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01 Jun 12 Chrome Steals Second From Firefox in Browser Wars


Google’s Chrome passed Mozilla’s Firefox in May to become the world’s second-most-popular browser, according to data released today by Web analytics company Net Applications.

The California-based firm was the second major metric company to track Chrome’s run to second. In November 2011, Irish measurement vendor StatCounter said Chrome had passed Firefox in its estimates.

Net Applications’ spot swapping came as a surprise: Earlier projections by Computerworld had pointed to a delay in Chrome’s capture of second place, perhaps to as late as August.

But in May, Chrome gained 1.3 percentage points, more than double its average increase over the last 12 months, to climb to 20.2%, while Firefox lost six-tenths of a point to fall to 19.6%.

Last month was the first time that Chrome cracked the 20% mark — the browser debuted in September 2008 — and the first time that Firefox fell under that number in Net Applications’ data since October of the same year.

Chrome Steals Second From Firefox in Browser WarsChrome Steals Second From Firefox in Browser WarsFirefox, backed by open-source developer Mozilla, peaked at just over 25% in April 2010, and has been on a slow-but-steady decline in usage share since then.

For Microsoft, May was a return to a more traditional pattern: Internet Explorer (IE) lost half a percentage point to end the month at 53.6%. May’s decline put an end to the two-month-in-a-row growth IE had experienced, and returned the browser to near the share it owned last March.

Even so, IE has gained share in three of the first five months of 2012.

Within the IE family, IE9 continued its ascent, adding one percentage point to account for 16.9% of all browsers on all operating systems. IE8 also was up, boosting its share by nearly half a point to 26.7%.

The other editions — 2006′s IE7 and the 11-year-old IE6 — lost share in May. IE6, the version Microsoft wants to disappear, lost a point last month, falling to 6.1%, a record low in Net Applications’ tracking. IE7 shed seven-tenths of a percentage point to drop to 3.4%, also a record.

While the shift toward IE9 can be attributed to the increasing uptake of Windows 7, IE8′s recent rebound is harder to explain. IE8 has grown its share in four of the first five months of the year compared to only two such months during all of 2011.

The shift toward IE8 and the above-average declines of both IE6 and IE7 so far this year may be due to Microsoft’s new practice of automatically upgrading older versions. Late last year, the company said it would begin to silently force Windows to upgrade IE to the newest-possible edition, ending a tradition of asking users’ permission for such moves.

In January, Microsoft started upgrading some PCs running Windows XP from IE6 or IE7 to IE8, and swapping IE9 for IE7 or IE8 on Vista and Windows 7.

The process started in Australia and Brazil, and is to gradually roll out worldwide this year. Microsoft has declined to provide the names of countries where it has switched on the silent IE upgrades.

Apple‘s Safari lost two-tenths of a point last month to end at 4.6%, while Opera Software’s Opera was flat at 1.6%.

StatCounter’s calculations, however, were considerably different than Net Applications’, as they tend to be.

Net Applications had IE falling by almost two percentage points to 32.1%, while Chrome grew by 1.2 percentage points to 32.4%, making good on reports throughout May that showed Chrome would kick IE out of first place. Firefox, said StatCounter, climbed to 25.6%, while Safari and Opera didn’t budge, accounting for shares of 7.1% and 1.7%, respectively.

Net Applications calculates browser usage share with data obtained from more than 160 million unique visitors who browse 40,000 Web sites that the company monitors. More browser share figures can be found on the company’s site.

Gregg Keizer covers Microsoft, security issues, Apple, Web browsers and general technology breaking news for Computerworld. Follow Gregg on Twitter at @gkeizer, on Google+ or subscribe to Gregg’s RSS feed. His email address is gkeizer@computerworld.com.

See more by Gregg Keizer on Computerworld.com.

Read more about browsers in Computerworld’s Browsers Topic Center.

Article source: http://www.pcworld.com/article/256624/chrome_steals_second_from_firefox_in_browser_wars.html

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31 May 12 Chrome to take world’s top browser spot for May


Computerworld -

Google’s Chrome is about to grab the top browser spot for a full month for the first time from Microsoft’s Internet Explorer, data from a Web analytics company showed.

For the month through Monday, Chrome had an average usage share of 32.5%, slightly higher than Internet Explorer’s (IE) 32.1%, according to Irish company StatCounter.

If the remaining three days of May play out as did the previous 28, Chrome will take the browser crown from IE for a full month for the first time since Chrome’s September 2008 launch.

Previously, Chrome had edged IE on weekends, and then earlier this month topped Microsoft’s combined browser usage share for the week ending May 20. That trend continued in the month’s fourth week as Chrome beat IE 32.9% to 31.4% for the seven days ending May 27.

The spread between the two browsers for the fourth week of the month was 67% larger than during the third week, hinting that Chrome continues to gain momentum in the share race.

Other browsers remained steady. Through May 28, Mozilla’s Firefox accounted for 25.5% of all browsers used worldwide, while Apple‘s Safari and Opera Software’s Opera logged in at 7.1% and 1.8%, respectively.

But StatCounter’s numbers are contentious in some quarters.

Rival metrics firm Net Applications, for example, cites data that shows Chrome far behind IE, with April’s numbers spotting Chrome at 18.9% and IE at 54.1%, or almost three times larger. Net Applications does not make its daily share data available to the public, so a direct comparison with StatCounter’s numbers through Monday was not possible.

Although both companies discard Chrome’s pre-rendered pages — those that the browser loads in the background in case the user decides to view them — their methodologies differ significantly. For one thing, StatCounter tallies page views while Net Applications counts unique visitors.

More importantly, Net Applications — but not StatCounter — weights its data by country to account for the lack of Western insight into browsing habits in places like China, where IE is the overwhelming favorite. The result is that Net Applications’ numbers for IE are always much larger, and Chrome’s much smaller, than StatCounter’s.

Not surprisingly, Microsoft has accepted Net Applications’ estimates and rejected StatCounter’s.

The two companies’ numbers for Firefox, Safari and Opera are typically in the same ballpark. In April, 4.7 percentage points separated the numbers for Firefox, 2.3 points for Safari and just one-tenth of a percentage point for Opera.

The differences between their shares for IE and Chrome, however, were much larger: 13.3 percentage points for Chrome and a whopping 20 points for IE.

Those variances have been obvious of late. In the early months of 2012, Net Applications revealed a rebound of IE and a halt to Chrome’s usual growth. By Net Applications’ calculations, the turnaround has been IE’s most significant and longest-sustained since the browser began shedding share last decade, first to Firefox, then to Chrome.

Meanwhile, StatCounter has spotted no sign of an IE recovery, and has said IE’s share fell and Chrome’s climbed in each of the first four months of the year.

covers Microsoft, security issues, Apple, Web browsers and general technology breaking news for Computerworld. Follow Gregg on Twitter at Twitter @gkeizer, on Google+ or subscribe to Gregg’s RSS feed Keizer RSS. His email address is gkeizer@computerworld.com.

See more by Gregg Keizer on Computerworld.com.

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Article source: http://www.computerworld.com/s/article/9227536/Chrome_to_take_world_s_top_browser_spot_for_May?taxonomyId=71

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30 May 12 Chrome to Take World's Top Browser Spot for May


Google’s Chrome is about to grab the top browser spot for a full month for the first time from Microsoft’s Internet Explorer, data from a Web analytics company showed.

For the month through Monday, Chrome had an average usage share of 32.5%, slightly higher than Internet Explorer’s (IE) 32.1%, according to Irish company StatCounter.

If the remaining three days of May play out as did the previous 28, Chrome will take the browser crown from IE for a full month for the first time since Chrome’s September 2008 launch.

Chrome — powered by upswings each weekend — is likely to take the browser crown from Microsoft’s IE this month for the first time. (Data: StatCounter.)

Previously, Chrome had edged IE on weekends, and then earlier this month topped Microsoft’s combined browser usage share for the week ending May 20. That trend continued in the month’s fourth week as Chrome beat IE 32.9% to 31.4% for the seven days ending May 27.

The spread between the two browsers for the fourth week of the month was 67% larger than during the third week, hinting that Chrome continues to gain momentum in the share race.

Other browsers remained steady. Through May 28, Mozilla’s Firefox accounted for 25.5% of all browsers used worldwide, while Apple‘s Safari and Opera Software’s Opera logged in at 7.1% and 1.8%, respectively.

But StatCounter’s numbers are contentious in some quarters.

Rival metrics firm Net Applications, for example, cites data that shows Chrome far behind IE, with April’s numbers spotting Chrome at 18.9% and IE at 54.1%, or almost three times larger. Net Applications does not make its daily share data available to the public, so a direct comparison with StatCounter’s numbers through Monday was not possible.

Although both companies discard Chrome’s pre-rendered pages — those that the browser loads in the background in case the user decides to view them — their methodologies differ significantly. For one thing, StatCounter tallies page views while Net Applications counts unique visitors.

More importantly, Net Applications — but not StatCounter — weights its data by country to account for the lack of Western insight into browsing habits in places like China, where IE is the overwhelming favorite. The result is that Net Applications’ numbers for IE are always much larger, and Chrome’s much smaller, than StatCounter’s.

Not surprisingly, Microsoft has accepted Net Applications’ estimates and rejected StatCounter’s.

The two companies’ numbers for Firefox, Safari and Opera are typically in the same ballpark. In April, 4.7 percentage points separated the numbers for Firefox, 2.3 points for Safari and just one-tenth of a percentage point for Opera.

The differences between their shares for IE and Chrome, however, were much larger: 13.3 percentage points for Chrome and a whopping 20 points for IE.

Those variances have been obvious of late. In the early months of 2012, Net Applications revealed a rebound of IE and a halt to Chrome’s usual growth. By Net Applications’ calculations, the turnaround has been IE’s most significant and longest-sustained since the browser began shedding share last decade, first to Firefox, then to Chrome.

Meanwhile, StatCounter has spotted no sign of an IE recovery, and has said IE’s share fell and Chrome’s climbed in each of the first four months of the year.

Gregg Keizer covers Microsoft, security issues, Apple, Web browsers and general technology breaking news for Computerworld. Follow Gregg on Twitter at @gkeizer, on Google+ or subscribe to Gregg’s RSS feed. His email address is gkeizer@computerworld.com.

See more by Gregg Keizer on Computerworld.com.

Read more about browsers in Computerworld’s Browsers Topic Center.

Article source: http://www.pcworld.com/article/256373/chrome_to_take_worlds_top_browser_spot_for_may.html

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29 May 12 Chrome to take top browser spot from Internet Explorer for May


Google Chrome will grab the top browser spot for a full month for the first time from Microsoft’s Internet Explorer, according to data from StatCounter.

For the month until yesterday, Chrome had an average usage share of 32.5%, slightly higher than IE’s 32.1%, the Irish company said.

If the remaining three days of May play out as did the previous 28, Chrome will take the browser crown from IE for a full month for the first time since Chrome’s September 2008 launch.

Previously, Chrome had edged IE on weekends, and then earlier this month topped Microsoft’s combined browser usage share for the week ending May 20. That trend continued in the month’s fourth week as Chrome beat IE 32.9% to 31.4% for the seven days ending May 27.

The spread between the two browsers for the fourth week of the month was 67% larger than during the third week, hinting that Chrome continues to gain momentum in the share race.

Other browsers remained steady. Through May 28, Mozilla’s Firefox accounted for 25.5% of all browsers used worldwide, while Apple’s Safari and Opera Software’s Opera logged in at 7.1% and 1.8%, respectively.

But StatCounter’s numbers are contentious in some quarters.

Rival metrics firm Net Applications, for example, cites data that shows Chrome far behind IE, with April’s numbers spotting Chrome at 18.9% and IE at 54.1%, almost three times larger. Net Applications does not make its daily share data available to the public, so a direct comparison with StatCounter’s numbers through Monday was not possible.

Although both companies discard Chrome’s pre-rendered pages – those that the browser loads in the background in case the user decides to view them – their methodologies differ significantly. For one thing, StatCounter tallies page views while Net Applications counts unique visitors.

More importantly, Net Applications – but not StatCounter – weights its data by country to account for the lack of Western insight into browsing habits in places like China, where IE is the overwhelming favourite. The result is that Net Applications’ numbers for IE are always much larger, and Chrome’s much smaller, than StatCounter’s.

Not surprisingly, Microsoft has accepted Net Applications’ estimates and rejected StatCounter’s.

The two companies’ numbers for Firefox, Safari and Opera are typically in the same ballpark. In April, 4.7% separated the numbers for Firefox, 2.3% for Safari and just 0.1% for Opera.

The differences between their shares for IE and Chrome, however, were much larger: 13.3% for Chrome and a whopping 20% for IE.

Those variances have been obvious of late. In the early months of 2012, Net Applications revealed a rebound of IE and a halt to Chrome’s usual growth. By Net Applications’ calculations, the turnaround has been IE’s most significant and longest-sustained since the browser began shedding share last decade, first to Firefox, then to Chrome.

Meanwhile, StatCounter has spotted no sign of an IE recovery, and has said IE’s share fell and Chrome’s climbed in each of the first four months of the year.

Article source: http://rss.feedsportal.com/c/270/f/470440/s/1fcf79fc/l/0Lnews0Btechworld0N0Capplications0C3360A6190Cchrome0Etake0Etop0Ebrowser0Espot0Efrom0Einternet0Eexplorer0Efor0Emay0C0Dolo0Frss/story01.htm

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03 Jan 12 Chrome Nears 20% Share, IE Resumes Slide


After a one-month pause, Microsoft’s Internet Explorer (IE) resumed its usage share slide in December, dropping to a new low and setting the stage for a fall below 50% as early as March.

IE lost eight-tenths of a percentage point last month to end with a share of 51.9%, according to California-based metrics company Net Applications. IE dropped more than seven points during 2011.

In November, said Net Applications, IE held steady, the only month in the year when it did not lose share.

Google’s Chrome benefited most from IE’s decline, growing its share by nine-tenths of a percentage point to a record high of 19.1%. Chrome should crack the 20% mark either this month or in February.

As was its practice during much of 2011, Microsoft did not address the continued slide of IE, but instead pointed to IE9′s performance on Windows 7, a combination the company has repeatedly said is the only metric that matters.

“Based on where the December data currently stands,” said Roger Capriotti, the head of IE marketing, in a Dec. 30 blog , “we’re pleased to say IE9 … will soon take the top spot from IE8 on Windows 7, with usage share expected to come in at nearly 25.6% this month.”

Neither Microsoft nor Net Applications — which does not make OS-specific browser statistics available to the public — published definitive December IE9-Windows 7 numbers on Jan. 1.

On all operating systems, IE9 held an 11.5% share during December, an increase of 1.2 points over November. IE8 remained Microsoft’s most-popular browser by far, accounting for 27.3% of all browsers used, or more than half of all versions of IE.

Other editions also slid last month: IE7 dropped to 4.8% and IE6, which Microsoft has been trying to euthanize since 2009, fell to 7.3%.

Microsoft’s recent decision to automatically upgrade older editions of IE may depress IE6 and IE7 numbers further during 2012 in favor of IE8 and IE9, but it’s unclear if the move will stem IE’s overall defections.

Chrome has gained most of what IE and Mozilla’s Firefox lost this year, boosting its numbers by 8.8 points in 2011. Firefox, which dropped three-tenths of a point during December and 1.9 points for the year, ended 2011 with 21.8%, a new low.

Firefox will lose its second-place spot to Chrome in March if the two browsers keep to their current Net Applications’ trend lines. (According to rival measurement company StatCounter, Chrome has already overtaken Firefox .)

Also during December, Apple’s Safari stayed flat at 5%, and Opera Software’s Opera gained one-tenth of a percentage point, its first significant increase in over a year, to reach 1.7%.

Net Applications calculates browser usage share with data obtained from more than 160 million unique visitors who browse 40,000 Web sites that the company monitors for clients. More browser statistics can be found on the company’s site.

Gregg Keizer covers Microsoft, security issues, Apple, Web browsers and general technology breaking news for Computerworld. Follow Gregg on Twitter at @gkeizer , on Google+ or subscribe to Gregg’s RSS feed . His e-mail address is gkeizer@computerworld.com .

See more articles by Gregg Keizer .

Read more about browsers in Computerworld’s Browsers Topic Center.

Article source: http://www.pcworld.com/article/247159/chrome_nears_20_share_ie_resumes_slide.html

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02 Jan 12 Chrome nears 20% sare, IE resumes slide


After a one-month pause, Microsoft’s Internet Explorer (IE) resumed its usage share slide in December, dropping to a new low and setting the stage for a fall below 50% as early as March.

IE lost eight-tenths of a percentage point last month to end with a share of 51.9%, according to California-based metrics company Net Applications. IE dropped more than seven points during 2011.

In November, said Net Applications, IE held steady, the only month in the year when it did not lose share.

Google’s Chrome benefited most from IE’s decline, growing its share by nine-tenths of a percentage point to a record high of 19.1%. Chrome should crack the 20% mark either this month or in February.

As was its practice during much of 2011, Microsoft did not address the continued slide of IE, but instead pointed to IE9′s performance on Windows 7, a combination the company has repeatedly said is the only metric that matters.

“Based on where the December data currently stands,” said Roger Capriotti, the head of IE marketing, in a Dec. 30 blog , “we’re pleased to say IE9 … will soon take the top spot from IE8 on Windows 7, with usage share expected to come in at nearly 25.6% this month.”

Neither Microsoft nor Net Applications — which does not make OS-specific browser statistics available to the public — published definitive December IE9-Windows 7 numbers on Jan. 1.

On all operating systems, IE9 held an 11.5% share during December, an increase of 1.2 points over November. IE8 remained Microsoft’s most-popular browser by far, accounting for 27.3% of all browsers used, or more than half of all versions of IE.

Other editions also slid last month: IE7 dropped to 4.8% and IE6, which Microsoft has been trying to euthanize since 2009, fell to 7.3%.

Microsoft’s recent decision to automatically upgrade older editions of IE may depress IE6 and IE7 numbers further during 2012 in favor of IE8 and IE9, but it’s unclear if the move will stem IE’s overall defections.

Chrome has gained most of what IE and Mozilla’s Firefox lost this year, boosting its numbers by 8.8 points in 2011. Firefox, which dropped three-tenths of a point during December and 1.9 points for the year, ended 2011 with 21.8%, a new low.

Firefox will lose its second-place spot to Chrome in March if the two browsers keep to their current Net Applications’ trend lines. (According to rival measurement company StatCounter, Chrome has already overtaken Firefox .)

Also during December, Apple’s Safari stayed flat at 5%, and Opera Software’s Opera gained one-tenth of a percentage point, its first significant increase in over a year, to reach 1.7%.

Net Applications calculates browser usage share with data obtained from more than 160 million unique visitors who browse 40,000 Web sites that the company monitors for clients. More browser statistics can be found on the company’s site.

Gregg Keizer covers Microsoft, security issues, Apple, Web browsers and general technology breaking news for Computerworld. Follow Gregg on Twitter at @gkeizer , on Google+ or subscribe to Gregg’s RSS feed . His e-mail address is gkeizer@computerworld.com .

See more articles by Gregg Keizer .

Read more about browsers in Computerworld’s Browsers Topic Center.

Article source: http://rss.feedsportal.com/c/559/f/7174/s/1b71667f/l/0L0Spcadvisor0O0Cnews0Cinternet0C33273220Cchrome0Enears0E20A0Eshare0Eie0Eresumes0Eslide0C0Dolo0Frss/story01.htm

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10 Oct 11 Mozilla: Rising revenue, but rising challenges


Firefox logo

Not bad for a nonprofit.

The Mozilla Foundation, the developer of the
Firefox Web browser and an organization charged with defending openness on the Web, plans to report today that its revenue increased 18 percent from $104 million in 2009 to $123 million in 2010.

Expenses rose, too, though–from $61 million to $87 million–and Mozilla generated less net cash, down from $26 million to $22 million, according to Mozilla’s tax filings. But hey, in case you missed it–Mozilla measures its success by improving the Web, not amassing a pile of cash.

Mozilla, with help from Opera Software’s Opera browser and later Apple’s
Safari, slowly chipped away at the dominance of Internet Explorer, and Microsoft now has gone whole hog for developing a modern, high-performance browser. The Web standards Mozilla long advocated are now ascendant, though not without a lot of chaos as they’re developed. Yet Mozilla in a way faces more challenges now that many of its ideals have prevailed.

That’s because browsers are more competitive than ever–and the rising use of Safari and Chrome, along with IE’s starring role in Windows 8, mean browsers from commercial interests are waxing in influence.

Mozilla argues that Firefox remains relevant, though. “Mozilla is unique in that we build Firefox to provide an independent offering focused solely on individual experience and the overall good of the Web,” the company said in its annual report. As evidence, it pointed to work to speed Web development by speeding Firefox development; work on the do-not-track technology to let people evade behavioral ad targeting; the release of Firefox for
Android; the development of Browser ID to try to reform Web site authentication; and working on the “Boot to Gecko” project for a Web-app operating system alternative to iOS or Android.

Mozilla discloses information available in its tax filings annually, but well after the tax year is over. In 2011, Mozilla has had a fresh series of challenges, perhaps most notably the steady rise in usage of Chrome as Firefox usage–as a percentage, not absolute terms–stayed level. Mozilla is still used by millions, but the more users it has, the more effective a tool it can be for reforming the Web. And though money isn’t as central to Mozilla’s operations as it is at a for-profit company, having money definitely helps Mozilla pursue its mission.

Most of Mozilla’s revenue came through revenue from search engines, chiefly Google but also Bing, Yahoo, Yandex, Amazon, and eBay. The Google contract is up for renewal in November, but Mozilla isn’t worried: “We have every confidence that search partnerships will remain a solid generator of revenue for Mozilla for the foreseeable future,” the organization said in its FAQ.

People like to fret about whether Google, which now has its own browser to promote, will cut Firefox off. But I’d be surprised. First, Firefox could direct its traffic from its search box elsewhere by default–hardly the sort of thing Google could be expected to welcome.

Second, Google’s mission with Chrome is not dominance of the browser market, it’s enabling the new era of Web apps and services that are where Google makes its real money. Sure, if more people searched directly with Chrome, Google wouldn’t have to hand over as much shared revenue to search partners such as Mozilla. But it’s hard to see how cutting off Mozilla’s search deal would result in people shifting to Chrome. Worse, it’s the kind of move that would be perceived as very hostile in Web-developer circles.

Search isn’t the sole source of Mozilla’s revenue. It also got money from “very important individual and corporate donations and grants” and from investments, the organization said.

It’s working on diversifying its revenue sources, though.

“We currently have several key business partnerships and are actively exploring search partnership opportunities and other potential revenue opportunities,” Mozilla said.

In another financial matter, Mozilla said it had cleared a hurdle in an ongoing Internal Revenue Service investigation about tax matters for the years 2004 through 2007.

Article source: http://news.cnet.com/8301-30685_3-20117274-264/mozilla-rising-revenue-but-rising-challenges/

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