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All about Google Chrome & Google Chrome OS
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17 Dec 11 How to set up multiple profiles in Chrome


There’s a ton of reasons to love Chrome, but syncing isn’t one of them–yet. Google has just built a new feature into Chrome 16 that could make multiple account management much better.

Multiple-user support is similar to Chrome’s Sync feature, but it’s more of a complementary feature than a must-use. Sync allows you to always have access to the same bookmarks, history, themes, and preferences. Multiuser support allows you to share a computer or maintain separate Google identities without logging out of the operating system. This could be useful for single-computer households or small businesses, but it’s really good for people who want to maintain more than one Gmail or Google account at a time.

Here’s how you do it:

Step 1: Create a new profile by going to the Wrench menu’s new “Sign into Chrome” option. If you’re already using Chrome’s sync, you’ll see your account listed as “Signed in as…”

Step 2: Go back to the Wrench, choose Options (Preferences on a
Mac,) then Personal Stuff, and “Add new user.” This will open a new Chrome window.

Step 3: The new user must repeat the “Sign into Chrome” procedure. This associates the Google account with the profile.

Step 4: Bask in the glory of being able to manage two accounts from the same browser without crossing your Google streams.

You can also customize the profile’s name and icon, and Google has provided some cutesy icons such as an alien, a flower, and a ninja. Once set up, you can jump accounts at will on the left of the tab bar.

By the way, a word of caution: the multiuser profile support is not intended to secure your private data against other users’ prying eyes, literally. Although your synced data might be secured on the server, if you’re logged in to Chrome with multiple profiles, anybody with keyboard and mouse access can switch profiles and get at your personal “stuff,” as the Goog likes to call it.

This is far less secure than forcing people to re-enter passwords before each opening of a second profile, but it is more convenient if you’re the only person who uses that particular computer. Basically, if your addiction to Google services is deep and spans multiple accounts, the new multiprofile switch is a small step toward making you a happier Googler.

Article source: http://news.cnet.com/8301-11310_39-57344541-285/how-to-set-up-multiple-profiles-in-chrome/

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17 Dec 11 How to set up multiple profiles in Chrome


There’s a ton of reasons to love Chrome, but syncing isn’t one of them–yet. Google has just built a new feature into Chrome 16 that could make multiple account management much better.

Multiple-user support is similar to Chrome’s Sync feature, but it’s more of a complementary feature than a must-use. Sync allows you to always have access to the same bookmarks, history, themes, and preferences. Multiuser support allows you to share a computer or maintain separate Google identities without logging out of the operating system. This could be useful for single-computer households or small businesses, but it’s really good for people who want to maintain more than one Gmail or Google account at a time.

Here’s how you do it:

Step 1: Create a new profile by going to the Wrench menu’s new “Sign into Chrome” option. If you’re already using Chrome’s sync, you’ll see your account listed as “Signed in as…”

Step 2: Go back to the Wrench, choose Options (Preferences on a
Mac,) then Personal Stuff, and “Add new user.” This will open a new Chrome window.

Step 3: The new user must repeat the “Sign into Chrome” procedure. This associates the Google account with the profile.

Step 4: Bask in the glory of being able to manage two accounts from the same browser without crossing your Google streams.

You can also customize the profile’s name and icon, and Google has provided some cutesy icons such as an alien, a flower, and a ninja. Once set up, you can jump accounts at will on the left of the tab bar.

By the way, a word of caution: the multiuser profile support is not intended to secure your private data against other users’ prying eyes, literally. Although your synced data might be secured on the server, if you’re logged in to Chrome with multiple profiles, anybody with keyboard and mouse access can switch profiles and get at your personal “stuff,” as the Goog likes to call it.

This is far less secure than forcing people to re-enter passwords before each opening of a second profile, but it is more convenient if you’re the only person who uses that particular computer. Basically, if your addiction to Google services is deep and spans multiple accounts, the new multiprofile switch is a small step toward making you a happier Googler.

Article source: http://howto.cnet.com/8301-11310_39-57344541-285/how-to-set-up-multiple-profiles-in-chrome/?part=rss&subj=latest-news&tag=title

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14 Dec 11 Chrome gets multiple-user support


New in Chrome 16: Multiple-user support in a single instance of Chrome.

(Credit:
Screenshot by Seth Rosenblatt/CNET)

More than one person can now use Chrome and keep personal data separate from other users on the same computer, thanks to today’s update to Google’s browser.

Google Chrome 16.0.912.63 stable for Windows (download), Mac (download), Linux (download), and Chrome Frame also adds an option to sync your Omnibox History, and it includes a number of security fixes.

Multiple-user support is similar to Chrome’s Sync feature, but it’s more of a complementary feature than a must-use. Sync allows you to always have access to the same bookmarks, history, themes, and preferences. Multi-user support allows you to share a computer and maintain separate identities without logging out of the operating system. This could be useful for single-computer households or small businesses, although it potentially means that Chromebook users will have two ways to switch profiles.

Creating a new profile first requires signing into Chrome, via the Wrench menu’s new “Sign into Chrome” option. Then, to add a new user, you must go back to the Wrench, choose Options (Mac users select Preferences,) then Personal Stuff, and finally “Add new user.” This will open a new Chrome window, and from here the new user must repeat the “Sign into Chrome” procedure. The new user can also go to the Personal Stuff menu in the new window and change the user name and icon.

When more than one account profile is synced to Chrome, a new drop-down appears in the upper left corner to make it easier to switch profiles. But it’s not particularly secure from prying eyes.

(Credit:
Screenshot by Seth Rosenblatt/CNET)

Chrome will open separate windows when switching between each profile.

Google cautions in its blog post announcing the feature that the multi-user profile support is not intended to secure your private data against other users. That means although your synced data might be secured on the server, if you’re logged in to Chrome with multiple profiles, anybody can switch profiles and access your personal “stuff,” as Google likes to call it. This is far less secure than forcing people to re-enter passwords before each opening of a second profile.

Along with the multiple profile support, Chrome 16 now lets adventurous types sync open tabs. You have to go through the about:flags config screen to enable it, but it does indicate that this long-missing sync option is getting close to being ready for stable Chrome users.

Other improvements in Chrome 16 are mainly security fixes, including six labeled “high.” There were no security fixes in this release marked “critical.” Check out the Chrome changelog published by Google.

Article source: http://download.cnet.com/8301-2007_4-57342468-12/chrome-gets-multiple-user-support/?part=rss&subj=software&tag=title

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14 Dec 11 The Always Up-to-Date Power User’s Guide to Chrome


The Always Up-to-Date Power User's Guide to ChromeChrome is overtaking Firefox among power users, and for good reason. It’s an incredibly powerful, extensible web browser with tons of excellent features. Today, we’re covering it all—from longtime shortcuts to the latest features in one of our favorite web browsers.

Title image remixed from an original by Lok Yek Mang (Shutterstock).

Google Chrome updates automatically, and those updates come around even faster on the Chromium developers channel. With such frequent updates it can be hard to keep track of all the great new stuff coming your way. So, just like our other always up-to-date guides, we’ve created this power user’s guide to Chrome. It features our favorite advanced features, updated with every new version.

  • Interface Tips and Tricks
  • The Most Time-Saving Shortcuts
  • Customize Chrome’s Settings
  • Enhance Chrome’s Functionality with Extensions
  • Master Chrome’s Secret Features

Interface Tips and Tricks


Chrome benefits from one of the more attractive, compact, and configurable interfaces you’ll find among modern web browsers. Here are some great ways to customize its interface.

The Always Up-to-Date Power User's Guide to ChromePin Tabs You Always Keep Open: With much of what we do on our computers migrating to the web, you probably visit a lot of the same web sites frequently, quickly cluttering up the top of your browser window. Pinning tabs saves those often-visited sites so you don’t have to constantly reopen them while making that tab extra compact so it doesn’t take up too much room. To pin a tab, just right-click on it and choose “Pin Tab”. It’ll shuffle over to the left side of the window and stay put until you decide to close it.

The Always Up-to-Date Power User's Guide to ChromeDecorate Your Browser Windows with Themes: Google created 15 simple themes to let you add a little personalization to Chrome, but other artists have created many, many more. I’m partial to the way Chrome looks by default, but if you’re looking for personalization or just a change of style, just visit the Chrome Theme Gallery and pick out something that you love.

The Most Time-Saving Shortcuts


The Always Up-to-Date Power User's Guide to ChromeChrome is full of useful shortcuts to help make your browsing experience better and faster. There are too many to include here, so we’ve whittled down the list to the ones we find most useful.

Note: If you’re a Mac user, just substitute the “Control” key for the “Command” key (and know that the “Alt” and “Option” keys are the same) when performing these shortcuts, unless a specific alternative is noted.

Navigate Back and Forward Through Web Pages: If you want to go back to the previous page, instead of clicking the back button just press Backspace (Delete on a Mac). To go forward in your history, press Shift+Backspace (Shift+Delete on a Mac) instead. Windows users can also use the Alt+Left Arrow to go back and Alt+Right Arrow to go forward as well.

Reload a Page: Although many web apps refresh themselves nowadays, many sites (like this one) require the reload button to check for new content. You can reload faster from your keyboard, however, by pressing Control+R on your keyboard. Additionally, if you’re reloading the page for new content but it isn’t showing up, Control+Shift+R will perform a hard refresh. This means Chrome will ignore the cached copy of the page and reload everything from scratch so you know you’re getting the latest version. (Alternatively, Windows users can use Control+F5 and Control+Shift+F5 to perform these same actions, respectively.)

Navigate Through Your Tabs: Navigating through your browser tabs is really easy via the keyboard. Just press Control+Tab to move to the right, and Control+Alt+Tab to move to the left. (On a Mac use Command+Option+Right Arrow and Command+Option+Left Arrow instead.) This will let you cycle through your tabs quickly.

Jump to the Top or Bottom of a Page: Web pages can get pretty long (like this one). If you want to quickly jump to the top of a page, press the Home key on your keyboard. If you want to go straight to the bottom, press the End key.

Find Text on a Page: If you want to search for text within a page, just press Control+F on your keyboard and start typing your search term. Chrome will search as you type, but pressing the Enter key will begin cycling through the results in chronological order. Conversely, pressing Shift+Enter will cycle backwards through the results.

The Always Up-to-Date Power User's Guide to ChromeOpen a New Tab or Window: To create a new tab in Chrome, just press Control+T on your keyboard. If you want a new Window, press Control+N instead. Either way you’ll be presented with a blank window and can start typing in the URL to any site your wish. Alternatively you can enter a URL in the address bar and press Alt+Enter (Command+Return on the Mac) to create a new tab with that page.

Close a Tab or Window: To close a tab, press Control+W on your keyboard. To close an entire window and all its tabs, press Control+Shift+W. (Windows users can also use Control+F4 and Control+Shift+F4 to perform the same actions, respectively, as well.)

The Always Up-to-Date Power User's Guide to ChromeReopen a Closed Tab or Window: Sometimes you close a window or tab by accident and want it back. This is when you realize that Control+Shift+T is the most useful combination of keys your web browser can provide. In Chrome, this shortcut will reopen the last tab or window you closed and load the page again. (Note: This does not work with private browsing sessions because your history isn’t recorded.)

The Always Up-to-Date Power User's Guide to ChromeStart a Private Browsing Session: When you’re, uh, not looking at porn and are using private browsing for another useful purpose, you can create a new incognito window via the keyboard by pressing Control+Shift+N.

The Always Up-to-Date Power User's Guide to ChromeAccess the Omnibar: When you need to get to the omnibar (the address + search bar) in Chrome, you can do so easily by just pressing Control+L on your keyboard. In an instant you’ll be magically transported to the omnibar and can start typing your URL or search term.

The Always Up-to-Date Power User's Guide to ChromeOpen a Link in a New Tab: If you want to open a link in a new tab, hold down the control key and click on it. You can also get the same result by click on the link with your middle mouse button (if you’ve got one). Adding the shift key to either of these shortcuts will open the new tab and select it immediately, rather than opening it in the background.

Bookmark the Current Page: When you want to save the current page to your bookmarks, pressing Control+D on your keyboard will do the trick. Chrome will then present you with a little window asking you to name your bookmark and select a location where it can live. In the event you want to bookmark every tab in the current window, just press Control+Shift+D instead.

The Always Up-to-Date Power User's Guide to ChromeAutocomplete a URL Ending in .COM: If you’re typing in a URL and you want to save yourself some time, don’t bother with the www. or the .com (e.g www.lifehacker.com would just be lifehacker). When you’re finished, press Control+Enter (it’s also Control+Enter on the Mac) and Chrome will take care of the extra work for you.

This is just a sampling of Chrome’s handy shortcuts. If you want more, check out the full list for Windows and Mac OS X.

Customize Chrome’s Settings


Chrome works pretty well by default, but there is so much you can customize if you dig into its settings pages. Windows users can quickly access Chrome’s settings by clicking on the wrench icon in the tool bar and choosing Options. Mac users can do the same by clicking on the wrench icon and choosing Preferences (or pressing Command+, on the keyboard). Either platform can also access the settings pages by simply typing chrome://settings into the omnibar. However you get there, you’ll be presented with four sections to choose from. Let’s go over each individually and look at the neat things you can do in each.

Basics

The Always Up-to-Date Power User's Guide to ChromeTo get started, open the Basic settings panel in Chrome.

Change Chrome’s Startup Behavior: The startup section allows you to define what happens when Chrome starts up. You can have Chrome load your default home page, reopen everything you had open when you last closed Chrome, or open a specific set of pages you want to view every time you start up. This is really handy if you open and close your browser every day and want it to get you started with your favorite sites every time you start up.

Customize Your Search Engines: The Search section is where you set your default search engine. When you launched Chrome for the first time, it probably asked you if you’d like to use Google, Yahoo!, or Bing every time you type in a search term in the omnibar. If you have Google set as your default, this is also where you can check a box to enable Google Instant search.

This is also where you can manage your search engines, which is a very cool feature. By default, Chrome tries to recognize search functionality on sites every time you use it. So, for example, if you searched 123people.com then Chrome would record it as one of your search engines. The benefit of this is when you type in 123people.com in the omnibar and press the tab key on your keyboard, you’ll then be able to type in a search term and press enter to search 123people.com without first visiting the site. Sometimes Chrome won’t pick up on these search engines, however, so you can add new ones manually in this panel. Just go down to the bottom of the page to find a space to enter a new option. First add a name of your choosing, the keyword you need to type to start the search (e.g. yahoo.com for Yahoo), and then a special search string. A sample search string for Yahoo looks like this:

http://search.yahoo.com/search?ei=UTF-8fr=crmasp=lifehacker

If you look at the URL you can see I searched for the term “lifehacker”, but Chrome’s asking us to replace our query with %s instead. So we need to change lifehacker to %s like this:

http://search.yahoo.com/search?ei=UTF-8fr=crmasp=%s

Once you do that just press enter to add your new, custom search engine. If you want to access this panel faster, without the need to go into the settings panel, just right click on the omnibar in any window and choose Edit Search Engines.

Personal Stuff

The Always Up-to-Date Power User's Guide to ChromeTo get started, open the Personal Stuff settings panel in Chrome.

Save Passwords and Automatically Fill Out Forms: By default, Chrome will offer to save any password you enter when browsing the web. If you don’t want this functionality, you can tell Chrome to “Never save passwords” instead in the Passwords section. This is also where you can manage your saved passwords in case you want to alter or delete any you’ve previously saved.

Chrome is also capable of storing address and credit card data so you can use it to automatically fill out forms. You can set this up in the Autofill section by checking the “Enable Autofill to fill out web forms in a single click” checkbox and then the “Manage Autofill Settings…” button to start filling in your addresses and credit cards.

Import Data from Another Browser: Perhaps you’re new to Chrome and you want to import data from your previous web browser. In the Browsing Data section, just click the “Import Data from Another Browser…” button and you’ll be presented with a Window with a few options. Select the browser you want, then check off the data you want to import and Chrome will do the rest.

Sync All Your Data: Chrome is great at synchronizing the majority of your browser data, including bookmarks, extensions, apps, passwords, autofill information, preferences, and themes. The Sync section is where you set it up. Just click the “Set up sync…” button and log in with your Google Account. That’s all you’ll really have to do to get started with syncing everything, but you can click on “Advanced Settings” if you want to select individual items and change encryption settings.

Under the Hood

The Always Up-to-Date Power User's Guide to ChromeTo get started, open the Under the Hood settings panel in Chrome.

Manage Your Privacy: Chrome’s default privacy settings aren’t necessarily as private as you might, so if you want to change them the Privacy section is the place to do it. For example, you might want to uncheck the box labeled “Automatically send usage statistics and crash reports to Google” if you don’t want to share that information, even anonymously. More important, however, are the settings you can access by clicking the “Content Settings…” button. These settings will allow you to enable cookie restrictions, manage the cookies you’ve already acquired, and blocks tons of different kinds of content like images, JavaScript, plug-in based content, and more.

If you want to take things a bit further and prevent yourself from being tracked, you can install Google’s official Keep My Opt-Outs extension. This will, essentially, block any cookies. Of course, you can also do this manually from Chromes Content and Data Exceptions settings page.

Set Up Google Cloud Print: If you want to use Google Cloud print, the aptly named Google Cloud Print section at the bottom of the page is where you do it. Just click the “Sign in to Google Cloud Print” button to start the process. This will open a new page and you’ll be asked to log in to your Google account if you aren’t already. Once you’re logged in (or if you already are), you’ll be able to start adding standard or cloud-enabled printers. If you’re not sure how to add your printers, just follow these instructions.

Extensions

The Always Up-to-Date Power User's Guide to ChromeThe Extensions settings panel in Chrome, or the standard extensions page, is where you can enable, disable, and uninstall extensions. You can also access their options, check for updates, and enable developer mode. There isn’t anything too special to see here, but if you want to learn more about extensions in Chrome just continue on to the next section.

Enhance Chrome’s Functionality with Extensions


Although Chrome began without support for extensions at all, the quantity and quality available may have surpassed even Firefox. If there isn’t something you like, you can always
build your own, too. In this section we’re going to take a look at a few extensions you can use to enhance Chrome’s functionality.

The Always Up-to-Date Power User's Guide to ChromePin Your Favorite Sites to Your New Tab/Window Page: When you make a new tab or window, you see Chrome’s default page that lets you open recent pages and access any web apps you installed via the Chrome Web Store. What it doesn’t let you do is pin any favorite sites to that page for quick access. Speed Dial is an extension that lets you do just that. It also lets you customize the look of the page, reopen closed tabs, and more.

Download Speed Dial

The Always Up-to-Date Power User's Guide to ChromeEasily Access Chrome’s Settings: Chrome’s settings can be access quickly with a variety of chrome:// prefixed URLs, as evidenced in the previous section, but that either requires a bit of typing or digging through menus. Mega Button is a Chrome extension that provides quick links to the most common settings pages directly from the toolbar so you don’t have to spend much time bringing up the exact page that you want.

Download Mega Button

The Always Up-to-Date Power User's Guide to ChromeSend Web Pages to Your Phone: If you’ve got an Android or iPhone and want to easily transfer a page to either, you need one of two extensions. Google’s official Chrome to Phone extension will send any web page to your Android smartphone or tablet. Site to Phone is a third-party equivalent originally developed for Apple mobile devices, but it has since been expanded to support Android, Blackberry, Windows Phone 7, and webOS as well.

Download Chrome to Phone or Site to Phone

The Always Up-to-Date Power User's Guide to ChromeSend Web Pages to Other Instances of Chrome: Perhaps you have a separate computer at work, or even multiple computers in your home. If you’re looking at a page on one machine and want to quickly transport it over to another, SendTab is a Chrome extension that can do it in a single click. Just register with SendTab on both computers, click the extension icon, and the page will automatically open on the paired machine.

Download SendTab

The Always Up-to-Date Power User's Guide to ChromeMake Pages Easier to Read: Most web pages have complex designs and often advertisements that distract from your reading experience. Readability is an extension that attempts to solve that problem. Just click the extension icon on any page you’d like to see in a more readable format and Readability will reformat it for you.

Download Readability

These are just a few extensions that enhance Chrome’s abilities and add some missing functionality. We’ve highlighted several more extensions we love, plus you can always find just about everything on the Chrome Extension Gallery.

Master Chrome’s Secret Features


The Always Up-to-Date Power User's Guide to ChromeChrome has a few features you probably wouldn’t know about unless you dug pretty deep or someone told you they exist. That’s what this section is for—to let you in on a few of Chrome’s handy little secrets.

Perform Simple Mathematical Calculations from the Omnibar: This neat little feature doesn’t require much explanation. Just press Control/Command+L on your keyboard to access the omnibar and type in an equation. Chrome will add, subtract, multiply and divide for you and place the answer at the top of its suggested search results.

Control Your Plug-ins: Sometimes plug-ins can get a little out of hand. Chrome’s good at wrangling them and cutting them off when they’re not behaving so it they don’t bring down the entire browser, but sometimes you need to go in and manually shut them off. To do that, just visit chrome://plugins to see a list of your plug-ins, plenty of “Disable” buttons, and version information.

Find Out Which Tabs Are Eating Up Your Memory: Chrome isolates each tab you create so if one crashes, it doesn’t take down the entire browser with it. This is a good thing, but it doesn’t prevent any particular tab from getting a little out of control. If you want to check which tabs are using the most resources, head on over to chrome://memory-redirect for a look. The resulting page will provide you with a full look at all usage so you can close any offending tabs.

Save Yourself a Few Clicks of the Back Button: If you want to get to a page you accessed further back in your browsing history, you might find yourself clicking the Back button (or pressing Backspace) incessantly until you get there. A better way to solve this problem is to click and hold the Back button. Doing so will provide you with the history for that specific tab so you can select the page you want, load it, and get on with your life.

Add New Functionality with Switches: If you’re running Chromium, the developer channel build of Chrome, you can enable some additional functionality by settings specific switches. They aren’t all terribly exciting, but these switches will allow you to disable functionality you don’t want, test out experimental interfaces, and even some handy features. For example, --enable-click-to-play allows you to click to temporarily enable embedded content requiring a blocked plug-in, which is great if you prefer to keep Flash disabled but occasionally want to enable it. For more, check out this full list of switches and how to set them up on Windows, Mac OS X, and Linux.

Inspect Any Part of a Web Page’s Code: Curious about a certain element on a web page and want to snoop around in the code? Just right-click on it and choose “Inspect Element” from the result contextual menu. This will bring up Chrome’s built-in Inspector and plenty of information about part of the page you’re interested in. This is a very handy tool for learning to code by example and for debugging your own code, too.


As long as this guide may be, there’s still plenty more you can do with Google Chrome. If you’ve got any favorite tips or tricks you’d like to share, post them in the comments.

Article source: http://lifehacker.com/5867446/the-always-up+to+date-power-users-guide-to-chrome

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14 Dec 11 Chrome gets multiple-user support


New in Chrome 16: Multiple-user support in a single instance of Chrome.

(Credit:
Screenshot by Seth Rosenblatt/CNET)

More than one person can now use Chrome and keep personal data separate from other users on the same computer, thanks to today’s update to Google’s browser.

Google Chrome 16.0.912.63 stable for Windows (download), Mac (download), Linux (download), and Chrome Frame also adds an option to sync your Omnibox History, and it includes a number of security fixes.

Multiple-user support is similar to Chrome’s Sync feature, but it’s more of a complementary feature than a must-use. Sync allows you to always have access to the same bookmarks, history, themes, and preferences. Multi-user support allows you to share a computer and maintain separate identities without logging out of the operating system. This could be useful for single-computer households or small businesses, although it potentially means that Chromebook users will have two ways to switch profiles.

Creating a new profile first requires signing into Chrome, via the Wrench menu’s new “Sign into Chrome” option. Then, to add a new user, you must go back to the Wrench, choose Options (Mac users select Preferences,) then Personal Stuff, and finally “Add new user.” This will open a new Chrome window, and from here the new user must repeat the “Sign into Chrome” procedure. The new user can also go to the Personal Stuff menu in the new window and change the user name and icon.

When more than one account profile is synced to Chrome, a new drop-down appears in the upper left corner to make it easier to switch profiles. But it’s not particularly secure from prying eyes.

(Credit:
Screenshot by Seth Rosenblatt/CNET)

Chrome will open separate windows when switching between each profile.

Google cautions in its blog post announcing the feature that the multi-user profile support is not intended to secure your private data against other users. That means although your synced data might be secured on the server, if you’re logged in to Chrome with multiple profiles, anybody can switch profiles and access your personal “stuff,” as Google likes to call it. This is far less secure than forcing people to re-enter passwords before each opening of a second profile.

Along with the multiple profile support, Chrome 16 now lets adventurous types sync open tabs. You have to go through the about:flags config screen to enable it, but it does indicate that this long-missing sync option is getting close to being ready for stable Chrome users.

Other improvements in Chrome 16 are mainly security fixes, including six labeled “high.” There were no security fixes in this release marked “critical.” Check out the Chrome changelog published by Google.

Article source: http://download.cnet.com/8301-2007_4-57342468-12/chrome-gets-multiple-user-support/

Tags: , , ,

13 Dec 11 The Always Up-to-Date Power User’s Guide to Chrome [Video]


The Always Up-to-Date Power User's Guide to ChromeChrome is overtaking Firefox among power users, and for good reason. It’s an incredibly powerful, extensible web browser with tons of excellent features. Today, we’re covering it all—from longtime shortcuts to the latest features in one of our favorite web browsers.

Title image remixed from an original by Lok Yek Mang (Shutterstock).

Google Chrome updates automatically, and those updates come around even faster on the Chromium developers channel. With such frequent updates it can be hard to keep track of all the great new stuff coming your way. So, just like our other always up-to-date guides, we’ve created this power user’s guide to Chrome. It features our favorite advanced features, updated with every new version.

  • Interface Tips and Tricks
  • The Most Time-Saving Shortcuts
  • Customize Chrome’s Settings
  • Enhance Chrome’s Functionality with Extensions
  • Master Chrome’s Secret Features

Interface Tips and Tricks


Chrome benefits from one of the more attractive, compact, and configurable interfaces you’ll find among modern web browsers. Here are some great ways to customize its interface.

The Always Up-to-Date Power User's Guide to ChromePin Tabs You Always Keep Open: With much of what we do on our computers migrating to the web, you probably visit a lot of the same web sites frequently, quickly cluttering up the top of your browser window. Pinning tabs saves those often-visited sites so you don’t have to constantly reopen them while making that tab extra compact so it doesn’t take up too much room. To pin a tab, just right-click on it and choose “Pin Tab”. It’ll shuffle over to the left side of the window and stay put until you decide to close it.

The Always Up-to-Date Power User's Guide to ChromeDecorate Your Browser Windows with Themes: Google created 15 simple themes to let you add a little personalization to Chrome, but other artists have created many, many more. I’m partial to the way Chrome looks by default, but if you’re looking for personalization or just a change of style, just visit the Chrome Theme Gallery and pick out something that you love.

The Most Time-Saving Shortcuts


The Always Up-to-Date Power User's Guide to ChromeChrome is full of useful shortcuts to help make your browsing experience better and faster. There are too many to include here, so we’ve whittled down the list to the ones we find most useful.

Note: If you’re a Mac user, just substitute the “Control” key for the “Command” key (and know that the “Alt” and “Option” keys are the same) when performing these shortcuts, unless a specific alternative is noted.

Navigate Back and Forward Through Web Pages: If you want to go back to the previous page, instead of clicking the back button just press Backspace (Delete on a Mac). To go forward in your history, press Shift+Backspace (Shift+Delete on a Mac) instead. Windows users can also use the Alt+Left Arrow to go back and Alt+Right Arrow to go forward as well.

Reload a Page: Although many web apps refresh themselves nowadays, many sites (like this one) require the reload button to check for new content. You can reload faster from your keyboard, however, by pressing Control+R on your keyboard. Additionally, if you’re reloading the page for new content but it isn’t showing up, Control+Shift+R will perform a hard refresh. This means Chrome will ignore the cached copy of the page and reload everything from scratch so you know you’re getting the latest version. (Alternatively, Windows users can use Control+F5 and Control+Shift+F5 to perform these same actions, respectively.)

Navigate Through Your Tabs: Navigating through your browser tabs is really easy via the keyboard. Just press Control+Tab to move to the right, and Control+Alt+Tab to move to the left. (On a Mac use Command+Option+Right Arrow and Command+Option+Left Arrow instead.) This will let you cycle through your tabs quickly.

Jump to the Top or Bottom of a Page: Web pages can get pretty long (like this one). If you want to quickly jump to the top of a page, press the Home key on your keyboard. If you want to go straight to the bottom, press the End key.

Find Text on a Page: If you want to search for text within a page, just press Control+F on your keyboard and start typing your search term. Chrome will search as you type, but pressing the Enter key will begin cycling through the results in chronological order. Conversely, pressing Shift+Enter will cycle backwards through the results.

The Always Up-to-Date Power User's Guide to ChromeOpen a New Tab or Window: To create a new tab in Chrome, just press Control+T on your keyboard. If you want a new Window, press Control+N instead. Either way you’ll be presented with a blank window and can start typing in the URL to any site your wish. Alternatively you can enter a URL in the address bar and press Alt+Enter (Command+Return on the Mac) to create a new tab with that page.

Close a Tab or Window: To close a tab, press Control+W on your keyboard. To close an entire window and all its tabs, press Control+Shift+W. (Windows users can also use Control+F4 and Control+Shift+F4 to perform the same actions, respectively, as well.)

The Always Up-to-Date Power User's Guide to ChromeReopen a Closed Tab or Window: Sometimes you close a window or tab by accident and want it back. This is when you realize that Control+Shift+T is the most useful combination of keys your web browser can provide. In Chrome, this shortcut will reopen the last tab or window you closed and load the page again. (Note: This does not work with private browsing sessions because your history isn’t recorded.)

The Always Up-to-Date Power User's Guide to ChromeStart a Private Browsing Session: When you’re, uh, not looking at porn and are using private browsing for another useful purpose, you can create a new incognito window via the keyboard by pressing Control+Shift+N.

The Always Up-to-Date Power User's Guide to ChromeAccess the Omnibar: When you need to get to the omnibar (the address + search bar) in Chrome, you can do so easily by just pressing Control+L on your keyboard. In an instant you’ll be magically transported to the omnibar and can start typing your URL or search term.

The Always Up-to-Date Power User's Guide to ChromeOpen a Link in a New Tab: If you want to open a link in a new tab, hold down the control key and click on it. You can also get the same result by click on the link with your middle mouse button (if you’ve got one). Adding the shift key to either of these shortcuts will open the new tab and select it immediately, rather than opening it in the background.

Bookmark the Current Page: When you want to save the current page to your bookmarks, pressing Control+D on your keyboard will do the trick. Chrome will then present you with a little window asking you to name your bookmark and select a location where it can live. In the event you want to bookmark every tab in the current window, just press Control+Shift+D instead.

The Always Up-to-Date Power User's Guide to ChromeAutocomplete a URL Ending in .COM: If you’re typing in a URL and you want to save yourself some time, don’t bother with the www. or the .com (e.g www.lifehacker.com would just be lifehacker). When you’re finished, press Control+Enter (it’s also Control+Enter on the Mac) and Chrome will take care of the extra work for you.

This is just a sampling of Chrome’s handy shortcuts. If you want more, check out the full list for Windows and Mac OS X.

Customize Chrome’s Settings


Chrome works pretty well by default, but there is so much you can customize if you dig into its settings pages. Windows users can quickly access Chrome’s settings by clicking on the wrench icon in the tool bar and choosing Options. Mac users can do the same by clicking on the wrench icon and choosing Preferences (or pressing Command+, on the keyboard). Either platform can also access the settings pages by simply typing chrome://settings into the omnibar. However you get there, you’ll be presented with four sections to choose from. Let’s go over each individually and look at the neat things you can do in each.

Basics

The Always Up-to-Date Power User's Guide to ChromeTo get started, open the Basic settings panel in Chrome.

Change Chrome’s Startup Behavior: The startup section allows you to define what happens when Chrome starts up. You can have Chrome load your default home page, reopen everything you had open when you last closed Chrome, or open a specific set of pages you want to view every time you start up. This is really handy if you open and close your browser every day and want it to get you started with your favorite sites every time you start up.

Customize Your Search Engines: The Search section is where you set your default search engine. When you launched Chrome for the first time, it probably asked you if you’d like to use Google, Yahoo!, or Bing every time you type in a search term in the omnibar. If you have Google set as your default, this is also where you can check a box to enable Google Instant search.

This is also where you can manage your search engines, which is a very cool feature. By default, Chrome tries to recognize search functionality on sites every time you use it. So, for example, if you searched 123people.com then Chrome would record it as one of your search engines. The benefit of this is when you type in 123people.com in the omnibar and press the tab key on your keyboard, you’ll then be able to type in a search term and press enter to search 123people.com without first visiting the site. Sometimes Chrome won’t pick up on these search engines, however, so you can add new ones manually in this panel. Just go down to the bottom of the page to find a space to enter a new option. First add a name of your choosing, the keyword you need to type to start the search (e.g. yahoo.com for Yahoo), and then a special search string. A sample search string for Yahoo looks like this:

http://search.yahoo.com/search?ei=UTF-8fr=crmasp=lifehacker

If you look at the URL you can see I searched for the term “lifehacker”, but Chrome’s asking us to replace our query with %s instead. So we need to change lifehacker to %s like this:

http://search.yahoo.com/search?ei=UTF-8fr=crmasp=%s

Once you do that just press enter to add your new, custom search engine. If you want to access this panel faster, without the need to go into the settings panel, just right click on the omnibar in any window and choose Edit Search Engines.

Personal Stuff

The Always Up-to-Date Power User's Guide to ChromeTo get started, open the Personal Stuff settings panel in Chrome.

Save Passwords and Automatically Fill Out Forms: By default, Chrome will offer to save any password you enter when browsing the web. If you don’t want this functionality, you can tell Chrome to “Never save passwords” instead in the Passwords section. This is also where you can manage your saved passwords in case you want to alter or delete any you’ve previously saved.

Chrome is also capable of storing address and credit card data so you can use it to automatically fill out forms. You can set this up in the Autofill section by checking the “Enable Autofill to fill out web forms in a single click” checkbox and then the “Manage Autofill Settings…” button to start filling in your addresses and credit cards.

Import Data from Another Browser: Perhaps you’re new to Chrome and you want to import data from your previous web browser. In the Browsing Data section, just click the “Import Data from Another Browser…” button and you’ll be presented with a Window with a few options. Select the browser you want, then check off the data you want to import and Chrome will do the rest.

Sync All Your Data: Chrome is great at synchronizing the majority of your browser data, including bookmarks, extensions, apps, passwords, autofill information, preferences, and themes. The Sync section is where you set it up. Just click the “Set up sync…” button and log in with your Google Account. That’s all you’ll really have to do to get started with syncing everything, but you can click on “Advanced Settings” if you want to select individual items and change encryption settings.

Under the Hood

The Always Up-to-Date Power User's Guide to ChromeTo get started, open the Under the Hood settings panel in Chrome.

Manage Your Privacy: Chrome’s default privacy settings aren’t necessarily as private as you might, so if you want to change them the Privacy section is the place to do it. For example, you might want to uncheck the box labeled “Automatically send usage statistics and crash reports to Google” if you don’t want to share that information, even anonymously. More important, however, are the settings you can access by clicking the “Content Settings…” button. These settings will allow you to enable cookie restrictions, manage the cookies you’ve already acquired, and blocks tons of different kinds of content like images, JavaScript, plug-in based content, and more.

If you want to take things a bit further and prevent yourself from being tracked, you can install Google’s official Keep My Opt-Outs extension. This will, essentially, block any cookies. Of course, you can also do this manually from Chromes Content and Data Exceptions settings page.

Set Up Google Cloud Print: If you want to use Google Cloud print, the aptly named Google Cloud Print section at the bottom of the page is where you do it. Just click the “Sign in to Google Cloud Print” button to start the process. This will open a new page and you’ll be asked to log in to your Google account if you aren’t already. Once you’re logged in (or if you already are), you’ll be able to start adding standard or cloud-enabled printers. If you’re not sure how to add your printers, just follow these instructions.

Extensions

The Always Up-to-Date Power User's Guide to ChromeThe Extensions settings panel in Chrome, or the standard extensions page, is where you can enable, disable, and uninstall extensions. You can also access their options, check for updates, and enable developer mode. There isn’t anything too special to see here, but if you want to learn more about extensions in Chrome just continue on to the next section.

Enhance Chrome’s Functionality with Extensions


Although Chrome began without support for extensions at all, the quantity and quality available may have surpassed even Firefox. If there isn’t something you like, you can always
build your own, too. In this section we’re going to take a look at a few extensions you can use to enhance Chrome’s functionality.

The Always Up-to-Date Power User's Guide to ChromePin Your Favorite Sites to Your New Tab/Window Page: When you make a new tab or window, you see Chrome’s default page that lets you open recent pages and access any web apps you installed via the Chrome Web Store. What it doesn’t let you do is pin any favorite sites to that page for quick access. Speed Dial is an extension that lets you do just that. It also lets you customize the look of the page, reopen closed tabs, and more.

Download Speed Dial

The Always Up-to-Date Power User's Guide to ChromeEasily Access Chrome’s Settings: Chrome’s settings can be access quickly with a variety of chrome:// prefixed URLs, as evidenced in the previous section, but that either requires a bit of typing or digging through menus. Mega Button is a Chrome extension that provides quick links to the most common settings pages directly from the toolbar so you don’t have to spend much time bringing up the exact page that you want.

Download Mega Button

The Always Up-to-Date Power User's Guide to ChromeSend Web Pages to Your Phone: If you’ve got an Android or iPhone and want to easily transfer a page to either, you need one of two extensions. Google’s official Chrome to Phone extension will send any web page to your Android smartphone or tablet. Site to Phone is a third-party equivalent originally developed for Apple mobile devices, but it has since been expanded to support Android, Blackberry, Windows Phone 7, and webOS as well.

Download Chrome to Phone or Site to Phone

The Always Up-to-Date Power User's Guide to ChromeSend Web Pages to Other Instances of Chrome: Perhaps you have a separate computer at work, or even multiple computers in your home. If you’re looking at a page on one machine and want to quickly transport it over to another, SendTab is a Chrome extension that can do it in a single click. Just register with SendTab on both computers, click the extension icon, and the page will automatically open on the paired machine.

Download SendTab

The Always Up-to-Date Power User's Guide to ChromeMake Pages Easier to Read: Most web pages have complex designs and often advertisements that distract from your reading experience. Readability is an extension that attempts to solve that problem. Just click the extension icon on any page you’d like to see in a more readable format and Readability will reformat it for you.

Download Readability

These are just a few extensions that enhance Chrome’s abilities and add some missing functionality. We’ve highlighted several more extensions we love, plus you can always find just about everything on the Chrome Extension Gallery.

Master Chrome’s Secret Features


The Always Up-to-Date Power User's Guide to ChromeChrome has a few features you probably wouldn’t know about unless you dug pretty deep or someone told you they exist. That’s what this section is for—to let you in on a few of Chrome’s handy little secrets.

Perform Simple Mathematical Calculations from the Omnibar: This neat little feature doesn’t require much explanation. Just press Control/Command+L on your keyboard to access the omnibar and type in an equation. Chrome will add, subtract, multiply and divide for you and place the answer at the top of its suggested search results.

Control Your Plug-ins: Sometimes plug-ins can get a little out of hand. Chrome’s good at wrangling them and cutting them off when they’re not behaving so it they don’t bring down the entire browser, but sometimes you need to go in and manually shut them off. To do that, just visit chrome://plugins to see a list of your plug-ins, plenty of “Disable” buttons, and version information.

Find Out Which Tabs Are Eating Up Your Memory: Chrome isolates each tab you create so if one crashes, it doesn’t take down the entire browser with it. This is a good thing, but it doesn’t prevent any particular tab from getting a little out of control. If you want to check which tabs are using the most resources, head on over to chrome://memory-redirect for a look. The resulting page will provide you with a full look at all usage so you can close any offending tabs.

Save Yourself a Few Clicks of the Back Button: If you want to get to a page you accessed further back in your browsing history, you might find yourself clicking the Back button (or pressing Backspace) incessantly until you get there. A better way to solve this problem is to click and hold the Back button. Doing so will provide you with the history for that specific tab so you can select the page you want, load it, and get on with your life.

Add New Functionality with Switches: If you’re running Chromium, the developer channel build of Chrome, you can enable some additional functionality by settings specific switches. They aren’t all terribly exciting, but these switches will allow you to disable functionality you don’t want, test out experimental interfaces, and even some handy features. For example, --enable-click-to-play allows you to click to temporarily enable embedded content requiring a blocked plug-in, which is great if you prefer to keep Flash disabled but occasionally want to enable it. For more, check out this full list of switches and how to set them up on Windows, Mac OS X, and Linux.

Inspect Any Part of a Web Page’s Code: Curious about a certain element on a web page and want to snoop around in the code? Just right-click on it and choose “Inspect Element” from the result contextual menu. This will bring up Chrome’s built-in Inspector and plenty of information about part of the page you’re interested in. This is a very handy tool for learning to code by example and for debugging your own code, too.


As long as this guide may be, there’s still plenty more you can do with Google Chrome. If you’ve got any favorite tips or tricks you’d like to share, post them in the comments.

Article source: http://lifehacker.com/5867446/the-always-up+to+date-power-users-guide-to-chrome

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03 Dec 11 Share Your Web Browser With Chrome’s New User Switching


Chrome Beta’s new user switching

Google has updated the beta channel of its Chrome web browser with a new syncing tool that makes it easy to move between Chrome installations with all your browsing data intact.

If you’d like to try the beta channel of Chrome, head over to the beta downloads page.

Chrome has long offered some syncing capabilities, but the new features ensure that all your bookmarks, browsing history and even passwords come with you when you sign in to Chrome on any computer you use. To make the new syncing features work, you’ll need to link Chrome with your Google account. Linking up Chrome with your Google account also means that you’ll be automatically signed in to any Google services you visit.

The new syncing features can be found in the Personal Stuff section of Chrome’s preferences. Just click the button that says “New User.”

The new user profiles also mean that multiple people can easily share a single Chrome installation. Switching between active users works much as it does at the operating-system level. Clicking the New User button will open a new window with an icon in the left-hand corner that lets everyone know whose window it is. Multiple users can even have windows open at the same time. Telling them apart is just a matter of checking the icon for that window.

One thing to keep in mind is that user switching in Chrome is nowhere near as secure as user switching at the OS level. Google Software Engineer Miranda Callahan warns on the Chrome blog:

this feature isn’t intended to secure your data against other people using your computer, since all it takes is a couple of clicks to switch between users. We want to provide this functionality as a quick and simple user interface convenience for people who are already sharing Chrome on the same computer today. To truly protect your data from being seen by others, please use the built-in user accounts in your operating system of choice.

In other words, the new switching features aren’t something you’d want to enable if you’re just letting someone you don’t know well borrow your laptop for a minute. However, so long as you’re sharing Chrome with people you trust, the new user switching features make it easy to share a browser while still keeping your data separate (if not totally private).

Article source: http://www.webmonkey.com/2011/12/share-your-web-browser-with-chromes-new-user-switching/

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21 Nov 11 A beginners guide to Google Chrome: Why it’s time to ditch Internet Explorer


Google Chrome wallpapers2

Between IE, Firefox, and Opera the choice might not be easy to make, but with our helpful guide, we will show you why we think Google Chrome stands out among the rest and deserves your attention.

In 2010, Internet Explorer for the first time dipped below 50% market share, an impressive slide from ten years ago, when nearly 90% of users decided on it. Part of the problem has been IE itself, as Microsoft’s development of the browser tends to be slow, but much of the blame for IE’s slide can be levied at the fact that there is actual competition in the form of Chrome, Firefox and Opera web browsers, all of which are now mature alternatives.

For the most part, users who abandon Internet Explorer end up joining the Firefox crowd, but not me. I’m a dedicated Chrome user, and have been since just a few months after its release. Despite the high-profile brand (Google) behind Chrome, only 13% of users choose it as their browser. I believe that’s awfully low, so allow me to help you become acquainted with the wonderful world of Chrome.

Google-Chrome-KingWhy Chrome?

Chrome’s development focused on two important themes. One was speed, and the other was excellent web page rendering. Many steps were taken to achieve this, among which was the development of the V8 JavaScript engine, which used new optimization techniques to achieve better performance.

Thankfully these efforts were not in vain. Though it’s been available nearly three years now, Chrome remains the unchallenged performance leader. Peacekeeper browser benchmark scores for Chrome are much higher than they are for other browsers – in fact, when compared to IE9, the latest version can almost double Internet Explorer’s score.

Compatibility is another strong point. In the Acid3 web standards test, Chrome can achieve a score of 97/100, which until recently was a leading result. However, changes to the Acid3 test now allow Firefox and Internet Explorer to achieve a 100/100 score.

Even so, I find that Chrome’s web rendering is superior to either, particularly Firefox, which has presented trouble with text on some high-resolution monitors. Chrome has always rendered images and text smoothly, and because of its speed, zooming in and out of pages is quick as lightening.

Installing Chrome

To demonstrate Chrome’s focus on speed, the installation process has been made simple and fast. When you visit the Google main page on a computer without the browser installed, you’ll see a prompt on the page asking if you’d like to install it. You may have banished this, already – so you can also access the installer by going directly to the Google Chrome website.

When you click the install or download button, you will be prompted with the terms of service, which you’ll need to accept. Then, the installer will download and installation will begin. On an average desktop or laptop the process will take only a couple minutes from start to finish.

Chrome, unlike many other browsers, doesn’t require that users re-download the browser when new updates are made available. Once you have it installed, you will never need to re-install it unless you’ve purchased a new computer or reformatted your hard drive. Updates are pushed out automatically, so you don’t even have to click a button to obtain the newest version.

Understanding the Chrome Interface

When Chrome was released, the interface was bold and new. Tabs are used to manage multiple browsing sessions, a concept that was still gaining steam when the browser was released, and the drop-down menus and large interface icons that used to dominate browsers are gone.

Now, this has actually become the norm. Internet Explorer, Firefox and Chrome have all homogenized at least some of their interface elements, so users will find some familiarity between them. They all use tabs that are managed at the top of the window, they all have just a few, abstracted icons, and they all tuck bookmarks under the URL bar.

However, all the browsers have very different menus for managing critical browser options. In Chrome, you will find the browser options by clicking on the wrench icon in the upper right, then navigating to Options. An options page will open like a web page in a new tab. Every single function of the browser is managed from this one area except for Bookmarks, Downloads and History.

Otherwise, there’s not much to understand about the basics of the interface, because there’s simply not a lot of interface there – but let’s take a closer look at some individual features.

Bookmarking

In Chrome, adding a bookmark is best accomplished by clicking the star icon on the right hand side of the URL bar. Once you click it, a small pop-up menu will ask you which folder you’d like to store the Bookmark in. This can be changed later, of course.

Sites that are bookmarked will from then display a yellow star icon (instead of the standard, uncolored icon) in the URL bar when you visit them.

Users have the choice to display or not display bookmarks in Chrome interface. This can be turned on or off by opening the wrench menu, going to bookmarks, and then de/selecting Show Bookmarks Bar. The bookmarks bar can contain both folders full of bookmarks or individual bookmarks, and can be edited directly by right-clicking.

There’s also a Bookmark Manager found in the options, but I doubt you’ll have much need for it. Since the Bookmarks Bar can be edited, the Manager is only needed by users who choose not to show the bar, or who prefer that interface for management of very large bookmark folders.

Downloads

In the toolbar menu you’ll find Downloads. Clicking on it opens the download manager, which appears like a web page in its own tab. There’s not a lot to comment on here. All of your recent downloads will be shown in chronological order. There is no option to filter them by name or size.

The only way to find a specific download is to either search for it, which is effective as long as you know the file name, or bypass Chrome by clicking on Open Downloads Folder. This will simply open your Windows download folder.

Extensions

Add-on software to Chrome is called an extension, and can be managed by going to the wrench menu, clicking on Options, and then going to Extensions. Users have the choice to disable or enable extensions through this menu, or uninstall them completely.

Google-Chrome-Extensions

Official extensions can be found at the Chrome Web Store. Recent updates have made this site very similar to the Android marketplace. Most of the extensions available are free, but developers can charge if they choose, and there is also support for in-app payments.

In addition to extensions, Chrome also supports “apps.” These are vaguely defined as web services that can be accessed through the Apps section of the Chrome homepage. At the moment, most of the apps are just than links to websites. Installing the Gmail by Google app, for example, does nothing more than install a new icon that takes you to the standard Gmail interface. However, there are some true apps available, including games like Angry Birds and Plants vs. Zombies.

Security and Privacy

When you open a new tab in Chrome via a right-click, you have the option to open the tab in “incognito mode.” This is a built-in private browsing feature. When a tab goes incognito, it doesn’t record the browsing or download history of that tab, and all cookies related to that tab are deleted when the tab is closed.

Sometimes users misunderstand incognito mode, thinking it provides some protection against keyloggers, spyware, or other such threats. It does not. The main purpose is to provide on-the-fly private browsing. Let’s say, for example, you want to research some Christmas gifts. Incognito mode lets you do this on the family computer without tipping anyone off.

Another important security feature, this time related to extensions and apps, is permissions. In order for the extensions that you install to function, they sometimes need “permission” to perform certain functions, such as access location data or information from a certain site.

You can find the permissions needed by going to the Details section of an extension on the Chrome Web Store. Unfortunately, permissions are not shown in the Extensions section of the Options menu.

Syncing

Google likes the cloud, most likely because they offer a lot of cloud services. Chrome does, as well, in the form of its sync feature. You can find this feature in the Personal Stuff section of the Options menu.

What this does is save your Chrome settings using your Google account. Once saved, these settings can then be loaded to Chrome on any other computer by going to the Personal Stuff section once again and entering your Google account information.

google-chrome-bookmakrs-sync

You can choose what to sync, including everything from passwords to extensions to bookmarks. If you make a change to your settings on any of the now synced Chrome browsers, it will be migrated to all of them. But you don’t have sync everything if you don’t want to, and you can pick-and-choose. You can, for example, choose not to sync extensions if you like to customize your extensions for each PC.

To protect your privacy, sync data is encrypted while it is sent. Normally the encryption passphrase if your Google account password, but if you want extra security, you can enter a different passphrase manually.

Tab Management

Chrome tabs can be moved about at your leisure by click-dragging them. When they are moved inside an open Chrome window, a tab’s position can be re-arranged. But you can also click-drag a tab away from the Chrome window in order to open another, separate browser window. Likewise, you can click-drag tabs from separate instances of Chrome into a single browser window to combine them.

New tabs can be opened using keyboard shortcuts or the small “+” icon beside the last currently open tab. All new tabs that are not opened to display a link will instead display the default home screen, which consists of a tile display of recently visited websites and installed apps. You can also access a list of recently closed tabs from the menu in the lower right hand corner.

There’s no hard cap on the amount of tabs you can have open at once in the browser, but once you go past about twelve, the titles of open tabs become difficult to see because so little space is available. If you need to frequently use a large number of tabs, you may want to download a tab management extension from the web store.

Important Shortcuts

Like any browser, Chrome has a number of keyboard shortcuts that can help you navigate the user interface. Here are some of the most important ones to know.

Ctrl+N – Opens new window

Ctrl+Shift+N– Opens new incognito mode window

Ctrl+T – Opens new tab

Ctrl+P– Print the page

Ctrl+S– Save the page

Ctrl+F5 – Reloads the page

Ctrl+D – Saves page as a bookmark

Ctrl+Shift+D– Saves all open pages as bookmarks

Ctrl+Click a link – Opens the link in a new tab in the background

Ctrl+Shift+Click a link – Opens the link in a new tab and switches to the new tab

Ctrl+Shift+T – Reopens the last closed tab

Ctrl+Tab– Switches to the next tab

Ctrl+Shift+Tab– Switches to the previous tab

Alt+For Alt+E– Opens the wrench menu

Ctrl+Shift+B– Toggles the bookmarks bar on and off

Ctrl+H– Opens the History page

Ctrl+J– Opens the Downloads page

Shift+Esc– Opens the Task Manager

Ctrl+Shift+Delete– Opens the Clear Browsing Data dialog

Come to Chrome

These are all of the basic features that make up the Chrome web browser. It’s an impressive suite, and generally better than what other browsers offer by default. But some of its biggest advantages – such as its speed – are only apparent after using the browser for a few minutes.

If you still feel a little overwhelming, try taking a look at Google’s official Chrome FAQ. There’s a nice introduction there that advanced users will find too fundamental, but newcomers may appreciate.

Article source: http://www.digitaltrends.com/computing/a-beginners-guide-to-google-chrome-why-its-time-to-ditch-internet-explorer/

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21 Nov 11 A beginners guide to Google Chrome: Why it’s time to ditch Internet Explorer


Google Chrome wallpapers2

Between IE, Firefox, and Opera the choice might not be easy to make, but with our helpful guide, we will show you why we think Google Chrome stands out among the rest and deserves your attention.

In 2010, Internet Explorer for the first time dipped below 50% market share, an impressive slide from ten years ago, when nearly 90% of users decided on it. Part of the problem has been IE itself, as Microsoft’s development of the browser tends to be slow, but much of the blame for IE’s slide can be levied at the fact that there is actual competition in the form of Chrome, Firefox and Opera web browsers, all of which are now mature alternatives.

For the most part, users who abandon Internet Explorer end up joining the Firefox crowd, but not me. I’m a dedicated Chrome user, and have been since just a few months after its release. Despite the high-profile brand (Google) behind Chrome, only 13% of users choose it as their browser. I believe that’s awfully low, so allow me to help you become acquainted with the wonderful world of Chrome.

Google-Chrome-KingWhy Chrome?

Chrome’s development focused on two important themes. One was speed, and the other was excellent web page rendering. Many steps were taken to achieve this, among which was the development of the V8 JavaScript engine, which used new optimization techniques to achieve better performance.

Thankfully these efforts were not in vain. Though it’s been available nearly three years now, Chrome remains the unchallenged performance leader. Peacekeeper browser benchmark scores for Chrome are much higher than they are for other browsers – in fact, when compared to IE9, the latest version can almost double Internet Explorer’s score.

Compatibility is another strong point. In the Acid3 web standards test, Chrome can achieve a score of 97/100, which until recently was a leading result. However, changes to the Acid3 test now allow Firefox and Internet Explorer to achieve a 100/100 score.

Even so, I find that Chrome’s web rendering is superior to either, particularly Firefox, which has presented trouble with text on some high-resolution monitors. Chrome has always rendered images and text smoothly, and because of its speed, zooming in and out of pages is quick as lightening.

Installing Chrome

To demonstrate Chrome’s focus on speed, the installation process has been made simple and fast. When you visit the Google main page on a computer without the browser installed, you’ll see a prompt on the page asking if you’d like to install it. You may have banished this, already – so you can also access the installer by going directly to the Google Chrome website.

When you click the install or download button, you will be prompted with the terms of service, which you’ll need to accept. Then, the installer will download and installation will begin. On an average desktop or laptop the process will take only a couple minutes from start to finish.

Chrome, unlike many other browsers, doesn’t require that users re-download the browser when new updates are made available. Once you have it installed, you will never need to re-install it unless you’ve purchased a new computer or reformatted your hard drive. Updates are pushed out automatically, so you don’t even have to click a button to obtain the newest version.

Understanding the Chrome Interface

When Chrome was released, the interface was bold and new. Tabs are used to manage multiple browsing sessions, a concept that was still gaining steam when the browser was released, and the drop-down menus and large interface icons that used to dominate browsers are gone.

Now, this has actually become the norm. Internet Explorer, Firefox and Chrome have all homogenized at least some of their interface elements, so users will find some familiarity between them. They all use tabs that are managed at the top of the window, they all have just a few, abstracted icons, and they all tuck bookmarks under the URL bar.

However, all the browsers have very different menus for managing critical browser options. In Chrome, you will find the browser options by clicking on the wrench icon in the upper right, then navigating to Options. An options page will open like a web page in a new tab. Every single function of the browser is managed from this one area except for Bookmarks, Downloads and History.

Otherwise, there’s not much to understand about the basics of the interface, because there’s simply not a lot of interface there – but let’s take a closer look at some individual features.

Bookmarking

In Chrome, adding a bookmark is best accomplished by clicking the star icon on the right hand side of the URL bar. Once you click it, a small pop-up menu will ask you which folder you’d like to store the Bookmark in. This can be changed later, of course.

Sites that are bookmarked will from then display a yellow star icon (instead of the standard, uncolored icon) in the URL bar when you visit them.

Users have the choice to display or not display bookmarks in Chrome interface. This can be turned on or off by opening the wrench menu, going to bookmarks, and then de/selecting Show Bookmarks Bar. The bookmarks bar can contain both folders full of bookmarks or individual bookmarks, and can be edited directly by right-clicking.

There’s also a Bookmark Manager found in the options, but I doubt you’ll have much need for it. Since the Bookmarks Bar can be edited, the Manager is only needed by users who choose not to show the bar, or who prefer that interface for management of very large bookmark folders.

Downloads

In the toolbar menu you’ll find Downloads. Clicking on it opens the download manager, which appears like a web page in its own tab. There’s not a lot to comment on here. All of your recent downloads will be shown in chronological order. There is no option to filter them by name or size.

The only way to find a specific download is to either search for it, which is effective as long as you know the file name, or bypass Chrome by clicking on Open Downloads Folder. This will simply open your Windows download folder.

Extensions

Add-on software to Chrome is called an extension, and can be managed by going to the wrench menu, clicking on Options, and then going to Extensions. Users have the choice to disable or enable extensions through this menu, or uninstall them completely.

Google-Chrome-Extensions

Official extensions can be found at the Chrome Web Store. Recent updates have made this site very similar to the Android marketplace. Most of the extensions available are free, but developers can charge if they choose, and there is also support for in-app payments.

In addition to extensions, Chrome also supports “apps.” These are vaguely defined as web services that can be accessed through the Apps section of the Chrome homepage. At the moment, most of the apps are just than links to websites. Installing the Gmail by Google app, for example, does nothing more than install a new icon that takes you to the standard Gmail interface. However, there are some true apps available, including games like Angry Birds and Plants vs. Zombies.

Security and Privacy

When you open a new tab in Chrome via a right-click, you have the option to open the tab in “incognito mode.” This is a built-in private browsing feature. When a tab goes incognito, it doesn’t record the browsing or download history of that tab, and all cookies related to that tab are deleted when the tab is closed.

Sometimes users misunderstand incognito mode, thinking it provides some protection against keyloggers, spyware, or other such threats. It does not. The main purpose is to provide on-the-fly private browsing. Let’s say, for example, you want to research some Christmas gifts. Incognito mode lets you do this on the family computer without tipping anyone off.

Another important security feature, this time related to extensions and apps, is permissions. In order for the extensions that you install to function, they sometimes need “permission” to perform certain functions, such as access location data or information from a certain site.

You can find the permissions needed by going to the Details section of an extension on the Chrome Web Store. Unfortunately, permissions are not shown in the Extensions section of the Options menu.

Syncing

Google likes the cloud, most likely because they offer a lot of cloud services. Chrome does, as well, in the form of its sync feature. You can find this feature in the Personal Stuff section of the Options menu.

What this does is save your Chrome settings using your Google account. Once saved, these settings can then be loaded to Chrome on any other computer by going to the Personal Stuff section once again and entering your Google account information.

google-chrome-bookmakrs-sync

You can choose what to sync, including everything from passwords to extensions to bookmarks. If you make a change to your settings on any of the now synced Chrome browsers, it will be migrated to all of them. But you don’t have sync everything if you don’t want to, and you can pick-and-choose. You can, for example, choose not to sync extensions if you like to customize your extensions for each PC.

To protect your privacy, sync data is encrypted while it is sent. Normally the encryption passphrase if your Google account password, but if you want extra security, you can enter a different passphrase manually.

Tab Management

Chrome tabs can be moved about at your leisure by click-dragging them. When they are moved inside an open Chrome window, a tab’s position can be re-arranged. But you can also click-drag a tab away from the Chrome window in order to open another, separate browser window. Likewise, you can click-drag tabs from separate instances of Chrome into a single browser window to combine them.

New tabs can be opened using keyboard shortcuts or the small “+” icon beside the last currently open tab. All new tabs that are not opened to display a link will instead display the default home screen, which consists of a tile display of recently visited websites and installed apps. You can also access a list of recently closed tabs from the menu in the lower right hand corner.

There’s no hard cap on the amount of tabs you can have open at once in the browser, but once you go past about twelve, the titles of open tabs become difficult to see because so little space is available. If you need to frequently use a large number of tabs, you may want to download a tab management extension from the web store.

Important Shortcuts

Like any browser, Chrome has a number of keyboard shortcuts that can help you navigate the user interface. Here are some of the most important ones to know.

Ctrl+N – Opens new window

Ctrl+Shift+N– Opens new incognito mode window

Ctrl+T – Opens new tab

Ctrl+P– Print the page

Ctrl+S– Save the page

Ctrl+F5 – Reloads the page

Ctrl+D – Saves page as a bookmark

Ctrl+Shift+D– Saves all open pages as bookmarks

Ctrl+Click a link – Opens the link in a new tab in the background

Ctrl+Shift+Click a link – Opens the link in a new tab and switches to the new tab

Ctrl+Shift+T – Reopens the last closed tab

Ctrl+Tab– Switches to the next tab

Ctrl+Shift+Tab– Switches to the previous tab

Alt+For Alt+E– Opens the wrench menu

Ctrl+Shift+B– Toggles the bookmarks bar on and off

Ctrl+H– Opens the History page

Ctrl+J– Opens the Downloads page

Shift+Esc– Opens the Task Manager

Ctrl+Shift+Delete– Opens the Clear Browsing Data dialog

Come to Chrome

These are all of the basic features that make up the Chrome web browser. It’s an impressive suite, and generally better than what other browsers offer by default. But some of its biggest advantages – such as its speed – are only apparent after using the browser for a few minutes.

If you still feel a little overwhelming, try taking a look at Google’s official Chrome FAQ. There’s a nice introduction there that advanced users will find too fundamental, but newcomers may appreciate.

Article source: http://www.digitaltrends.com/computing/a-beginners-guide-to-google-chrome-why-its-time-to-ditch-internet-explorer/

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16 Nov 11 Chrome browser adds multiple user sign-in and syncing


Takeaway: Chrome is adding a personalized experience for shared computers, allowing multiple people to sync their settings, but be careful how you use it.

Google Chrome, like any tech product worth its salt today, wants your experience with it to be personal. Whatever computer a user sits down with, their bookmarks, preferences, extensions and apps, and even passwords should be easily accessible. With its latest beta release, soon to spread to all users, Chrome is adding that personalized experience for shared computers, allowing multiple people to sync their Chrome stuff into one browser, and so letting you use any Chrome browser on Earth as if it were your own.

Nothing has changed from the looks of Chrome, until you head into the Options menu (or “Preferences” on a Mac), accessible by clicking the wrench icon near the top-right corner of your browser. Under the “Personal Stuff” section, a new Users sub-section will offer a button for “Add new user.” Click that, and a new window pops up, asking for a new user’s Google account name and password. Now that new window becomes an entirely different Chrome instance, with a small user icon in the upper-left corner, and all its own bookmarks, settings, extensions.

Note that this isn’t just for switching between Chrome accounts on a single computer – someone can create an account, or sign into one, and use Chrome in an entirely separate window, while keeping the other account open and running. In Windows 7, at least, Chrome even separates into different taskbar icons, with the user’s icon stamped onto each.

As Google’s Chrome team points out, this isn’t a secure user-switching method, by any means. It’s meant for computers where multiple people are already using the same user account: at a communal office computer or perhaps a home computer where it’s easier to just pop open a browser than log out and log back in. The solution to the switching issue, up until now, was to just open an “Incognito Window” and log into separate accounts; with multiple accounts, though, everyone has access to their own look and feel.

One weird aspect of multiple user accounts in Chrome, at least as it stands as of this writing, is that there’s no way to disable it. There’s nothing to prevent someone who stops by your desktop or laptop while you’re not using it from clicking into the Options (or the upper-left user icon, if you’ve added more than one account) and adding another account to your Chrome browser. It’s easy to delete accounts from the Options/Preferences page, but if someone has set up their own account on your browser, they’ve left everything in their account open to you. If you’re using multiple accounts on a computer owned by somebody else, you’d better head into your Options on that system and disable the syncing of passwords, and possibly bookmarks, too, if any are of a sensitive nature.

Multiple, personalized Chrome accounts are a cornerstone of the appeal of Chromebooks, but Google likely knows that there are plenty of netbooks, easily passed laptops, and other devices that benefit from easy user switching. In the meantime, feel free to set it up on your own Chrome browser – but, again, be smart about where you sign into Chrome, especially if you’re syncing passwords.

Also read:

Article source: http://www.techrepublic.com/blog/google-in-the-enterprise/chrome-browser-adds-multiple-user-sign-in-and-syncing/639

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