-days


Computerworld -

Google yesterday revealed that the two researchers who cracked Chrome in March at the company’s inaugural “Pwnium” hacking contest used a total of 16 zero-day vulnerabilities to win $60,000 each.

The number of bugs each researcher used — six in one case, “roughly” 10 in the other — was dramatically more than the average attack. The Stuxnet worm of 2010, called “groundbreaking” by some analysts, used just four bugs, only three of them previously-unknown “zero-day” vulnerabilities.

Google detailed only the half-dozen deployed by the researcher known as “Pinkie Pie” in a post to the Chromium blog yesterday. Details of the 10 used by Sergey Glazunov will not be disclosed until they are patched in other programs they afflict, said Jorge Lucangeli Obes and Justin Schuh, two Chrome security engineers, in the blog.

Pinkie Pie and Glazunov were the only prize winners at Pwnium, the March contest Google created after it withdrew from the long-running “Pwn2Own” hacking challenge. Google had pledged to pay up to $1 million, but ended up handing out just $120,000 — $60,000 to each of the men.

In previous P2n2Own contests, Chrome had escaped not only unscathed, but also untested by top-flight security researchers.

Pinkie Pie strung together six vulnerabilities on March 9 to successfully break out of the Chrome “sandbox,” an anti-exploit technology that isolates the browser from the rest of the system.

The vulnerabilities let him exploit Chrome’s pre-rendering — where the browser loads potential pages before a user views them — access the GPU (graphics processor unit) command buffers, write eight bytes of code to a predictable memory address, execute additional code in the GPU and escape the browser’s sandbox.

At the time of Pwnium, one Google program manager called Pinkie Pie’s exploits “works of art.”

Google patched Pinkie Pie’s bugs within 24 hours of his demonstration. Since then, the company has revealed technical details in its Chromium bug database of five of the six vulnerabilities.

Glazunov’s exploits relied on approximately 10 vulnerabilities — they, too, were patched within 24 hours — but Google is keeping information on those secret for now.

“While these issues are already fixed in Chrome, some of them impact a much broader array of products from a range of companies,” said Obes and Schuh. “We won’t be posting that part until we’re comfortable that all affected products have had an adequate time to push fixes to their users.”

Chrome, currently at version 19, had an estimated 18.9% of the browser usage market in April, according to metrics firm Net Applications. Rival StatCounter, however, pegged Chrome’s share for the month at 31.2%.

covers Microsoft, security issues, Apple, Web browsers and general technology breaking news for Computerworld. Follow Gregg on Twitter at Twitter @gkeizer, on Google+ or subscribe to Gregg’s RSS feed Keizer RSS. His email address is gkeizer@computerworld.com.

See more by Gregg Keizer on Computerworld.com.

Read more about Malware and Vulnerabilities in Computerworld’s Malware and Vulnerabilities Topic Center.

Article source: http://www.computerworld.com/s/article/9227404/Pwnium_hacking_contest_winners_exploited_16_Chrome_zero_days?source=rss_keyword_edpicks

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22 May 12 Chrome Browser Usage Artificially Boosted


Tech blogs were abuzz yesterday over the news that Google Chrome had topped Internet Explorer in global browser market share. But the source for this story was StatCounter, which Microsoft has accused of using a somewhat flawed methodology. The other major traffic measurement site, Net Applications, reports IE as having a comfortable 54 percent of browser usage this month, with Firefox in second place with 20.20 percent and Chrome in third with 18.85 percent.

How can the results be so different? While StatCounter reported Chrome as being on top last week, even that traffic measuring site has IE back on top this week. But the real problem is just what StatCounter counts: pre-rendered Web pages that the user never saw. When a Chrome user types in a Google search, Chrome pre-loads an invisible tab in the background. StatCounter still counts this as a page view. By comparison, Net Applications removes these artificial results, as the company explained on its site.

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Malware Download Protection


Add New User


Syncing Choices


New new-tab page notice

The Microsoft blog post also pointed out that Net Applications, unlike StatCounter, weights results by a country’s Internet-using population. Since these measuring companies depend on the number of sites using their service, this can be skewed by how many such installations exist in a given country. For example, in StatCounter’s data, Turkey is the number-two Internet-using country, and its results are based on that, while CIA data shows Turkey actually to be the fifteenth largest Internet-using country.

Another perhaps even more important factor is that StatCounter doesn’t count by unique browsers, but rather by sheer traffic volume. The volume can be artificially boosted by single computers hitting an inordinate number of web pages.

The rise in Google Chrome usage has certainly been meteoric, propelled by a button on Google’s market-dominating search site asking people to download it. And the writing may be on the wall for its ascendency. But it’s still too early to crown the only major browser without a Do Not Track feature as king of browser usage.

Update: As the first commenter points out below, if you hover your mouse along StatCounter’s graph line representing Chrome, at one point you’ll see a large tooltip box stating that the site now does indeed filter out prerendered pages in Chrome. However, StatCounter’s use of all page views rather than unique browsers still skews the results, as does the lopsided geographical representation.

For more, see PCMag’s review of Chrome 18 (slideshow above), IE9, and Firefox 12.

For more from Michael, follow him on Twitter @mikemuch.

For the top stories in tech, follow us on Twitter at @PCMag.

Article source: http://www.pcmag.com/article2/0,2817,2404714,00.asp

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22 May 12 Chrome Browser Usage Artificially Boosted


Tech blogs were abuzz yesterday over the news that Google Chrome had topped Internet Explorer in global browser market share. But the source for this story was StatCounter, which Microsoft has accused of using a somewhat flawed methodology. The other major traffic measurement site, Net Applications, reports IE as having a comfortable 54 percent of browser usage this month, with Firefox in second place with 20.20 percent and Chrome in third with 18.85 percent.

How can the results be so different? While StatCounter reported Chrome as being on top last week, even that traffic measuring site has IE back on top this week. But the real problem is just what StatCounter counts: pre-rendered Web pages that the user never saw. When a Chrome user types in a Google search, Chrome pre-loads an invisible tab in the background. StatCounter still counts this as a page view. By comparison, Net Applications removes these artificial results, as the company explained on its site.


View Slideshow
See all (23) slides


Malware Download Protection


Add New User


Syncing Choices


New new-tab page notice

The Microsoft blog post also pointed out that Net Applications, unlike StatCounter, weights results by a country’s Internet-using population. Since these measuring companies depend on the number of sites using their service, this can be skewed by how many such installations exist in a given country. For example, in StatCounter’s data, Turkey is the number-two Internet-using country, and its results are based on that, while CIA data shows Turkey actually to be the fifteenth largest Internet-using country.

Another perhaps even more important factor is that StatCounter doesn’t count by unique browsers, but rather by sheer traffic volume. The volume can be artificially boosted by bots that generate huge amounts of Web traffic.

The rise in Google Chrome usage has certainly been meteoric, propelled by a button on Google’s market-dominating search site asking people to download it. And the writing may be on the wall for its ascendency. But it’s still too early to crown the only major browser without a Do Not Track feature as king of browser usage.

For more, see PCMag’s review of Chrome 18 (slideshow above), IE9, and Firefox 12.

For more from Michael, follow him on Twitter @mikemuch.

For the top stories in tech, follow us on Twitter at @PCMag.

Article source: http://www.pcmag.com/article2/0,2817,2404714,00.asp?kc=PCRSS03069TX1K0001121

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19 May 12 Google releases Chrome 19, adds tab sync and patches 20 bugs


Google on Tuesday released Chrome 19, patched 20 vulnerabilities in the browser and doled out $16,500 in bug bounties and rewards to independent researchers.

Chrome 19′s most obvious change is the new support for tab synchronization. Like the already available bookmark, password, app and extension sync, open tabs will now be kept in step on all copies of Chrome, on multiple platforms, including Android, that are linked to the same Google account.

Although Chrome 19 supports the feature, synchronization will not be enabled for all users immediately, said Raz Mathias, a Chrome software engineer. “The tab sync feature will be rolled out gradually over the coming weeks, Mathias said in a Tuesday blog.

Chrome is not breaking ground here.

Mozilla has had tab sync since Firefox 4, which shipped more than a year ago, and third-party extensions, like Xmarks, sync open tabs across browsers from different vendors.

Chrome was last upgraded seven weeks ago. Google releases a new “stable” version about every six to eight weeks and has been on a slightly slower schedule recently than rival Mozilla’s strict every-six-weeks tempo.

Chrome 19 also includes patches for 20 security vulnerabilities: Eight were ranked “high,” Google’s second-most-serious threat rating, seven were marked “medium,” and five were labeled “low.”

Seven of the vulnerabilities were described in Google’s brief advisory as “out-of-bounds” read or write flaws, a category of memory bugs where a function does not check that input doesn’t exceed allocated buffers.

Google paid $7,500 in bounties to six researchers for reporting nine vulnerabilities, including two that were not strictly within Chrome. One of the latter was a bug in a Linux Nvidia driver, for example.

The 11 remaining bugs were uncovered by Google’s own security team or were credited to Microsoft, or were not significant enough to rate a bounty.

Google also handed over an additional $9,000 to half-a-dozen researchers, some of whom collected other cash rewards, for reporting bugs that were patched by Google earlier in Chrome 19′s development process.

So far this year, Google has paid more than $230,000 to outside researchers for submitting Chrome vulnerabilities. More than half of that — $120,000 — was laid out in March at “Pwnium,” a Google-sponsored hacking challenge.

Tuesday’s update was the 13th this year that patched one or more vulnerabilities.

According to the latest figures from metric company Net Applications, Chrome has a usage share of about 19%. Irish measurement firm StatCounter, on the other hand, pegged Chrome’s share for April at 31%.

Chrome 19 can be downloaded for Windows, Mac OS X and Linux from Google’s website. The browser is updated automatically through its silent service.

Gregg Keizer covers Microsoft, security issues, Apple, Web browsers and general technology breaking news for Computerworld. Follow Gregg on Twitter at @gkeizer, on Google+ or subscribe to Gregg’s RSS feed. His email address is gkeizer@computerworld.com.

See more by Gregg Keizer on Computerworld.com.

Read more about browsers in Computerworld’s Browsers Topic Center.

Article source: http://www.itworld.com/software/277314/google-releases-chrome-19-adds-tab-sync-and-patches-20-bugs

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18 May 12 Google Releases Chrome 19, Adds Tab Sync and Patches 20 Bugs


Google on Tuesday released Chrome 19, patched 20 vulnerabilities in the browser and doled out $16,500 in bug bounties and rewards to independent researchers.

Chrome 19′s most obvious change is the new support for tab synchronization. Like the already available bookmark, password, app and extension sync, open tabs will now be kept in step on all copies of Chrome, on multiple platforms, including Android, that are linked to the same Google account.

Although Chrome 19 supports the feature, synchronization will not be enabled for all users immediately, said Raz Mathias, a Chrome software engineer. “The tab sync feature will be rolled out gradually over the coming weeks, Mathias said in a Tuesday blog.

Chrome is not breaking ground here.

Mozilla has had tab sync since Firefox 4, which shipped more than a year ago, and third-party extensions, like Xmarks, sync open tabs across browsers from different vendors.

Chrome was last upgraded seven weeks ago. Google releases a new “stable” version about every six to eight weeks and has been on a slightly slower schedule recently than rival Mozilla’s strict every-six-weeks tempo.

Chrome 19 also includes patches for 20 security vulnerabilities: Eight were ranked “high,” Google’s second-most-serious threat rating, seven were marked “medium,” and five were labeled “low.”

Seven of the vulnerabilities were described in Google’s brief advisory as “out-of-bounds” read or write flaws, a category of memory bugs where a function does not check that input doesn’t exceed allocated buffers.

Google paid $7,500 in bounties to six researchers for reporting nine vulnerabilities, including two that were not strictly within Chrome. One of the latter was a bug in a Linux Nvidia driver, for example.

The 11 remaining bugs were uncovered by Google’s own security team or were credited to Microsoft, or were not significant enough to rate a bounty.

Google also handed over an additional $9,000 to half-a-dozen researchers, some of whom collected other cash rewards, for reporting bugs that were patched by Google earlier in Chrome 19′s development process.

So far this year, Google has paid more than $230,000 to outside researchers for submitting Chrome vulnerabilities. More than half of that — $120,000 — was laid out in March at “Pwnium,” a Google-sponsored hacking challenge.

Tuesday’s update was the 13th this year that patched one or more vulnerabilities.

According to the latest figures from metric company Net Applications, Chrome has a usage share of about 19%. Irish measurement firm StatCounter, on the other hand, pegged Chrome’s share for April at 31%.

Chrome 19 can be downloaded for Windows, Mac OS X and Linux from Google’s website. The browser is updated automatically through its silent service.

Gregg Keizer covers Microsoft, security issues, Apple, Web browsers and general technology breaking news for Computerworld. Follow Gregg on Twitter at @gkeizer, on Google+ or subscribe to Gregg’s RSS feed. His email address is gkeizer@computerworld.com.

See more by Gregg Keizer on Computerworld.com.

Read more about browsers in Computerworld’s Browsers Topic Center.

Article source: http://www.pcworld.com/article/255654/google_releases_chrome_19_adds_tab_sync_and_patches_20_bugs.html

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16 May 12 Google Releases Chrome 19, Adds Tab Sync and Patches 20 Bugs


Google on Tuesday released Chrome 19, patched 20 vulnerabilities in the browser and doled out $16,500 in bug bounties and rewards to independent researchers.

Chrome 19′s most obvious change is the new support for tab synchronization. Like the already available bookmark, password, app and extension sync, open tabs will now be kept in step on all copies of Chrome, on multiple platforms, including Android, that are linked to the same Google account.

Although Chrome 19 supports the feature, synchronization will not be enabled for all users immediately, said Raz Mathias, a Chrome software engineer. “The tab sync feature will be rolled out gradually over the coming weeks, Mathias said in a Tuesday blog.

Chrome is not breaking ground here.

Mozilla has had tab sync since Firefox 4, which shipped more than a year ago, and third-party extensions, like Xmarks, sync open tabs across browsers from different vendors.

Chrome was last upgraded seven weeks ago. Google releases a new “stable” version about every six to eight weeks and has been on a slightly slower schedule recently than rival Mozilla’s strict every-six-weeks tempo.

Chrome 19 also includes patches for 20 security vulnerabilities: Eight were ranked “high,” Google’s second-most-serious threat rating, seven were marked “medium,” and five were labeled “low.”

Seven of the vulnerabilities were described in Google’s brief advisory as “out-of-bounds” read or write flaws, a category of memory bugs where a function does not check that input doesn’t exceed allocated buffers.

Google paid $7,500 in bounties to six researchers for reporting nine vulnerabilities, including two that were not strictly within Chrome. One of the latter was a bug in a Linux Nvidia driver, for example.

The 11 remaining bugs were uncovered by Google’s own security team or were credited to Microsoft, or were not significant enough to rate a bounty.

Google also handed over an additional $9,000 to half-a-dozen researchers, some of whom collected other cash rewards, for reporting bugs that were patched by Google earlier in Chrome 19′s development process.

So far this year, Google has paid more than $230,000 to outside researchers for submitting Chrome vulnerabilities. More than half of that — $120,000 — was laid out in March at “Pwnium,” a Google-sponsored hacking challenge.

Tuesday’s update was the 13th this year that patched one or more vulnerabilities.

According to the latest figures from metric company Net Applications, Chrome has a usage share of about 19%. Irish measurement firm StatCounter, on the other hand, pegged Chrome’s share for April at 31%.

Chrome 19 can be downloaded for Windows, Mac OS X and Linux from Google’s website. The browser is updated automatically through its silent service.

Gregg Keizer covers Microsoft, security issues, Apple, Web browsers and general technology breaking news for Computerworld. Follow Gregg on Twitter at @gkeizer, on Google+ or subscribe to Gregg’s RSS feed. His email address is gkeizer@computerworld.com.

See more by Gregg Keizer on Computerworld.com.

Read more about browsers in Computerworld’s Browsers Topic Center.

Article source: http://www.pcworld.com/article/255654/google_releases_chrome_19_adds_tab_sync_and_patches_20_bugs.html

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15 May 12 Frak, yeah, I'd use iPad if there was Google Chrome


What timing. I posted my iPad for sale on Craigslist over the weekend — and two people are jockeying to get ahead of the other to buy it today. But I’m suddenly unsure about selling, after seeing a Macquarie Capital report claiming that Chrome will come to iOS as early as this quarter. Hot damn!

I rarely make decisions based on rumors, nor should you. Besides, the “timing is unclear, but it could be as soon as Q2 and is very likely to be a 2012 event”, according to Macquarie Capital. “Could” be this quarter and “likely” this year stink of pure speculation — or big back door should there be no Chrome for iOS this year. In the end, I’ll likely sell the iPad, but must convey this: Chrome would be a very good reason to buy an iOS device but be akin to Google cutting off one limb to save another.

Shine That Tablet’s Chrome

Yesterday, Ian Betteridge and I bantered back and forth about Chrome and iOS on Google Plus. He called Google services on Apple devices a “pretty good experience”, to which I responded: “I would agree about the Google ecosystem with iPhone (and iPad) if Chrome was option. That’s the deal breaker for me, sadly. I’m seriously thinking about selling my iPad, for that reason — and another: Galaxy Nexus is tablet enough for me, so far”.

As expressed last week, “You can have iPhone 4S, I’ll take Galaxy Nexus“. But there’s more. I find the Google and Samsung branded smartphone good enough replacement for my iPad, too. Chrome for Android is one reason, Galaxy Nexus’ super sharp, 4.65-inch, 1280 x 800 resolution screen is the other. Repeating a sentiment from my Galaxy Nexus HSPA+ review: I’d by the phone just for Chrome, which currently is only available for Android 4 “Ice Cream Sandwich”, in beta.

Presumably, Chrome would be available for the newest iOS version, which means broader distribution than Android, since Apple doesn’t have the same fragmentation problem. Based on number of devices accessing Google Play during the previous 14 days, Ice Cream Sandwich accounted for just 4.9 percent of the Android install base on May 1. Chrome has limited reach at best on Android, while distribution could be enormous on iOS, assuming people using the browser on the desktop go mobile, too. There, Chrome is third-most used browser and closes on Firefox, according to Net Applications.

Chrome is a huge improvement over the stock Android browser. It’s fast and flows, but sync capabilities, which include active tabs on the desktop, really stand out. Last week’s huge Google+ for iPhone update shows that the search and information giant can deliver exceptional user experiences on iOS. Why shouldn’t Chrome be same?

A TACtical Decision

The problem: Chrome for iOS, particularly iPad, removes an important reason to choose Android tablets over Apple’s. Google gains in one area, while giving up somewhere else. If Google offered Chrome for iOS right now, I’d keep my iPad. How many other people considering Apple’s tablet would choose it over an Android because of Chrome? You can help answer that question by taking our poll.

In April, with considerably smaller install base, iPad took decisive mobile browser usage share lead from iPhone, according to NetApps. More broadly, in the mobile device category, Safari has 63.84 percent usage share, compared to 18.87 percent for Chrome. Google’s browser could make usage share leaps competing alongside Safari on iOS devices. The cloud-connected device era is all about mobile. Google should want Chrome on market-leading devices like iPad.

If Google made Chrome available for iPad and iPhone, how likely would you be to use it over Safari?

Then there are traffic acquisitions costs, which eat into Google search margins. Macquarie Capital: “If GOOG gains market share, it could reduce our estimate for Google.com TAC meaningfully”. Google pays Apple to compete with Android — and Chrome, for that matter — via Safari’s search bar. Google’s TAC goes down when people use Chrome.

Something else: Google services have a cloudy future on Apple devices. There already are rumors Apple will ditch Google Maps for a home-grown option in iOS 6. I expect to see a Siri search service someday replace Google. Chrome for iOS would be an important anchor for Google services as Apple offers more of its own from the cloud.

Even then, Chrome faces hurdles placed by Apple. Based on the browsers currently available for iOS, Safari is default for mail and other services. So Chrome would be at disadvantage, as long as Apple only allows Safari to be default. However, surely Chrome could be default for Google services — gulp, right?

From that viewpoint, Chrome will always be better on Android. That said, Chrome on iOS ought to be pretty good, and if Google is going to feed the hand that bites it, better to extend existing services rather than pay TAC to Apple.

My question for you: Would you use Chrome over Safari on iPad or iPhone? Please answer the question below and take our poll above.

Article source: http://betanews.com/2012/05/15/frak-yeah-id-use-ipad-if-there-was-google-chrome/

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01 May 12 IE Makes Gains, iPad Traffic Eclipses iPhone


Internet Explorer continued to make gains in April, landing at 54.09 percent global market share ahead of Chrome and Firefox, according to data from Net Applications.

Microsoft’s browser share increased about 0.26 percent last month from 53.83 percent in March, which was also up from 52.84 percent in February. The most-popular version was IE8 with 26.22 percent market share in April, followed by IE9 with 15.91 percent.

Microsoft said that on Windows 7 machines, IE9 use hit 35.5 percent worldwide by the end of April. “The data is particularly encouraging for users and developers in the US, with IE9 growing 4 points of share on Windows 7, hitting 52.9 percent usage share in April,” the company said in a blog post.

Despite Microsoft’s efforts to kill off IE6, the browser version is still hanging on with about 7.11 percent market share.

Firefox, meanwhile, nabbed the number-two spot with 20.2 percent market share, down slightly from March’s 20.55 percent. The most-popular version of Mozilla’s browser is Firefox 11, which debuted in mid-March, with 11.35 percent.

Rounding out the top three is Google’s Chrome with 18.85 percent market share, up from 18.57 percent in March. Most users, or 13.97 percent, are on Chrome 18.

iPad Tops iPhone
Net Applications also examined traffic on the iPad and iPhone and found that with the release of the new iPad, Web traffic to the Apple tablet surpassed that to its smartphone.

“The iPad and iPhone have been close in browsing share for the last several months,” Net Applications said. “However, upon the release of the latest version of the iPad, its share has accelerated and now tops iPhone share 33.7 percent to 27.4 percent.”

The iPad and iPhone helped Safari nab the most mobile browser share, with 63.8 percent, followed by the Android browser at 18.9 percent and Opera Mini at 12.1 percent.

Most of those mobile Web surfers – or 63.2 percent – were on iOS devices, followed by Android at 19.3 percent.

For more, see PCMag’s full reviews of IE9 (slideshow below), Chrome 18, and Firefox 12.

For more from Chloe, follow her on Twitter @ChloeAlbanesius.


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Start Installation


About Box


First Look at IE9


Gear Menu


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Article source: http://www.pcmag.com/article2/0,2817,2403812,00.asp

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