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18 Jun 12 Early Metro-Style Chrome Comes to Windows 8


As promised, Google this week released a new version of Chrome for its dev channel that adds support for Windows 8 Metro mode.

The Monday release includes “improved support for on-screen keyboard on Windows 8 in Metro mode,” Google said in the release notes. It also “resolved several Windows 8 crashes and performance regressions.”

To try it, you’ll have to install the Release Preview of Windows 8 and then select Chrome as your default browser.

Google first announced plans for a Metro-style Chrome browser in March, and announced last week that it was coming to the dev channel shortly.

The “initial releases of Chrome in Metro mode will include integration with the basic Windows 8 system functionality, such as charms and snap view,” Google said last week. But in the lead-up to the expected late-2012 release of Windows 8, Google will be “smoothing out the UI on Metro and improving touch support, so please feel free to file bugs.”

Given that the Chrome dev channel and the Windows 8 Release Preview are pre-release versions of the software, these releases are intended for the tech-savvy rather than the average consumer.

On that front, Google today also announced new developer features for the Chrome Web Store, including the addition of six new countries: Turkey, Ukraine, Egypt, Saudi Arabia, Morocco, and the United Arab Emirates. The search giant also created a new section for apps that work offline, and promised better information in the developer dashboard.

For more, check out PCMag’s Hands On With Windows 8 Release Preview and the slideshow below, as well as our review of Chrome 19.

For more from Chloe, follow her on Twitter @ChloeAlbanesius.


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Windows 8 Multi-Monitor


Windows 8 Lock Screen


Charms and Status


Sports App


For the top stories in tech, follow us on Twitter at @PCMag.

Article source: http://www.pcmag.com/article2/0,2817,2405731,00.asp

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15 Jun 12 Google To Release Chrome Beta for Windows 8 Testing


News

Google To Release Chrome Beta for Windows 8 Testing

The test browser is just for the x86/x64 Windows 8 Release Preview, where it can run in both the desktop and Metro user interfaces of the operating system.

Google has announced that its Chrome browser will be available for testing on the Windows 8 Release Preview. The company plans to smooth out the user interface of the browser over the next couple of months, and will be seeking user feedback.

The test browser is just for the x86/x64 Windows 8 Release Preview, where it can run in both the desktop and Metro user interfaces of the operating system. While Windows 8 will be available on ARM-based tablets, the ability to run any other browser besides Internet Explorer on that OS, known as Windows Runtime, appears to be restricted by Microsoft.

The Chrome test browser will be released at the Google Chrome dev channel for Windows, according to Google’s blog post, which didn’t specify when.


WinRT ‘Won’t Run’ Other Browsers
Google and Mozilla, which is also devising its Firefox browser for Windows 8, have both complained publicly that their browsers will not have access to the WinRT APIs necessary for their browsers to work as users would expect. Google went farther in its blog announcing the Chrome beta for Windows 8, by stating that its browser won’t run at all on WinRT.

“Chrome won’t run in WinRT, i.e. Windows 8 on ARM processors, as Microsoft is not allowing browsers other than Internet Explorer on the platform,” Google’s blog states.

An attorney with Mozilla suggested last month that Microsoft could be veering into possible antitrust litigation turf with the restrictions of WinRT. He cited Microsoft’s past antitrust supervision by the U.S. Department of Justice and the European Commission. Those bodies have faulted Microsoft for restricting API access and dominating the browser market via a Windows monopoly.

Microsoft hasn’t clarified the WinRT browser restriction matter publicly. While it has published a guide for a “Metro style enabled desktop browser” (Word doc) that software companies can use to build browsers for Windows 8, it appears that this guide only applies to x86/x64 systems, and not to WinRT systems.

The latest test version of Microsoft’s Internet Explorer 10 browser is called “platform preview 6.” It was distributed with the Windows 8 release preview that Microsoft announced at the end of last month. This new IE 10 version comes with Adobe Flash Player 11.3 built into the browser for use on both the desktop and Metro user interfaces. (Microsoft made no mention about whether its own Silverlight would similarly be supported in IE 10.). Another new aspect of IE 10 is that Microsoft’s “do not track” privacy option, first introduced in IE 9, is turned on by default.

Disagreement on Do Not Track
The do-not-track issue has been kicked around by all of the browser makers, with little effect. Microsoft’s method depends on Web advertisers voluntarily honoring a request to not track user clickstream information. It’s just a technical solution, as there’s nothing legally binding on advertisers to behave in the proper way. Microsoft’s do-not-track approach sends an HTTP string to indicate preference, a method that’s currently under consideration at the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C).

Microsoft’s embrace of having a do-not-track mechanism turned on by default in the latest IE 10 has caused some controversy. It apparently conflicts with the current W3C working draft, according to a Wired report. The W3C appears to be leaning toward the idea of not enabling do-not-track functionality by default, which could put IE 10 out of compliance once the spec becomes a W3C recommendation.

In response, Brendon Lynch, Microsoft’s chief privacy officer, noted in a Friday blog post that the draft hasn’t been finalized yet and that Microsoft plans to work on it with various stakeholders “in the months ahead.” He didn’t acknowledge that Microsoft may be going against the evolving spec with IE 10 on the do-not-track issue, but he suggested that Microsoft would stay engaged in “good faith” efforts.

“As discussions continue, Microsoft remains firmly committed to defining bona fide technical specifications and policies to govern DNT [do not track],” Lynch wrote in the blog post.

Mozilla’s also has a do-not-track approach for its Firefox browser that apparently uses a similar method as Microsoft’s approach. The Mozilla do-not-track system has been used by 8.6 percent of desktop users and 19 percent of mobile users, according to a May 17 Mozilla blog post.

Google has its own antitracking approach for Chrome called “Keep My Opt-Outs.” The Keep My Opt Outs method apparently works through a cookie opt-out procedure, but just for U.S. advertisers. The approach is vaguely described by Google here.

About the Author


Kurt Mackie is online news editor, Enterprise Group, at 1105 Media Inc.

Article source: http://reddevnews.com/articles/2012/06/14/google-to-release-chrome-beta-for-windows-8-testing.aspx

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13 Jun 12 First look at Chrome in the Windows 8 Metro environment



Google has rolled out experimental support for running Chrome in the Windows 8 Metro environment. The feature landed yesterday in the Chrome developer channel and is available for testing on the Windows 8 Release Preview.

As we reported earlier this year, Mozilla and Google are working to bring their respective browsers to the Metro environment in Windows 8. Microsoft has created a special class of hybrid application specifically for browser vendors that will allow them to support both Metro and the traditional desktop with a single program.

The new application type, which is designated “Metro style enabled desktop browsers,” comes with a few caveats. In order to operate in the Metro environment, a browser will have to be configured as the platform’s default. Hybrid browsers that are not set as default will simply open in the traditional desktop when launched from the Metro environment.

I tested the Chrome developer build on an installation of the Windows 8 Release Preview in VirtualBox. Chrome works exactly as expected under the conventional desktop, with the same user interface and behavior that users are accustomed to under previous versions of Windows.

When I used the relevant button in the browser’s settings to make Chrome the platform’s default browser, Windows 8 displayed a simple prompt asking for confirmation. The prompt listed the installed hybrid browsers and indicated that Internet Explorer was my current default. It looks a lot like the equivalent dialog in Google’s Android platform that is used to specify which application should be the default handler for a given action.

After setting Chrome as the default browser, I was able to launch its Metro interface from the Metro environment by clicking its icon in the launcher. Chrome’s Metro front-end is clearly a work in progress—it doesn’t yet conform with the Metro look and feel. It currently uses a direct adaptation of Chrome’s standard appearance on the desktop.

Chrome’s distinctive curved tabs appear at the top of the screen, over the standard navigation toolbar. On the right-hand side of the browser’s Omnibar is a menu button. Instead of using Chrome’s standard wrench icon, it uses three horizontal lines.

It seems like Google is still determining how it wants to handle window management for its Metro flavor of Chrome. The user can have one regular browser window and one Incognito browser window open at the same time. The user can switch between them by clicking an icon in the top right-hand corner. The menu still has the standard New Window item, but it’s currently wired up to create a new tab.

In a nod to tablet users, the menu items are much larger in Metro mode, making them potentially easier to hit with a finger. Like a lot of aspects of the browser’s look and feel in Metro, this aspect looks like it’s a temporary measure while a more cohesive Metro-like design is being devised. The Omnibox autocompletion options are similarly inflated like the menu items.

The Metro support that Google is offering today in the Chrome developer channel is not bad for a first pass. It gets the job done and will give testers something to work with. We’re hopeful that we’ll see a more comprehensive and native-looking take from Google as their Metro implementation matures.

Google has been working to bring Chrome to its own Android mobile platform and has made it the centerpiece of its Web-centric Chrome OS. The search giant has largely kept the look and feel consistent across the various platforms and form factors that it supports with few platform-specific deviations. It’s not yet entirely clear how that philosophy will translate over the Metro environment.

Article source: http://arstechnica.com/information-technology/2012/06/first-look-at-chrome-in-the-windows-8-metro-environment/

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13 Jun 12 Early Metro-Style Chrome Comes to Windows 8


As promised, Google this week released a new version of Chrome for its dev channel that adds support for Windows 8 Metro mode.

The Monday release includes “improved support for on-screen keyboard on Windows 8 in Metro mode,” Google said in the release notes. It also “resolved several Windows 8 crashes and performance regressions.”

To try it, you’ll have to install the Release Preview of Windows 8 and then select Chrome as your default browser.

Google first announced plans for a Metro-style Chrome browser in March, and announced last week that it was coming to the dev channel shortly.

The “initial releases of Chrome in Metro mode will include integration with the basic Windows 8 system functionality, such as charms and snap view,” Google said last week. But in the lead-up to the expected late-2012 release of Windows 8, Google will be “smoothing out the UI on Metro and improving touch support, so please feel free to file bugs.”

Given that the Chrome dev channel and the Windows 8 Release Preview are pre-release versions of the software, these releases are intended for the tech-savvy rather than the average consumer.

On that front, Google today also announced new developer features for the Chrome Web Store, including the addition of six new countries: Turkey, Ukraine, Egypt, Saudi Arabia, Morocco, and the United Arab Emirates. The search giant also created a new section for apps that work offline, and promised better information in the developer dashboard.

For more, check out PCMag’s Hands On With Windows 8 Release Preview and the slideshow below, as well as our review of Chrome 19.

For more from Chloe, follow her on Twitter @ChloeAlbanesius.


View Slideshow
See all (24) slides


Windows 8 Multi-Monitor


Windows 8 Lock Screen


Charms and Status


Sports App


For the top stories in tech, follow us on Twitter at @PCMag.

Article source: http://www.pcmag.com/article2/0,2817,2405731,00.asp?kc=PCRSS03069TX1K0001121

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11 Jun 12 Chrome for Windows 8 Metro Coming Soon, Says Google


Google is getting ready to release a version of Chrome that works in Metro mode in Windows 8 Release Preview.

On Thursday Carlos Pizano, Software Engineer and “Metro Gnome” at Google, said that Chrome for Windows 8 Release Preview will arrive soon.

According to Pizano’s blog entry, Chrome will run in both Metro and desktop environments of Windows 8 on x86. However Chrome will not be released for Windows RT — the version of Windows 8 running on ARM-based chips — because Microsoft is reportedly not allowing browsers other than Internet Explorer on the platform.

“The initial releases of Chrome in Metro mode will include integration with the basic Windows 8 system functionality, such as charms and snap view,” he said. “Over the next few months, we’ll be smoothing out the UI on Metro and improving touch support, so please feel free to file bugs. We’re committed to bringing the speed, simplicity, and security of Chrome into Windows 8, and we look forward to working with you on it.”

Consumers running Windows 8 Release Preview will be able to try the Chrome browser in Metro mode in the next Chrome Dev channel release by setting it as the default browser. Based on a screenshot provided by Pizano, the browser won’t look any different than it does on Windows 7 or other desktop operating systems, keeping with the standard Google design.

Microsoft is following Apple’s lead by denying 3rd-party browsers besides its own stock Internet Explorer on Windows RT tablets with ARM-based processors. The desktop version of Windows 8 won’t have the same restriction although users won’t be able to run more than one browser in Metro mode at any given time.

In addition to Google, Mozilla is also working on a Metro version of Firefox. The company recently published a blog stating that users of Windows RT also deserve a choice of browsers, and called on Microsoft to remain firm on its user choice principles.

“Windows on ARM -as currently designed- restricts user choice, reduces competition and chills innovation,” wrote Mozilla General Council Harvey Anderson. “By allowing only IE to perform the advanced functions of a modern Web browser, third-party browsers are effectively excluded from the platform. This matters for users of today’s tablets and tomorrow’s PCs.”

“Because Windows on ARM relies upon so many traditional Windows assets, including brand, code, footprint, and experience, the decision to exclude other browsers may also have antitrust implications,” Anderson added.

Sounds like a threat, doesn’t it?

Article source: http://www.tomshardware.com/news/Chrome-Metro-Windows-8-Windows-RT-Carlos-Pizano,15962.html

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11 Jun 12 Chrome for Windows 8 Metro Coming Soon, Says Google


Google is getting ready to release a version of Chrome that works in Metro mode in Windows 8 Release Preview.

On Thursday Carlos Pizano, Software Engineer and “Metro Gnome” at Google, said that Chrome for Windows 8 Release Preview will arrive soon.

According to Pizano’s blog entry, Chrome will run in both Metro and desktop environments of Windows 8 on x86. However Chrome will not be released for Windows RT — the version of Windows 8 running on ARM-based chips — because Microsoft is reportedly not allowing browsers other than Internet Explorer on the platform.

“The initial releases of Chrome in Metro mode will include integration with the basic Windows 8 system functionality, such as charms and snap view,” he said. “Over the next few months, we’ll be smoothing out the UI on Metro and improving touch support, so please feel free to file bugs. We’re committed to bringing the speed, simplicity, and security of Chrome into Windows 8, and we look forward to working with you on it.”

Consumers running Windows 8 Release Preview will be able to try the Chrome browser in Metro mode in the next Chrome Dev channel release by setting it as the default browser. Based on a screenshot provided by Pizano, the browser won’t look any different than it does on Windows 7 or other desktop operating systems, keeping with the standard Google design.

Microsoft is following Apple’s lead by denying 3rd-party browsers besides its own stock Internet Explorer on Windows RT tablets with ARM-based processors. The desktop version of Windows 8 won’t have the same restriction although users won’t be able to run more than one browser in Metro mode at any given time.

In addition to Google, Mozilla is also working on a Metro version of Firefox. The company recently published a blog stating that users of Windows RT also deserve a choice of browsers, and called on Microsoft to remain firm on its user choice principles.

“Windows on ARM -as currently designed- restricts user choice, reduces competition and chills innovation,” wrote Mozilla General Council Harvey Anderson. “By allowing only IE to perform the advanced functions of a modern Web browser, third-party browsers are effectively excluded from the platform. This matters for users of today’s tablets and tomorrow’s PCs.”

“Because Windows on ARM relies upon so many traditional Windows assets, including brand, code, footprint, and experience, the decision to exclude other browsers may also have antitrust implications,” Anderson added.

Sounds like a threat, doesn’t it?

Article source: http://www.tomshardware.com/news/Chrome-Metro-Windows-8-Windows-RT-Carlos-Pizano,15962.html

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09 Jun 12 Chrome set to appear on Windows 8 Metro mode


The Chromium team is set to release its first a version of the Chrome browser for the Metro mode of Windows 8, the open-source project announced on Thursday.

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Windows 8 Release Preview: Read the review

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The version will run in both the Metro and desktop environments that come with Windows 8, but it will only run on the traditional x86 flavour of the operating system. As has already been established to some consternation, third-party browsers are locked out of the ‘Windows RT’ version that is designed to run on ARM-based tablets.

The Chromium project is open source, but the code it produces forms the basis for Google’s Chrome browser.

“The initial releases of Chrome in Metro mode will include integration with the basic Windows 8 system functionality, such as charms and snap view,” Google software engineer Carlos Pizano said in a blog post. “Over the next few months, we’ll be smoothing out the UI on Metro and improving touch support, so please feel free to file bugs.”

Those developers wanting to access the early versions of Chrome in Metro mode will need to set it as their default browser in the Chrome Dev channel, which releases new test iterations of the browser once or twice a week.

Microsoft’s decision to ensure the only browser on Windows RT is Internet Explorer has drawn criticism from rival browser-makers such as Mozilla, and European antitrust regulators said last month that they were keeping an eye on the situation.

Microsoft has famously clashed with these regulators before over the issue of browser choice, having been forced in 2009 to stop bundling IE with Windows.

Article source: http://rss.feedsportal.com/c/32424/f/469424/s/202d1c11/l/0L0Szdnet0O0Cblogs0Ccommunication0Ebreakdown0E10A0A0A0A0A30A0Cchrome0Eset0Eto0Eappear0Eon0Ewindows0E80Emetro0Emode0Ebut0Efor0Ex860Eonly0E10A0A263530C0Ds0Icid0F938/story01.htm

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08 Jun 12 Chrome for Windows 8 Metro Coming Soon


Google announced this week that it will soon release a version of its Chrome browser for Windows 8 Metro mode.

Chrome for Metro will be available in the next Chrome Dev channel release by setting it as your default browser, Carlos Pizano, a Google software engineer and “Metro Gnome,” wrote in a blog post. It will work with the Release Preview of Windows 8, which Microsoft released last week.

Google first announced plans for a Metro-style Chrome browser in March. “Our goal is to be able to offer our users a speedy, simple, secure Chrome experience across all platforms, which includes both the desktop and Metro versions of Windows 8,” Google said at the time.

Pizano said today that the “initial releases of Chrome in Metro mode will include integration with the basic Windows 8 system functionality, such as charms and snap view.” But in the lead-up to the expected late-2012 release of Windows 8, Google will be “smoothing out the UI on Metro and improving touch support, so please feel free to file bugs,” Pizano wrote.

“We’re committed to bringing the speed, simplicity, and security of Chrome into Windows 8, and we look forward to working with you on it,” he concluded.

Google was sure to bring up the fact that the Windows on ARM version of the upcoming Windows 8 OS will not support browsers other than Internet Explorer. “Chrome won’t run in WinRT,” Pizano said simply.

Like the other versions of Windows 8, Windows RT will include two environments: the classic Windows interface and the more Windows Phone-esque Metro style option. Last month, however, Mozilla complained publicly that “Windows on ARM prohibits any browser except for Internet Explorer from running in the privileged ‘Windows Classic’ environment.” Google soon chimed in that it shared Mozilla’s concerns.

Microsoft has not commented on the controversy, but the Senate Judiciary Committee said it is examining whether Windows RT runs afoul of any antitrust regulations.

For more, see Who’s Ready for Microsoft’s Windows RT? Also check out PCMag’s Hands On With Windows 8 Release Preview and the slideshow below.

For more from Chloe, follow her on Twitter @ChloeAlbanesius.


View Slideshow
See all (24) slides


Windows 8 Multi-Monitor


Windows 8 Lock Screen


Charms and Status


Sports App


For the top stories in tech, follow us on Twitter at @PCMag.

Article source: http://www.pcmag.com/article2/0,2817,2405532,00.asp

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08 Jun 12 Chrome for Windows 8 Metro Coming Soon


Google announced this week that it will soon release a version of its Chrome browser for Windows 8 Metro mode.

Chrome for Metro will be available in the next Chrome Dev channel release by setting it as your default browser, Carlos Pizano, a Google software engineer and “Metro Gnome,” wrote in a blog post. It will work with the Release Preview of Windows 8, which Microsoft released last week.

Google first announced plans for a Metro-style Chrome browser in March. “Our goal is to be able to offer our users a speedy, simple, secure Chrome experience across all platforms, which includes both the desktop and Metro versions of Windows 8,” Google said at the time.

Pizano said today that the “initial releases of Chrome in Metro mode will include integration with the basic Windows 8 system functionality, such as charms and snap view.” But in the lead-up to the expected late-2012 release of Windows 8, Google will be “smoothing out the UI on Metro and improving touch support, so please feel free to file bugs,” Pizano wrote.

“We’re committed to bringing the speed, simplicity, and security of Chrome into Windows 8, and we look forward to working with you on it,” he concluded.

Google was sure to bring up the fact that the Windows on ARM version of the upcoming Windows 8 OS will not support browsers other than Internet Explorer. “Chrome won’t run in WinRT,” Pizano said simply.

Like the other versions of Windows 8, Windows RT will include two environments: the classic Windows interface and the more Windows Phone-esque Metro style option. Last month, however, Mozilla complained publicly that “Windows on ARM prohibits any browser except for Internet Explorer from running in the privileged ‘Windows Classic’ environment.” Google soon chimed in that it shared Mozilla’s concerns.

Microsoft has not commented on the controversy, but the Senate Judiciary Committee said it is examining whether Windows RT runs afoul of any antitrust regulations.

For more, see Who’s Ready for Microsoft’s Windows RT? Also check out PCMag’s Hands On With Windows 8 Release Preview and the slideshow below.

For more from Chloe, follow her on Twitter @ChloeAlbanesius.


View Slideshow
See all (24) slides


Windows 8 Multi-Monitor


Windows 8 Lock Screen


Charms and Status


Sports App


For the top stories in tech, follow us on Twitter at @PCMag.

Article source: http://www.pcmag.com/article2/0,2817,2405532,00.asp?kc=PCRSS03069TX1K0001121

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07 Jun 12 Chrome For Metro Set To Arrive In Next Dev Channel Release


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As the release of Windows 8 draws closer, all of the major browser vendors are also preparing to launching their applications for the touch-centric Metro UI that will prominently feature in next version of Microsoft’s flagship operating system. Today, Google announced that – assuming you are running the Release Preview of Windows 8 – you’ll soon be able to test Chrome in Windows 8′s Metro mode. Once the next version of Chrome arrives in the Dev channel, you will be able to take Chrome for Metro for a spin after setting it as your default browser.

Google Software Engineer and “Metro Gnome” Carlos Pizano notes that this first version will “ include integration with the basic Windows 8 system functionality, such as charms and snap view.” He also promises that the Chrome team will be “smoothing out the UI on Metro and improving touch support.”

Judging from the first screenshot Google posted today, Chrome for Metro will mostly stick to the standard design Google is also using on the desktop. Unlike Microsoft’s Internet Explorer for Metro, Google isn’t experimenting with any new designs here as far as we can see.

Similar to Apple’s policies, Microsoft doesn’t allow any browsers besides its own Internet Explorer on Windows RT tablets with ARM processors. On the desktop, however, there are no such restrictions besides the fact that users won’t be able to run more than one browser in Metro mode at any given time.

Just like Google, Mozilla is also working on a Metro version of Firefox. While we’ve seen some mockups for Mozilla’s browser for Metro, though, it looks like Google is currently a bit closer to actually releasing a working app.


  • GOOGLE CHROME

Google Chrome is an based on the open source web browser Chromium which is based on Webkit. It was accidentally announced prematurely on September 1, 2008 and slated for release the following day. It premiered originally on Windows only, with Mac OS and Linux versions released in early 2010.

Features include:

Tabbed browsing where each tab gets its own process, leading to faster and more stable browsing. If one tab crashes, the whole browser doesn’t go down with it
A…

Learn more

Article source: http://techcrunch.com/2012/06/07/chrome-for-metro-set-to-arrive-in-next-dev-channel-release/

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