msgbartop
All about Google Chrome & Google Chrome OS
msgbarbottom

28 Dec 12 LG wants Samsung Galaxy Note 10.1 banned in Korea


LG Display has fired back at Samsung in the ongoing patent skirmish between the two Korean companies.

An injunction filed today by LG seeks to ban Samsung’s
Galaxy Note 10.1 in Korea based on allegations that the
tablet ‘s display panel violates certain LG patents. LG said it filed the suit over Samsung’s use of OLED displays, according to Dow Jones Newswires.

The patents in question are related to the viewing technology used in OLED displays, which helps people better see the screen from any angle. In addition to halting sales of the Galaxy Note, LG is also looking for damages of 1 billion won ($933,000) each day in the event of “continued non-compliance,” Dow Jones added.

This suit marks the latest action in the OLED (organic light-emitting diode) patent wars between the two display manufacturers.

In September, LG filed a patent lawsuit against Samsung, claiming infringement of seven of its OLED patents. Alleging that Samsung violated the design, driver circuitry, and device design of its OLED panels, that suit wanted an an unspecified amount in damages and a permanent ban on five products, including the Galaxy S3 phone, the Galaxy Tab 7.7 tablet, and the smaller Galaxy Note.

In November, Samsung retaliated by filing its own suit against LG seeking to invalidate the patents in question on the grounds that they “lack innovation.”

The bad blood between the two goes back even further.

Earlier this year, 11 current and former Samsung Mobile employees were arrested on charges that they allegedly stole and leaked details to LG about a Samsung AMOLED TV. Six of LG’s own workers were also reportedly involved in the theft.

As Korea’s top two display manufacturers, LG and Samsung have been jockeying for dominant market share, especially in the area of OLED panels, which are used for smartphones, tablets, and TVs.

Shim Jaeboo, a Samsung Display vice president, told Dow Jones that his company did not infringe on LG’s patents and that it will respond to “unjustified claims” made by LG.

CNET contacted both LG and Samsung for comment and will update the story if we receive any information.

Article source: http://news.cnet.com/8301-13578_3-57561093-38/lg-wants-samsung-galaxy-note-10.1-banned-in-korea/

Tags: , , , , ,

20 Dec 12 Samsung Galaxy S4 Release Date in Mid-2013 with Android Key Lime Pie OS?


<!–

Like us on Facebook

–>

In either case, the new build of Android will almost certainly debut with a new Nexus Smartphone before being made available for use with other devices, which could see the wait for the Galaxy S4 launch stretch even further.

Another rumor claimed that Samsung Galaxy S4 will sport a flexible OLED 1080p HD displays. This technology will likely also be featured with the Samsung Galaxy Note 3. This contradicts the previous report that the device will be equipped with an indestructible screen display.

It was previously reported that the Samsung Galaxy S4 will sport a 5-inch full HD display with full 1080p and a whopping 440 pixels per inch. The device will be powered by two quad core chips.

The Galaxy S4 might also sport a 13-megapixel rear-facing camera, which will intimate other smartphones with 8MP back shooters.

The handset should come with a minimum of 2GB RAM, although there are reports that Samsung is testing an unidentified smartphone with 3GB RAM.

Samsung also began mass producing 128GB memory chips for smartphones and tablets earlier this year, and we could see storage capacities that high as early as next year. With this, the Samsung will continue its reign in producing devices with large storage capacity.

Samsung kept mum on the rumors surrounding the upcoming Samsung Galaxy S4. There is no official comment from the South Korea’s tech giant.

To contact the editor, e-mail:

Article source: http://au.ibtimes.com/articles/416969/20121220/samsung-galaxy-s4-release-date-launch-specs.htm

Tags: , , , , ,

07 Jun 12 HTC’s new One phones are worth a look


When it comes to smartphones, I’m an iPhone guy. But I’ve long appreciated HTC’s Android phones.

The first Android phone I really liked was the Google Nexus One, which was made by HTC. I also was a big fan of the Nexus One’s sibling, the Droid Incredible.

But in the past year or so, HTC has struggled to make phones that stood out in the increasingly crowded Android marketplace. It has lost share to Samsung, which has focused on phones with jumbo, brilliantly lit screens.

HTC is trying to stage a comeback. It announced a new flagship line this year of phones dubbed One. The first two models in the line, the One S and the One X, recently hit store shelves at T-Mobile USA and ATT, respectively.

I’ve been testing both phones and generally like what I’ve seen. I don’t consider either one a must-have, but they are worth a serious look if you are in the market for an Android device.

Of the two, I was immediately drawn to the One S. I’ve not been a big fan of phones with screens larger than 4 inches because they tend to be unwieldy to use with one hand. But the One S is supersleek.

Despite having the same 4.3-inch screen as Motorola’s Droid Razr, the One S is lighter. It’s also nearly as thin as the Razr without having a raised bump for its camera. Instead, the One S’s back is flat with rounded edges and feels great in the hand.

With a 4.7-inch screen, the One X is noticeably bigger than the One S. Although it shares the same basic design and is only slightly heavier, its bulk makes it feel clumsy.

The two phones’ screens differ in size and in underlying technology and resolution. The One S has an organic light-emitting diode, or OLED, display, which offers richer colors and deeper blacks than the One X’s LCD display, but looks a bit dimmer in bright light.

As one might expect from a bigger screen, the One X’s shows more pixels than the One S’s, but that’s not necessarily a good thing. Some apps designed for smaller displays appear stretched out or have ultratiny buttons.

Still, the One S and the One X have a lot in common. Both have fast dual-core processors, an adequate but not ample amount of storage — 16 gigabytes — and Ice Cream Sandwich, the latest version of Android.

On both phones, though, HTC has decided to forgo the virtual system buttons that Google built into Ice Cream Sandwich, which change in number and appearance from application to application. Instead, HTC is sticking with the permanent and fixed touch-sensitive buttons that used to be found on all Android phones. I think that’s a good choice; I’ve found the ever-changing system buttons in the latest version of Android confusing.

Both phones also run the latest version of HTC’s Sense interface on top of Android. I’ve always liked Sense, an easier-to-use interface than what ships with the standard version of Android. HTC streamlined the interface a bit in the new version and added one cool feature that helps its devices continue to stand out from other Android phones.

Recently used applications are displayed as cards rotated slightly. You can swipe left and right to access various apps. And you can close applications by swiping up. It looks a lot like the multitasking system of Palm’s webOS, which I loved, and I was happy to see HTC borrow the idea.

One of the key features HTC is touting in the One l phones is their superfast cameras.

I take a lot of pictures on cellphones, and it can be a frustrating experience. They tend to do a poor job in low-light situations, and many are too slow to capture pictures of fast-moving kids or animals.

But I was impressed with the cameras on the One phones, at least in terms of speed. They shoot photos almost instantaneously. And if you keep the shutter button pressed down, they’ll shoot continuously until you have no more storage space left, if you want to go that long. When you stop shooting, the phones will help you select the best shot; you can either keep all the ones you shot in a row, or simply the best one.

Neither phone is perfect. Thanks to its giant screen, the One X seemed to gobble up its battery power fairly quickly, even in moderate use.

Meanwhile, the One S suffers from its service provider; as I drove around the San Francisco Bay Area, I found numerous spots where I either couldn’t get T-Mobile’s service on the One S, or where I could only get its aging 2G network. The One S I tested also had a bug that caused it to mysteriously reboot several times, even when I wasn’t using it.

Article source: http://seattletimes.nwsource.com/html/businesstechnology/2018372691_pthtcphones09.html

Tags: , , , , ,

28 May 12 Wolverton: New HTC phones are Ones to look for


Click photo to enlarge

When it comes to smartphones, I’m an iPhone guy. But I’ve long appreciated HTC’s Android phones.

The first Android phone I really liked was HTC’s Galaxy Nexus. I also was a big fan of the Nexus’ sibling, the Droid Incredible.

But over the past year or so, HTC has struggled to make phones that stood out in the increasingly crowded Android marketplace. It’s lost share to Samsung, which has focused on phones with jumbo, brilliantly lit screens.

Now HTC is trying to stage a comeback. Earlier this year, it announced a new flagship line of phones dubbed One. The first two models in the line, the One S and the One X, recently hit store shelves at T-Mobile and ATT, respectively.

I’ve been testing out both phones and generally like what I’ve seen. I don’t consider either one a must-have, but they are both worth a serious look if you are in the market for an Android device.

Of the two, I was immediately drawn to the One S. I’ve not been a big fan of phones with screens larger than 4 inches because they tend to be unwieldy to use with one hand. But the One S is super-sleek.

Despite having the same 4.3-inch screen as Motorola’s Droid Razr, the One S is lighter. It’s also nearly as thin as the Razr without having a raised bump for its camera. Instead, the One S’s back is flat with rounded edges and feels great in the hand.

With a 4.7-inch screen, the One X is noticeably bigger than the One S. Although it shares the same basic

design and is only slightly heavier, its bulk makes it feel clumsy in my hands.

The two phones’ screens differ not just in size but also in underlying technology and resolution. The One S has an organic light-emitting diode, or OLED, display, which offers richer colors and deeper blacks than the One X’s LCD display, but looks a bit dimmer in bright light.

As one might expect from a bigger screen, the One X’s shows more pixels than the One S’s, but that’s not necessarily a good thing. Some apps designed for smaller displays appear stretched out or have ultra-tiny buttons.

Still, the One S and the One X have a lot in common. Both have fast dual-core processors, an adequate but not ample amount of storage — 16 gigabytes — and the latest version of Android, which is known as Ice Cream Sandwich.

On both phones, though, HTC has decided to forgo the virtual system buttons that Google (GOOG) built into Ice Cream Sandwich that change in number and appearance from application to application. Instead, HTC is sticking with the permanent and fixed touch-sensitive buttons that used to be found on all Android phones. I think that’s a good choice; I’ve found the ever-changing system buttons in the latest version of Android to be confusing.

Both phones also run the latest version of HTC’s Sense interface on top of Android. I’ve always liked Sense, an easier-to-use interface than what ships with the standard version of Android. HTC streamlined the interface a bit in the new version and added one cool feature that helps its devices continue to stand out from other Android phones.

Recently used applications are displayed as cards that are rotated slightly. You can swipe left and right to access various apps. And you can close applications by swiping up. It looks a lot like the multi-tasking system of Palm’s webOS, which I loved, and I was happy to see HTC borrow the idea.

One of the key features HTC is touting in the One line of phones is their super-fast cameras.

I take a lot of pictures on cellphones, and it can be a really frustrating experience. They tend to do a poor job in low-light situations and many are just too slow to capture pictures of fast-moving kids or animals.

But I was impressed with the cameras on the One phones, at least in terms of their speed. They shoot photos almost instantaneously. And if you keep the shutter button pressed down, they’ll shoot continuously until you have no more storage space left — if you want to go that long. When you stop shooting, the phones will help you select the best shot; you can either keep all the ones you shot in a row, or simply the best one.

Neither phone is perfect. Thanks to its giant screen, the One X seemed to gobble up its battery power fairly quickly, even in moderate use.

Meanwhile, the One S suffers from its service provider; as I drove around the Bay Area, I found numerous spots where I either couldn’t get T-Mobile’s service on the One S, or where I could only get its aging 2G network. The One S I tested also had a bug that caused it to mysteriously reboot several times, even when I wasn’t using it.

Contact Troy Wolverton at 408-840-4285 or twolverton@mercurynews.com. Follow him at www.mercurynews.com/troy-wolverton or Twitter.com/troywolv.

HTC One S
smartphone

Likes: Super-fast camera; sleek design; easy-to-use interface
Dislikes: Spotty coverage; bug causes random reboots
Specs: 1.5 GHz dual-core processor; 16 gigabytes of storage; 4.3-inch OLED screen; 8-megapixel rear and sub-1-megapixel front cameras
Price: $200 with two-year T-Mobile contract
Web: www.htc.com,
www.t-mobile.com

HTC One X
smartphone

Likes: Fast-shooting camera; easy-to-use interface; speedy 4G LTE coverage
Dislikes: Bulky; big screen limits battery life; some apps appear stretched out on big screen
Specs: 1.5 GHz dual-core processor; 16 gigabytes of storage; 4.7-inch LCD screen; 8-megapixel rear and sub-1-megapixel front cameras
Price: $200 with two-year ATT contract
Web: www.htc.com,
wireless.att.com

Article source: http://www.mercurynews.com/troy-wolverton/ci_20702448/troy-wolverton-review-new-htc-one-smartphone-s-x-android-tmobile-att

Tags: , , , , ,

12 Apr 12 Sony SmartWatch launches, delivers ‘Android power’ to wrist


Sonys SmartWatch works with Android smartphones.

Sony’s SmartWatch works with Android smartphones.

(Credit:
Sony)

Have you ever wanted a watch that can communicate with your
Android phone? Sony sure hopes so.

Sony today launched its SmartWatch, a timepiece for the wrist that allows owners to read text messages, social updates and e-mail, manage calls, and control music. The SmartWatch connects to an Android phone via Bluetooth in order to deliver its functionality and capture what Sony calls “Android power.”

The SmartWatch might be useful for those who don’t want to continuously pull their smartphone out of their pocket, but it certainly won’t win a fashion contest. The device’s strap is rubber and comes in several colors, including white, pink, mint, and blue. However, the black strap comes standard, while the additional colors must be purchased separately. Sitting atop the strap is the watch’s touch-screen OLED display measuring 1.3 inches. To alert users to an event or an incoming call, the timepiece vibrates.

Sony announced the SmartWatch at the Consumer Electronics Show in January. The company said at the time that the watch would work with Android phones from Sony, HTC, Motorola, Samsung, and others. Sony says the handset can run four days on a single charge and is both dust and splash proof.

This isn’t Sony’s first foray into the watch business. Back in 2010, the company launched LiveView, another watch that interacted with Android phones. Although it floundered after launch, the device is still for sale on Amazon for $54.99.

Sony’s SmartWatch is available now for $149.99 on the company’s online marketplace and in its stores. Sony says that it will “soon” announce availability at other retailers.

Keeping time and in touch with the Sony Xperia Watch (photos)

Update 6:34 a.m. PT
to include more details.

Article source: http://news.cnet.com/8301-1035_3-57412973-94/sony-smartwatch-launches-delivers-android-power-to-wrist/

Tags: , , ,