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15 Jun 12 Chrome vs Firefox for Ubuntu


Jun 14, 2012, 23:00 (1 Talkback[s])


(Other stories by Anonymous)

According to the independent web analytics firm, StatCounter Chrome has excelled as the world most popular browser with the highest browser usage share for the month of May 2012. But does that apply to Linux platform too? Is Chrome the best browser for Linux? The post compares the widely popular Mozilla Firefox browser version 4 with relatively new Google’s Chrome version 16, distinctly for Ubuntu!

Mozilla Firefox comes by default on Linux based distributions such as Ubuntu, Linux Mint, Fedora etc. Naturally Ubuntu users opt for open source softwares. Technically, Opposed to Mozilla Firefox, Google’s Chrome is closed source; that makes Ubuntu users favour Firefox than Chrome, and that is understandable. Chromium, on the other hand is open source basis of Chrome. But unfortunately it lacks some key features like default PDF plug-in for viewing PDF files in the browser and Flash support. Ubuntu users, primarily supporters of open community also tend to have grudges towards Google, who is alleged to collect and aggregate data of Internet users that is later used by marketing agencies and by Google itself to increase the efficiency of its own marketing/advertising activities. Of course, many detest the fact of having their data sold for advertisement. But apart from that, Firefox outshines Chrome on Ubuntu machine for feature, stability and security. Now let’s investigate further, why Firefox remains dominant in the Ubuntu/ Linux sphere.

Complete Story

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Article source: http://www.linuxtoday.com/upload/chrome-vs-firefox-for-ubuntu-120613010457.html

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05 Jun 12 When should you upgrade to Internet Explorer 9?


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Question: Is there really any difference between Internet Explorer 8 and 9? Every time I download 9 something goes wrong; is it okay if I keep 8?

Answer: You’d have plenty of company in opting out of IE9 – according to NetApplications’ research, IE8 remains the most widely-used browser version, with 26.2 percent of the market compared to 15.9 percent for its successor.

But those same statistics also show that Microsoft’s horrifyingly obsolete IE6 somehow retains a 7.1 percent share, so don’t draw too many conclusions from them.

The biggest difference between IE8 and 9 is the interface of each. The 2009-vintage IE8 was the last browser release from Microsoft to stick with separate address and search boxes (a design still used by Mozilla Firefox and Apple’s Safari), while IE9 adopted the unified search-plus-address box of Google’s Chrome when it debuted a year later.

That alone makes IE9 a better choice on smaller screens, where its more efficient layout lets you see more of a Web page. But I also found IE9′s toolbar more cluttered than the equivalent interface in Chrome.

The other differences between these two versions are less obvious but more important. IE9 offers better controls for your privacy and makes it easier to discipline plug-ins that delay the browser’s startup and eat available memory. It includes security fixes to protect against unintentional and deliberate software downloads. And it does a much better job of supporting Web standards than IE8.

That last feature may force your decision: Site developers will eventually tire of supporting IE8, especially if most of any one site’s users have moved on to newer software. Google, for example, declared last year that it would only support the current and previous major releases of browsers- which suggests that when IE10 ships as part of Windows 8 later this year, IE8 users may find parts of Gmail don’t work for them.

To put this in more human terms: If friends of yours work in Web development, your continued use of IE8 keeps them at their desks longer.

But what if you just can’t get IE9 to install properly? Look, it happens: Internet Explorer, unlike third-party options like Chrome, Firefox or Safari, functions as an extension of Windows, with a lot more wiring connecting it to the rest of the operating system.

In that case, it’s easier to switch than fight: Install a competing browser and use that as your default. I’d go with Google’s Chrome – and I say this as a skeptic of giving Google too much of your business online. It’s hard to beat Chrome’s efficient operation, clean interface and automatic updates to itself and to its Flash and PDF viewers, two plug-ins that in competing browsers require separate and all-too-frequent updates.

Tip: Two Google alternatives to try

Even if you do switch to Chrome, that doesn’t mean you have to use Google as its default search engine. Microsoft’s Bing is one obvious alternative, with some appealing innovations in areas like “social search”- i.e., results informed by people in your social networks. But you may also want to try two newer contenders: DuckDuckGo brags of much better privacy protection, while Blekko aims to cut down on the uninformative “spammy” content that has infested too many Google search results, especially before recent upgrades by Google.

To its credit, Google has made switching Chrome to these alternatives a five-step process: Visit the search engine’s home page, click the wrench icon in Chrome’s upper-right corner, click “Settings…” from the menu, click the “Manage search engines…” button, and click the “Make default” button that will appear when you hover over a site in that list.

USA Today

Article source: http://www.news10.net/news/national/195689/5/Should-you-upgrade-to-IE9

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21 May 12 3 Free Apps to Guard Android from Malware


Android smartphones rock, but whether you use Avast, Lookout, the new Sophos, or another freebie antivirus/security app, you better lock and load to protect your Android before you become a victim and a stat.

Android, once dubbed a “cyber menace,” is too popular, too juicy and potentially too lucrative of a target for malware writers to ignore. In fact, a new F-Secure report suggests malware writers are getting craftier by creating Trojanized apps that can defeat antivirus detection. F-Secure released its latest mobile threat report [PDF] concerning the first quarter of 2012 and Android malware has grown exponentially. Since a year ago, the number of new malware variants have quadrupled and the number of malicious Android application package files (APKs) had a “staggering” increase of “139 to 3063 counts.” (See also “Tips for a Malware-Free Android Smartphone.”

According to F-Secure:

Today what we’re seeing are malicious Android applications that have bundled legitimate apps such as Rovio’s Angry Birds Space. First the malicious “wrapper” tricks and manipulates the user into granting permissions that allow the malware to subscribe to premium rate services. But then….then malware actually does install a working copy of the promised game. At this point, there is little to be suspicious of and nothing to troubleshoot. The user gets the game that he was promised.

Avast put together this comparison chart of free antivirus Android apps.

After identifying a fake antivirus scam making the rounds on Twitter, GFI blogged about the growing Android malware threat; if this rogue antivirus APK file is downloaded, it shows the Kaspersky logo. “Such Tweets are equally accessible to computer (desktop, laptop, and tablet) and smartphone users. There is no doubt, however, that smartphone users on Android**are particularly targeted by these spam.”

A new NSA mobile risks fact sheet [PDF] said the newer generation of smartphones are more resistant to cyberattacks, but also listed the attack categories against mobile devices, including vectors, sophistication level of effort required to deliver the mobile cyberattack, and mitigation. 

Screenshot of the free Sophos security app

Meanwhile the Sophos Mobile Security team announced, “To help you better safeguard your Android phone and tablet, Sophos just published Sophos Mobile Security for Android [BETA] in Google Play.”

The Privacy Advisor comes with three different filters which can be turned on individually or all turned at once to list apps “that may cause costs, harm your privacy, and access the Internet.” The scanner protects against malicious apps “and other risks” and detects “even the recent fake antivirus nasty, which attempts to send expensive SMS messages to premium-rate services.” F-Secure’s Mikko Hypponen warned about this type of mobile malware two years ago in “You will be billed $90,000 for this call.”

The loss and theft portion of the Sophos app requires Sophos Mobile Security to be activated as the device administrator to locate or lock a lost or stolen Android. When asked about permissions, Graham Cluley explained:

Some folks have asked why the app requests rights to send SMS messages and access your contacts. When you do a remote lock or locate, the app sends you an SMS with latitude/longitude or confirmation that the lock was successful. Access to contacts is required because the user specifies from which other phone numbers they might wish to remotely lock/locate their missing Android. You can choose those numbers from your contacts.

Sophos, Avast Offer Apps

Do you use a freebie antivirus app to protect your Android smartphone or tablet?

Besides Sophos Mobile Security Beta, which currently has a 4.9 average rating from 18 users, of the freebies, Lookout Security Antivirus has a 4.5 average rating and is installed on 303,730 Androids.

I liked Lookout but the privacy and safe browsing are not free.

avast! Mobile Security has a lot of free features that most security apps do not.

Google Play lists it as having an average rating of 4.7 from 47,590 Android users. The firewall only works for rooted mobile phones. It’s like some kind of unpleasant mantra that mobile malware is on the rise and Android smartphones are dead-center in the crosshairs.

See also Antivirus and Security apps PCWorld’s Downloads section.

Article source: http://www.pcworld.com/article/255875/3_free_apps_to_guard_android_from_malware.html

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17 May 12 Mobile malware madness: Favorite target? Android. Here’s 3 free security apps


Android smartphones rock, but whether you use Avast, Lookout, the new Sophos, or another freebie antivirus/security app, you better lock and load to protect your Android before you become a victim and a stat.

Android, once dubbed a “cyber menace,” is too popular, too juicy and potentially too lucrative of a target for malware writers to ignore. In fact, a new F-Secure report suggests malware writers are getting craftier by creating trojanized apps that can defeat anti-virus detection. F-Secure released its latest mobile threat report [PDF] concerning the first quarter of 2012 and Android malware has grown exponentially. Since a year ago, the number of new malware variants have quadrupled and the number of malicious Android application package files (APKs) had a “staggering” increase of “139 to 3063 counts.”

According to F-Secure:

Today what we’re seeing are malicious Android applications that have bundled legitimate apps such as Rovio’s Angry Birds Space. First the malicious “wrapper” tricks and manipulates the user into granting permissions that allow the malware to subscribe to premium rate services. But then….then malware actually does install a working copy of the promised game. At this point, there is little to be suspicious of and nothing to troubleshoot. The user gets the game that he was promised.

After identifying a fake antivirus scam making the rounds on Twitter, GFI blogged about the growing Android malware threat; if this rogue antivirus APK file is downloaded, it shows the Kaspersky logo. “Such Tweets are equally accessible to computer (desktop, laptop, and tablet) and smartphone users. There is no doubt, however, that smartphone users on Android are particularly targeted by these spam.”

A new NSA mobile risks fact sheet [PDF] said the newer generation of smartphones are more resistant to cyberattacks, but also listed the attack categories against mobile devices, including vectors, sophistication level of effort required to deliver the mobile cyberattack, and mitigation. 

Meanwhile the Sophos Mobile Security team announced, “To help you better safeguard your Android phone and tablet, Sophos just published Sophos Mobile Security for Android [BETA] in Google Play.”

Here’s a screenshot of the free Sophos security app:

The Privacy Advisor comes with three different filters which can be turned on individually or all turned at once to list apps “that may cause costs, harm your privacy, and access the Internet.” The scanner protects against malicious apps “and other risks” and detects “even the recent fake anti-virus nasty, which attempts to send expensive SMS messages to premium-rate services.” F-Secure’s Mikko Hypponen warned about this type of mobile malware two years ago in “You will be billed $90,000 for this call.”

The loss and theft portion of the Sophos app requires Sophos Mobile Security to be activated as the device administrator to locate or lock a lost or stolen Android. When asked about permissions, Graham Cluley explained:

Some folks have asked why the app requests rights to send SMS messages and access your contacts. When you do a remote lock or locate, the app sends you an SMS with latitude/longitude or confirmation that the lock was successful. Access to contacts is required because the user specifies from which other phone numbers they might wish to remotely lock/locate their missing Android. You can choose those numbers from your contacts.

Do you use a freebie antivirus app to protect your Android smartphone or tablet? Besides Sophos Mobile Security Beta which currently has a 4.9 average rating from 18 users, of the freebies, Lookout Security Antivirus has a 4.5 average rating and is installed on 303,730 Androids. I liked Lookout but the privacy and safe browsing are not free.

 

Avast put together this comparison chart of free antivirus Android apps.

 

avast! Mobile Security has a lot of free features that most security apps do not. Google Play lists it as having an average rating of 4.7 from 47,590 Android users. The firewall only works for rooted mobile phones.

It’s like some kind of unpleasant mantra that mobile malware is on the rise and Android smartphones are dead-center in the crosshairs.  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Article source: http://blogs.computerworld.com/20186/mobile_malware_madness_favorite_target_android_heres_3_free_security_apps?source=rss_blogs

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02 May 12 Google Wave Dead to All Except Chrome Users


google-wave-logoGoogle has finally shut its Wave tool and told web users they can no longer access their group discussions and collaborative projects from the service, unless they are Chrome browser users.

Internet Explorer and Firefox users trying to access the Wave website are now told the hosting servers for the service have been closed completely.

“You will no longer be able to get to your waves,” says the status page.

However, Google has chosen – for the time being – to allow users of its own browser, Chrome, to access the read-only version of Google Wave. Google hasn’t confirmed how much longer Chrome users would have this access.

The long wave goodbye began in August 2010, when Google announce plans to discontinue the project. Last November, the web giant had warned it would pull the plug on the project, telling Wave users they would be able to access the service in a read-only version only from January 31 through April 30 of this year.

Its read-only users could still export their waves using the PDF export feature, read existing waves, or export their waves to an open source project called Walkaround.

Google Wave was one of the company’s first major social moves, before Buzz and Google+. Wave was Google’s attempt to “rethink email” by allowing web users to collaborate and discuss ideas through a hosted conversation, rather than through multiple emails back and forth.

Google Wave launched as an invitation-only platform at the 2009 Google I/O conference. Wave proved popular with developers, but failed to generate much interest in the wider online market. Google VP Marissa Mayer once called Wave one of Google’s biggest mistakes.

SES Toronto 2012 is June 11-13. Register before May 11 and save up to $300!

Article source: http://searchenginewatch.com/article/2171812/Google-Wave-Dead-to-All-Except-Chrome-Users

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02 May 12 Google Wave Dead to All Except Chrome Users


google-wave-logoGoogle has finally shut its Wave tool and told web users they can no longer access their group discussions and collaborative projects from the service, unless they are Chrome browser users.

Internet Explorer and Firefox users trying to access the Wave website are now told the hosting servers for the service have been closed completely.

“You will no longer be able to get to your waves,” says the status page.

However, Google has chosen – for the time being – to allow users of its own browser, Chrome, to access the read-only version of Google Wave. Google hasn’t confirmed how much longer Chrome users would have this access.

The long wave goodbye began in August 2010, when Google announce plans to discontinue the project. Last November, the web giant had warned it would pull the plug on the project, telling Wave users they would be able to access the service in a read-only version only from January 31 through April 30 of this year.

Its read-only users could still export their waves using the PDF export feature, read existing waves, or export their waves to an open source project called Walkaround.

Google Wave was one of the company’s first major social moves, before Buzz and Google+. Wave was Google’s attempt to “rethink email” by allowing web users to collaborate and discuss ideas through a hosted conversation, rather than through multiple emails back and forth.

Google Wave launched as an invitation-only platform at the 2009 Google I/O conference. Wave proved popular with developers, but failed to generate much interest in the wider online market. Google VP Marissa Mayer once called Wave one of Google’s biggest mistakes.

SES Toronto 2012 is June 11-13. Register before May 11 and save up to $300!

Article source: http://searchenginewatch.com/article/2171812/Google-Wave-Dead-to-All-Except-Chrome-Users

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15 Apr 12 Upcoming Firefox click-to-play feature will stop automated plug-in exploits


April 13, 2012

IDG News Service —

Mozilla developers are working on a new Firefox feature that will block the automated display of plug-in-based content like Flash videos, Java applets or PDF files, and will protect users from attacks that exploit vulnerabilities in browser plug-ins to install malware on their computers.

Known as “click to play,” this feature has been present in the popular NoScript Firefox security extension for many years, as well as in other browsers like Google Chrome and Opera.

When click-to-play is enabled, the browser displays static images instead of the active content that requires plug-ins to be displayed. Users need to click on those images in order to authorize the loading of each plug-in-based element.

“A couple days ago I landed an initial implementation of ‘click-to-play plugins’ in desktop Firefox,” Mozilla software engineer Jared Wein said in a blog post on Wednesday.

Wein’s implementation is available for testing in the latest Firefox nightly build, but there’s still work to be done. “I’m currently working on implementing the ability for plugin activation settings to be remembered on a per-site basis,” he said.

Wein hopes to finish developing the feature before the deadline for code submissions in Firefox 14, but there’s no guarantee that it will be included in that version.

Security experts agree that technically speaking, this feature is capable of preventing plug-in-based attacks and should be implemented in every browser. However, they point out that its effectiveness will ultimately depend on user behavior.

“Let’s not forget that there has been a similar implementation in Internet Explorer (the Internet Explorer Information Bar) that did not really make any difference, since users would always allow blocked content to be executed,” Bogdan Botezatu, a senior e-threat analyst at antivirus vendor BitDefender, said. “Similarly, users might allow click-to-play content as well, based on the mere assumption that they really have to have everything loaded on the page.”

Botezatu believes that keeping click-to-play as an opt-in feature will significantly reduce its overall efficiency, because most non-technical users will leave it disabled. However, having it enabled by default in the browser would not be a good idea either, because it could result in the same users missing content they actually need, he said.

An alternative would be to have the browser automatically enable the feature when it detects that the required plug-in is outdated, and to display the content normally if the plug-in is up-to-date, Botezatu said. Firefox already checks for vulnerable plug-ins when it gets updated, so the mechanism to do this is already built into the browser.

Article source: http://www.csoonline.com/article/704280/upcoming-firefox-click-to-play-feature-will-stop-automated-plug-in-exploits

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17 Feb 12 Password Generator May Appear in Future Versions of Chrome


Google’s Chromium open-source project has revealed what could be a future feature of the Chrome browser: a password generator.

“[Passwords] are easy to use but they are trivial to steal, either through phishing, malware, or a malicious/incompetent site owner,” the design document states, apparently updated on Feb. 14.

As a solution, Google has come up with a way to auto-generate a password, if a user allows it. So far, however, it’s just a work in progress; since it relies on the autocomplete function of a Web site (which must be enabled by the site) Google estimates that it won’t serve to defeat 40 percent to 70 percent of phishing sites.

Google can usually detect if a user clicks on a login field and offer to enter the related password, if a user allows it. Likewise, Chrome can also detect when a user is filling out a password field. When a user then creates a new login and password at a Web site, a “key” icon appears. Clicking it will generate (in Google’s example) a password of “hbXX#2opz7^1,” which contains special characters, numbers, and capital letters – all keys to a cryptographically strong passphrase.

Chromium Password Generator

“The reason we don’t just choose a password for them is that many sites have requirements (e.g. must have one digit, must be alphanumeric, must be between 6 and 20 characters) some of which may be contradictory between sites,” Google says. “So we will choose a default generator that will work on most sites, but users may need to change our password if it doesn’t work.”

So how in the world do you remember a password like that? Chances are, you don’t; in fact, that’s Google’s end game.

“Chrome’s long term solution to this problem is browser sign in plus OpenID,” Google said. “While implementing browser sign in is something that we can control, getting most sites on the internet to use OpenID will take a while. In the meantime it would be nice to have a way to achieve the same affect of having the browser control authentication.”

Chromium is the name of the open-source browser project that Google’s Chrome is built upon; check out PCmag.com’s review of Chrome 17 for the latest updates, or our slideshow below. Anyone is free to take the Chrome source and modify or redistribute it according to the terms of the license; Google uses Chromium, and adds its logo, secure PDF viewer, Flash player, and other additions to generate its custom version.

For more from Mark, follow him on Twitter @MarkHachman.

For the top stories in tech, follow us on Twitter at @PCMag.


View Slideshow
See all (24) slides


Google Chrome 17


Malware Download Protection


Add New User


Syncing Choices

Article source: http://www.pcmag.com/article2/0,2817,2400403,00.asp?kc=PCRSS03069TX1K0001121

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14 Feb 12 Firefox Roadmap for 2012 Calls for Chrome Catch-up and Better Privacy Tools


If you’re running the Aurora builds, you should be able to see the new tab page now. It’s basically a take on the Speed Dial concept that was initially expressed in Opera 9.2, and has analogs in Google Chrome and Safari. It doesn’t allow you to create buttons manually, they’re pulled from the most frequently visited pages. You can zap pages that you don’t want displayed, or hide the page alttogether.

The Mozilla folks are also planning to add a Chrome migration tool, so they can move users from the Google browser to Firefox. Firefox is also targeting inline PDF view and in-browser translation for the second half of the year.

Did somebody say Apps? Firefox could also have a Web App integration in place by the release of Firefox 13. (That’s the targeted release, but the feature page is not fully spec’ed out yet.) Mozilla is aiming for an app store launcher in the Home Tab that would make it easy to see new Web apps on offer.

User Privacy and “Log into Firefox”

The second half of the Mozilla roadmap is where it really gets interesting, at least for folks concerned about privacy, security and control of their data. While Mozilla has been championing the Do Not Track (DNT) stuff, I’m less than convinced that DNT is a good answer to privacy concerns given that it’s voluntary for sites to implement.

new-tab-2.png

One of the ideas that’s on the roadmap, but without an accompanying feature page, is tracking map and 3rd party cookie management. According to the roadmap, this would let users “visualize how they are tracked as they move around the web and be empowered to easily block that tracking.” I’d really like to see this one implemented, sooner rather than later.

Users could also be seeing a site-based permissions manager. The roadmap says “users manage their permissions on a per-feature basis: cookies, passwords, history, etc. This is confusing. A site-based permission manager will empower people to edit all of the permissions associated with any particular site.”

For the record, I’m not sure that users will find managing permissions on a site-by-site basis less confusing than doing so on a per-feature basis. However, it’s not entirely clear what Mozilla has in mind here because the site-based permissions manager feature is also without a feature page.

Firefox is also concerned about search hijacking. Basically this is a set of techniques that are “used to circumvent browser search defaults to funnel search revenues to third parties.” Obviously, this is a big deal for Firefox not only because it undermines user choice, but also because much of Mozilla’s revenue comes from its search deal with Google.

Another feature slated for later in the year is the sign in to Firefox, which would provide the ability to sign into Firefox with BrowserID credentials (and create a BrowserID account if the user doesn’t have one). That would open up the identity features that Mozilla is targeting with Sync and BrowserID.

Performance, Performance, Performance

According to the 2012 roadmap, Mozilla is planning on paying a lot of attention to performance. According to the strategy section, “In 2012 strengthened and dedicated teams will wipe out any and all Firefox responsiveness issues users face and guarantee the rock solid stability at low memory costs that developers demand for their apps.” This includes performance improvements for tabs, start-up improvements and work to improve Firefox’s page caching.

Firefox is also going to be introducing a new Just-in-Time (JIT) compiler for JavaScript called IonMonkey.

Concerned that add-ons are harming performance? There’s a proposal for a new policy about add-on performance and tools to detect add-ons that hamper performance.

A Bright 2012

If the Mozilla team can hit most of the features on the roadmap for 2012, they might be able to reverse the trend of losing users to Google Chrome. I’d really love to see the tracking map and third party cookie management in Firefox. That has a lot more potential than the DNT efforts.

What do you think of the roadmap for 2012? If you’re a Firefox user now, does this look like a good direction for Firefox? If you’re not, do you think you’d be likely to switch?

Article source: http://www.readwriteweb.com/hack/2012/02/firefox-roadmap-for-2012-calls.php

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09 Feb 12 Chrome 17 Goes Stable With Faster, Safer Browsing


Google Feb. 8 pushed Chrome 17 into the stable channel
for  Windows, Mac and Linux, paying out
$10,500 to fix bugs and making the browser faster and more secure.

Bug hunters squashed 20 bugs. Google paid for 11 of them,
including $2,000 for the detections of “bad casts with column spans.

The
Chrome maker paid $1,000 apiece for five use-after-free flaws, including one in
PDF garbage collection. Google also shelled out $1,000 for a buffer overflow in
locale handling and race condition after crash of utility process.

Readers may peruse the full list of flaws and those who
discovered them in this corporate blog post

To satisfy Google’s need for speed, Chrome 17 includes prerendering, the predictive search technology Google has used in search and its browser.

When users start typing in the omnibox address bar and the URL autocompletes to
a Website users visit with some frequency, Chrome will prerender the page. This
means the Web page could appear instantly once the user hits enter.

Faster page rendering, means faster information delivery to users, which means users may be more likely to search the Web more in Chrome, goes Google’s thinking.

Google also elevated the security levels in Chrome,
running checks on executable .exe and .msi files. If the executable doesn’t
match a whitelist, Chrome checks with Google to see if the Website the user is
visiting commands a lot of malicious downloads.

Google also pledged to begin rolling out updates to
Chrome Operating System that will make using a Chromebook better.

Specifically,
Google plans to add a new image editor to let Chromebook users view, edit and
share photos on the Web. Users will also see an improved Verizon 3G activation
portal, which will allow users to set up a recurring purchase of mobile data.

The arrival of Chrome 17 to beta caps a busy week for the
browser, which is used by more than 200 million people worldwide.

On Feb. 6,
Google released Chrome for Android to beta, finally bringing Chrome to Android
handsets and tablets, albeit only for Android 4.0 “Ice Cream
Sandwich” devices.

Also, Google confirmed Chrome Screenwise, a program in which it will pay online
surfers to browse the Web and share data about their travels with the
search-engine giant. Ideally, this will enable Google to improve Chrome for its
users.

 

 

Article source: http://www.eweek.com/c/a/Security/Chrome-17-Goes-Stable-With-Faster-Safer-Browsing-743839

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