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29 Dec 12 What to Do With Your New Android


SEE ALSO: Top 20 Things Every First-Time Android User Should Know

Switching from an older Android requires a bit more prep, but it’s not impossible. Once you have a Google account, simply log in and sync accounts to receive your email and contacts. Some of your data, like photos and apps, will not transfer as easily, but there are a few ways to get around that.

The easiest way is to purchase the MyBackup Pro app. It’ll cost you $4, but the app backs up data and restores it to a new device.

If you’d rather start with a clean slate, without losing old photos, store all of your data in the cloud. Apps like Dropbox will back up data, but you can manually restore specific items to the new device.

Apps will need to be re-downloaded manually on a new device. Any apps purchased on a former Android will not need to be purchased again, but you will have to download those again, too.

Get Connected

The first thing to do before playing around with your new phone is to set up a Wi-Fi connection.

Hit the Menu button, and choose Settings. Then select Wireless Networks and connect to the proper Wi-Fi as you would anywhere with a computer.

You’ll also have the option to connect to mobile networks — those settings can be found in the same menu. Your phone runs on 3G or 4G mobile networks when there is not a Wi-Fi connection.

It’s important to connect your phone to Wi-Fi when it’s available, because running on mobile networks uses data. Each download will cost data, which can quickly run over when you first get a new phone and want to try new apps. Running over on data can be very expensive.

Apps on Apps on Apps

Now that you’re up and running, it’s time to dive into the Google Play Store and get the apps that will make your life easier and more efficient.

There are so many apps for every aspect of your life. It depends on whether you want something entertaining, educational, fun, informative, creative or navigational. Sifting through apps can feel overwhelming — trial and error is the best way to approach the task. You can always uninstall an app if you don’t want it.

If you plan on purchasing anything, you’ll need a credit card. Your information will be stored securely, so you’ll only need to enter this once. But that doesn’t mean you have to spend money — there are plenty of free apps that will help you just as effectively.

Your phone will already have built-in apps, which differ with every manufacturer. These are likely due for an update before you even log into the new device. You can update them all at once by opening the Play Store, tapping the Menu button and selecting “My Apps.”

The Google Play Store can be accessed and adjusted from your phone or a desktop when logged into your Google account. You can install, update or remove any app from your phone via the store.

Google’s native apps should already be built in the device. If you can’t function without these tools — which is likely why you went with Android — you won’t be disappointed with the mobile versions.

If you juggle more than one email address, Gmail will access multiple accounts in one device.

Google Maps is a seamless GPS system, plus the updated app gives offline maps, indoor navigation and recommendations for nearby places.

Social

Facebook’s native app favors Android devices. The app closely mirrors what you’d see on a desktop, making it easy to navigate. Like any other app, it has pre-fixed settings, so you might need to adjust, depending on your preferences.

After downloading and logging in to your account, hit the Menu button and select Settings. If you don’t want to use Facebook Chat from your phone, make sure Chat Availability is off. You can also adjust notifications so they only push the updates most important to you.

If you choose to sync your Facebook friends, they will automatically appear in your contact list if they share their phone number. When you agree to use the Facebook app, it shows your phone number on your profile. If you don’t want to share your number with friends, be sure to edit your contact info so that information is only available to you. The easiest way to do so is from a desktop.

Setup for Twitter is pretty straightforward. You can adjust syncing and push notifications, just like you did for Facebook, by going to Settings from the Menu button.

There are a couple options for Twitter aside from the native app. If you’re a list person, TweetDeck or Hootsuite might be better experiences.

If there is one good thing about Google+, it’s the syncing features that come with an Android device. If you don’t use the network as a social place, it can function as an automatic storage space. For example, if you take a photo with your phone, it will save to your Google+ account, even if you delete the photo from your device.

Of course, there are plenty of other social networks, so test them out and judge for yourself. If you don’t like one (or any app, for that matter) you can always uninstall it from the Google Play Store, just as you would update it.

Music

Your new Android replaces the need to carry multiple devices, including an MP3 player. If you’re gung-ho Google, the native Music app stores all of your files in the cloud, so you can easily switch from device to computer.

There is no native iTunes app, but that’s nothing a little hack can’t work around. DoubleTwist is worth the $5 pricetag if you cannot live without your iPod. Also, your iTunes library syncs over Wi-Fi — no wires required.

There are other great apps for music lovers on the go. Spotify is the best service for sharing and discovering music. You can send friends songs, albums and playlists. The free service features a nearly limitless music library, or you can upgrade to premium for an unlimited, ad-free experience.

Are you and Android user? Share any advice for first-timers in the comments below.

Images courtesy of iStockphoto, by_nicholas, Flickr, JD Hancock

Article source: http://mashable.com/2012/12/28/android-setup/

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29 Dec 12 How to Know When the Nexus 4 is Back in Stock


As we head into the New Year, Google’s latest Nexus smartphone, the Nexus 4, remains sold out completely through the Google Play Store with no return in sight. Those who still wish to buy it might be waiting a few weeks before it comes back into stock but that doesn’t mean that you’ll need to check the Play Store every day. Instead, there are three much easier methods of checking for Nexus 4 stock on the Google Play Store.

Read: Nexus 4 Launch Remains a Mess into 2013.

Since the November, the Nexus 4 has been extremely scarce. The 8GB sold out almost immediately after the device went on sale for a second time through Google’s Play Store and a few weeks after that, the 16GB Nexus 4 displayed the same bold sold out symbol which prohibits customers from ordering the device. The Nexus 4′s bumper case remains sold out as well.

Google has not yet said when the Nexus 4 might be relieved of its supply issues, leaving prospective buyers wondering when they might be able to get their hands on LG’s first Nexus smartphone.

For those who might be looking to order, checking the Google Play Store for availability might have already become a daily ritual. Personally, I used check it every day in the hopes that Google would finally be offering it again because I have no interest in paying exorbitant amounts of money for the Nexus 4 through site’s like Craigslist or eBay. One of the beautiful parts about the Nexus 4, after all, is its price tag.

Fortunately, I decided to cut that daily routine out and move on to greener pastures. What I mean is that there are easier ways to ensure that you’ll be ready to buy a Nexus 4 once the device comes back into stock.

Here now, we show you how to check for Nexus 4 stock through the Google Play Store not only in the U.S., but in other countries as well.

Article source: http://www.gottabemobile.com/2012/12/28/how-to-know-when-the-nexus-4-is-back-in-stock/

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26 Dec 12 LG Nexus 4 Available In Google Play Store On 2/31/2013 – Auto-o


As we reach the end of 2012, the most difficult smartphone to come by is the LG Nexus 4. We had our bets up that it would be the iPhone 5 but it looks like Apple learned its lesson from past iPhone releases and were well prepared this time.

LG Nexus 4: when (if ever) will it be easily available on the Google Play Store?

Unfortunately we can’t say that about Google and their empty Play Store is proof of that. Not only is the LG Nexus 4 sold out but so is the Google Nexus 7 and some of the Nexus 10 models.

Now back to the LG Nexus 4, so when can we expect it to be back in stock? At this time both Google and LG are playing the blame game. Google is criticizing LG for the lack of stock while others are seeing Google’s lack of experience with selling hardware the real issue. At this time, all that has been officially said is that it will be back in a couple of weeks.

If you’ve been keeping an eye on the Play Store though you will see that the shipping date keeps slipping, and now it is deep into February should you order one today. Personally, I would be on the lookout for the few units that happen to pop up in the Google Play Store every now and then. That is if you don’t mind waiting until next year. Check out the link below to see real-time updates of availability of the LG Nexus 4 over at the Google Play Store across 4 countries. It also has a history of previous times when it became available in case you’re good with numbers and can work out the pattern. If you can, do tell me your predictions as I am yet to get my hands on one!

Article source: http://www.autoomobile.com/news/lg-nexus-4-play-store-availability/10010511/

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23 Dec 12 Google Play now allows Developers to Localize their Promotional Graphics


Google Play, the world’s largest app-store, offers developers the gateway to reach millions of Android users around the world. When Google’s revolutionary mobile OS debuted in market, the Google Play was supported only across a number of countries. In fact, until the start of 2011, it didn’t cover more than 30 countries.

However, in the last year-or-two, the scenario has changed pleasantly for Android. It now encircles over 130 countries across the world, and supports 49 international languages. Shockingly enough, more than 2/3rd of the total app revenue comes from countries other than U.S. The statistics can be accredited to Google’s increased support for paid-apps in various countries, with the recent additions being- Israel, Mexico, the Czech Republic, Poland, Brazil and Russia.

Google realizes how important it is for developers to reach their target audience. There are more than 700,000 apps on Play Store, and there are more than a billion people using the Android platform. Though it’s important to get apps into spotlight, it’s also important that app is understandable and interpretable the multi-lingual audience.

For instance, a developer might rely on the translated text description for his app into numerous languages supported by Google Play, but that alone is not enough to grab more users as people are still not able to understand the working of the app in the video. Until now, there was no way he could customize the videos and images for a particular set of people. If the promotional video is in English, a French guy, who does not understand English, would have no way of interpreting the essence of the video. While he can still see the working of the app, he cannot fully understand what it does.local_graphics

Keeping this in mind, Google now allows developers to add localized images and video links, just like they added localized text descriptions. Besides showing translated text, a localized graphic feature would also allow you to add local flavor to your app — for instance, changing its theme to reflect local holidays.

… “If a picture says a thousand words, how many words can a motion picture say?”

Localized images, and video links make it easy for user to interpret the purpose of the app. While a user could always read the description, the first thing that attracts you about the app is the look-and-the-feel. If the user is easily familiarized with the app through the localized interpretation, the likeliness of his/her buying the app increases greatly.

Hence, localized images and videos would help the developers fetch even more downloads. With localized videos, you can now add appropriate voiceover and text and also show app running in the background.

Before, upload the localized video, do make sure you upload the video in various different sizes. Also, as many people would be buying new tablets for their holidays, and loading them with lots of apps, make sure you include localized tablet screenshots to show off your various tablet layouts.

To add the localized graphics and videos to your app, you would need to use the Google Play Developer Console Preview. Please note that once you publish you app using the newer console, you won’t be able to publish the app using the older version. Hence, developers who are using the APK Expansion Files would now be compelled to use this feature. Once you’ve saved and published your application using the new console, automated translations would become available to all Android users.

We think this is an amazing move from Google. Perhaps, this move could bring Google a little closer to the humungous amount of revenue Apple earns from its App Store. Just a little bit closer, though.

Source: Android Developers

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Article source: http://thedroidguy.com/2012/12/google-play-now-allows-developers-to-localize-their-promotional-graphics/

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22 Dec 12 Redbox Instant App Now Available on Google Play and iTunes, Still Requires …


Verizon’s Redbox Instant streaming video service app is now available through Google’s Play Store and Apple’s iTunes App Store as the service is nearing launch to compete with subscription rivals such as Amazon Video on Demand, Netflix, and Hulu Plus. However, to sign up for the service and use it, users will still need an invitation code from Redbox to join.

At this time, the service is still in beta, and users interested in joining the party early can request an invite code via Redbox. The $8 per month service is free for the first month as a trial, similar to what Netflix is offering, and after that you’ll get unlimited streaming. However, unlike Netflix, you’ll also get credit for 4 DVDs a month as well for titles that may not be available via streaming.

Screen Shot 2012-12-20 at 9.48.38 PM

The service price makes Redbox Instant affordable, but the streaming catalog may not be as robust as that offered on competing services at this time. Hopefully, both companies will grow their selection of content in the future.

Though the Instant service is branded through Verizon and is formed via a partnership between Redbox and Verizon, users do not need a Verizon device or service to access Redbox.

If you’re able to get an invite code and sign up for the service, let us know how Redbox Instant fares for you.

 


Article source: http://www.gottabemobile.com/2012/12/21/redbox-instant-app-now-available-on-google-play-and-itunes-still-requires-invitation/

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19 Dec 12 Google Play Books Gets “Read Aloud” and Other New Features



Kyle Wagner

Google Play Books Gets Read Aloud and Other New FeaturesGoogle Play Books got a nice update last night, with a Read Aloud feature, and pinch-to-zoom and double-tap-to-zoom. The Read Aloud feature sounds really robotic—even more than Siri or other voice command prompts—but it gets the job done. It’s nowhere near as polished as something like Amazon’s integration with Audible audiobooks, but it’s also totally free.

The zoom functions seemed a liiiiittle choppy when we tried it out on a Nexus 4, but nothing too concerning. And they’re both better than the Kindle app’s features, so hey, no big deal. You can update now from the Play Store. [Google via TalkAndroid]

Article source: http://gizmodo.com/5969748/google-play-books-gets-read-aloud-and-other-new-features

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17 Dec 12 Puzzle & Dragons hits the Google Play Store, blocks rooted devices


puzzle-and-dragons

Puzzle Dragons, originally released for iOS last month, has now made its way to Google’s Play Store for Android devices. Unless you’ve rooted your device, that is.

Described by developer GungHo Online Entertainment as a social puzzle role-playing game, Puzzle Dragons mixes and matches elements of jewel matching puzzle games like Bejeweled with simple RPG elements.

Ostensibly to prevent piracy, Puzzle Dragons refuses to run on rooted devices. The game’s page in the Play Store spells it out plainly:

Puzzle Dragons will not run on Rooted/Super User Android devices. If you observe the application starts but closes before splash screen pops, your device is likely rooted. To start the app, please turn off the Rooting/Super User option of your device.

Now, as most Android Authority readers are probably aware, rooting your device does not mean that you’re a pirate. Either GungHo is not aware of this, or they simply think that it’s worth alienating a large portion of its potential audience to prevent a few lost sales.

It’s pretty clear that this move has users upset, as the game currently has a 2.4-star rating in the Play Store, with 1-star reviews greatly outnumbering positive reviews. If you want to see the game for yourself (and you’re not rooted, of course) check out the Google Play Store link in the sources section below the article.

Are you running a rooted device? If so, is it keeping you from trying Puzzle Dragons, or would you not have been interested anyway?

SOURCES Google Play Store

To-Fu Puzzle platformer To-Fu: The Trials of Chi now available in Google Play for free total-defense-3d Total Defense 3D hits the Google Play Store Freeze Freeze! physics-based puzzle game is now available in the Play Store banner-snappy-dragons-2-app-review-120926 Snappy Dragons 2: Save the little dragons from the red mages

Kristofer Wouk is a tech writer, gadget reviewer, blogger, and whatever it’s called when someone makes videos. In his free time, he likes to make music, read and write short fiction.

Article source: http://www.androidauthority.com/puzzle-dragons-blocks-rooted-devices-140466/

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15 Dec 12 What’s on your Google Play wishlist?


I don’t have an exact count, but I’ve purchased somewhere north of 150 applications for Android. There was a time I would go on buying sprees and buy anything and everything that looked interesting. Back then, it was easy to get away with. If the application wasn’t up to snuff or wasn’t as described, users had 24 hours to uninstall and get refund for the application.

However, that habit carried over to through the implementation of new policies prior to the Play re-branding, where the refund window was shortened to 15 minutes from the point of installation.

Recently, I explained that I have the tendency to impulsively and compulsively buy applications for all my devices. I’m in constant search of new apps and services, and if something looks like it might remotely solve one of my problems, I purchase with no remorse … until later.

Take LockerPro, for example. I saw it run on Lifehacker and immediately went to the Play Store to check it out. There weren’t a ton of ratings, but the ones that were there were heavily distributed over four and five stars. And reviews showed those who had purchased the app were happy with it. So I purchased it on a whim and used it for several hours.

It was great. The lock screen itself was gorgeous, and I loved my screen lighting up for incoming notifications and the iOS-like chronological order of missed messages, calls and other notifications. It was a vast improvement over the native TouchWiz Nature UX lock screen, so I decided to write about it.

It wasn’t until after I spent about five days with LockerPro before it started giving me serious trouble. It started with duplicate notifications. I would get multiple chimes for a single notification. Eventually, I got past this problem. Then something much worse started happening incessantly. The lock screen would randomly activate. I would be typing a message or reading a long email and … boom! The screen would lock. It eventually got to the point where it was happening numerous — 30 or more — times every day.

I had put up with all I could take, so I uninstalled LockerPro and never looked back. It was fun while it lasted.

But it was at this point that I realized just how many times I have done this over the last two years. I have purchased at least 50 (probably many more) applications on Android that I used for a week or so before metaphorically tossing it aside and never using it again. And when you begin to quantify that number with the price of mobile apps, that’s not exactly chump change.

In the past few months, I’ve probably spent upwards of $100 on applications alone. Most of those, I no longer use.

So last week, I decided I was going to stop buying so many applications – or at least ones that I’m not positive I’ll continue to use. I’m all for supporting developers, but I’m not made of money. Just like anyone else, I need to budget. And application purchases have grown to be one of the most lax and out of control parts of my budget. A dollar here and five bucks there may not seem like much. But when it’s consistently exceeding $20 per month, and sometimes significantly more, it’s not a terrible idea put a cap on it for a while.

Back in October, Google added a new feature to the Play app: My Wishlist. In essence, this is a bookmarking tool for the applications you may want but aren’t willing to purchase on a whim. I practiced some self-control, for once, and in just about a week’s time, I have accrued 12 applications in My Wishlist. The total price of those 12 applications, not including tax, is $58.84.

I do plan to buy at least most of these applications at some point, but I definitely need to start spreading my purchases out a little. The most notable on My Wishlist are: Action Launcher Pro, Light Flow, Tasker, Minecraft – Pocket Edition, Need For Speed™ Most Wanted and SPB Shell 3D.

Do you have any applications in your Google Play wishlist yet, readers? If so, which applications? Does it help keep you from buying too many applications, too?

Article source: http://www.phonedog.com/2012/12/14/what-s-on-your-google-play-wishlist/

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15 Dec 12 What’s on your Google Play wishlist?


I don’t have an exact count, but I’ve purchased somewhere north of 150 applications for Android. There was a time I would go on buying sprees and buy anything and everything that looked interesting. Back then, it was easy to get away with. If the application wasn’t up to snuff or wasn’t as described, users had 24 hours to uninstall and get refund for the application.

However, that habit carried over to through the implementation of new policies prior to the Play re-branding, where the refund window was shortened to 15 minutes from the point of installation.

Recently, I explained that I have the tendency to impulsively and compulsively buy applications for all my devices. I’m in constant search of new apps and services, and if something looks like it might remotely solve one of my problems, I purchase with no remorse … until later.

Take LockerPro, for example. I saw it run on Lifehacker and immediately went to the Play Store to check it out. There weren’t a ton of ratings, but the ones that were there were heavily distributed over four and five stars. And reviews showed those who had purchased the app were happy with it. So I purchased it on a whim and used it for several hours.

It was great. The lock screen itself was gorgeous, and I loved my screen lighting up for incoming notifications and the iOS-like chronological order of missed messages, calls and other notifications. It was a vast improvement over the native TouchWiz Nature UX lock screen, so I decided to write about it.

It wasn’t until after I spent about five days with LockerPro before it started giving me serious trouble. It started with duplicate notifications. I would get multiple chimes for a single notification. Eventually, I got past this problem. Then something much worse started happening incessantly. The lock screen would randomly activate. I would be typing a message or reading a long email and … boom! The screen would lock. It eventually got to the point where it was happening numerous — 30 or more — times every day.

I had put up with all I could take, so I uninstalled LockerPro and never looked back. It was fun while it lasted.

But it was at this point that I realized just how many times I have done this over the last two years. I have purchased at least 50 (probably many more) applications on Android that I used for a week or so before metaphorically tossing it aside and never using it again. And when you begin to quantify that number with the price of mobile apps, that’s not exactly chump change.

In the past few months, I’ve probably spent upwards of $100 on applications alone. Most of those, I no longer use.

So last week, I decided I was going to stop buying so many applications – or at least ones that I’m not positive I’ll continue to use. I’m all for supporting developers, but I’m not made of money. Just like anyone else, I need to budget. And application purchases have grown to be one of the most lax and out of control parts of my budget. A dollar here and five bucks there may not seem like much. But when it’s consistently exceeding $20 per month, and sometimes significantly more, it’s not a terrible idea put a cap on it for a while.

Back in October, Google added a new feature to the Play app: My Wishlist. In essence, this is a bookmarking tool for the applications you may want but aren’t willing to purchase on a whim. I practiced some self-control, for once, and in just about a week’s time, I have accrued 12 applications in My Wishlist. The total price of those 12 applications, not including tax, is $58.84.

I do plan to buy at least most of these applications at some point, but I definitely need to start spreading my purchases out a little. The most notable on My Wishlist are: Action Launcher Pro, Light Flow, Tasker, Minecraft – Pocket Edition, Need For Speed™ Most Wanted and SPB Shell 3D.

Do you have any applications in your Google Play wishlist yet, readers? If so, which applications? Does it help keep you from buying too many applications, too?

Article source: http://www.phonedog.com/2012/12/14/what-s-on-your-google-play-wishlist/

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15 Dec 12 What’s on your Google Play wishlist?


I don’t have an exact count, but I’ve purchased somewhere north of 150 applications for Android. There was a time I would go on buying sprees and buy anything and everything that looked interesting. Back then, it was easy to get away with. If the application wasn’t up to snuff or wasn’t as described, users had 24 hours to uninstall and get refund for the application.

However, that habit carried over to through the implementation of new policies prior to the Play re-branding, where the refund window was shortened to 15 minutes from the point of installation.

Recently, I explained that I have the tendency to impulsively and compulsively buy applications for all my devices. I’m in constant search of new apps and services, and if something looks like it might remotely solve one of my problems, I purchase with no remorse … until later.

Take LockerPro, for example. I saw it run on Lifehacker and immediately went to the Play Store to check it out. There weren’t a ton of ratings, but the ones that were there were heavily distributed over four and five stars. And reviews showed those who had purchased the app were happy with it. So I purchased it on a whim and used it for several hours.

It was great. The lock screen itself was gorgeous, and I loved my screen lighting up for incoming notifications and the iOS-like chronological order of missed messages, calls and other notifications. It was a vast improvement over the native TouchWiz Nature UX lock screen, so I decided to write about it.

It wasn’t until after I spent about five days with LockerPro before it started giving me serious trouble. It started with duplicate notifications. I would get multiple chimes for a single notification. Eventually, I got past this problem. Then something much worse started happening incessantly. The lock screen would randomly activate. I would be typing a message or reading a long email and … boom! The screen would lock. It eventually got to the point where it was happening numerous — 30 or more — times every day.

I had put up with all I could take, so I uninstalled LockerPro and never looked back. It was fun while it lasted.

But it was at this point that I realized just how many times I have done this over the last two years. I have purchased at least 50 (probably many more) applications on Android that I used for a week or so before metaphorically tossing it aside and never using it again. And when you begin to quantify that number with the price of mobile apps, that’s not exactly chump change.

In the past few months, I’ve probably spent upwards of $100 on applications alone. Most of those, I no longer use.

So last week, I decided I was going to stop buying so many applications – or at least ones that I’m not positive I’ll continue to use. I’m all for supporting developers, but I’m not made of money. Just like anyone else, I need to budget. And application purchases have grown to be one of the most lax and out of control parts of my budget. A dollar here and five bucks there may not seem like much. But when it’s consistently exceeding $20 per month, and sometimes significantly more, it’s not a terrible idea put a cap on it for a while.

Back in October, Google added a new feature to the Play app: My Wishlist. In essence, this is a bookmarking tool for the applications you may want but aren’t willing to purchase on a whim. I practiced some self-control, for once, and in just about a week’s time, I have accrued 12 applications in My Wishlist. The total price of those 12 applications, not including tax, is $58.84.

I do plan to buy at least most of these applications at some point, but I definitely need to start spreading my purchases out a little. The most notable on My Wishlist are: Action Launcher Pro, Light Flow, Tasker, Minecraft – Pocket Edition, Need For Speed™ Most Wanted and SPB Shell 3D.

Do you have any applications in your Google Play wishlist yet, readers? If so, which applications? Does it help keep you from buying too many applications, too?

Article source: http://www.phonedog.com/2012/12/14/what-s-on-your-google-play-wishlist/

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