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14 Jun 12 Only Android users care when the iPhone gets features late



Apple iOS 6 introduced new features, some of which Android already had.
(Credit: James Martin/CNET)

Whenever Apple introduces a new version of iOS, it’s guaranteed that Android fans will protest that Google’s operating system has long had most of the new features. Apple is late again, they’ll say, and only following Google down the smartphone innovation trail.

Truth is, I don’t really blame them for making that case. Indeed, I’ve done the same when reviewing iOS updates (most recently with CNET’s iOS 6 First Take) so I understand where their fervor is coming from. But as right they may be, Android fans forget one important thing. Apple may be late to a feature party, but iPhone users really don’t care.

Of course, iPhone owners will gripe when their phone is missing an important feature. The wait for real notifications, for example, was particularly galling and it took until iOS 6 to add a button for attaching a photo to an email that you’re already writing. But even with those complaints, most iPhone users will forgive Apple and be patient. Because deep down they believe that when Apple finally delivers the feature, they’ll get a better experience than their Android friends. Tear off the front page, but Apple takes its time to deliver the experience it wants. That’s how it’s always been and its customers know it.

Of course, I’m not saying that Apple always hits the highest mark–the iPhone’s multitasking is still a bit of a mess–but sometimes it does. It took a while to get video editing, for example, but it was a dream when it arrived. It’s those moments that really matter to Apple users. They’d rather sit on the bench than get a half-baked product. To them, Apple doesn’t have to invent it as long as it adds the signature Apple touch that customers expect and love.

In the end, it’s really about two distinct philosophies of a smartphone user experience. On one side you have an OS that can do almost anything, offers oodles of choice, and is exhaustively customizable. But at the same time it can feel messy and a tad unrefined. That’s fine for some people, but others will prefer an OS that’s less buggy and that’s tightly integrated and exceedingly easy to use. Sure, that same OS also is limiting and occasionally less powerful, but users should be allowed to choose what works for them.

So, yes, Android users, I feel your pain. When Apple announces a feature that you’ve had for months, I know that it is frustrating. And when Apple gets only thunderous applause in return I see why it makes your blood boil. But even though that’s the reality, Apple fans won’t hear you shouting. Their new iOS feature may be late, but to them it was worth the wait.

Via CNET

Article source: http://asia.cnet.com/only-android-users-care-when-the-iphone-gets-features-late-62216543.htm

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12 Jun 12 Dual Core Processors Wasted on Android, Intel Claims


Current versions of Google’s Android operating system for smartphones make woeful use of their dual core processors, according to an Intel executive.

Poor implementation of threading technology by the operating system saps any benefits dual core processing brings to a system — and in some cases can actually be a detriment to performance, contends Mike Bell, general manager of Intel’s Mobile and Communications Group.

Bell told The Inquirer that even the latest version of Android, 4.0 (Ice Cream Sandwich) suffers from problems with threading scheduling that limits the benefits dual core ARM processors bring to Android phones. Intel uses a competing technology, Atom, in its mobile processor.

What’s more, he maintains that Intel testing found single core processors running faster than some dual core processors. For a lot of the handsets in the market, it isn’t clear that much benefit is gained by turning on the chip’s second core. Worse yet, “having a second core is actually a detriment, because of the way some of the people have not implemented their thread scheduling,” Bell says.

While multicore processors offer performance benefits in environments without power constraints, Bell maintained, that’s not the case with smartphones, which have limits on both power consumption and thermal tolerances.

Bell doesn’t lay all the blame for the poor performance of dual processors on Android’s doorstep. Some of the OS’s threading scheduler problems could be addressed by the chip makers, he asserts, “they just haven’t bothered to do it.” 

Consider the Source

One has to wonder how much of Bell’s thinking is colored by Intel’s experience in the mobile market. No smartphones currently have Intel processors in them. The company’s first stab at making a mobile chip, Moorestown, flopped. Its latest offering, Medfield, has had better luck. It has lined up Motorola and Lenovo to make smartphones with the chips later this year.

LG’s first Intel phone, the never-released GW990

Nevertheless, it’s true that multicore processing has been used as a marketing tool of Android handset makers. For example, they began releasing phones with dual core processors even before Android could support those chips. And they’ve rushed to bring quad core phones into the market.

While Bell’s remarks on dual core performance may have a marketing spin of their own, the questions they raise need further exploration by a party with less of a stake in the market. If Android can’t handle the existing dual core chips in its handsets, what’s the point of doubling the cores — other than to make meaningless marketing claims and deceive consumers that they’re getting performance that they’re not.

Follow freelance technology writer John P. Mello Jr. and Today@PCWorld on Twitter.

Article source: http://www.pcworld.com/article/257307/dual_core_processors_wasted_on_android_intel_claims.html

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11 Jun 12 Intel: ARM, Android far behind x86 when it comes to multi-threaded optimizations


chipzilla-eating-android

The director of Intel’s mobile products division, Mike Bell, has leveled some interesting charges at the company’s ARM-using competitors in the Android smartphone market. Bell, an engineer who spent time at both Apple and Palm before moving to Intel, claims that the major smartphone players have done precious little work to optimize their software for multi-threaded environments.

According to Bell, Intel’s own investigation into the state of multi-processing support in Android turned up a number of deficiencies. Some of the problems can be traced back to manufacturing and the difficulty of controlling current leakage, but others point to poorly optimized thread schedulers and inefficient data structures.

“The way it’s implemented right now, Android does not make as effective use of multiple cores as it could,” Bell told The Inquirer. “I think — frankly — some of this work could be done by the vendors who create the SoCs, but they just haven’t bothered to do it.”

Intel is scarcely a neutral third party, but in this case, we’re inclined to take Bell at his word. His background is in engineering, rather than PR/product evangelism, and the comments themselves make sense. ARM and Android have become ubiquitous precisely because they allow Samsung, Qualcomm, TI, and Nvidia to reap the benefits of research and product development without being directly responsible for the implementation. Intel’s massive software development resources exemplify the opposite approach, and the company’s silicon is quite competitive with ARM devices.

Intel’s software advantage isn’t really x86 compatibility, at least not primarily. The company’s true ace card is the expertise of its software engineers and the scale of its development environment. The fact that its many forms of expertise revolve around the x86 instruction set is nearly incidental. Of its competitors, only Nvidia has much experience in low-level development.

The other reason we take Bell’s criticisms fairly seriously is that they make logical sense. It’s easy to forget that Android is a very young operating system. Dual-core phones are everywhere these days, but the first DC devices shipped less than two years ago. The kind of ultra-low-level optimizations Bell is discussing aren’t something Google can build for each and every device manufacturer — they depend on the specifics of the SoC and, in theory, would be custom built by the relevant OEM. Relying on Google may have worked to date, but it’s unlikely to be effective for much longer.

These type of optimizations become more important as core counts increase. It can be more power-efficient to use four slow cores rather than two fast ones, but only if the OS is efficient enough to leverage all four threads. If it isn’t, the consumer gets a slower device with worse battery life.

Intel smartphone roadmap

More than anything, Intel’s comments are a sign that the company is deadly serious about matching and exceeding its competitors. Medfield demonstrated Intel’s commitment on hardware, but discussions of low-level software optimizations are a different animal. To date, other OEMs have gotten away with limited software customization thanks to ARM and Google. Everything we’ve seen to date suggests that Cortex-A15 and 28nm are the last low-hanging fruit vendors will see for several years. With Intel planning dual-core Clover Trail tablets for later this year and a 22nm Silvermont refresh dropping in 2013, the various ARM vendors will need to look to such optimizations to continue competing effectively.

Article source: http://www.extremetech.com/mobile/130703-intel-arm-android-far-behind-x86-when-it-comes-to-multi-threaded-optimizations

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11 Jun 12 Flash player 11.3 will support sandboxing in Firefox on Windows



Several changes that Adobe made in Flash 11.3 aim to boost the browser plugin’s security and reduce its susceptibility to attacks. The most significant of those changes is the introduction of sandboxing on the Windows platform.

Due to the frequent discovery of Flash vulnerabilities and the relative ubiquity of the plugin, Flash is one of the most heavily-exploited pieces of software. Adobe and browser vendors have been working to make it harder to exploit by isolating the plugin and working to ensure that users have easier access to the latest version.

Most browsers already implement process isolation for plugins in order to prevent Flash crashes from taking down the whole application. In some browsers, such as Chrome, the plugin is sandboxed on Windows to prevent it from accessing sensitive platform functionality. Adobe has worked with Mozilla to bring that feature to Firefox on Windows.

The sandboxing takes advantage of native security features that Microsoft built into Windows Vista and Windows 7. The Flash plugin will operate in three separate processes, one that interacts with the browser, one that does the bulk of the Flash execution, and one that mediates control of underlying operating system features.

The main Flash process will be run at a “low integrity” level, which will prevent it from writing to the user’s profile, manipulating the registry, or sending messages to higher integrity processes. It will also be encumbered with a number of job restrictions that will further limit its access. In order to reach the filesystem or hardware devices, the sandboxed process will have to go through the OS broker process, which is designed to strictly limit access.

The sandboxing mechanism that will be used for Flash in Firefox is similar to the one that Adobe has already implemented in its Acrobat Reader software. Because the implementation relies on features that are built into Windows Vista and Windows 7, however, the Flash sandboxing will not be supported on Windows XP.

Flash has had sandboxing support in Chrome on Windows Vista and Windows 7 since 2011. Internet Explorer doesn’t quite have full Flash sandboxing yet, but already runs the plugin at a low integrity level. Bringing the sandboxing feature to Firefox is another positive step forward.

In addition to introducing sandboxing, Adobe has also been working on a background update system that will allow the plugin to be updated automatically–without requiring user intervention. Simplifying Flash updates will make it easier for Adobe to protect users from zero-day vulnerabilities.

Adobe first introduced the automatic updater on Windows earlier this year. Now Adobe is bringing it to Apple’s Mac OS X. The updater will use a launch daemon to check for updates every day. When an update is detected, it can automatically install it in the background without disrupting the user’s activities.

Alongside the addition of the background updater, Adobe has also taken the opportunity to add application signing, which allows the Flash plugin to run on systems where Gatekeeper is configured to block unsigned software.

The Flash plugin is supported in a restricted capacity in Windows 8, not available on iOS, being discontinued on Android, and soon to be phased out on the Linux desktop. It’s no longer a viable solution for developers who want to reach every screen. Although Flash is gradually heading towards obsolescence, Flash content will continue to be supported in some capacity while standards-based alternatives are maturing and gaining acceptance. As such, enhancements that help to reduce the security risks posed by the plugin are welcome developments.

Article source: http://arstechnica.com/information-technology/2012/06/flash-player-11-3-will-support-sandboxing-in-firefox-on-windows/

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09 Jun 12 Google’s Chrome OS: The dirty little secret about those new devices


By (@jr_raphael) G+

Google Chrome OS Chromebooks

My first thought when I saw Google’s new Chromebooks was “wow”: We’re finally seeing the hardware horsepower and software improvements Chrome OS needs to succeed.

My second thought was “damn”: They still aren’t getting the pricing right.

Initial appearances aren’t everything, though. It turns out there’s a whole other layer to Google’s Chrome OS reboot, and it’s where the company’s real strategy likely lies.

Google, if you haven’t heard, just unveiled a new series of second-gen notebooks that runs its cloud-centric Chrome OS operating system. There’s the Samsung Chromebook Series 5 550 3G model, which costs $550, and the Samsung Chromebook Series 5 550 Wi-Fi model, which runs $449.

Google Chrome OS

I’ve been watching Google’s Chrome OS since its limited launch at the end of 2010 (remember the Cr-48, anyone?). It’s hard to emphasize how far Chrome OS has come since that inauspicious debut: Chrome OS has transformed from a shaky and somewhat limited setup into a full-fledged operating system that’s actually quite nice to use — provided, of course, you’re comfortable living online and using cloud-based applications.

Still, for most shoppers, $450 to $550 is a lot to ask for the type of experience Chrome OS provides — especially when you consider the variety of full-fledged Windows 7 notebooks and high-end tablets you can find for the same price. As I concluded when the first Chromebooks came out, the pricing model is Google’s Achilles’ heel with these systems; if they’d make the devices 200 bucks instead of $500, the Chrome OS concept could really take off.

Here’s the dirty little secret, though: Google isn’t going after the individual consumer with its Chrome OS Chromebooks. Not at those prices. Sure, the G-Team will be delighted when an average consumer decides to pick up its product — and for some of us, the value will be worth the cost — but the true target here is almost certainly the world of business and education.

While the $450 to $550 cost may seem steep from a consumer perspective, for businesses and schools, the Chromebook is part of a bigger package. Full support — both hardware warranty and 24-hour phone service — Samsung Chromebook Series 5 550and enterprise management tools are available for $150 per device for businesses and $30 apiece for schools. That’s an eye-catching proposition: thirty dollars per system, with practically no training required and no need to worry about virus protection or labor-intensive software updates (Chrome’s cloud-based setup is inherently safe from viruses, and OS updates are pushed quietly through the cloud with no need for user or admin intervention). 

It’s a big change from the pricing model Google offered with Chrome OS in the past: The first generation of Chromebooks came with monthly fees for business and school accounts — $28 a month per device for businesses and $20 a month for schools. With the new plan, organizations pay only the single flat fee for the lifetime of each device. 

Consider, too, the fact that Google’s enterprise division just rolled out an optional hosted virtualization solution for Chrome OS account holders. That means business and education users can now gain access to services from nGenx that allow full execution of desktop apps through the Web, essentially addressing the most obvious enterprise-level objection to Chrome OS adoption. Google isn’t publicizing the price of the service but says it comes “at a fraction of the price of current virtualization offerings.”

(Google’s Chrome Remote Desktop beta app, meanwhile, allows individual user-based remote access to any Chrome-connected PC at no extra cost.)

Android Power TwitterGoogle has talked about its desire to bring Chrome OS into businesses and schools before. With its new pricing structure, the company’s ultimate goal is becoming crystal clear. For Chromebooks, the price is right — it just isn’t about the average consumer.

SEE ALSO: The Chrome OS experiment: 2 weeks with Google’s new Chrome computers 

JR Raphael writes about smartphones and other tasty technology. You can find him on , Twitter, or Facebook.

Article copyright 2012 JR Raphael. All rights reserved.

Article source: http://blogs.computerworld.com/20242/google_chrome_os_devices

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09 Jun 12 The ClamBook: A laptop powered by your smartphone



Holy sexy accessories, Batman!

Holy sexy accessories, Batman!

(Credit:
ClamCase)

Android phones and iPhones pack pretty powerful processors — powerful enough, in fact, to deliver laptop-level performance, if only they had big screens and keyboards for your viewing and working pleasure.

Enter the ClamCase ClamBook, a kind of laptop extension for
Android and
iPhone.

It works like this: Your smartphone sits in a wired dock and drives the ClamBook’s screen and keyboard. It’s effectively your phone writ large, which could be great for everything from watching movies to playing games to working on documents.


The new MacBook Air? No, the ClamCase, which could potentially turn your smartphone into the next best thing.

The new MacBook Air? No, the ClamCase, which could potentially turn your smartphone into the next best thing.

(Credit:
ClamCase)

ClamCase isn’t sharing a lot of details just yet, but here’s what we know so far:

  • The 13.3-inch LED-backlit display has a 16:9 aspect ratio and WXGA resolution, which translates to 1,280 x 720 pixels.
  • To look at the ClamBook is to see something akin to a
    MacBook Air, and indeed the company notes that the former’s “sleek and slim all-aluminum body is actually thinner” than Apple’s featherweight laptop. But its actual weight and dimensions have yet to be disclosed. (I’ve asked the company for specifics and will update the post if they come through.)
  • The ClamBook has an island-style keyboard and multi-touch touchpad, with dedicated Android keys for functions like Home, Back, and Menu. It also has media-control keys: play, pause, and volume.
  • Its battery not only powers the screen, but also charges your phone while it’s docked.
  • ClamCase promises “3D Cinema Sound,” though it’s not clear whether that’s from speakers, headphones, or both. Looking at the 360-degree view of the ClamBook, the case doesn’t appear to have any speakers.

Although ClamBook says the device is for iPhones and Android phones, there seems to be more focus on the latter at this point, as evidenced by the aforementioned Android keyboard keys and the nod to Motorola’s Webtop app, which simulates a desktop OS — when paired with Android.

So, will there be a slightly different model for iPhones? And will it simply provide a large, iPad-like view, or will there be a similar kind of desktop simulator?

These are key questions, to be sure, but I think the biggest one is price: how much will the ClamBook cost? I would love to see this come in at around $149, though I suspect it’ll probably sell for twice as much. At that point, most folks would probably just buy a tablet and pair it with an external keyboard.

That said, the ClamBook could be a game-changer, a way to unleash smartphones’ processing power in a slim, travel-friendly package. Hopefully we’ll know more before the product ships in “holiday 2012.”

What do you think? Is this something you’d buy? If so, what’s a fair price? Share your thoughts in the comments!

Article source: http://reviews.cnet.com/8301-19512_7-57449706-233/the-clambook-a-laptop-powered-by-your-smartphone/

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08 Jun 12 Has Android lost its mojo?


One sad Android

One of the most striking differences between Computex 2011 and this years’ show is how few Android and ARM devices are being shown. There have been a few demos that highlight hardware from Qualcomm and Nvidia, or show Microsoft’s next-gen Windows 8 running on ARM hardware, but these announcements are few and far between.

That’s not to say Android is completely gone from the show — it isn’t — but the mood last year was that Microsoft had missed the boat with Windows 8. While Redmond toiled, its erstwhile partners were clambering aboard the SS Android to set sail for the land of Milk and Tablets.

Xoom tabletThat was before the boat mostly sank. Android as a whole claimed nearly half the tablet market in 2011, but the only device to break away from the pack and make a name for itself was Amazon’s Kindle Fire — a tablet that cost half of what an iPad 2 did, and one that’s sold basically at-cost as a way to hook customers on Amazon Prime. Adding insult to injury is the fact that while the Kindle Fire does run Android, Amazon did a huge amount of work to customize the experience and de-emphasize Google’s OS as a brand. Samsung was bogged down by Apple’s lawsuits, the PlayBook turned out to be pants, and the Xoom xucked.

It’s not clear if there are bad feelings between Google and the various OEMs who bet big money on Android-powered tablets, but the focus during the show is overwhelmingly on Microsoft, Intel, and Windows 8. Most of the demo hardware is x86-based, even though Windows on ARM tablets are supposedly the Next Big Thing — again, you can find them if you look, but there aren’t very many and we’ve seen most of them before. ARM tablets running ICS 4.0 or Jelly Bean 4.2 are even rarer.

This is troubling for several reasons. Microsoft’s numerous ARM restrictions make it clear that the company plans to treat ARM owners like second-class citizens. The company runs the risk of bifurcating the market by creating two de facto Windows standards. x86 devices, be they tablets or notebooks, will be able to install alternate browsers or download applications that aren’t stamped with the MS seal of approval. ARM owners can’t do either. In theory, a strong Android presence in tablets provides an option for customers who aren’t enamored of Microsoft or Apple — but only if manufacturers continue to build around the OS.

Phones: Slow uptake, or business as usual?

The phone situation is markedly different. There’s no danger of Android going anywhere; analyst firms like Gartner expect Android to hold a majority share of the phone market through 2016. What’s more interesting, particularly given the way OEMs have turned away from Android on tablets, is the way Ice Cream Sandwich isn’t gaining traction.

Android Market Share

Seven months after release, Ice Cream Sandwich holds just 7.1% of the market. We know from other sources that Android 2.3 (Gingerbraed) had roughly 40% of the market in October 2011, with another 45% still using the older 2.2 (Froyo) at that time. We consulted WayBackMachine for additional data points on how the transition looked earlier in 2011.

In early March 2011, Android 2.2 held 61.3% of the market, with Android 2.3 (Gingerbread) at just 0.7%. By late June, roughly six months after release, 9.2% of phones were running a flavor of Gingerbread. Our last available data point is for July 18, but it shows devices running Android 2.3.3 – 2.3.4 at 17.6% of the market — almost double the previous month’s total. By October, Froyo and Gingerbread were running neck-and-neck.

That’s good news for phone owners impatient for the next round of Google goodies, especially after missing out on Honeycomb, but it points to a major disconnect between when Google delivers OS updates and when carriers actually start shipping them in volume. If ICS hits true to form, we should see a major spike in its usage rates beginning in July or August.

If it doesn’t, other factors may be in play. Google has rolled out updates to Android before, but Ice Cream Sandwich’s debut kicked off a flurry of requests for OS updates and a substantial amount of user unhappiness when phone companies claimed they needed 5-7 months to release an updated OS. Device manufacturers aren’t that used to interacting directly with customers or having to pay attention to their demands; quality issues and phone problems are almost always handled by the carriers long before they get back to Samsung, HTC, or Motorola. Android’s openness works to break down those walls. By de-prioritizing upgrades, carriers can send a message to Google over who’s really in charge of the OS business.

As for tablets, current evidence suggests that Android’s long-term strength may depend on how consumers respond to Windows 8 when it ships out on tablet devices. We’re hoping to see a vibrant community emerge for both devices, if only to keep Microsoft on its toes. For now, most eyes are tracking Redmond, but if Microsoft can’t counter the iPad 3 — and let’s face it, no one has a great track record there — OEMs may start paying more attention to Android again.

Article source: http://www.extremetech.com/computing/130565-has-android-lost-its-mojo

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06 Jun 12 Galaxy Nexus drops to a cent on Amazon


Samsung Galaxy Nexus(Credit:
Sarah Tew/CNET)

Right now you can get a screaming deal on one of the top
Android phones around, as long as you’re willing to hand over two years of mobile indentured servitude to Verizon.

Google tapped Samsung to make its latest Nexus phone, which went on sale at the end of last year and was the first device to officially come preloaded with Android 4.0 Ice Cream Sandwich. Half a year later it’s still one of the top phones running the OS, and just a few months ago it was still selling for $299.99 with a new contract, so Amazon Wireless‘ new single-penny price point is a price slash that’s splattering savings all over the place.

The Galaxy Nexus comes with 4G connectivity, 32GB, an impressive 5-megapixel camera, and a 4.65-inch Super AMOLED display. The timing of the price drop likely is no coincidence. With Samsung’s much-anticipated Galaxy S III soon to drop in the United States, it makes sense to move more units of the
Galaxy Nexus before the S III sucks all the air out of the room.

You’ll need a new Verizon account to get the phone for a penny, unless you’re adding a line to a family account, which also gets you the big markdown. If you’re looking to upgrade your phone and extend your contract at the same time, you can still wind up with some savings by paying just $149.99 for a new Galaxy Nexus.

Then again, if you’re already spending more than $100, you might just want to wait for that Galaxy S III.

(Via TechCrunch)

Article source: http://news.cnet.com/8301-17938_105-57447779-1/galaxy-nexus-drops-to-a-cent-on-amazon/

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06 Jun 12 Galaxy Nexus drops to a cent on Amazon


Samsung Galaxy Nexus(Credit:
Sarah Tew/CNET)

Right now you can get a screaming deal on one of the top
Android phones around, as long as you’re willing to hand over two years of mobile indentured servitude to Verizon.

Google tapped Samsung to make its latest Nexus phone, which went on sale at the end of last year and was the first device to officially come preloaded with Android 4.0 Ice Cream Sandwich. Half a year later it’s still one of the top phones running the OS, and just a few months ago it was still selling for $299.99 with a new contract, so Amazon Wireless‘ new single-penny price point is a price slash that’s splattering savings all over the place.

The Galaxy Nexus comes with 4G connectivity, 32GB, an impressive 5-megapixel camera, and a 4.65-inch Super AMOLED display. The timing of the price drop likely is no coincidence. With Samsung’s much-anticipated Galaxy S III soon to drop in the United States, it makes sense to move more units of the
Galaxy Nexus before the S III sucks all the air out of the room.

You’ll need a new Verizon account to get the phone for a penny, unless you’re adding a line to a family account, which also gets you the big markdown. If you’re looking to upgrade your phone and extend your contract at the same time, you can still wind up with some savings by paying just $149.99 for a new Galaxy Nexus.

Then again, if you’re already spending more than $100, you might just want to wait for that Galaxy S III.

(Via TechCrunch)

Article source: http://news.cnet.com/8301-17938_105-57447779-1/galaxy-nexus-drops-to-a-cent-on-amazon/

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05 Jun 12 Any.DO expands outside of Android, brings its handy To-Do tools to iOS and …


Any.DO expands outside of Android, brings its handy To-Do tools to iOS and Google Chrome

Chances are some members of Team Android won’t be too pleased to share the any.DO goods with the iOS squad, but for what it’s worth, you’ll always be able to say you had it first. After being a success on Google’s mobile OS, any.DO has decided to test out other waters, including making its way to those iPod touches / iPhones / iPads of the world, as well as Google Chrome in extension form. On the iOS front, the app — which sports a very minimalist, but sleek design — allows users to add, adjust and edit multiple tasks using a drag-and-drop, gesture-based UI. Meanwhile, the Chrome extension keeps the similar productivity goal, but takes it to the larger screen — what’s best, however, is any.DO allows you to sync all your To-Do’s between different devices regardless of OS. Both the iOS application and Chrome extension are free of charge, and you can grab the version best suited for you at either of the source links below.

Article source: http://www.engadget.com/2012/06/05/any-do-to-do-on-ios-google-chrome/

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