msgbartop
All about Google Chrome & Google Chrome OS
msgbarbottom

16 Dec 12 Tablet features war: Google Nexus 10 vs Apple iPad 4 vs Nexus 7 vs iPad mini


The best way to compare different devices is to subject them to a series of tests. These tests are known as benchmarks which are used for determining the processing speed of the CPU, along with the navigation, and the performance of the graphics unit, GPU, for each of them. On Dec. 15, Itproportal released there comparison between the Nexus 10 and iPad 4, but now there is a recent video in which you will see interesting results in addressing the Nexus 7, Nexus 10, the iPad 4 and iPad Mini.

The first thing that should be noted is that these devices are facing very different price ranges. The Nexus 10 and iPad 4 prices can’t be compared with those of Nexus 7 and the iPad Mini, but still it’s interesting to see the speed of each because this can help you decide which one to buy.

The first test that appears in the video compares the processing speed of the CPU, the central processing unit. For this test there is a a clear winner: the Nexus 10 with a score of 2,761 points. The best thing about this issue is to compare it with its main rival, the iPad 4 that scores 1767 points. However, the most curious thing about this test is that the Nexus 7 reaches a score 1659 points with its Nvidia Tegra 3 processor, which is very close to the A6X iPad 4. The smallest of the Apple tablets, iPad Mini, falls far short with 758 points.

The second test determines how the CPU performs when browsing. For this test, the lower the score the better, and the iPad 4 wins with 839 points, followed by Nexus 10 with 1396, iPad Mini comes in at 1440 and Nexus 7 at 1690.

The third test, which has already been mentioned, is to see what the performance of the graphics processing unit, the GPU. This test is very important due to the popularity of graphics software applications such as games. This time, the iPad 4 again surpasses the rest, and by far, achieving a rate of 42 fps. It is followed by the Nexus 10 with 26 fps, iPad Mini with 24 fps and 14 fps for the Nexus 7. What happens in this test is that you have the screen-size as a factor, because the larger screens are supposedly penalized by size.

Although all the aforementioned tablets make a good choice for the holiday shopping season, the winner is the iPad 4. However, some may choose to go with cheaper options such as the Nexus 10, iPad mini or Nexus 7, which still offer a lot of power.

Article source: http://www.examiner.com/article/tablet-features-war-google-nexus-10-vs-apple-ipad-4-vs-nexus-7-vs-ipad-mini

Tags: , , ,

14 Jun 12 Acer Takes on Apple With Its High-Res Iconia Tab A700 Android …


Calling a new Android tablet a potential iPad killer is a cliche. But make no mistake: Acer’s Iconia Tab A700 has its sights set on doing just that thanks to an impressive list of specifications that includes a 1920-by-1200-resolution display and 32GB of storage, and a $450 price that comes in at 25 percent below the price of a same-capacity iPad.

The Iconia Tab A700 goes on presale today, and will be shipping later this month at retail and directly from Acer; it will be available either in black or silver.

Acer was one of two Android tablet makers to introduce a high-resolution, “Full HD” 1920-by-1200-pixel display in January at CES 2012. Asus, the other manufacturer, followed up its CES announcement of a “Full HD” tablet with a renamed variant at the Mobile World Congress in February, but it has remained mum on U.S. availability. In the interim, Apple introduced its third-generation iPad with a 2048-by-1536-pixel display—264 pixels per inch—a move that effectively left Android tablets in dire need of playing catch-up.

Finally, three months later, Acer’s A700 becomes the first model to do so. The A700′s 1920-by-1200-pixel resolution doesn’t quite match the pixel depth of the iPad, but it nonetheless provides a significantly enhanced viewing experience over existing 1280-by-800-resolution tablets (the pixel density is 55 percent higher at the new resolution). The demo unit I saw had crisp, detailed text, images, and video, and the best display I’ve seen yet from Acer or any other Android tablet maker. I’m eager to get my hands on a sample of this tablet and view my own test images on it. Acer says that the 16:10 aspect-ratio display has a 178-degree viewing angle—certainly sufficient for sharing. The display itself is a 10-point touch-capacitive screen, for improved responsiveness.

Acer also significantly undercuts Apple by offering 32GB of storage built in. That’s double the capacity of the baseline Apple 16GB iPad, and Acer does this at a price that’s $50 less than that 16GB iPad, and $150 less than a 32GB iPad. Not a bad deal at all. And if you need more storage, this Acer model has a microSD card slot, for use with cards of up to 64GB. I wish this model still had the full-size SD card slot that Acer’s first-generation Iconia Tab had, simply because of the camera/tablet interoperability such a slot offers, but microSD at least provides some level of storage expansion—a critical point given that the high-resolution display means you’ll want to have more, and larger, media files stored on your tablet.

As the company’s premium tablet, Acer goes all-out with the rest of its specs. This model packs an Nvidia Tegra 3 quad-core processor and 1GB of RAM, and it runs Android 4.0 Ice Cream Sandwich. It also has a micro-USB port for charging—a welcome change from the plethora of proprietary chargers we’ve seen—and data transfers. And it has a micro-HDMI port, via which you can output video to your home theater system (with 5.1-channel Dolby Surround Sound), or use the tablet as a dual display.

The A700 has Dolby Mobile 3 and improved audio capture capabilities, too. Also present are now-standard features such as integrated GPS and e-compass, 802.11 b/g/n wireless, and Bluetooth 2.1 + EDR. The rear-facing 5-megapixel camera lacks a flash; the front-facing 1-megapixel camera suffices for video conferencing.

The 9800-mAh battery should last up to 10.5 hours for video playback, according to Acer.

Acer bundles Polaris Office 3.5 to read and edit documents, and preinstalls Evernote and its own Acer Print app and Acer Ring navigation interface, all in the name of getting you a head start on productivity.

The one disappointment about the Acer A700 is its size and weight. It comes in at 1.47 pounds—just 0.01 pound more than the current iPad, and about 0.2 pound heavier than some of the lighter Android tablets of the same screen size. And it’s 0.06 inches thicker than the iPad. These numbers are competitive, but it would have been better still if Acer had been able to shave a bit off these dimensions to further outdo the iPad.

Next on deck in the high-resolution tablet race will be Asus; I expect the company will have some news soon, since it has previously targeted a summer release for its 1920-by-1200-resolution tablet. Less clear is when we’ll hear anything from anyone else, since Acer and Asus are the only companies that had already discussed product plans for this summer. The lack of news from Samsung on the high-res front is of particular concern, considering that Samsung has been a front-runner in innovation and sales in the Android tablet market. They’ll get there, I’m sure, but the bigger question is when—and at what price? That, apparently, only time will tell.

 

Article source: http://www.pcworld.com/article/257509/acer_takes_on_apple_with_its_highres_iconia_tab_a700_android_tablet.html

Tags: , , , , ,

14 Jun 12 Acer Takes on Apple With Its High-Res Iconia Tab A700 Android Tablet


Calling a new Android tablet a potential iPad killer is a cliche. But make no mistake: Acer’s Iconia Tab A700 has its sights set on doing just that thanks to an impressive list of specifications that includes a 1920-by-1200-resolution display and 32GB of storage, and a $450 price that comes in at 25 percent below the price of a same-capacity iPad.

The Iconia Tab A700 goes on presale today, and will be shipping later this month at retail and directly from Acer; it will be available either in black or silver.

Acer was one of two Android tablet makers to introduce a high-resolution, “Full HD” 1920-by-1200-pixel display in January at CES 2012. Asus, the other manufacturer, followed up its CES announcement of a “Full HD” tablet with a renamed variant at the Mobile World Congress in February, but it has remained mum on U.S. availability. In the interim, Apple introduced its third-generation iPad with a 2048-by-1536-pixel display—264 pixels per inch—a move that effectively left Android tablets in dire need of playing catch-up.

Finally, three months later, Acer’s A700 becomes the first model to do so. The A700′s 1920-by-1200-pixel resolution doesn’t quite match the pixel depth of the iPad, but it nonetheless provides a significantly enhanced viewing experience over existing 1280-by-800-resolution tablets (the pixel density is 55 percent higher at the new resolution). The demo unit I saw had crisp, detailed text, images, and video, and the best display I’ve seen yet from Acer or any other Android tablet maker. I’m eager to get my hands on a sample of this tablet and view my own test images on it. Acer says that the 16:10 aspect-ratio display has a 178-degree viewing angle—certainly sufficient for sharing. The display itself is a 10-point touch-capacitive screen, for improved responsiveness.

Acer also significantly undercuts Apple by offering 32GB of storage built in. That’s double the capacity of the baseline Apple 16GB iPad, and Acer does this at a price that’s $50 less than that 16GB iPad, and $150 less than a 32GB iPad. Not a bad deal at all. And if you need more storage, this Acer model has a microSD card slot, for use with cards of up to 64GB. I wish this model still had the full-size SD card slot that Acer’s first-generation Iconia Tab had, simply because of the camera/tablet interoperability such a slot offers, but microSD at least provides some level of storage expansion—a critical point given that the high-resolution display means you’ll want to have more, and larger, media files stored on your tablet.

As the company’s premium tablet, Acer goes all-out with the rest of its specs. This model packs an Nvidia Tegra 3 quad-core processor and 1GB of RAM, and it runs Android 4.0 Ice Cream Sandwich. It also has a micro-USB port for charging—a welcome change from the plethora of proprietary chargers we’ve seen—and data transfers. And it has a micro-HDMI port, via which you can output video to your home theater system (with 5.1-channel Dolby Surround Sound), or use the tablet as a dual display.

The A700 has Dolby Mobile 3 and improved audio capture capabilities, too. Also present are now-standard features such as integrated GPS and e-compass, 802.11 b/g/n wireless, and Bluetooth 2.1 + EDR. The rear-facing 5-megapixel camera lacks a flash; the front-facing 1-megapixel camera suffices for video conferencing.

The 9800-mAh battery should last up to 10.5 hours for video playback, according to Acer.

Acer bundles Polaris Office 3.5 to read and edit documents, and preinstalls Evernote and its own Acer Print app and Acer Ring navigation interface, all in the name of getting you a head start on productivity.

The one disappointment about the Acer A700 is its size and weight. It comes in at 1.47 pounds—just 0.01 pound more than the current iPad, and about 0.2 pound heavier than some of the lighter Android tablets of the same screen size. And it’s 0.06 inches thicker than the iPad. These numbers are competitive, but it would have been better still if Acer had been able to shave a bit off these dimensions to further outdo the iPad.

Next on deck in the high-resolution tablet race will be Asus; I expect the company will have some news soon, since it has previously targeted a summer release for its 1920-by-1200-resolution tablet. Less clear is when we’ll hear anything from anyone else, since Acer and Asus are the only companies that had already discussed product plans for this summer. The lack of news from Samsung on the high-res front is of particular concern, considering that Samsung has been a front-runner in innovation and sales in the Android tablet market. They’ll get there, I’m sure, but the bigger question is when—and at what price? That, apparently, only time will tell.

 

Article source: http://www.pcworld.com/article/257509/acer_takes_on_apple_with_its_highres_iconia_tab_a700_android_tablet.html

Tags: , , , , ,

13 Jun 12 Acer Takes on Apple With High-Res Iconia Tab A700 Android Tablet


Calling a new Android tablet a potential iPad killer is a cliche. But make no mistake: Acer’s Iconia Tab A700 has its sights set on doing just that thanks to an impressive set of specs that includes a 1920 by 1200 resolution display and 32GB of storage; and a $450 price that comes in at 25 percent under the price of a same-capacity iPad.

The Iconia Tab A700 goes on pre-sale today, and will be shipping later this month at retail and directly via Acer in black or silver.

Acer was one of two Android tablet makers to introduce a high-resolution, “Full HD” 1920 by 1200 pixel display earlier this year at CES 2012. Asus, the other manufacturer to do so, followed up its CES announce with a renamed variant at Mobile World Congress; but it has remained mum on U.S. availability. In the interim, Apple introduced its third-generation iPad with a 2048 by 1536 pixel, 264 pixels per inch display, a move that effectively left Android tablets in dire need of playing catch up.

Finally, three months later, Acer’s A700 becomes the first model to do so. The A700′s 1920 by 1200 resolution doesn’t quite match the pixel depth of iPad, but it nonetheless provides a significantly enhanced viewing experience over existing 1280 by 800 resolution tablets (the pixel density is 55 percent higher at the new resolution). The demo unit I saw had crisp, detailed text, images and video, and the best display I’ve seen yet from Acer or any other Android tablet maker. I’m eager to get my hands on a tablet and view my own test images on it. Acer says that the 16:10 aspect ratio display has a 178 degree viewing angle, which makes it good for sharing. The display itself is a 10-point touch capacitive screen, for improved responsiveness.

Acer also significantly undercuts Apple by offering 32GB of storage built in. That’s double the capacity of the baseline Apple 16GB iPad, and Acer does this at a price that’s $50 less than that 16GB iPad, and $150 less than a 32GB iPad. Not a bad deal at all. And if you need more storage, this Acer model has a microSD card slot, for use with cards of up to 64GB. I wish this model still had the full-size SD card slot of Acer’s first-generation Iconia Tab, simply because of the interoperability between camera and tablet, but microSD at least provides some level of storage expansion—a critical point given that the high-resolution display means you’ll want to have more, and larger, media files stored on your tablet.

As the company’s premium tablet, Acer goes all-out with the rest of its specs. This model packs an Nvidia Tegra 3 quad-core processor, 1GB of RAM, and runs Android 4.0 Ice Cream Sandwich. It also has micro-USB port for charging—a welcome change from the plethora of proprietary chargers we’ve seen—and data transfers. And it has a micro-HDMI port, via which you can output video to your home theater system (including 5.1-channel Dolby Surround Sound), or use the tablet as a dual display.

The A700 has Dolby Mobile 3, and improved audio capture capabilities, too. Also present are now-standard features such as integrated GPS and e-compass, 802.11 b/g/n wireless, and Bluetooth 2.1 + EDR. The rear-facing 5-megapixel camera lacks a flash; the front-facing 1-megapixel camera suffices for video conferencing.

The 9800 mAh battery should be last up to 10.5 hours for video playback, according to Acer.

Acer bundles Polaris Office 3.5 to read and edit documents, and preinstalls Evernote and its own Acer Print app and Acer Ring navigation interface, all in the name of getting you a headstart on productivity.

The one disappointment about the Acer A700 is its size and weight. It comes in at 1.47 pounds—just 0.01 more than the current iPad, and about 0.2 pounds heavier than some of the lighter Android tablets of the same screen size. And it’s 0.06 inches thicker than the iPad. These numbers are competitive, but it would have been better still if Acer had been able to shave a bit off of these specs to further outdo the iPad.

Next on deck in the high-resolution tablet race will be Asus; I expect the company will have some news soon, since it has previously targeted a summer release for its 1920 by 1200 tablet. Less clear is when we’ll hear anything from anyone else, since Acer and Asus are the only companies that had already discussed product plans for this summer. The lack of news from Samsung on the high-res front is of particular concern, considering that Samsung has been a front-runner in innovation and sales in the Android tablet market. They’ll get there, I’m sure, but the bigger question is when—and at what price? That, apparently, only time will tell.

 

Article source: http://www.pcworld.com/article/257509/acer_takes_on_apple_with_highres_iconia_tab_a700_android_tablet.html

Tags: , , , , ,

04 Jun 12 Samsung Galaxy S III landing on 5 US carriers in June, without quad-core


Samsung Galaxy S III

Coming to five carriers, starting at $200, Samsung is pushing its flagship phone hard.

(Credit:
Jessica Dolcourt/CNET)

Samsung means business. The consumer electronics giant has just announced sales of its Samsung Galaxy S III flagship
Android 4.0 Ice Cream Sandwich smartphone for five U.S. carriers starting in June.

Verizon, ATT, Sprint, T-Mobile, and U.S. Cellular will all receive variations of the Galaxy S III this month, but Samsung isn’t sharing the exact pricing and release date for each carrier just yet. What we do know is that $200 is the lowest price of the bunch.

What’s incredibly interesting (and what CNET had predicted) is that the U.S.-based version, like its HTC One X rival, will carry a 1.5 GHz dual core Qualcomm Snapdragon S4 processor as opposed to the 1.4GHz quad-core Samsung Exynos processor that’s used in the global release.

The “downgrade” is likely due to a current incompatibility between the quad-core chip and LTE data networks, just as with the HTC One X, which forewent the Nvidia Tegra 3 processor that was used in the global version of its hero device.

If you’re tempted to get huffy over your quad-core loss, keep in mind that Qualcomm’s dual-core chip is plenty fast, and that quad-core performance claims aren’t always what they seem.

The Galaxy S III is a slim handset with a 4.8-inch HD Super AMOLED display. It supports 4G LTE and HSPA+ 42 speeds, has an 8-megapixel camera (hands on) with 1080p HD video capture and playback, and a bevy of software features to complement and enhance Android’s Ice Cream Sandwich operating system.

Samsung has also given the Galaxy S III 2GB of RAM and a very large, removable 2100mAh battery. There will be support for 16GB or 32GB of expandable memory, depending on the carrier, it seems.

Another nice touch, the Galaxy S III is topped with Gorilla Glass 2.0, a stronger, thinner type of the premium glass brand that Corning, Gorilla Glass’ maker, unveiled this past January at
CES.

Read CNET UK’s full review here, or my in-depth hands-on.

Article source: http://news.cnet.com/8301-1035_3-57446342-94/samsung-galaxy-s-iii-landing-on-5-u.s-carriers-in-june-without-quad-core/

Tags: , , , , ,

30 May 12 Rightware Android benchmark lists “Google Asus Nexus 7″ device


In one inconspicuous little benchmark table, two previously unconfirmed rumors seem to be more than likely as though they’re the real deal – first, that Google is in fact working on putting its stamp of approval an an Android tablet, and second that the tablet in question will be manufactured by Asus. Rightware’s Power Board now lists a “Google Asus Nexus 7″ device with an Nvidia Tegra 3 processor and 720p resolution that sure looks like what we’ve been expecting.

It’s believed the device will carry the “Nexus” name, which has been used in the naming of every Android phone that Google has had an active hand in developing. Although the Nexus phones are seen as one streamlined line of devices, they’ve been made by different manufacturers and available on different carriers so Google doesn’t look like it’s playing favorites.

It’s been rumored for some time that Google was also toiling behind-the-scenes to come up with a Nexus-branded tablet, but the question of which manufacturer would get the honors has been largely mysterious. Earlier this year, it came out of the woodwork that Asus might the manufacturer of choice, since it is well known for creating low-cost electronics. It was also reported that the tablet is likely to cost between $150 and $200.

[via AndroidCommunity]

Article source: http://www.slashgear.com/rightware-android-benchmark-lists-google-asus-nexus-7-device-29230746/

Tags: , ,

18 May 12 The Champ Is Here


Our new fave in the Android realm. Photo by Ariel Zambelich/Wired

The HTC One X is one of the best smartphones on the market, and the best Android phone you can buy right now, period.

It’s fast, it’s gorgeous, it’s lightweight and it has a stellar battery that lasts all day. The camera is also outstanding. It’s the best I’ve seen on an Android phone, though it falls just short of the camera on the iPhone 4S.

It’s not just the hardware — the One X runs version 4.0 of Android, aka Ice Cream Sandwich, which is overlaid by HTC’s own Sense skin. It’s fast and easy to use. Combine that with the excellent hardware and you’ve got a handset worthy of being a flagship device for both HTC and ATT (even though you might have to wait a bit to get one).

In fact, the one thing I really don’t like about the One X is its exclusivity to ATT, the only carrier that sells the phone in the U.S. It’s a shame this phone isn’t available on T-Mobile, Sprint and Verizon.

Android handset makers don’t have the same leverage as Apple when it comes to dealing with telecommunications companies, so they continue to pump out a few slightly different versions of every phone, each one exclusive to a different carrier. It’s unnecessary and insane — HTC produced more than 50 different handsets last year alone.

The One X, being a stellar phone, serves as a testament that Android handset makers should go the iPhone route and make fewer phones of higher quality available through multiple carriers. The hardware companies would of course gain from this, but the payoff for the consumer would be huge as well.

To wit: Nearly every quibble I had with the T-Mobile-exclusive One S — a fine mid-range handset being sold at a flagship price — was fixed in the One X.

My biggest complaint with the One S was its display, and the feature I enjoyed most on the One X was — you guessed it — the display.

The One X has a 4.7-inch, 1280×720 IPS LCD touchscreen, covered in Corning’s durable, crystal-clear Gorilla Glass. The viewing angles on the screen are some of the best I’ve seen on a smartphone. Colors are bright and accurate, producing consistently true-to-life images across websites and apps. Pixel edges are indistinguishable with the display’s density of 316 pixels per inch.

Let me put it this way: The One X’s screen is on the same level as the iPhone’s Retina display. I love looking at it, and it blows away the PenTile displays found on the One S and the Samsung Galaxy Nexus (my former favorite Android handset).

Beneath the fantastic touchscreen, the One X is a beast, with a 1.5GHz dual-core Qualcomm Snapdragon processor, 1GB of RAM and 16GB of storage (the same set-up found in the One S). Performance is blazing-fast, and though the ATT handset doesn’t pack the Nvidia Tegra 3 quad-core processor found in Europe and Asia’s One X, it doesn’t feel any less capable. The U.S. model is just as good and just as impressive as what HTC is offering overseas.

The U.S. version of the One X, unlike its overseas counterpart, runs on ATT’s 4G LTE network, which is only available in a small number of cities right now. In San Francisco, the One X downloaded and uploaded data quickly, whether connected to ATT’s 4G LTE, 4G HSPA+ or 3G service.

But despite performing like a beast, the One X is also a beauty.

The 0.36-inch chassis is made of a single piece of polycarbonate, giving the handset a sophisticated look free of seams or gaps, as seen on past HTC hardware. Given its size, the phone is also surprisingly light, weighing in at 4.6 ounces.

The One X is a handsome, well-designed phone. Photo by Ariel Zambelich/Wired

Pages: 1 2 View All

Article source: http://www.wired.com/reviews/2012/05/htc-one-x/

Tags: , , , , ,

22 Apr 12 Asus Transformer Pad TF300T


With its newest 10-inch tablet, the Transformer Pad TF300T ($379 list 16GB; $399, 32GB), Asus eschews major hardware and design upgrades, opting instead for incremental improvements and a more value-focused remix of an existing tablet. The TF300T is a more affordable version of the current Eee Pad Transformer Prime ($499, 4 stars). Inside, you’ll still find the quad-core Nvidia Tegra 3 processor that made the Prime the fastest Android device to come through our labs. But some of the premium features like the aluminum back and Super IPS+ display are absent—and the price is $100 lower to compensate. The TF300T is still one of the fastest tablets available, but it doesn’t quite have the chops to topple the New Apple iPad ($499, 4.5 stars) as the best 10-inch tablet on the block. Solid performance, the latest Android OS, and signature keyboard dock make the TF300T a solid iPad alternative, but we’re still waiting for a spectacular Android tablet to blow us away.

Physical Design, Features, and Differences
The most immediately apparent difference between the Transformer Pad TF300 and the Transformer Prime is the textured plastic back. The dimensions are nearly identical, at 10.4 by 7.1 inches (HW), but the TF300T is slightly thicker (0.38 inches vs. 0.32) and heavier (1.39 pounds vs. 1.28 pounds) than the Prime. A power/dock connector sits along the bottom edge, the micro USB port and microSD card slot can be found on the left panel, the standard-size 3.5mm headphone jack is on the right, and the Power button is up top. The TF300T is available in three patriotic colors: Royal Blue, Iceberg White, and Torch Red. The entry-level model we reviewed includes 16GB of internal storage, and a 32GB model can be had for $399. There is no 64GB model, like with the Transformer Prime.  

View Slideshow
See all (6) slides


Asus Transformer Pad T300T : Top


Asus Transformer Pad T300T : Tablet  Keyboard


Asus Transformer Pad T300T : Vertical


Asus Transformer Pad T300T : Size Comparison


A standard IPS display replaces the Prime’s Super IPS+ screen. This might seem like marketing jargon, but there is a significant difference. The 1280-by-800-pixel resolution remains, but the TF300T’s screen maxes out at 350 nits, instead of the Prime’s outdoor-friendly 600-nit mode. The TF300T’s display still gets sufficiently bright, though it appears slightly dimmer than the screen on the iPad 2 ($399, 4.5 stars). The viewing angle is fine, but hues are cooler on the TF300T, and everything just looks more vibrant and saturated on the Prime. It’s still a high-quality display, with a higher resolution than the iPad 2′s 1,024 by 768 pixels.

The TF300T uses a similar 8-megapixel rear-facing camera to the Prime, with the only difference being a slightly larger aperture—f/2.2 rather than f/2.4. There’s no LED flash on the TF300T, but the 1.2-megapixel front-facing camera is identical on both models. The Transformer Prime had some GPS connectivity issues, which were largely attributed to the tablet’s aluminum body. The plastic back on the TF300T should help out there. The tablet connects to 802.11b/g/n Wi-Fi networks and supports Bluetooth 3.0.

The optional keyboard dock for the TF300T and Prime are pretty much identical. The price remains the same at an extra $149, but the docks are not cross compatible between Transformer models. The keys are very comfortable, the multitouch trackpad is responsive, and you get tablet-specific function keys, while multi-key actions like Cut, Copy, and Paste work like they would on a laptop. The dock adds a 16.5Wh battery, a full-size USB port, and an SD card slot. If you’re considering the TF300T for productivity, you’ll want to pony up the extra $150 for the dock, as it adds functionality and sets the tablet apart from its Android brethren.

Performance, Software, and Multimedia
The Prime and the TF300T are still the only tablets available with the latest round of high-end quad-core processors. Though the CPU clock speed has been lowered from 1.3GHz to 1.2GHz here, the TF300T’s quad-core Nvidia Tegra 3 still blazed through our benchmarks.

You get three performance modes: Normal, Balanced, and Power Saving. At the highest setting, the TF300T came up just short of the Prime, but still turned in some of the most impressive results of any Android tablet. Theoretically, the TF300T should have an advantage in memory with 1GB of DDR3 RAM, as opposed to the 1GB DDR2 RAM in the Prime, but the difference in memory benchmarks was negligible in my tests. During regular use, both tablets felt equally responsive and fast, excelling with games and power-hungry apps. Expect the same great performance from the TF300T, which is refreshing given the value-driven pricing.

The Transformer Prime received an Ice Cream Sandwich upgrade earlier this year, and the TF300T comes with Google’s latest mobile OS right out of the box. The experience is nearly identical on both tablets, with Asus’s minor customizations to the look and feel of the software. Aside from cosmetic changes, the most notable addition is the Advanced Settings menu that pops up when you press the notification area. From here you can easily adjust display brightness, Wi-Fi, Bluetooth settings, and see all of the updates from your various apps. For a closer look at the OS tweaks, check out our hands-on with the Transformer Prime with Ice Cream Sandwich. Android 4.0 is a big step forward with a smoothness and polish that rivals Apple’s iOS, but the same problems remain: A lack of tablet-optimized Android apps along with an easy way to find them in Google Play.

Bundled along with the standard Google app suite, you get some genuinely useful preloaded apps including SuperNote (a word processing and note-taking app), Polaris Office (an office suite that handles Microsoft Word, Excel, and PowerPoint files), and MyCloud (Asus’s cloud storage solution that offers 8GB of lifetime cloud storage), which help increase the tablet’s productivity prowess. Netflix, Photoshop Express, and Temple Run are also preloaded and welcome. Bloatware, thankfully, is non-existent.

Photos taken with the TF300T’s 8-megapixel rear-facing camera look good, with little image noise and mostly sharp detail. Some finer textures still look a bit waxy, but that’s pretty typical of tablet cameras. The difference between the TF300T and the Prime is most apparent in low light situations—the TF300T has an advantage due to its larger aperture. Low-light images looked markedly better, capturing fine details with relatively low image noise. The Prime’s low-light images were grainier with a good deal more noise. The TF300T can capture 1080p video just like the Prime, and while smooth and sharp at 30 frames per second outdoors, video became grainy and choppy topping out at around 17fps indoors.

Much like the Prime, the TF300T is a media whiz. Xvid, DivX, MPEG4, H.264, and AVI videos all played smoothly at 1080p resolution. MP3, AAC, FLAC, OGG, WAV, and WMA audio files all played without a hitch.

The TF300T packs a 22-watt-hour battery, which Asus rates at up to 10 hours of normal use. With the screen set to maximum brightness, Wi-Fi connected, and the processor set to Maximum Performance, the TF300T turned in 7 hours, 53 minutes of continuous video playback—slightly better than the 7 hours, 38 minutes registered by the Transformer Prime, with its much brighter screen. Asus claims the dock accessory adds another 5 hours of battery, so the TF300T should last all day.

Conclusions
The Transformer Prime was a top-notch tablet when it was released last year, and the TF300T, which isn’t vastly different, except that it’s less expensive, carries that torch. But it seems like a placeholder while we wait for the Infinity Prime, with its 1080p high-resolution display. Much like Samsung with its Samsung Galaxy Tab 2 (7.0) ($249.99, 4 stars), Asus is concentrating on affordability, rather than major spec upgrades. At $379 for the 16GB model, with the fastest processor available, the latest version of Android, and a versatile add-on keyboard dock, the Asus Transformer Pad TF300T is an attractive package. It’s certainly among the best non-Apple tablets available today, but we’re still on the lookout for an Android tablet that can top the iPad.

More Tablet Reviews:
•   Asus Transformer Pad TF300T
•   ZTE Optik (Sprint)
•   Samsung Galaxy Tab 2 (7.0)
•   Samsung Galaxy Tab 10.1 (U.S. Cellular)
•   Kupa X11 Pro Tablet
•  more

Article source: http://www.pcmag.com/article2/0,2817,2403304,00.asp

Tags: , , , , ,

10 Apr 12 Toshiba Unveils 13.3-Inch Android Tablet


Toshiba Unveils 13.3-Inch Android TabletToshiba has introduced its new line of quad-core Android tablets, including a giant 13-inch model with a high-resolution display and quad-core processor. The company is also phasing out its 7- and 10-inch Thrive tablets, which will be replaced with the new Excite line of tablets running Android 4.0.

The 13.3-inch Toshiba Excite sports a high-res display, which at 1,600 by 900 pixels is sharper than typical Android tablets, but still below the third-generation iPad’s display of 2,048 by 1,536 pixels. The only comparable resolution in Android land would be the Asus Transformer TF700T, which sports a resolution of 1,900 by 1,200 pixels.

Make no mistake though, the 13-inch model is big: it weighs 2.2 pounds, it’s 0.4 inches thick and is practically the size of a serving tray. But with the size, you get a range of ports, including a full-size SD card slot, a microUSB port and a microHDMI port. Toshiba also claims the battery can last up to 13 hours, and there’s an included (separate) tablet stand for when the tablet gets too heavy for users.

Toshiba Unveils 13.3-Inch Android TabletThe 7.7-inch ExciteThe giant Toshiba tablet also packs some powerful specs inside: it runs Android 4.0 Ice Cream Sandwich on a Nvidia Tegra 3 quad-core processor and 1GB of RAM, and sports dual cameras, 1.3-megapixel on the front and a 5-megapixel on the back. There’s no 3G/4G connectivity on board though, and the Excite 13 is set to arrive on June 10 for $650 for the 32GB model and $750 for the 64GB model — around $50 more than the equivalent iPad models.

With a 13.3-inch tablet, almost double the size of the popular Amazon Kindle Fire, Toshiba hopes to appeal to those who use their tablet mostly at home. With the large screen and loud SRS Surround speakers, it’s easier on the eye to watch videos (as long as you use the aforementioned stand), and it could be better for video calls as well.

Toshiba Unveils 13.3-Inch Android TabletThe 10-inch ExciteBut if you’re looking for some more regular-sized tablets from Toshiba, the company also introduced 7.7- and 10-inch Excite tablets, also running on quad-core processors and Android 4.0. The Excite 10 is set to go on sale in May for $450 for 16GB, $530 for 32GB or $650 for the 64GB model. The Excite 7.7 will arrive in June with the Excite 13, at $500 for 16GB and $580 for 32GB.

Follow Daniel Ionescu and Today @ PCWorld on Twitter

Article source: http://www.pcworld.com/article/253508/toshiba_unveils_133inch_android_tablet.html

Tags: , , , ,

08 Apr 12 Google Readying 7-Inch Tablet for Late Summer Release


Google has come a long way since it launched its first Android consumer device, the Nexus One, with HTC back in January 2010, in its first attempt to compete with the Apple iPhone.

Well, that one crashed and burned. Verizon veered away and eventually decided to stick with the iPhone and (eventually) other Android phones, performance complications set in, and the Nexus One quickly faded into oblivion.

Google can be forgiven, certainly. Few companiesespecially those working in new markets for the first timehit home runs as soon as they step into the batter’s box. Since then, of course, companies such as HTC, Motorola, Lenovo and others have come up with popular Android-powered smartphones, and the Nexus One now is merely a collector’s item.

A major issue with its sales, it turned out, was that the Nexus One was made available only via online order, and not in retail stores. The look, feel and responsiveness of any phone obviously can’t be experienced until the device is actually in the user’s hands. As a result, a high percentage of the Nexus Ones were returned to HTC and Google when they didn’t live up to users’ expectations.

In fairness, as the first Google phone out of the box, the Nexus One taught the company a great deal about the phone business, and subsequent models (Nexus S and S2, Nexus Galaxy) have been much more successful.

Second Try at a Co-Branded Smart Device

Two and a half years later, Google is doing it againthis time with a tablet PC. This first one will be a co-branded (with Asustek Computer of Taiwan) Android device that is expected to become available near the end of this summerlate July or August.

Google CEO Eric Schmidt let it slip to an Italian newspaper last December that the company would have a tablet “in six months.” Well, the project is pretty much on schedule after all. Device Website The Verge reported April 6 that Google originally planned to launch the tablet next month but decided to push it back because the device was becoming too expensive.

In order for any device to compete with the iPad and Amazon’s Kindle Fire, a lower price is going to have to be the main attraction, and Google knows it. Google opted to spend a few more months modifying the tablet to bring the price down, the site reported.

The company’s product team is making these design changes now with the goal to drop the price at least $50 below the original retail tag of $249, so it can compete directly with the Kindle Fire (same 7-inch size, $199).

7-inch Screen, Ice Cream Sandwich OS

The Google WiFi-only tablet (pictured) features a 7-inch screen and an Nvidia Tegra 3 quad-core processor. It is powered by Google’s Android 4.0 Ice Cream Sandwich operating system.

Google’s co-branding strategy with Asustek in Android tablets may indicate that other Far Eastern device manufacturers also will be working with the company in the future, including Samsung Electronics, Acer and others.

Editor’s note: This story has been augmented to add more background about the entire Google Nexus phone product line.

Chris Preimesberger is eWEEK Editor for Features and Analysis. Twitter: @editingwhiz



Article source: http://www.eweek.com/c/a/Mobile-and-Wireless/Google-Readying-7inch-Tablet-for-Late-Summer-Release-773313/

Tags: , , , , ,